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HUMAN STUDIES period of time varies with subjects, grade level, and specific student goals. The COA supervisor visits schools in a liaison capacity, and also evaluates the student teacher’s performance a minimum of eight times in the term. Student teachers meet together regularly to discuss issues such as curriculum planning, instruction, teaching practices, classroom environment, and broader educational issues. Students may use student teaching to fulfill the COA internship requirement if it is completed prior to graduation. Prerequisites: permission of Educational Studies Program Director.

STUDENTS WITH █ SUPPORTING DISABILITIES IN THE REGULAR CLASSROOM Kelley Sanborn This is an introductory course in special education. We explore the needs of children with disabilities and techniques for meeting these needs in the regular classroom. The course emphasizes both the social and instructional aspects of the concepts of inclusion, differentiation, and serving students in the “least restrictive environment.” Participants are introduced to concepts central to understanding the role of regular classroom teachers in meeting the academic, social, and emotional needs of students with disabilities. By the end of the course students are able to: identify and describe current issues and trends in education related to individuals with disabilities and their families; describe special education laws and procedures impacting individuals with disabilities; develop a working definition for each area of exceptionality in relation to achievement of educational goals; and develop strategies and resources for modifying, adapting, and/or differentiating curriculum and instruction. Prerequisites: a course in education.

█ SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE Katharine Turok Course limit: 15 Poetry, plays, essays, and fiction by British writers from the medieval period to the early twentieth century are explored in the context of social, historical, and cultural currents and cross currents. In addition to examining the lives and works of men and women writers from Chaucer to T.S. Eliot students are encouraged to question and analyze writings in relation to nature, science, and philosophy; poetry and painting; exploration, travel, trade, and colonialism; gender, class, and family; slavery and plurality; monarchy and revolution; classic, romantic, and modern theories and forms; and industrialism and alienation. Three papers are written during the semester; each paper is followed by a tutorial conference. Writing focus optional.,

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█ SUSTAINABILITY (INTRODUCTION TO) Molly Anderson Course limit: 18 Cost: $25 Introduction to Sustainability is a gateway into current thinking and practice of sustainability in multiple fields. It uses examples of people and organizations trying to move toward more sustainable practices in city planning, transportation, food systems, energy, business operations, housing design, consumption, waste disposal, and other areas. Guest speakers who work to implement more sustainable practices in their businesses and society help introduce students to current thinking and practices in their fields. Although most of the class is grounded in specific examples, we begin with controversies over the meaning of sustainability and address how it can be measured and evaluated. The last part of the class deals with socio-cultural changes needed to move individuals and societies toward more sustainable practices and how these can become part of the warp and woof of the way we live. Students are evaluated based on participation in class discussion, regular journal entries, completion of individual and group assignments, and independent projects and presentations that explore and practices in a specific field of particular interest to each student.

█ SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES Jay Friedlander Course limit: 15 Business has tremendous societal ramifications. Inventions and industries from the automobile to the internet impact everything from air quality to economic and political freedom. Entrepreneurs, who are often at the forefront of business and thus societal innovation, are changing the way business is conducted by creating businesses that are beneficial to the bottom line: society and the environment. Through cases, projects, and present day examples, the course will challenge students to understand the impact of business on society and the challenges and pitfalls of creating a socially responsible venture. In addition, it will offer new frameworks for creating entrepreneurial ventures that capitalize on social responsibility to gain competitive advantage and increase valuation while benefiting society and the environment. The final deliverable for the course is an in class presentation in which student teams will either: recommend ways to improve the social and environmental impacts of a company, while increasing competitive advantage and bottom line; or benchmark two industry competitors, a socially responsible company versus a traditional company.

2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014

2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014