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Annual Report 2016-2017


The College Explained The College of Alberta Psychologists (the “College”) regulates the profession of psychology in the province of Alberta. The profession of psychology was initially organized in Alberta in the 1960s as the Psychologists’ Association of Alberta. In 1987 the Psychology Profession Act was passed, and in 1996 the Association was separated into regulatory and fraternal bodies. The College of Alberta Psychologists assumed responsibility for the regulation of the profession. The College was proclaimed under the Health Professions Act on January 15, 2006.

Key Priorities •

regulating the profession

fostering the development of the profession and of individual members of the profession

communicating with government and stakeholders

educating and informing the public

This annual report covers the fiscal year from April 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017.

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Annual Report 2016 - 2017


Table of Contents Message from the Registrar

4

Message from the President

5 6

Introduction Report of the Council

1.

STRATEGIC PLAN KEY OBJECTIVES AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN 2016–17

2.

ORGANIZATIONAL STRATEGIC PLAN 2017–2022

3.

REPORTS OF PUBLIC MEMBERS

Reports of the Advisory Committees

Practice Advisory Committee

Registration Advisory Committee

Report of the Registrar

4.

REGISTRATION OF COLLEGE MEMBERS

4.1

Registration process

4.2

Credentials Evaluation Sub-Committee

4.3

Registration applications

4.4

Registration Approvals Sub-Committee

4.5

Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology

4.6

Oral examination

4.7

New registrants

4.8

Number of members

4.9

Substantial Equivalency Sub-Committee

9 9 15 16 18 18 18 20 20 20 21 22 23 24 24 24 25 26

Complaint Process

28

Treasurer’s Report

34 35 48

Audited Financial Statements

Council, Committee and Staff Members

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Message from the Registrar This is my first message in my capacity as Registrar, having served for the last two months of this reporting period. I would like to begin by thanking my predecessor Dr. Alexandra Kinkaide for her many years of valued service, and to wish her the very best in the years to come. I know this sentiment is shared by College Council, staff and members alike. While change is often met with some trepidation, these are important and exciting times. The mental health of all Albertans has been identified as a priority of the Government of Alberta as well as Ministers Hoffman and Payne. The College and our sister fraternal organization the Psychologists’ Association of Alberta (PAA) participated in the recent Alberta Mental Health Review and serve on the Recommendations Implementation Committee. Submissions have also been provided to panels reviewing the Office of the Child and Youth Advocate, Child Intervention and the anticipated legalization of cannabis. Both the College and the PAA have also ensured the role of psychologists in Medical Assistance in Dying has been clarified and that psychologists are afforded similar protections as other allied health professionals. The College has actively participated in the Alberta Federation of Regulated Health Professions, the Association of Canadian Regulators of Psychology and the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards. We also represent the regulated health professions on the University of Alberta Collaborative Health Education Program Coordinating Committee. Several recent initiatives internal to the College are also underway, including a comprehensive human resource review. Additional initiatives include the development of a five-year strategic plan and a parallel communication/member engagement strategy. Key components of the latter are our refreshed website and quarterly publication. Both are designed to provide timely, engaging and relevant regulatory information to the public and our members. Psychologists continue to be among Alberta’s most valued and accessible mental health resource across urban and rural communities. Our members are found in community, social, educational, public safety and health organizations, occupying key roles frequently as part of a collaborative care team. Responding respectfully to the increasingly complex and diverse mental health needs of all Albertans is a priority for both the College and the profession. The College is committed to making a difference in the lives of all Albertans by ensuring mental health services are delivered in a safe and effective manner.

Richard J. Spelliscy, PhD, RPsych Registrar & CEO

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Message from the President It is my privilege, as President of the Council of the College of Alberta Psychologists, to submit this article for the Annual Report. As we reflect on the past year, we can take pride in our accomplishments and our efforts, highlighted in this report, on behalf of our members. The Council’s primary role is to ensure adherence to the legislation by the College. This is the key way we can ensure protection of the public and advancement of the profession. The College works diligently to fulfill this role in a thoughtful, professional and respectful manner. If you feel the College could make changes to obtain an even finer balance, please let us know. We continue to build on our partnership with the Psychologists’ Association of Alberta, to determine how we can each remain true to our respective mandates while combining our efforts, as appropriate, on topics and activities that are mutually beneficial to our members. We also continue to maintain and enhance our connections with provincial, national and international bodies to advance the profession of psychology. The Council acknowledges our two Registrars—formerly, Dr. Kinkaide, and currently, Dr. Spelliscy—for their wisdom, insight and commitment to the College of Alberta Psychologists and our members. If questions arise about any of the material presented in this Annual Report, please contact the Registrar at the College.

Lorraine Stewart, PhD, RPsych Council President

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Introduction The College regulates the practice of registered psychologists and registered provisional psychologists. The scope of practice for the profession is set out in Schedule 22, Section 3 of the Health Professions Act, which states:

In their practice, psychologists do one or more of the following:

(a)

assess, diagnose, treat, guide and support persons or groups of persons in order to enhance development, effective living and quality of life or to prevent, remedy or ameliorate mental, emotional, cognitive, behavioural and interpersonal difficulties;

teach, supervise or consult in the practice of psychology;

(b)

(b.1) manage and conduct research in the science, techniques and practice of psychology;

(c)

provide restricted activities authorized by the regulations.

The College maintains two primary regulated members’ registers under the Health Professions Act: registered psychologists and registered provisional psychologists. The College also maintains a courtesy register for temporary registration, for a period of up to one year, for psychologists registered elsewhere. A non-regulated members’ register for retired members is established in the bylaws. Regulated members of the College may perform the restricted activity of “psychosocial intervention.” The titles “psychologist” and “provisional psychologist” are protected under this legislation. The College approves the use of the title “Doctor” or the abbreviations “Dr,” “PhD,” “EdD” or “PsyD.” The College Council sets the strategic direction and priorities within the context of the Health Professions Act and the College’s mandate. Adjudicative and advisory functions of the College are clearly identified and separated in keeping with the principles of natural justice. These include fairness, objectivity and transparency. The College Council appoints members to two advisory committees, the Practice Advisory Committee and Registration Advisory Committee. These committees provide advice and assistance to Council in ensuring the College’s mandate of public protection is forefront. The Registrar’s role is to function as the Chief Executive Officer of the College and to discharge the responsibilities of the Registrar as mandated in the Health Professions Act and the Psychologists Profession Regulation. The Registrar oversees regulatory compliance of College functions and advises and supports the Council in fulfilling its responsibilities in accordance with College policies. Additionally, the Registrar advocates high professional standards for members and promotes and maintains public relations with agencies, members, government and the public. In addition to the Registrar, the College has 10 staff members who are organized by regulatory and administrative functions. Member volunteers appointed by the Council perform many advisory and adjudicative functions. Their service is invaluable. In fact, without the members’ support and commitment to College committees and processes, self-regulation would be less efficient and effective. We wish to extend many thanks to all our member volunteers for their continuous contributions and the assistance they provide on behalf of the College. Volunteers contributed hundreds of hours to the College in 2016–17. These volunteers included:

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Council members

members of standing and legislated committees, task forces and ad hoc committees formed to address specific, time-sensitive issues

members who offer their professional expertise to the College Annual Report 2016 - 2017


