Page 80

HUMAN STUDIES view of what it is like to farm organically and to build a lifestyle with that basis. Students are evaluated on participation and on a journal which includes transcriptions and interpretations of notes from the field trips and readings.

PSYCHOLOGY: █ CONTEMPORARY BODY, MIND, & SOUL Rich Borden Course limit: 15 Cost: $25 This course explores current theories, research, and ideas in psychology. The core themes of body, mind, and soul all have a long history of psychological inquiry associated with them. Yet they are every bit as vital and important today. Some of the most influential authors in the field continue to struggle with these classical philosophical questions — and with ways to incorporate state of the art research on them. In this class, we read and discuss at least one major new book on each theme. Ideas from these perspectives are compared, contrasted and critiqued. In the final portion of the class, we look especially at ways in which all three themes can be integrated — not only in academic psychology — but within our own experience. Evaluations are based on careful reading of all materials, participation, a series of short papers, and an end of term presentation and final paper in each student’s area of personal interest. Prerequisites: some background in psychology.

SOCIAL █ CONTEMPORARY MOVEMENT STRATEGIES Gray Cox Course limit: 15 Cost: $25 When groups organize others to promote social change, what alternative strategies do they employ and how effective are they in varying circumstances? Can any general principles or methods for social change be gleaned from the successes and difficulties encountered in various social movements around the world? We use Bill Moyer’s Doing Democracy and a series of other theoretical readings to look at general models and strategies. And we use a series of case studies including, for instance, the Zapatistas, Moveon.org, the liberation of Eastern Europe, the United States Civil Rights Movement, the anti-globalizaton movement, the Breast Cancer social movement, and the Gay and Lesbian movement. Students write a series of short analyses of cases considered in class and do extended case studies on their own. Evaluations are based on the quality of participation, research, and writing.

78

█ CONTEMPORARY WOMEN’S NOVELS Karen Waldron This course selects from among the most interesting, diverse, and well written of contemporary women’s fiction to focus on questions of women’s writing (and how/whether it can be treated as a literary and formal category), gender identity and women’s issues, and the tension between sameness and difference among women’s experiences, and narrations of women’s experience, around the world. The course begins by examining two relatively unknown yet rather extraordinary novels from earlier in the twentieth century: Alexandra Kollantai’s Love of Worker Bees (1927) and Sawako Ariyoshi’s The Doctor’s Wife (1967). After these, we read from truly contemporary authors and quite varied authors published within the last twenty years, like Buchi Emecheta, Gloria Naylor, Ursula Hegi, Nawal El Saadawi, Sue Grafton, Graciela Limon, Tsitsi Dargarembga, Barara Yoshimoto, Dorothy Allison, Rose Tremain, Julia Alvarez, Leslie Feinberg, April Sinclair, and Achy Obejas. Students each choose an additional author to study and read a novel outside of class. An extensive list of authors is included in the syllabus. Evaluation be based on class participation, either two short papers or one long paper on works discussed in class, a presentation to the class of the outside novel, and a final evaluation essay. Prerequisites: a previous literature course and signature of instructor. Offered every other year.

█ CORN AND COFFEE Todd Little-Siebold Course limit: 12 Cost: $50 This course explores the rich history of Guatemala through the lens of two vital products: corn and coffee. The crops provide insight into the global and local dimensions of both historical and contemporary reality there. The course will cover the history of Guatemala from pre-contact native society through the myriad changes wrought by colonialism, decolonization, the rise of the modern nation state, and the transformations associated with the rise of coffee as a major export crop. Corn and coffee provide a convenient vantage point from which to examine the social, economic, and cultural dynamics of native society and the globally connected production of coffee. The course moves from a broad macro perspective on each crop to an intensive exploration of how both are produced in Guatemala. In this way, class participants look at global historical trends in consumption and how they have played themselves out in local communities. The class simultaneously looks at the

2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014

2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014