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HUMAN STUDIES

█ WRITING SEMINAR Human Studies Faculty Course limit: 15 This expository writing course, which is limited to second- and third year students, focuses on writing as a process, audience awareness, syntax, and analysis. Through class discussion of readings, students gain an understanding of how others use the various principles of exposition to explain, clarify, and analyze. By writing several drafts of papers (topics may be chosen by students), students develop prewriting and revision skills. Through peer review sessions, students apply what they have learned in analyzing the writings of others to the writing of their peers. The portfolio students turn in at the end of the term should contain several drafts and the final version of two shorter papers, drafts and final copy of a library based research paper, and an annotated bibliography. This course meets the first-year writing requirement.

█ WRITING SEMINAR II Human Studies Faculty Course limit: 15 A logical sequence to Writing Seminar and Writing Seminar I, this course emphasizes argument and persuasion. The assigned readings show students not only how others passionately and creatively argue points but how argument and persuasion are integral to writing effective papers on topics ranging from the need to diversify the student body to protecting Atlantic salmon. Like Writing Seminar I, this course also requires library research and an understanding of different forms of documentation. Prerequisites: signature of Writing Program Director. Offered every year.

█ WRITING SEMINAR I Katharine Turok Course limit: 15 While individual sections of this class may adhere to a specific theme such as nature, culture, or biological sciences, this course is designed primarily to prepare students to write academic papers. Designed to serve the overall academic program, this course focuses on formal writing based on rhetorical principles of exposition and concentrates on the writing process: prewriting, writing, and rewriting. Assigned readings both illustrate how to use these principles and develop students’ analytical skills. Through a research paper or case study, this course introduces students to library research and documentation of an academic paper. Each section emphasizes peer review, revision, regular conferences, and some class presentations.

WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT WHAT YOUR COA EDUCATION MIGHT LOOK LIKE? VISIT WWW.COA.EDU FOR MORE COURSES, STUDENT PROFILES, AND STORIES. 113

2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014

2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014