Functional Committee Structure

C O UN C IL

R EGISTR AR /C EO

D E PU T Y R E G I ST R AR C o m p l a i nt s D i re c t or

AS S ISTAN T D EP UTY R EGISTR AR D i re c t or, P rof e ssi onal Gui danc e

Adjudicative Committees

Advisory Committees

O ral Ex a mi n a t i o n s Co m mi t t ee

Re g i s t ra t i o n Committee

Rost e r of M e mbe rs: He ari ng Tri bunal and C omp l ai nt Re vi e w C ommi t t e e

Cred en t ia ls Ev a l u a t i o n Sub-C o mm it t ee

Re g i s t ra t i o n A p p ro v a l s S ub - C o m m i t t e e

S ubst ant i al Eq ui val e nc y S ub- C ommi t t e e

P rac t i c e Advi sory C ommi t t e e

Re g i st r a tion A dv isory Committee

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Report of the Council


Report of the Council The Council, which governs the College, consists of 10 voting members: •

seven registered psychologists elected by the membership

three public members provincial government

appointed

by

the

College officials and one recording secretary also attend Council meetings. The President-Elect and the Treasurer are elected from amongst Council members each September. The Council held five meetings over the course of the fiscal year.

1 Strategic Plan Key Objectives and Accomplishments in 2016-17 Each year the Council holds an annual strategic planning meeting at which it establishes short-term and long-term strategic objectives, as needed. The Council established the framework for long-term objectives in November 2006. Each year, Council discusses the role(s) of psychologists, the development of the profession and current and future trends. Council has focused on, and will continue to focus on, implementing the ongoing priorities of: •

regulating the profession

fostering the development of the profession and of individual members of the profession

communicating with government and stakeholders

educating and informing the public

At each Council meeting, Council receives information, through the Registrar’s Report, on initiatives relating to the College’s strategic direction. On March 19, 2016, the Council approved the following Strategic Plan Priority Goals:

1. Review and develop the credentials evaluation process.

2. Implement efficiencies within the registration process.

3. Review and develop the substantial equivalency process.

4. Review ALL College bylaws and policies.

5. Develop an integrated information management system.

6. Improve public access to, and transparency of, the College’s processes.

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March 2016 Priority Update Registration Review The College retained Katrina Haymond of Field LLP to assist with a third-party review of registration criteria and processes, to ensure its existing criteria and processes are compliant with the Health Professions Act and the Psychologists Profession Regulation. The College received Ms. Haymond’s final report on December 23, 2016. This report has been shared with key stakeholders. College Council will establish a Registration Review Recommendation Implementation (RRRI) subcommittee to address the recommendations contained in the report. The RRRI sub-committee is a priority for the College. The College is anticipating establishing increased communications with the post-secondary community to streamline our admission criteria and credentialing process. Once the registration review has been completed, the College will undertake a full audit of all existing College bylaws and policies. This is to ensure any changes resulting from the registration review are supported by companion regulations, bylaws and policies. A primary goal of the registration review is to ensure its processes are transparent, objective, impartial and fair. This is consistent with the principles of natural justice.

Develop an Integrated Information Management System The College is anticipating undertaking a formal review of its information management needs. This includes the ability to develop online learning modules for both the jurisprudence examination and as one aspect of meeting our continuing education objectives. College staff is reviewing its internal processes to identify additional areas that may be streamlined with enhanced technological resources. An ongoing priority is to facilitate the College’s direction toward a paperless workplace environment.

Improved Access and Transparency of College Processes The College website is one of the main venues of information to the public and members. The new College of Alberta Psychologists website went live on Thursday, September 8, 2016. The new website has received positive feedback. Enhancements are ongoing to ensure the public has easy access to updated information and members are informed of important regulatory advances in real time. In February 2017, the College’s enhanced online fee payment program was introduced, with heightened security features to protect member data.

Professional Guidance Department The Professional Guidance department communicates daily with members; it received approximately 519 inquiries during this fiscal period, a decrease of approximately 16% from the 615 inquiries received during the previous year. The inquiries dealt with a variety of practice-related regulatory issues including, but not limited to: duty to report, retention of records and consent of minors. After each inquiry has been closed, members are sent a link to a survey so they may provide their feedback on the guidance they received. In this reporting period, the College received 76 responses to the survey. Over 90% of respondents had positive feedback and indicated they were satisfied with the guidance they received.

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Member Survey A Member Survey was circulated to all registered psychologists and provisional psychologists (3,260) on August 16, 2016. Four hundred eighty-six members completed the survey. A preliminary review of survey results identified several key findings. Underlying many of these themes is a lack of clarity about the respective roles of the College and the Psychologists’ Association of Alberta. Minimum entry to practice requirements (Masters vs. Doctoral) continues to be an item of debate amongst the membership. Other regulatory issues identified as being of importance included the implementation of the Continuing Competence Program, understanding and working within existing privacy legislation requirements, use of technology (including records storage) and public awareness about what differentiates psychologists from other professionals who provide mental health services.

Communication Survey A Communication Survey was distributed to 3081 members in April 2016. One hundred sixty-two members submitted responses. This valuable feedback is being used to improve member communication. The survey asked members about their satisfaction with two specific communication strategies: The CAP Monitor and the College website. When asked what other information members would appreciate from the College, requests included: •

inclusion of more ethical and legal articles

presentation of branch-specific topical articles, for example, school and forensic practice or major advances in our field

guidelines for high-risk and emerging areas such as telepsychology

specific legislation and inter-provincial issues that apply to practicing psychologists who wish to provide services outside Alberta

that all ethical review and complaints findings be produced as a separate publication or email, and that a provisional psychologist-oriented newsletter be published

College Staff College staff continue to present on a broad range of regulatory issues and common concerns facing the profession including, but not limited to: changes to record-keeping, informed consent, registration processes, ethical practice and complaints and professional conduct. Emerging trends suggest future presentations should focus on medical assistance in death, the legalization of cannabis and child intervention.

Supervision Consultants Two supervision consultants appointed by the Council continue to be available to assist provisional psychologists and their supervisors with ethical and practice issues. The College received 43 supervisionrelated questions in this fiscal year. This valuable resource often prevents potential conflicts between a supervisor and a provisional psychologist. Annual Report 2016 - 2017

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2016 Annual Meeting & Professional Development Day The 2016 Annual Meeting and Professional Development Day was held in Calgary on Saturday, September 24, 2016 at the Best Western Village Park Inn. We were very pleased to have Dr. Marlene Maheu from San Diego, California, join us as our keynote speaker. Dr. Maheu presented on the topic of “TeleMental Health: Psychology at the Technology Crossroads.” A dynamic speaker, trainer, consultant and author, Dr. Maheu has been a telemental health leader since 1994. As a telepsychologist and technology developer, she has been a staunch advocate for telehealth, with specialized interests in legal, ethical and other risk management approaches to developing and delivering behavioural services. Additionally, four professional development sessions in the afternoon focused on a range of topics, including presentations on: •

Supervision: A Critical Part of Professionalism – Dr. Greg Schoepp

Collaborative Practice: Knowledge Café – Dr. Elaine Greidanus, Ms. Deborah Hinds-Nunziata and Dr. Arlin Pachet

Telepsychology Best Practices: Do’s and Don’ts – Dr. Marlene Maheu

Social Media for Psychologists – Dr. Marlene Maheu

The day ended with a reception in honour of the College’s many volunteers. Evaluations of this year’s meeting were very positive.

