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HUMAN STUDIES technologies for learning, single sex education), students learn how educational policy at the federal, state, and local levels impacts teaching and learning, investigate the moral dimensions of the teacher student relationship, and reflect on the construct of teacher learners. Students are introduced to a variety of educational research methods (i.e, ethnography, case study, quasi experimental, correlational) that allow critical analysis of the knowledge base that strives to impact educational policy and practice. Evaluations are based on participation, reflective writing, service learning, and group projects and presentations.

█ CHILD EDUCATION & DEVELOPMENT Ken Hill Course limit: 15 Cost: $30 How does a child think? What causes him/her to learn? What educative approaches work best with young children? These questions and more will be explored through readings, lectures, field observations, and planned class activities. This course provides an introduction to early childhood education (preschool to middle school). Theorists such as Piaget, Vygosky, Montessori, Gardener, Freud, Erikson, Gilligan, and Kohlberg will be used to examine physical, mental, emotional, moral, and social aspects of childhood growth and development. We examine how questioning, peer influences, parenting approaches, media, and society play into childhood learning. The primary modes of instruction for this class are lectures, classroom discussions, field observations/reflections, and cooperative learning activities. Short reflective papers, an observational journal, and a class project will be used to assess student learning.

█ CHILDREN’S LITERATURE Ryan Siobhan Course limit: 15 This course is a broad overview of children’s literature and its place in the elementary school classroom. It examines the range and trends in literature for children that includes all genres, prominent authors, illustrators, and awards, critical evaluation, and integration into instruction across the curriculum. Students participate in and design lessons which incorporate or extend children’s response to literature. Students survey poetry and media appropriate for elementary students. Students read an extensive amount of children’s literature, keep a response journal, develop an author study, and create a teaching unit using children’s literature.

█ CHINESE PHILOSOPHY John Visvader This is a course in the study of Chinese philosophy and culture. The philosophies of Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism are examined in detail and their influence on the arts and culture of China are explored. Eastern and western views on nature, human nature, and society are compared and contrasted. Offered every other year.

█ CITY/COUNTRY: LITERARY LANDSCAPES 1860–1920 Karen Waldron Course limit: 15 This class focuses on American fiction from the Realist/Naturalist period (roughly 1860–1920), a time when enormous changes were occurring in and on the American landscape. Increasing urbanization, immigration, and industrialization corresponded both with a desire for “realistic” fiction of social problems, and nostalgic stories of a more “realistic” rural life. For the first time there was a national literature, resulting from the capabilities of large publishing houses, urban centers, and mass production — but this national literature was acutely self conscious of regional differences, and especially of the tension between city and country. As writers tried to paint the American landscape in literature, their works subsumed major social issues to place and formal arguments about the true nature of realistic description. Examining works that portray factory towns, urban tenements, Midwestern prairies, New England villages, and the broad spectrum of American landscapes, we look at how a complex, turbulent, multi-ethnic, and simultaneously urban and rural American culture defined itself, its realism, and thus its gender, class, race, and social relations and sense of values, against these landscapes. There are two extra, evening classes during week seven (Short Fiction Week), and a modest lab fee. Evaluations are based on weekly response papers, two short papers, and a short fiction project, as well as class participation. Prerequisites: Writing Seminar i (or equivalent).

█ CLASSIC SHORTS: CHANGING WEATHER Candice Stover Course limit: 15 Cost: $25 Weather as fact. Weather as atmosphere. Weather as metaphor. The seasons of change on our planet, in a lifetime, evolving. Heat, dust, natural disasters, questions of fertility, water, human intervention. Who survives what, what grows or doesn’t, where and how. The short story offers a lens on

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2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014

2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014