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ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

█ HISTORY OF NATURAL HISTORY John Anderson Course limit: 12 Cost: $100 Natural History can be regarded as the oldest science — indeed, at one point within the Western canon natural history was science. Beginning with discussion of early hunter gatherers, working past Ashurbanipal, King of Kings, Hellenistic Greece, the Roman Empire, and into the herbals and magicians of the Middle Ages, this course surveys development and eventual fragmentation of natural history into more specialized branches. Once a foundation has been established, we engage with the naturalists of the great age of exploration and conquest during the 17th through the 19th centuries, ending with an examination of natural history’s legacy in the rise of modern ecology. Course readings draw heavily on original sources, using translations where appropriate. At the end of the term we discuss the strengths and limitations of inductive and deductive reasoning in science and the implications of the 20th and 21st centuries’ increased emphasis on theoretical reasoning. Students gain a better sense of Euro American history and the history of science in particular; the ability to use original sources; understanding of the importance of comparing multiple sources in arriving at historical conclusions and of the importance of recognizing cultural and historical biases in interpretation of information. Evaluations are based on participation and spoken and written presentations of chosen research on a person or topic important to natural history as a science.

█ HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I John Anderson Course limit: 15 Cost: $30 This is the first course in a two-term sequence designed for students interested in pursuing medicine or biomedical research. It examines aspects of human anatomy and physiology, with particular emphasis on the digestive system, reproductive physiology, the circulatory system, immune response, and elements of nutrition and neurophysiology. This course emphasizes the relationships between anatomy and physiology and focuses on basic principles of biochemistry, the musculoskeletal system, digestion, nutrition, osmoregulation, and circulation. Readings include standard pre-medical text and primary literature. Evaluations are based on a number of quizzes, a term paper, class participation, and final exam. Prerequisites: biology work, background in chemistry, and permission of instructor. Students are encouraged to take both sequences.

█ HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II John Anderson Course limit: 15 Cost: $10 This two-term sequence designed for students interested in pursuing medicine or biomedical research examines aspects of human anatomy and physiology, with particular emphasis on the digestive system, reproductive physiology, the circulatory system, immune response, and elements of nutrition and neurophysiology. Readings include a pre-medical text and primary literature. Evaluations are based on in-class quizzes, a term paper, class participation, and final exam. Prerequisites: biology work, background in chemistry and permission of instructor. Students are encouraged to take both sequences.

█ HYDROLOGY Don Cass Course limit: Cost: $50 Hydrology is the science that studies the movement, distribution and quality of water resources throughout the Earth. Water is an essential component to life on Earth. Changes to our Earth System affect the distribution and quality of water resources and can have profound effects on adjacent and embedded systems. In this class we will look at how freshwater systems function and how perturbations result in changes. Field studies and laboratory analyses will help students develop a complete understanding of the physical and chemical processes that influence freshwater resources, with a particular emphasis on activities on and near Mount Desert Island. Field trips will include monitoring and measuring water quantity and quality at several locations around mdi in conjunction with United States Geological Survey: Water Division data. In addition we will visit public utilities such as water treatment and wastewater treatment facilities on the island. These field studies and field trips will help link natural processes and human activities that place demands on water resources. This course combines hands on experiential learning and group participation with independent work in primary literature. Students will have opportunities to develop and design term projects to investigate specific areas of interest. Students will be evaluated on their participation in class discussion of the readings, problem sets, field studies, and projects. Recommended prerequisites: a college level course in chemistry or geology is helpful but not required.

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2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014

2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014