Continuing Competence Program The amendments to the Psychologists Profession Regulation have yet to be approved by the Lieutenant Governor in Council due to a change in government staff, as well as the ongoing and unresolved backlog of other regulated health profession regulations. The Continuing Competence Program is on target for implementation and will continue on a voluntary basis until the regulation is approved. The College will monitor legislative developments related to the Continuing Competence Program and will institute the final administrative preparatory steps to implement it once the government proclaims the regulation. Until regulations have been proclaimed, the College is not authorized to collect information related to continuing competence and it therefore remains a voluntary program.

Information Sharing Strategy The Information Sharing Strategy posited by the Government of Alberta affects psychologists in general, and especially those in multidisciplinary team settings. The College is participating in ongoing discussions with the provincial government in relation to many information and data exchange projects, and is supportive of projects that facilitate the best possible care for Albertans. The College recognizes its unique fiduciary obligation to protecting the privacy interests of Albertans and the integrity of professional relationships.

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The College and the Psychologists’ Association of Alberta (PAA) The College and PAA continue to promote a collegial and mutually beneficial relationship while ensuring that professional psychology in Alberta is perceived in a positive light by members, the public and government officials alike. The College Registrar and PAA CEO meet regularly to discuss common issues facing the profession and the public. The College Council and the PAA Board also continue to meet to review mutual interests and activities through the creation of a joint task force. Richard Spelliscy and Roy Frenzel continue to represent the College on the joint task force. A province-wide joint CAP/PAA Town Hall meeting schedule has been developed. Meetings are to be held throughout the province over the next three years. Town Hall meetings are an informal way for organizational representatives to engage with members and discuss issues and plans affecting the profession of psychology. Members are encouraged to seek out the next Town Hall meeting in their area, to share their views and aspirations.

External Relations and Engagement The College continues to foster positive, collaborative relationships with government. It meets with various government officials to discuss issues facing the profession, such as abandoned records, revisions to College regulations, changes to the Child & Youth Advocate Act, the Mental Health Amendment Act, medical assistance in dying, Practice Notes 7 & 8 and the legalization of cannabis. The College also consults with government on specific critical issues facing the profession, in order to meet our regulatory obligations and serve the public interest.

Participation in Provincial, National and International Associations The College continues to be actively involved in several provincial, national and international organizations. College representatives regularly attend meetings of the following: i. Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB) Initially formed to develop and administer the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP), the ASPPB does not have regulatory authority over member jurisdictions but is an organization of psychology regulators across North America that assists regulators in areas such as: credentialing; examinations and assessment; ethics and discipline; regulatory, professional and legislative issues; mobility agreements; and professional relations. The ASPPB meets twice yearly and provides opportunities for psychology regulators across North America to remain abreast of trends in regulation and the development of the practice of the profession through continuing education seminars. The ASPPB also provides a mechanism for the mobility of psychologists through the Certificate of Professional Qualification in Psychology program. Meeting themes included Promoting Public Protection in an Anti-Regulatory Climate and Social Media: Regulator’s Friend or Foe? ii. Association of Canadian Psychology Regulatory Organizations (ACPRO) This is a fraternal body composed of Canadian provincial psychology regulatory authorities. Other relevant national and international organizations such as Canadian Psychological Association (CPA) and ASPPB are ex-officio partners. ACPRO has no regulatory authority over its partners or regulatory jurisdictions. Professional regulation is a provincial responsibility that recognizes both the individual differences and the jurisdictional needs of each province. ACPRO meets twice a year and enables provincial regulatory bodies to discuss and collaborate on issues affecting the practice of psychology, including the mobility of psychologists.

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iii. Alberta Federation of Regulated Health Professions (AFRHP) This Alberta association provides a forum within which 28 health professions discuss issues of mutual interest specific to the Health Professions Act. All AFRHP colleges can participate in both generalinterest and specific-interest group meetings. The College attends a variety of relevant AFRHP subgroup meetings, such as those related to continuing competence and complaint processes. The key issues addressed by the AFRHP include the hiring of a new Executive Director and ensuring a sufficient number of public members sit on College Council and committees. Alberta government officials made various presentations to the AFRHP that addressed consultation and engagement around specific policy issues being addressed by Alberta Health. Dr. Richard Spelliscy (College Registrar) is the Chair of the Executive Committee of the AFRHP, and sits for a two-year term.

Agreement on Internal Trade (AIT) Chapter 7–Labour Mobility Canada’s provincial premiers and territorial leaders endorsed two key amendments to the AIT at a First Ministers’ meeting held on January 16, 2009. The Labour Mobility Chapter of the AIT is intended to provide barrier-free mobility across Canada. The College is fully compliant with the AIT and works closely with the Domestic and International Labour Mobility Unit from the Ministry of Labour, Government of Alberta. The College has been advised that the Act has been renamed as the Canadian New Free Trade Agreement and will supersede the AIT effective July 1, 2017. The College continues to meet with senior government officials to ensure the spirit of this agreement is upheld.

Foreign Qualifications Recognition (FQR) Project The FQR project began in April 2011. Every year, the College is required to provide the Government of Alberta with annual statistics regarding internationally trained applicants. The assessment and recognition of internationally trained applicants’ foreign qualifications, cultural differences and substantial equivalency assessment continue to be reviewed and enhanced by the College. The College continues to explore ways of assessing prior learning.

Public Communication Information is routinely provided to educate the public about psychology and about psychologists’ roles and responsibilities. The College also addresses concerns and complaints. Members of the public are often referred to the Psychologists’ Association of Alberta’s Referral Service, as well as other organizations when appropriate. The www.cap.ab.ca website is designed to serve the public’s need for information and transparency regarding College processes. Public communication occurs via phone, email and the website Contact Us page. The College’s primary mandate of protecting the public is enhanced through easy access to the College. As part of this mandate, the College has established a full-time Communications Coordinator position.

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2 Organizational Strategic Plan 2017-2022 College Council met on March 25, 2017 to develop a five-year Organizational Strategic Plan (2017–2022). A professional facilitator led the Council through an extensive process to finalize the plan. The new plan resulted in a new Vision statement and Mission statement:

OUR VISION

Ensuring the interests of the public are protected by enhancing the practice of psychology and engaging psychologists to excel.

OUR MISSION The College of Alberta Psychologists is the regulator for the profession of psychology in Alberta within a diverse, dynamic and increasingly complex discipline. We protect the public, by determining entry-to-practice requirements, enhancing psychologists’ ethical awareness, establishing standards of practice and ensuring that the profession holds the welfare of the people they serve as their highest duty. We are the regulatory voice for Alberta psychology - locally, nationally and globally. Our goal is to create compassionate, caring and competent psychologists. Six Strategic Objectives were approved:

1

ENSURE the ethical principles and standards of practice that govern the profession are enforced in a manner consistent with the stated values of the College and the legislative requirements - protecting the public, guiding the profession and instilling confidence in the self-regulated profession of psychology.

2

ENGAGE and connect with psychologists on a routine basis to foster and instill their commitment to both the profession and practice of psychology.

3

ENHANCE the profession by promoting psychologists practicing to their full scope of practice and examining expansion opportunities while simultaneously meeting our public protection mandate.

4

ENDORSE evidence-based decision-making in all applied and scientific activities as a critical element in defining professional psychology.

5

EXCEL as a regulator, implementing state of the art operations, leading edge technologies, and elegant, efficient and accessible systems.

