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HUMAN STUDIES in the subject they aim to teach. The final project is a collaboratively designed, integrated curriculum unit, including lesson plans and assessments. Evaluations are based on participation, reflective writing, individually designed lesson plans and assessments, and the final project. Prerequisites: Supporting Students with Disabilities in the Regular Classroom.

█ DEBATE WORKSHOP Jamie McKown Course limit: 10 This class will be conducted as a workshop with an emphasis on providing students with an opportunity to engage in various forms of public debate and argumentation. The majority of work related to the class will be spent participating in hands-on debate and argument practice. Students will get the chance to take part in wide array of debate formats covering a broad spectrum of topics and themes. In many instances decisions about topics will be student driven and guided by events external to the class. Along with the instructor, students will work together to refine argument structure, strategic argument selection, research practices, presentation skills, and audience analysis. In addition, students will also examine various historical accounts of academic debate practices and the theoretical/social context that gave rise to them. Previous debate and/or public speaking experience is not required. Students of all academic interests and backgrounds are encouraged to participate. Students will be evaluated on their participation in class, completion of process based assignments, collaboration on team projects, and several individual reports that require outside research. At no point will the final evaluation of students be tied to any standard of what constitutes a “good” debater in a competitive sense. Students who feel that they are less proficient in the areas of argument and public communication should not be worried that this would somehow disadvantage them in terms of grading. While there is no set lab, this class will require a good deal of time commitment outside of the traditional classroom environment. This includes research on the debate topics as well as actual performance time.

ECONOMICS █ ECOLOGICAL (ADVANCED SEMINAR IN) Davis Taylor Course limit: 12 This seminar explores selected themes in ecological economics, which is both the economics of sustainability as well as a paradigmatic approach distinct from the mainstream neoclassical approach to the

study of economic activity. At first we define and outline ecological economics. We use the remainder of the term to explore topics of student interest, focusing on three to five major themes. Possible themes include: methodological issues (post normal science, transdisciplinarity); biophysical constraints to economic growth (entropy, technological pessimism, capital substitution, critical natural capital, resource peaks); sociocultural impacts of economic growth (consumption, happiness studies); energy and resource flow analysis (entropy); system dynamics (steady state economy, resiliency, degrowth); measurement issues (growth versus development, ecological footprint, Index of Sustainable Economic Welfare); institutional arrangements (adaptations of ideas from Douglass North); trade and development (embodied trade, pollution havens); community sustainability; philosophical issues (Buddhist economics, homo economicus); and historical issues of sustainability (Malthusian perspectives, Jevon’s Paradox). Evaluations are based on an exam at the end of the introductory phase, an article précis, and a final poster presentation. Prerequisites: one term in intermediate neoclassical economics.

█ ECOLOGY & EXPERIENCE Rich Borden Course limit: 15 Cost: $25 Ecology is sometimes considered a subversive subject — the more humans learn about the living world, the more we are challenged to reexamine many of our fundamental beliefs. According to this perspective, ecology provides a complex mirror for humans. In its reflection we glimpse at a different understanding of our place in the world. Age old concerns return to consciousness: questions about insight and responsibility, the relation of spirit and matter, issues of meaning, purpose, and identity. In short, the science of ecology has given birth to an entirely new approach to psychology. The purpose of this course is to examine a cross section of new ideas along this interface. Some ideas draw on clues from deep in our evolutionary past. Other questions explore what we know from ecology about living more fully in the present — or ways that ecology can enrich our imagination of the future. Readings for this class are drawn from primary sources in a variety of fields with a focus on the relationships of mind and nature. The course is taught in an interactive, seminar-style with participants sharing summaries of readings, individually and in teams. Two short papers and one end of term long paper are required. Preference is given to students with background or strong interests in psychology and/or ecology.

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2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014

2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014