Page 1

BEALL’S HILL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


HILLTOP BELVEDERE: The vacant property at the top of Orange Terrace is a very special site in the neighborhood. The highly visible location rises above the Medical Center and provides a marvelous view of downtown and the river. The team proposed that this underutilized site be developed for housing that might include a lookout tower or hilltop belvedere that could be a signature landmark for the neighborhood. In the event that a parking garage is constructed on the Medical Center site across the street, liner buildings wrapping the garage structure should be incorporated in the design, perhaps with offices or apartments that reflect the character of the residential neighborhood. It is important to think of the street as a public space, with buildings on both sides of the street contributing to the character of the public realm.

STREETS AND SIDEWALKS: Streets in the neighborhood have wide and varying rights of way - 60 to 85 feet. The team suggested that these rights of way be made uniform and that some be reduced to 55 or 60 feet. This uniform dimension would accommodate sidewalk paving, street trees, and utilities. The team urged that existing sidewalks be repaired and made ADA accessible. “Little Richard” Penniman Boulevard is a pivotal road accessing the neighborhood. After reviewing the preliminary plans for the extension of “Little Richard,” the team recommended that careful attention be paid to the design, so that the final alignment and scale do not divide the neighborhood. The road should be built close to the existing railroad tracks, with neighborhood access at intersections on all major streets. New home sites could be located along the extension facing the street so that the boulevard is lined with the fronts of new houses rather than the backs of old ones. The space between the boulevard and railroad tracks should be developed as a linear park.

Charrette sketch of residential building and hilltop belvedere

BEALL’S HILL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

HOUSING: The neighborhood’s historic housing contributes to its unique character. The existing variety of housing types should be the framework for all future development within the neighborhood. Recognizing this strength, the team strongly encouraged preserving and renovating as many of the original structures in the neighborhood as possible. The drawing on the left shows lots on the north side of Oglethorpe Street being in-filled to recapture the historic pattern of large houses with spaces between them. Due to the grade change in this area, these new houses would sit several feet above street level and command a prominence and stature within the neighborhood fabric. As other areas in the neighborhood are in-filled, the new construction should reinforce rather than contrast with the existing architectural character of the neighborhood.

Proposed housing and neighborhood park on Oglethorpe Street

NEW HOUSES: The extensive amount of vacant land in Beall’s Hill offers a unique opportunity to build mixed-income housing for new homeowners, with minimal displacement of existing residents. The varying topography and lot sizes invite houses of various sizes and programs—and a wide-range of affordability. The new house types reflect the vernacular character of existing houses in the neighborhood and enhance the existing streetscape. Ayers/Saint/Gross, Architects + Planners developed 15 residential model units ranging in size from 600 square feet to 3,200 square feet. Auxiliary units above two-car garages are also permitted where alleys are designated. Curb cuts are minimized to permit continuous sidewalks and visibility of garage doors is prohibited from major streets. Infill houses are sited so as to be contextual with existing adjacent residential structures. Mixed-income prototypical housing developed by Ayers/Saint/Gross

HOPE VI: The team suggested slight modifications to the proposed HOPE VI plan. Suggestions included that houses on the periphery of the site should be constructed as duplexes and triplexes that have the look of large houses and the smaller townhouses should be located on the lanes at the interior of the site. This would be consistent with the historic block structure of the neighborhood, which had large homes on the streets and smaller homes on the lanes. A significant change to the urban fabric of the neighborhood is the continuation of two existing streets through the superblock that was created by Oglethorpe Homes. The revised plan creates a more porous fabric, and diminishes the negative impact of impenetrable superblock. Since the charrette in 2001 the public housing project has been demolished and new buildings are under construction. Construction photograph of Hope VI redevelopment of Oglethorpe Homes

LEGEND

LEGEND

Existing Buildings

Mercer University Existing Buildings Proposed Buildings

Mercer University

Open Space

Proposed Buildings 0

100'

Open Space

0

300'

500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities. 100' 300' 500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities.