6

ENCOURAGE and inspire psychologists to incorporate the principles of continuous learning, self-care and work-life balance into their professional identities thereby exemplifying the values of the profession.

all in keeping with the previous framework for the long-term objectives to: •

regulate the profession

foster development of the profession and of individual members of the profession

communicate with government and stakeholders

educate and inform the public

A copy of the Organizational Strategic Plan can be found on the College website. The College Council and staff look forward to implementing the new plan, and to continuing the work ahead. Annual Report 2016 - 2017

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3 Reports of Public Members Kenneth Bainey Mr. Bainey’s report was unavailable at the time of publication.

David Ellement The past year has been a busy and very productive time for the College. Council has committed itself to making numerous positive changes that will demonstrate the core values of the profession and the members of the College. Council has recognized that its most valuable resources are its members and staff. Council held a Strategic Planning Session in March of 2017. This resulted in a path to the future that captures the values and the mission of the College, and gave clear direction regarding how to achieve them. I am very proud to be a Public Member of such a caring and professional organization. I have watched how much the Council, members-at-large, staff and volunteers value the profession and work so very hard to make it even better. The citizens of Alberta are fortunate to be cared for by you, the College of Alberta Psychologists.

Michael D. McLaws It has been my pleasure and a privilege to be part of Council for the past three years. As in past years, the College saw another productive year of organizational development aimed at better serving the profession and the public. Amongst the College’s excellent work this year are three especially noteworthy achievements to which I would like to draw particular attention. First, the College retained a third party to conduct a review of its registration processes. That review identified several areas where Council could take steps to streamline the registration process for certain applicants, while clarifying it for others. The refinements are currently underway. Once complete, the registration process is expected to be a leader amongst regulators’ processes. Second, the College conducted a human resource review of administration to enhance its capability to serve the profession and the public. Third, Council prepared an exciting new five-year strategic plan that will serve as a road map, bringing together all its ongoing initiatives. These three key achievements, together with the other excellent and continued work of the College and its administration, volunteers and Council will ensure this organization remains a leader and a progressive and responsive professional regulator. In closing, I wish to note, as I have in years past, the outstanding talent, professionalism and respect shown by the members of Council. Its effectiveness and leadership, shown through the rigorous and respectful debate, motivation and tireless work of its members, is due to its diversity and should be applauded. Also, Council would not be able to do what it does without the tireless support of College administration. The College is a professional regulator of which all Albertans can be proud. I look forward to a continuing relationship with Council and the College in the future.

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Reports of the Advisory Committees


Reports of the Advisory Committees Practice Advisory Committee (PAC) The PAC is a standing committee established by Council. Its mandate is to advise Council about standards, ethics, practice and professional issues. The PAC also responds to members and the public regarding emerging issues related to the practice of psychology. These responses may take the form of letters, practice alerts or practice guidelines. The committee has continued to review and develop practice alerts and practice guidelines for Council consideration. The PAC will also continue to oversee the implementation of the Continuing Competence Program. A Continuing Competence Ad Hoc Committee was established to assist the College in meeting its Health Professions Act obligation to have a Continuing Competence Program in place for maintaining the ongoing competency of members. The status of the Continuing Competence Program is outlined above, in the Report of the Council. It will be fully activated once the government approves the regulations supporting the Continuing Competence Program.

Registration Advisory Committee (RAC) The RAC is a standing committee that acts in an advisory capacity to Council. The committee’s mandate is to review all aspects of the registration process and make recommendations to Council. Members discussed Council’s request that the College undergo a third-party review of its registration processes. The RAC also discussed the potential of providing an online oral exam with accompanying learning modules. Amendments to registration policies and to registration documents will be put forward to Council for consideration in the upcoming fiscal year.

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Report of the Registrar

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Report of the Registrar

4 Registration of College Members 4.1 Registration Process Under the Health Professions Act, the Registration Committee is mandated to consider applications for registration. The Registration Committee has three sub-committees: •

the Credentials Evaluation Sub-Committee (CESC), responsible for approving the academic credentials of applicants

the Registration Approvals Sub-Committee (RASC), responsible for approving supervision plans, evaluating documentation related to good character and reputation and issuing final approval of applicants who have completed the registration process

the Substantial Equivalency Sub-Committee (SESC), responsible for reviewing credentials and applications for the registration of applicants who do not meet registration requirements

Upon receiving approval of academic credentials, applicants apply to the College to become registered provisional psychologists. Additional registration requirements include: •

completion of 1,600 hours of evaluated, supervised practice under the supervision of a registered psychologist approved by the Registration Approvals Sub-Committee

passing the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology

successful completion of the ethics jurisprudence oral examination

obtaining documentation indicating they are of good character and reputation (including three professional references, a declaration of their fitness to practice, a criminal record check and a registration verification form)

To continue registration each year, regulated members of the College must provide the following information with their practice permit renewal application: •

a declaration that they maintain professional liability insurance coverage in an amount of no less than $1 million

a declaration that they have not been charged with or convicted of a criminal offence

a declaration that they have the capacity to safely serve the public interest

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4.2 Credentials Evaluation Sub-Committee (CESC) Panels of the sub-committee met six times in 2016–17 to review 351 new applications for evaluation of academic credentials. A total of 224 applications (new and existing) were approved. Three appeals to Council were filed this year. In one instance, Council rescinded a portion of the CESC decision and upheld the other portion of the decision. In the other two cases Council rescinded the CESC’s decision.

351

New applications reviewed for evaluation of academic credentials

224

Total applications (new and existing) approved

Table 1 Review of Academic Credentials Approvals (New and Existing) April 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017 Source

Approved

Alberta

99

Other Canadian provinces

54

Internationally trained/educated: United States

61

Outside North America

7

Appeals to Council

3

Total

224

Additionally, the Registrar reviewed 57 new and existing applications for evaluation of academic credentials. Table 2 Approval of Doctoral Credentials April 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017 Source

Approved

Alberta

2

Other Canadian provinces

7

Internationally trained/educated: United States

6

Outside North America

1

Appeals to Council

0

Total

16

Additionally, the Registrar reviewed and approved 42 applications for evaluation of doctoral credentials. No appeals were heard regarding the evaluation of doctoral credentials this fiscal year.

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4.3 Registration Applications After successfully completing the credentials evaluation, a candidate may apply for registration. As shown in Table 3 and Chart 1, the College received 305 applications for registration in 2016–17. This is an increase of 26 applicants (9%) from the 279 applications received last year.

305

New applications for registration

9%

Increase in new applications for registration since last year

Table 3 Applications for Registration April 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017 Type of Application

Applications

Provisional psychologists

274

Fast-tracking mechanisms

6

Re-instatements/re-applications

22

Courtesy registrants

3

Appeals to Council

0

Total

305

Chart 1 Total Number of Registration Applicants by Fiscal Year 350 300 2011-12: 255

250

2012-13: 264

200

2013-14: 274 2014-15: 235

150

2015-16: 279

100

2016-17: 305

50 0

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2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17


4.4 Registration Approvals Sub-Committee (RASC) The Registration Approvals Sub-Committee is responsible for approving supervision plans, evaluating documentation related to good character and reputation and issuing final approvals for applicants who have completed the registration process. Sub-committee members sit in panels of three or more. Nine meetings were held during 2016–17. In total, 818 files were reviewed—619 by the RASC and 199 by the Registrar under delegated authority.

