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HUMAN STUDIES transfer, and mechanisms for civil society engagement. Work in the class will include a general presentation to the class on the basic elements of the regime and another presentation on the politics of a specific issue to be addressed by the body during its meeting. Each student will attend a negotiating session of their chosen regime and will write daily analytical blog postings while at the meeting. Students will be evaluated based on their two presentations, blog posts, and contribution to the collective learning of the class through the term long comparative analysis of the four regimes. Prerequisites: prior coursework in global politics, permission of instructor.

JOYCE, & BECKETT: █ PROUST, THE LIMITS OF LANGUAGE Colin Capers Course limit: 15 Cost: $60 Samuel Beckett’s early studies of the masterworks of Marcel Proust (À la Recherche du Temps Perdu, translated into English as, In Search of Lost Time) and James Joyce (Finnegans Wake) are a useful starting point for examining the work of these three individuals as a particularly tightly knit cluster of sensibilities working on the cusp of Modernism’s slide into Postmodernism. All three writers were attempting to describe the totality of human existence, as particularly lived and reflected at the times they lived in. For Proust and Joyce this endeavor entailed a precise, expansive, and exhaustive technique, whereas Beckett responded with a contracted use of language reflecting a dwindling human capacity to comprehend our circumstance. All three authors challenged readers’ perceptions of form and pushed language to the limits of its potential. In this course we will read extensively from In Search of Lost Time, Ulysses, and Finnegans Wake finishing with Beckett’s trilogy of Molloy, Malone Dies, and The Unnameable. Several of Beckett’s short plays and late prose pieces will also be studied. These readings will be supplemented with critical, cultural, and historical studies by Badiou, Cioran, Campbell, Pinter, Kristeva, Lukács, Zizek, and others. Prerequisites: The Nature of Narrative or signature of instructor.

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█ PUBLIC SPEAKING WORKSHOP Jamie McKown Course limit: 10 Cost: $10 This class is conducted as a workshop with an emphasis on students producing increasingly advanced speeches for public performance and/ or consumption. We cover a wide variety of areas including those related to constructing the speech in advance (invention and arrangement), as well as those related to the actual performance of the text (style, memory, and execution). While the primary goal of the class is to create an environment in which students can improve vital public communication skills, we also strive to cultivate critical and respectful listening skills (which is a vital skill). A wide variety of speaking genres are covered during the term, though there is a strong emphasis on public advocacy and persuasion. This class is designed for students with varying levels of public speaking backgrounds. A diverse array of experiences, skills, and strengths helps foster a collaborative and supportive speaking environment. Throughout the term students work on individual projects, in pairs, and in larger collaborative groups. There is a minimal focus on theoretical questions in favor of a hands-on approach to constructing speeches. Students are evaluated on a number of process oriented assignments. Final evaluations are relative to individual participation in the process and not to an objective scale of public speaking talent. As such, students who feel they are less proficient in the area of public communication should not be worried that this would somehow disadvantage them in grading. In order to facilitate a vibrant working environment, a lab session will be a component of the class.

█ REDEFINING FOOD SYSTEMS EFFICIENCY Molly Anderson Course limit: 15 Efficiency has been the driver and justification for agricultural innovation in industrialized societies, including the United States, over the past 60 years. In most circumstances efficiency means the replacement of human labor with synthetic chemicals, petroleum, and mechanization. While there has been a dramatic increase in production and productivity, there has also been massive displacement of the rural population to cities, the death of rural communities, environmental degradation, scale changes in agriculture, and growing contributions from agriculture to global environmental change. Thinking about efficiency in the long term, rather than with its common short term meaning, would incorporate the full costs of agricultural practices, such as their impacts on the

2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014

2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014