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HUMAN STUDIES

STUDENTS RESPOND TO FUNDAMENTAL QUESTIONS

develop an understanding of Catholic theology and various Protestant challenges to it, as well as develop a sense of the political rework of Europe provoked by theological debate. We read social histories of the period and primary texts by thinkers such as Erasmus of Rotterdam, Jean Calvin, Martin Luther, Teresa of Avila, Galileo, and Bartolome de las Casas and use films to provide context. Students are evaluated on mastery of readings, discussions, short essays, and a final project.

█ RESILIENCE IN SOCIAL & ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS environment, animal welfare, rural communities, and the possibility of making a decent living as a farmer or wage worker in agriculture. This course examines the most innovative practices in the Northeast that point toward long term food system efficiency and sustainability. Participating students in Maine examine the Northeastern food system and its issues in-depth through films, research, and interviews with practitioners. Students document what they learn and combine their interviews and documentation into a story of food system innovation in the Northeast. Course lectures are videotaped for students in England and Germany who take the course through distance learning. COA students interact with British and German students to allow comparisons of how young people in different industrialized countries think about sustainability and long term efficiency in the food system, as well as compare practices, and the level of innovation across countries and across food system sectors. Evaluation are based on essays, assignments, and participation. Prerequisites: some experience and/or coursework in agriculture and food systems; permission of instructor.

& THE REFORMATION: █ RENAISSANCE EUROPE IN TRANSITION Todd Little-Siebold This class is an introductory exploration of the transformations in Europe from 1400 to the sixteenth century wrought by the changing religious, political, and social thought. Taking as its point of departure the transformation of European society provoked by the “new” ideas of the Renaissance, the course focuses on the phenomena of humanism and the challenges to religious orthodoxy and political hierarchies it represented. The course uses a range of secondary and primary sources to examine the social, spiritual, and political implications of the challenges to the Catholic Church’s preeminence in the Christian west. We examine the idea of Renaissance and its expressions in the world of ideas, art, and science practice. Students

Molly Anderson Course limit: 16 Resilience, or the ability to regain critical structure and functions after disturbance, has become widely recognized as an important attribute of sustainable social and ecological systems. This course examines the concept of resilience from system dynamics and the related concepts of vulnerability, thresholds, adaptive capacity, and societal learning Students learn consequences of lack of resilience and explore how to enhance resilience in food systems, global environmental change, and social experiments such as transition towns. Evaluations are based on participation and projects. Prerequisites: at least one QR course; courses in agriculture or food systems are useful..

█ SATANIC VERSES Bill Carpenter Course limit: 18 Cost: $10 This course is a study of the figure of Satan in classic and contemporary literature and visual art including painting and film. We view the Satanic image in the light of Jung’s shadow archetype, an unconscious compensatory figure in the evolution of morality. It is also related to ideas of nature and civilization, to major religious structures and to the political techniques of demonization and projection. A centerpiece of the course is a close reading of Salman Rushdie’s Satanic Verses and its relation to contemporary Islam. Other readings include the books of Genesis and Job from the Old Testament, Jung’s Answer to Job, Sura 46 of the Koran, selections from Dante’s Inferno and Milton’s Paradise Lost, Goethe’s Faust, William Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, the Grand Inquisitor chapter from Dostoevsky’s Brothers Karamazov, Nietzsche’s The Antichrist, Elaine Pagel’s The Origin of Satan, and the Rolling Stones’ Sympathy for the Devil. We also study visual imagery from Bosch, Goya, and the Dore illustrations to Dante. Halfway steering clear of Hollywood, films may include The Passion of the Christ, Pasolini’s Gospel According to St. Matthew,

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2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014

2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014