818

2.5

Files reviewed

Years to complete all registration requirements, on average ( Includes 1600 hrs of supervised practice)

The sub-committee also reviewed applications for registration under the Agreement on Internal Trade, and applicants registered with another regulatory body of psychology in another jurisdiction, which are two fast-tracking mechanisms. Since the Agreement on Internal Trade was signed in August 2009, 42 applicants have applied from differing Canadian jurisdictions. At the end of the 2016–17 fiscal year, 695 registered provisional psychologists were registered with the College. It takes provisional psychologists, on average, less than 2.5 years to complete all registration requirements. Currently, 335 registered psychologists provide supervision to registered provisional psychologists. The number of supervisors is consistent with last year’s number.

335

Registered psychologists providing supervision to provisional psychologists.

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4.5 Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP) The Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology, which is administered by ASPPB, is a multiplechoice, computerized examination designed to establish an applicant’s familiarity with the core body of psychological knowledge foundational to clinical practice. While registered as provisional psychologists, applicants must take the EPPP and must obtain a score of 70% or higher. In this fiscal year, 309 provisional psychologists took the examination; 179 (58%) passed and 130 (42%) were unsuccessful.

309

58% 42%

Provisional psychologists took the EPPP

Passed Unsuccessful

4.6 Oral Examination The oral examination is an interview-format, face-to-face examination designed to assess whether applicants demonstrate a minimum standard of competence for independent practice and a minimum standard of knowledge and judgment in matters of jurisprudence and ethics. Three-member panels conduct the oral examination. Oral examinations were held five times in 2016–17. During this period, a large number of provisional psychologists (283) undertook the oral examination; 259 (92%) passed and 24 (8%) were unsuccessful. No appeals were received in this reporting period.

283

92% 8%

Provisional psychologists took the Oral exam.

Passed Unsuccessful

4.7 New Registrants During the fiscal year, 187 registered psychologists were added to the regulated members register, as follows: •

181 provisional psychologists through completion of the registration process

5 through the Agreement on Internal Trade

1 through another of the approved fast-tracking registration mechanisms (registered in another jurisdiction outside of North America)

187 24

Annual Report 2016 - 2017

Registered psychologists added to the register this fiscal year


4.8 Number of Members The total number of new registered psychologists has remained constant over the last few years at approximately 4.4% annual growth, with an increase of 3.75% this year. Chart 2 shows the number of regulated members of the College of Alberta Psychologists as of March 31, 2017.

3.75%

Increase in total number of registered psychologists this year

Average Age of Members

Provisional Psychologists

Registered Psychologists

37 48

85% 15%

75% 25%

Provisional Psychologist Registered Psychologist

Female Male

Female Male

Chart 2 Number of Regulated Members

2711

Registered Psychologists

695

Registered Provisional Psychologists

2

Courtesy Registrants

Between April 1, 2016 and March 31, 2017, 63 registered psychologists were taken off the general register. Of these, 41 retired and 22 cancelled. The majority were cancelled for non-payment of annual fees. As of March 31, 2017, 666 retired members were on the non-regulated register.

666

Retired members on the non-regulated register

Annual Report 2016 - 2017

25


4.9 Substantial Equivalency Sub-Committee Applicants who do not meet our registration requirements may, in some circumstances, apply for a substantial equivalency review in accordance with the Health Professions Act. Substantial equivalency is the process of determining the competence of an applicant based on a combination of the qualifications (education, experience, practice, etc.) required for registration as a regulated member. SESC members sit in panels of three or more and are appointed by Council from the Registration Committee. The College received three substantial equivalency review requests in the 2016–17 fiscal year; two were regarding substantial equivalency for the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology and one request was for the waiver of the 1600 hours of supervised practice. Of these requests, one EPPP request was approved and the other EPPP and request to waive supervised practice hours was denied. No requests were received for a substantial equivalency review of academic credentials. No appeals were filed to Council.

26

Annual Report 2016 - 2017


Complaint Process

Annual Report 2016 - 2017

27


Complaint Process The goal of the College is to protect the public by ensuring complaints are handled in a manner consistent with the principles of natural justice, including transparency, objectivity, independence and fairness. The College affords due process to both the complainant and the regulated member in compliance with our legislative obligation under the HPA. The Complaints Director is the College official mandated by the HPA to act on complaints about regulated members. Complaints are processed under Part 4 of the HPA. Members of the public who chose not to participate in the formal complaint process brought forward approximately 420 concerns. These concerns were satisfactorily resolved by various means, including mutually agreed-upon terms of resolution such as letters of clarification/apology, or by production of reports, files or invoices. Sometimes resolutions to these concerns simply involve taking the time to speak with individuals so that they feel heard. Typically, resolution agreements involve the complaints department communicating directly with the public and the psychologist to obtain a mutually agreeable solution, or encouraging the public to address the issues directly with the psychologist. Fifty-three complaints were open from previous fiscal years. Thirty-eight new complaints were filed in the 2016–17 fiscal year and 28 complaints were closed. In total, 91 complaints were active within this fiscal year.

38

Complaints opened in this fiscal year

28

Complaints closed

Most formal complaints are resolved by agreement, without proceeding to a hearing. This is consistent with the College’s mandate of protecting the public interest and enhancing the practice of psychology in a remedial manner when it is both reasonable and commensurate with the allegations. Importantly, remediation processes require the consent of all parties. The primary role of the College’s complaint process is public protection. Consent agreements, often involving terms such as ethics/practice reviews, apologies or letters of clarification, may offer several advantages to both parties in terms of timeliness and certainty of outcomes. Members of the public can play a more active role in identifying meaningful terms of resolution that speak directly to their issues. The process is typically less adversarial and more collaborative. Members of both the public and the profession are more likely to see the outcomes as reasonable and satisfying. Nevertheless, the seriousness and complexity of some complaints may warrant a hearing. Additionally, under existing legislation, the complainant and the psychologist must both agree to a negotiated resolution or an alternative complaint resolution. As a result, a hearing may be the only option available to the College if an agreement between the parties cannot be reached and sufficient evidence exists to suggest that the minimum expectations of professional practice have not been met. No new complaints received during the 2016–17 fiscal year were referred by the Complaints Director to the Hearings Director for a hearing. Hearing tribunals examine allegations of unprofessional conduct made against psychologists. Complaint review committees conduct reviews of the Complaints Director’s decisions. College Council appoints a

28

Annual Report 2016 - 2017


list of regulated members to serve on both the Hearing Tribunal and the Complaint Review Committee. Hearing Tribunals typically consist of two regulated members and one public member appointed by the government. Only one hearing was held in the 2016–17 fiscal year, this was related to a complaint from the previous fiscal year. The hearing was open to the public. The hearing tribunal was presented with agreedupon statements of facts and sanctions. While accepting the agreed-upon facts, they made additional sanctions. The investigated person appealed the hearing tribunal decision to Council and Council upheld the original Agreed Statement of Facts and Joint Submission on Sanctions as presented to the hearing tribunal. Complaints to the College are multifaceted, typically involving more than one issue/allegation. The most common allegations are competence, bias and unprofessional conduct. Allegations of bias typically arise from custody/access evaluations where one party does not believe their perspective is fully accepted. A second common complaint is when a professional opinion is rendered without direct and substantive professional contact. Competence is foundational to the profession of psychology and it is important that psychologists practice only in areas in which they can demonstrate their competence. It is equally important to maintain professionalism and to demonstrate respect and dignity for all. Allegations of unprofessional conduct are also frequently made when services do not meet expectations. Allegations of bias often arise when the psychologist seemingly accepts the perspective of one party over another. Psychologists are prohibited from providing a professional opinion that impacts an individual’s rights without direct and substantial contact with that person. The following charts and tables outline specific complaint information as at the end of the 2016–17 fiscal year. Chart 3 Total Number of Complaints Received by Fiscal Year

