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HUMAN STUDIES women novelists (who outnumbered and outsold male authors) — such as Rowson, Foster, Child, Cooke, Fern, Stowe, Phelps, Jewett, Chopin, and Gilman — we consider how they have shaped the tradition of the novel and social values Americans encounter today. Prerequisites: Writing Seminar i or signature of instructor. Offered every other year. the wide selection of nineteenth century American

COMMUNICATION, █ NON-VERBAL CULTURE & THE BODY Ann Axtmann Course limit: 12 Cost: $15 In popular culture, diet and exercise fads, and recent scholarship, the human body has become a critical site of cultural representation and inquiry. In this interdisciplinary course, we look at how the body expresses and communicates in our daily lives, the arts, and in literature. A principle goal is to become more aware of our enormous capacity to embody self and culture. Familiarity with how the body moves is at the core of that understanding. Starting with an overview of body studies, we locate the (moving) body within the disciplines of anthropology, sociology, psychology, arts, cultural studies, disability studies, medicine, and media and explore our own pre-conceptions and ideas. Students examine an outline of non-verbal communication and kinesics and movement analysis as we keep in mind that as the body moves, it gives, and receives information. We look at the body in motion in the visual, performing, and literary arts. Notions of space (proxemics and haptics), time,silence and sound (vocalics), gesture, and posture are considered alongside issues of power relations, cultural diversity, and group behavior. During the term students engage in classroom activities and fieldwork. Students keep an observation journal that serves as a basis for discussions. Fieldwork ethics are addressed and films are screened. Evaluations are based on class participation, three response papers, and a take home exam. In addition, participants collaborate on final group projects that consist of a proposal, fieldwork, data analysis, and a performative/non-verbal presentation. Readings may include Ellen Goldman’s As Others See Us; The Nonverbal Communication Reader edited by Guerrero, DeVito, and Hecht; Milan Kundera’s novel Identity; and other selected texts by Marcel Mauss, Chris Shilling, Edward T. Hall, Albert E. Scheflen, and others.

THE MANTRA OF COA'S WRITING CENTER

NAMES, & NARRATIVES: DOING █ NUMBERS, HUMAN ECOLOGY IN HUMAN STUDIES Gray Cox Cost: $25 This is a course for students who want to use history, anthropology, and social science research in their work on community organizing, social change efforts or public policy advocacy. Human ecological approaches to such problems and studies require using interdisciplinary methods to integrate different points of view and different theories in a more comprehensive understanding of a person, text, situation, or problem. But how can we do that? What sorts of things are methods, theories, and disciplines and how can they be integrated? How is theoretical research related to practical action? How should we deal with the ethical issues that come up in research? The aim of this course is to develop students’ abilities to articulate different ways of framing these questions and answering them, and to apply those questions and answers in projects in human ecology — including in internships, residencies, and senior projects. The class examines a series of texts that provide case studies that address these problems at a practical as well as philosophical and methodological level. Work for the class includes a series of short papers and exercises that provide descriptions and critical analyses of texts read in class and provide applications of theories and methods to a project. Texts include: Albion’s Seed by David Hackett Fischer, The Evaluation of Cultural Action by Howard Richards, The Ethnographic Method by James Spradley, The Serpent and the Rainbow by Wade Davis, The Two Milpas of Chan Kom by Alicia Re Cruz, Interdisciplinary Research: Process and Theory by Allen F. Repko, and a series of short articles and chapters. Evaluations are based on participation, short papers and homework exercises through the term, and work on a final project. This course is recommended for sophomores and juniors interested in pursuing advanced work in Human Studies.

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2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014

2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014