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ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

█ CALCULUS III: MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS Dave Feldman Cost: $10 The functions studied in Calculus i and ii are one dimensional, but the universe of everyday experience is, at minimum, three-dimensional. In this course we explore how calculus can be applied to functions of more than one variable, and thus apply them to the three dimensional world. We review vectors and functions of several variables. We then learn about partial derivatives and gradients and how to apply these tools to multivariable optimization. Turning our attention to integral calculus, we cover double and triple integrals and their applications. We conclude with a treatment of line integrals, flux integrals, the divergence and curl of a vector field, and Green’s and Stokes’s theorems. Evaluations are based on participation and weekly problem sets. Prerequisites: Calculus II or equivalent or signature of instructor.

█ CHAOS & FRACTALS (INTRODUCTION TO) Dave Feldman Course limit: 15 Cost: $20 This course presents an elementary introduction to chaos and fractals. The main focus is on using discrete dynamical systems to illustrate many of the key phenomena of chaotic dynamics: stable and unstable fixed and periodic points, deterministic chaos, bifurcations, and universality. A central result of this study is the realization that very simple non-linear equations can exhibit extremely complex behavior. In particular, a simple deterministic system (i.e., physical system governed by simple, exact mathematical rules) can behave unpredictably and random, (i.e., chaotic). This result suggests there are potentially far reaching limits on the ability of science to predict certain phenomena. Students also learn about fractals — self similar geometric objects — including the Mandelbrot set and Julia sets. We also read and discuss the development of the field of chaos. In so doing, we examine the nature of scientific communities, with a particular eye toward how changes in scientific outlooks occur. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to explore the relations between chaos, fractals, and other areas of study such as literature, art, and cultural studies. Students who successfully complete this class gain a quantitative and qualitative understanding of the basic ideas of chaos and fractals, a greater understanding of the cultural practice of science, and improved mathematical skills. Evaluations are based on participation, weekly problem sets several short writing assignments and a final. Prerequisites: a high school algebra course or signature of instructor.

█ CHEMISTRY FOR CONSUMERS Ryan Bouldin Cost: $20 This class is designed to introduce the perspective from which chemists view their world. It begins with examining how life reflects properties of biomolecules, moves to discussions of the chemistry of nutrition, cooking, agriculture, and medicines. The class then shifts gears and discusses how the properties of useful materials such as metals, ceramics, and polymers reflect their microscopic structures. Evaluations are based on participation and a final project. Offered every other year.

█ CHEMISTRY I Ryan Bouldin Cost: $75 This first half of a two-term course sequence is designed to help students describe and understand properties of materials. The course first explores how our current pictures of atoms and molecules can explain physical properties of materials (state, color, density, specific heat). The course then explains how materials behave when mixed together: what sorts of transformations occur; how fast they occur; to what extent do they occur; and why they occur. Subjects are applied to better understand living systems, the natural environment, and industrial products. In addition to course lectures/discussions a three-hour lab per week is required. Students are encouraged to take both terms of this course. Those hoping for a less rigorous chemistry course should take Chemistry for Consumers. Evaluations are based on participation, lab reports, and quizzes. Offered every year.

█ CHEMISTRY II Don Cass Cost: $60 This is the second half of a two term course sequence designed to help students describe and understand properties of materials, beginning with a survey of how the internal structures of atoms lead to the formation of different sorts of bonds between them. It then considers how weaker forces can arise between molecules and the sorts of physical phenomena such forces explain. Class concludes by considering how to describe and explain the rates at which (and the extents to which) chemical reactions occur and applies such explanations to common types of reactions (acid/base and redox). Throughout the course, examples are drawn from living systems, the natural environment, and industrial products. In addition to course lectures/ discussions a three-hour lab per week is required. Chemistry i is strongly recommended as a

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2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014

2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014