50 40

2011-12: 16 2012-13: 26

30

2013-14: 35 2014-15: 44

20

2015-16: 30 2016-17: 38

10 0

2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17

Annual Report 2016 - 2017

29


Table 4 Status of Open Complaints April 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017 Status

Number of Complaints*

Under investigation

40

Completing agreed-to terms of resolution

4

Forwarded to hearing (by the Complaint Review Committee)

0

Forwarded to hearing (by the Complaints Director)

1

Awaiting decision from Hearing Tribunal

0

Hearings held

1

Completing orders of Hearing Tribunal

6

Matters heard in Court of Appeal

0

Dismissed (within review request time period)

0

Dismissed, appealed and awaiting decision of Complaint Review Committee

1

Dismissed, appealed and review scheduled in next fiscal year

0

Section 118

0

Appeals to Council

1

Referred to ACR

0

Total

54

*Not indicative of total cases, as some open complaints contain more than one status.

Chart 4 New Complaints by Practice Area April 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017

30

Annual Report 2016 - 2017

19

Assesment

13

Counselling

6

Non-Practice Related


Table 5 New Complaints by Nature of Allegation April 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017 Nature of Allegation

Number of Complaints*

Professional boundaries

2

Competence

15

Breach of confidentiality

5

Supervision

2

Consent/informed consent

3

Fitness to practice

0

Bias

8

Insufficient professional knowledge in providing opinion

4

Failure to fulfill contract

0

Misrepresentation

1

Unprofessional behaviour

11

Billing practices

3

Record-keeping

3

Test administration

2

Continuity of care

2

Employer notification under section 57 of the HPA

3

Dual role

1

Failure to release client file upon request

1

Total

66

* Complaints typically contain more than one allegation.

Annual Report 2016 - 2017

31


Table 6 Status of Closed Complaints April 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017 Status

Number of Complaints

Dismissed (no request for review)

8

Dismissed (reviewed by Complaint Review Committee) and upheld

1

Dismissed (request for review received outside of 30-day limitation date, and not accepted)

2

Terms of resolution successfully completed

13

Complaint abandoned/withdrawn

1

Withdrew from practice

1

No jurisdiction to accept complaint

1

Orders of Hearing Tribunal completed

1

Court of Appeal

0

Total

28

Complaints to the Alberta Ombudsmun One Ombudsman complaint has been carried over from the previous fiscal year. The chief concern was the length of time the proceedings took to address a complaint. The College has provided a detailed response outlining the reasons for the delay. These included various attempts to resolve the complaint and the offer of a second hearing to address the sufficiency of reasons provided by the initial hearing tribunal. The office of the Ombudsman has not yet issued its decision. One new complaint to the Ombudsman was received during this reporting period. The complaint has two components: whether the College’s Acting Complaints Director’s decision to dismiss was administratively fair; and whether the Complaint Review Committee’s decision to not accept the complainant’s request for review was administratively fair. The Complaint Review Committee decided to not accept the request for review as the request for review was received five days past the 30-day limitation date outlined in the HPA. The office of the Ombudsman has not yet issued its decision.

Complaints to the Office of the Information Privacy Commissioner of Alberta (OIPC) No complaints to the OIPC were received about the College during this reporting period.

32

Annual Report 2016 - 2017


Treasurer’s Report Audited Financial Statements

Annual Report 2016 - 2017

33


Treasurer’s Report I am pleased to report on the fiscal status of the College for this past fiscal year. Once again, KPMG LLP served as auditors to the College of Alberta Psychologists. Audited financial statements for the College of Alberta Psychologists for the fiscal year April 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017 are provided in the following report. Council has tasked the Registrar to address any audit recommendations in order to ensure the College operates under fiscal best practices. Council expresses its thanks to College staff for their contribution to the sound fiscal management of the College.

Roger Gervais, PhD, RPsych Treasurer

34

Annual Report 2016 - 2017


Financial Statements of

COLLEGE OF ALBERTA PSYCHOLOGISTS Year ended March 31, 2017

Annual Report 2016 - 2017

35


KPMG LLP 2200, 10175-101 Street Edmonton Alberta T5J 0H3 Canada Tel (780) 429-7300 Fax (780) 429-7379

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT To the Members of the College of Alberta Psychologists We have audited the accompanying financial statements of the College of Alberta Psychologists, which comprise the statement of financial position as at March 31, 2017, the statements of operations, changes in net assets and cash flows for the year then ended, and notes, comprising a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information. Management’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with Canadian accounting standards for not-for-profit organizations, and for such internal control as management determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditors’ Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Canadian generally accepted auditing standards. Those standards require that we comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on our judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, we consider internal control relevant to the entity's preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity's internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion.

36

Annual Report 2016 - 2017


Opinion In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the College of Alberta Psychologists as at March 31, 2017 and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with Canadian accounting standards for not-forprofit organizations.

Chartered Professional Accountants August 1, 2017 Edmonton, Alberta

Annual Report 2016 - 2017

37


38

Annual Report 2016 - 2017


COLLEGE OF ALBERTA PSYCHOLOGISTS Statement of Operations

Year ended March 31, 2017, with comparative information for 2016 2017 Revenue: Annual membership fees Examinations Credentials evaluation committee Applications Investment income Sundry Legal fee recoveries Late payment penalty fees Grants

$

Expenses: Discipline Examinations Council Project, committee and task force Foreign qualification recognition project Credentials evaluation committee HPA compliance

2,191,583 154,350 107,675 56,450 54,579 18,708 14,764 14,700 2,612,809

2016

$

203,724 82,906 70,455 59,019 28,324 15,127 459,555

General administration: Salaries and benefits Rent Records management Bank charges and interest Office Repairs and maintenance Professional fees Amortization Licenses, dues and fees Website Insurance Newsletter and publications Gain on disposal of capital assets

179,520 72,572 68,046 17,936 8,049 33 346,156

1,027,719 154,663 97,575 79,685 72,137 68,147 51,368 21,384 15,104 4,778 4,138 730 (740) 1,596,688 2,056,243

Excess revenue over expenses

$

556,566

2,081,373 178,950 102,025 53,200 48,488 17,254 48,699 38,950 15,000 2,583,939

923,300 154,426 58,492 70,445 70,677 58,927 52,758 11,761 14,454 3,780 4,619 650 1,424,289 1,770,445 $

813,494

See accompanying notes to financial statements.

2 Annual Report 2016 - 2017

39


COLLEGE OF ALBERTA PSYCHOLOGISTS Statement of Changes in Net Assets Year ended March 31, 2017 Invested in capital assets Balance, beginning of year

$

Excess revenue (expenditures) Investment in capital assets $

10,561

38,135

(38,135)

3 Annual Report 2016 - 2017

2,623,233 577,210

See accompanying notes to financial statements.

