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HUMAN STUDIES

█ NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE Karen Waldron Course limit: 12 Cost: $10 This course is a challenging introduction to several centuries of Native American literature, the relevance of historical and cultural facts to its literary forms, and the challenges of bridging oral and written traditions. Authors include such writers as Silko, Erdrich, Harjo, Vizenor, and McNickle as well as earlier speeches and short stories. We also consider non-native readings and appropriation of Native American styles, material, and world views. Prerequisites: signature of instructor.

█ NATURE OF NARRATIVE Karen Waldron Course limit: 15 This is an advanced writing focused course in which students practice the human ecology of literary analysis. We explore the mind or consciousness of fictional writing (specifically, novels) by looking at how narratives make meaning, and at how we make meaning from narratives. The course surveys some of the best modern fiction, with a particular focus on works that highlight narrative technique, stretch the boundaries of the imagination, have a rich and deep texture, and push against the inherent limitations of textuality. Students also hone their reading and analytical skills as they work closely with modern texts that broke new literary ground. Some of the authors we may read include: Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, William Faulkner, Monique Wittig, John Dos Passos, Toni Morrison, N. Scott Momaday, Bessie Head, Manuel Puig, and Margaret Atwood. We also study some narrative (and possibly film) theory. Evaluation is based on class participation, frequent short response and passage analysis papers, and an independent project. Prerequisites: signature of instructor. Writing focus optional. Offered every other year.

█ NATURE OF NARRATIVE II Karen Waldron Course limit: 12 This is an advanced course in which students practice the human ecology of literary analysis. We explore the mind or consciousness of twentieth and twenty first century fictional writing (specifically, novels) by looking at how narratives make meaning, and at how we make meaning from narratives. The course accomplishes this by surveying some of the best and most challenging works of modern fiction, with a particular focus on those novels that highlight narrative technique, stretch

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the boundaries of the imagination, have a rich and deep texture, and push against the limitations of prose fictional textuality. Students hone their reading and analytic skills by working closely with texts that broke literary ground. Authors include several of the following: Virginia Woolf, William Faulkner, Djuna Barnes, Alain Robbe Grillet, Toni Morrison, Manuel Puig, Italo Calvino, Clarice Lispector, Ishmael Reed, Hélène Cixous, Gerald Vizenor, Jeanette Winterson, Julio Cortazar, as well as others. We also study some narrative and novel theory. Evaluations are based on class participation, frequent short response and passage analysis papers, and an independent theory based research and novel project. Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Writing focus optional.

█ NEGOTIATING EDUCATIONAL POLICY Linda Fuller Course limit: 15 Cost: $10 Public schools are everyone’s concern. Shared ownership by diverse stake-holders often brings strong interest in school policies. This course explores issues under debate by state and local policy makers through readings, full class and small group discussions, guest speakers, and an extended simulation. We also examine Maine’s Civil Rights Act and its implementation in various school districts. Our driving questions include: what are the ways parents, teachers, business people, and community members might influence school policies given the common constraints of limited time and energy? How do policy makers sort through various opinions and facts to create legislation? How do those who implement policy integrate context and experience with the spirit of an official state statute? With the objective of understanding and negotiating critical school policy issues impacting the nation and beyond, evaluations are based on participation (including field trips), journal entries, a group interview and presentation, and a final personal analysis paper based on one of the bills under deliberation by Maine legislators. Prerequisites: Changing Schools, Changing Society and/or a prior policy course or strong interest in policy recommended.

█ NINETEENTH CENTURY AMERICAN WOMEN Karen Waldron Course limit: 15 This course studies the American novel as written by women of the nineteenth century. It focuses on how women’s issues and styles change over the course of the century, with its revolutionary economic, technological, social, and political shifts, as well as on enduring questions. As we read from

2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014

2014 College of the Atlantic Guidebook  

This is the College of the Atlantic Guidebook prospectus for 2014