40

$

(20,644)

28,052

2017 Total

Unrestricted

$

3,162,308

$

$

2,633,794

2016 Total $

1,820,300

556,566

813,494

-

-

3,190,360

$

2,633,794


COLLEGE OF ALBERTA PSYCHOLOGISTS Statement of Cash Flows

Year ended March 31, 2017, with comparative information for 2016 2017

2016

Cash provided by (used in): Operations: Excess revenue over expenses Adjustments for: Amortization Gain on disposal of capital assets Amortization of deferred lease inducement Change in non-cash operating working capital: Accounts receivable Prepaid expenses and deposits Accounts payable and accrued liabilities Deferred revenue

$

556,566

$

813,494

21,384 (740) -

11,761 (1,300)

(5,443) 1,211 54,250 216,065 843,293

(1,262) 7,166 (57,540) 197,463 969,782

(6,508) (6,508)

(8,073) (8,073)

(31,627) (853,553) (885,180)

(1,625,085) (1,625,085)

Decrease in cash position

(48,395)

(663,376)

Cash position, beginning of year

814,343

Financing: Repayment of obligations under capital lease Investments: Purchase of capital assets Purchase of investments

Cash position, end of year

$

765,948

1,477,719 $

814,343

During the year, the College paid interest of $1,499 (2016 - $1,862). See accompanying notes to financial statements.

4 Annual Report 2016 - 2017

41


COLLEGE OF ALBERTA PSYCHOLOGISTS Notes to Financial Statements Year ended March 31, 2017

College of Alberta Psychologists (the "College") is a not-for-profit organization continued under the Health Professions Act. The College's primary purpose is to regulate and monitor the practice of its members. It is exempt from the payment of income tax under the Income Tax Act. 1.

Significant accounting policies: These financial statements have been prepared by management in accordance with Canadian accounting standards for not-for-profit organizations in Part III of the CPA Canada Handbook. The College's significant accounting policies are as follows. (a) Revenue recognition: The College follows the deferral method of accounting. Any restricted grants received are recognized as revenue when the related expenses are incurred. Deferred fee revenue represents the fees received relating to a subsequent period. Revenues from annual membership fees, examinations, credentials evaluation committee and applications are recognized in the year in which the related services are provided and collection is reasonably assured. Revenue from legal fee recoveries is recognized when collection is reasonably assured. (b) Capital assets: Capital assets are recorded at cost. Amortization is provided using the straight-line method over the following periods: Asset

Period

Computer hardware Computer software Equipment under capital lease Furniture and equipment

5 years 3 years 5 years 5 years

Leasehold improvements are depreciated on a straight line basis over the shorter of the term of the lease and the estimated useful life of the asset.

5

42

Annual Report 2016 - 2017


COLLEGE OF ALBERTA PSYCHOLOGISTS Notes to Financial Statements (continued) Year ended March 31, 2017

1.

Significant accounting policies (continued): (c) Financial instruments and risk management: Financial instruments are recorded at fair value on initial recognition. Freestanding derivative instruments that are not in a qualifying hedging relationship and equity instruments that are quoted in an active market are subsequently measured at fair value. All other financial instruments are subsequently recorded at cost or amortized cost unless management has elected to carry the instruments at fair value. The College has elected to carry its investments at fair value. Transaction costs incurred on the acquisition of financial instruments measured subsequently at fair value are expensed as incurred. All other financial instruments are adjusted by transaction costs incurred on acquisition and financing costs, which are amortized using the straight line method. Financial assets are assessed for impairment on an annual basis at the end of the fiscal year if there are indicators of impairment. If there is an indicator of impairment, the College determines if there is a significant adverse change in the expected amount or timing of future cash flows from the financial asset. If there is a significant adverse change in the expected cash flows, the carrying value of the financial asset is reduced to the highest of the present value of the expected cash flows, the amount that could be realized from selling the financial asset or the amount the College expects to realize by exercising its right to any collateral. If events and circumstances reverse in a future period, an impairment loss will be reversed to the extent of the improvement, not exceeding the initial carrying value. (d) Use of estimates: The preparation of financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the year. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

6 Annual Report 2016 - 2017

43


COLLEGE OF ALBERTA PSYCHOLOGISTS Notes to Financial Statements (continued) Year ended March 31, 2017

2.

Investments: 2017 Cash Guaranteed investment certificates, bearing interest at 1.20% to 1.75% (2016 - 1.10% to 1.80%) maturing April 2017 to March 2019 (2016 - October 2016 to March 2019)

$

4,780,987

16,726

3,910,708 $

3,927,434

Capital assets:

Cost Computer hardware Computer software Leasehold improvements Equipment under capital lease Furniture and equipment

Annual Report 2016 - 2017

2017 Net book value

Accumulated amortization

2016 Net book value

$

74,067 47,341 54,033 26,974 105,090

$

55,697 44,901 54,033 1,798 98,223

$

18,370 2,440 25,176 6,867

$

6,382 815 6,024 3,921

$

307,505

$

254,652

$

52,853

$

17,142

7

44

$

3,408,175 $

3.

1,372,812

2016


COLLEGE OF ALBERTA PSYCHOLOGISTS Notes to Financial Statements (continued) Year ended March 31, 2017

4.

Obligations under capital lease: Future minimum lease payments under capital leases for equipment are as follows: 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022

$

Total minimum lease payments

30,653

Less amount representing interest at 9.33%

5,852

Present value of net minimum capital lease payments

24,801

Current portion of obligations under capital lease

4,658 $

5.

6,812 6,812 6,812 6,812 3,405

20,143

Commitments: The College occupies office space under an operating lease through May 2020. Approximate total annual base rental payments are as follows:

2018 2019 2020 2021

$

88,250 88,974 88,974 14,829

$

281,027

Under the terms of the lease for office space, the College is also responsible for its proportionate share of operating costs.

8 Annual Report 2016 - 2017

45


COLLEGE OF ALBERTA PSYCHOLOGISTS Notes to Financial Statements (continued) Year ended March 31, 2017

6.

Financial risks: The College has a risk management framework to monitor, evaluate and manage the principal risks assumed in investments. The risks that arise from transacting financial instruments include credit risk, liquidity risk, and price risk. Price risk arises from changes in interest rates, foreign currency exchange rates and market prices. The College does not use derivative financial instruments to alter the effects of these risks. Changes in interest rates and credit ratings are the main cause of changes in the fair value of the College's investments resulting in a favourable or unfavourable variance compared to current value. Interest rate risk is mitigated by managing maturity dates and payment frequency. Credit risk is mitigated by investing in high-grade bonds and debentures issued by financial institutions or similar entities. It is management's opinion that the College is not exposed to significant interest, currency or credit risk arising from its financial instruments.

7.

Comparative information: Certain comparative information has been reclassified to conform with the financial statement presentation adopted in the current year.

9

46

Annual Report 2016 - 2017


Council, Committee and Staff Members 2016-2017

Annual Report 2016 - 2017

47


Council, Committee and Staff Members, 2016–2017 Council President Past-President President-Elect Treasurer Members-at-Large Public Members Ex officio Members

Dr. Lorraine Stewart Dr. Roy Frenzel Mr. Paul Jerry Dr. Roger Gervais Dr. Kevin Alderson Mr. Terence Creighton Ms. Hanita Dagan Mr. Kenneth Bainey Mr. David Ellement Mr. Michael McLaws Dr. Richard Spelliscy Ms. Wendy El-Issa

Executive Committee of Council President Past-President President-Elect Treasurer Public Member

48

Annual Report 2016 - 2017

Dr. Dr. Mr. Dr. Mr.

Lorraine Stewart Roy Frenzel Paul Jerry Roger Gervais David Ellement


Advisory Committees Practice Advisory Committee Dr. Christoph Wuerscher, Chair

Dr. Brenda Mann

Dr. Jon Amundson

Dr. Garth Stewart

Dr. Lana Hawkins

Dr. Richard Spelliscy, ex officio

Dr. Shirley Karseboom

Mr. Aaron Block, ex officio

Mr. Owen Lai

Ms. Kathy Semchuk, ex officio

Mr. Rob McGarva

Continuing Competence Ad Hoc Committee Dr. Lorraine Breault

Dr. Christoph Wuerscher

Dr. Dennis Brown

Dr. Richard Spelliscy, ex officio

Mr. Paul Jerry

Ms. Kathy Semchuk, ex officio

Continuing Competence Consultants Dr. Dennis Brown

Dr. Christoph Wuerscher

Ms. Bonnie Rude-Weisman

Publications Committee Mr. Harvey Brink

Dr. Richard Spelliscy, ex officio

Dr. James Canniff

Ms. Melanie Rutten, ex officio

Mr. Paul Jerry

Registration Advisory Committee Dr. Christina Rinaldi, Chair

Dr. Greg Schoepp

Dr. Roy Frenzel

Dr. Jill Turner

Mr. Walter Goos

Dr. Richard Spelliscy, ex officio

Ms. Melody Hopchin

Ms. Ingrid Thompson, ex officio

Supervision Consultants Dr. Jon Amundson

Mr. Walter Goos

Annual Report 2016 - 2017

49


Adjudicative Committees Credentials Evaluation Sub-Committee Dr. Ali AL-Asadi, Chair

Dr. Helen Madill

Dr. Wendy Hawkins, Panel Chair

Dr. Koreen Martfeld

Dr. Lori Rossi, Panel Chair

Mr. Kenneth Reap

Ms. Amanda Baird

Ms. Christine Sribney

Dr. Marta Edgar

Dr. Richard Spelliscy, ex officio

Dr. Andrew Howell

Ms. Kymberly Wahoff, ex officio

Oral Examinations Committee Dr. Erik Wikman, Chair Panel Chairs:

Examiners:

Dr. Tanya Beran

Dr. Ali AL-Asadi

Dr. Lorraine Breault

Ms. Lana Bryanton

Mr. Theodore Cadman

Dr. Emma Climie

Dr. Sharon Cairns

Ms. Jeannine Crofton

Ms. Cheryl Chase

Mr. Lewis Dell

Dr. Judy Chew

Ms. Phoenix Friesen

Dr. Gerald Cossitt

Ms. Patricia Hagarty

Mr. Terence Creighton

Dr. Marianne Hrabok

Dr. Jim Eliuk

Ms. Joanna Jewell

Dr. Nancy Fisher

Ms. Shirley Karseboom

Dr. Andrew Haag

Ms. Soraya Lakhani

Ms. Lee Hackney

Ms. Jacqueline Leland

Dr. Teresita José

Mr. Yeung Yue Paul Lam

Dr. Stewart Longman

Ms. Connie Leclair

Dr. Richard Lucardie

Ms. Erin Makowsky

Dr. Andre Pierre Masson

Ms. Ashley Marsh Ms. Deena Martin Ms. Milena Meneghetti Ms. Jenny McAlister Dr. Dawn McBride Dr. Susan Middleton Dr. Janet Miller

50

Annual Report 2016 - 2017


Oral Examinations Committee Continued... Dr. Lynda Phillips Ms. Terilyn Pott Ms. Shauna Pupp Mr. Jesse Rabinovitch Ms. Sumerlee Samuels Mr. Devnath Sawh Dr. Kathleen Schwartzenberger Mr. John Streukens Dr. Jennifer Thannhauser Dr. Chee-Ping Tsai Ms. Caroline Walters Dr. Corrick Woodfin Dr. Theresa Zolner Dr. Richard Spelliscy, ex officio Ms. Danielle Salame, ex officio

Registration Approvals Sub-Committee Dr. Greg Schoepp, Co-Chair Dr. Jill Turner, Co-Chair

Dr. Adam McCrimmon

Dr. Jacqueline Pei, Panel Chair

Mr. Stanislaw Mlynczak

Ms. Anneta Alexandrovich

Ms. Rosemarie Nardella

Dr. Julia Burbidge

Dr. Noella Piquette

Ms. Dawn Chalas

Dr. Troy Rieck

Mr. Colin Collett

Dr. Linda Rose

Ms. Zuraida Dada

Ms. Stephanie Salamon

Dr. Daniel Garfinkel

Dr. James Sanders

Dr. Sheila Gothjelpsen

Ms. Aaryn Viczko

Ms. Carrie Laturnus

Dr. Richard Spelliscy, ex officio

Ms. Christine Lee

Ms. Ingrid Thompson, ex officio

Annual Report 2016 - 2017

51


Roster of Members: Hearing Tribunal and Complaint Review Committee Dr. Robert Acton

Dr. Monty Nelson

Dr. Ali AL-Asadi

Dr. Arlin Pachet

Dr. Lorraine Breault

Ms. Bonnie Rude-Weisman

Mr. Theodore Cadman

Dr. Greg Schoepp

Dr. Sharon Cairns

Dr. Erik Wikman

Dr. Irene Estay

Dr. Richard Spelliscy, ex officio

Dr. Teresita JosĂŠ

Ms. Lindsey Bowers, ex officio

Dr. Susann Laverty Ms. Elizabeth Massiah

Substantial Equivalency Sub-Committee Dr. Ali AL-Asadi, Chair

Dr. Jill Turner

Mr. Theodore Cadman

Dr. Richard Spelliscy, ex officio

Dr. Greg Schoepp

Ms. Ingrid Thompson, ex officio

Staff of the College of Alberta Psychologists

52

Registrar and Hearings Director (April 1, 2016 to January 31, 2017)

Dr. Alexandra Kinkaide

Registrar and Complaints Director (February 1, 2017 to March 31, 2017)

Dr. Richard Spelliscy

Assistant Deputy Registrar and Director of Professional Guidance

Mr. Aaron Block

Finance and Administration Coordinator

Ms. Wendy El-Issa

Complaints and Hearings Coordinator

Ms. Lindsey Bowers

Administrative Assistant to the Registrar

Ms. Kathy Semchuk

Registration Coordinator

Ms. Ingrid Thompson

Registration Assistant and Oral Examinations Coordinator

Ms. Danielle Salame

Credentials Evaluation Coordinator

Ms. Kymberly Wahoff

Communications Coordinator and Professional Guidance Assistant

Ms. Melanie Rutten

Receptionist/Office Assistant

Ms. Renetta Geisler

Annual Report 2016 - 2017


2100 Sun Life Place 10123 – 99 Street NW Edmonton, Alberta T5J 3H1 Phone: (780) 424-5070 Toll free: 1-800-659-0857 (in Alberta) Fax: (780) 420-1241 Email: psych@cap.ab.ca Website: www.cap.ab.ca

Annual report 2016-2017  

College of Alberta Psychologists' Annual Report for 2016-2017.

Annual report 2016-2017  

College of Alberta Psychologists' Annual Report for 2016-2017.