STRATEGIC ACTIONS Development Incentives: Create additional incentives for the development of market-rate housing. Regulating Code: Consider an urban design code, tied to a master plan, that is consistent with the neighborhood’s historic character and pedestrian scale. The code will define and protect the character of the neighborhood’s residential streets and lanes, specify the residential, commercial, and mixed-use building types permitted, the types of frontages permitted, and the disposition of buildings on lots. Drainage: Purchase or swap property at the northwest corner of Telfair and Hazel for drainage and make aesthetic improvements. Funding: Seek non-traditional mortgage financing, bridge financing, and other financial leveraging through LISC, Enterprise, or Seedco, Freddie Mac, HUD and FHA. Street Design: Maintain parallel parking on all streets in the neighborhood, minimize curb cuts, and reduce intersection corner radii. Funding: Seek additional private sector funding for capacity building through Enterprise Foundation, Pew Charitable Trust, CRA funding for community development. Events: Establish a weekly Farmers’ Market in Tattnall Square Park. Street Design: Add metered on-street parking on all sides of the park (to add parking spaces, calm traffic and improve pedestrian character) and provide residents with parking stickers. Parks: Locate a basketball court in the Square or at another neighborhood park location. Tattnall Square: Remove cloth screening from the tennis courts or aesthetically conceal with landscaping. Safety: Bolster community policing with bicycle cops, patrol cars, and resident police officer on City property. Transit: Establish experimental trolley bus service connecting Tattnall Square to downtown; extend service to the HOPE VI site upon redevelopment. Events: Establish a “Parade of Homes” as soon as possible. Safety: Create a police kiosk for hourly stops by officers (and Federal Express pickups) at Lee’s corner store. Legal Issues: Take a comprehensive approach to clearing up confusion over old easements and unclear titles. Safety: Aggressively eliminate known illegal activities within the neighborhood. Parking: Offer incentives to reduce traffic congestion and parking demand, such as bus passes, live-where-you-work home mortgages, location efficient mortgages, cash-out parking at $3.00 per day, and complete shower facilities for bicyclists. Business Assistance: Mitigate effects on existing retailers from HOPE VI construction and relocation of residents. Bridges: Initiate appropriate action to redesign and rebuild the Hazel Street Bridge as a matter of environmental justice. Collaboration and Partnerships: Seek technical assistance to further partnerships and collaborations between faith-based institutions, Mercer, and other stakeholders.


HILLTOP BELVEDERE: The vacant property at the top of Orange Terrace is a very special site in the neighborhood. The highly visible location rises above the Medical Center and provides a marvelous view of downtown and the river. The team proposed that this underutilized site be developed for housing that might include a lookout tower or hilltop belvedere that could be a signature landmark for the neighborhood. In the event that a parking garage is constructed on the Medical Center site across the street, liner buildings wrapping the garage structure should be incorporated in the design, perhaps with offices or apartments that reflect the character of the residential neighborhood. It is important to think of the street as a public space, with buildings on both sides of the street contributing to the character of the public realm.

STREETS AND SIDEWALKS: Streets in the neighborhood have wide and varying rights of way - 60 to 85 feet. The team suggested that these rights of way be made uniform and that some be reduced to 55 or 60 feet. This uniform dimension would accommodate sidewalk paving, street trees, and utilities. The team urged that existing sidewalks be repaired and made ADA accessible. “Little Richard” Penniman Boulevard is a pivotal road accessing the neighborhood. After reviewing the preliminary plans for the extension of “Little Richard,” the team recommended that careful attention be paid to the design, so that the final alignment and scale do not divide the neighborhood. The road should be built close to the existing railroad tracks, with neighborhood access at intersections on all major streets. New home sites could be located along the extension facing the street so that the boulevard is lined with the fronts of new houses rather than the backs of old ones. The space between the boulevard and railroad tracks should be developed as a linear park.

Charrette sketch of residential building and hilltop belvedere

BEALL’S HILL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

HOUSING: The neighborhood’s historic housing contributes to its unique character. The existing variety of housing types should be the framework for all future development within the neighborhood. Recognizing this strength, the team strongly encouraged preserving and renovating as many of the original structures in the neighborhood as possible. The drawing on the left shows lots on the north side of Oglethorpe Street being in-filled to recapture the historic pattern of large houses with spaces between them. Due to the grade change in this area, these new houses would sit several feet above street level and command a prominence and stature within the neighborhood fabric. As other areas in the neighborhood are in-filled, the new construction should reinforce rather than contrast with the existing architectural character of the neighborhood.

PHASE I:  Branding  the  Lifestyle  

Proposed housing and neighborhood park on Oglethorpe Street

NEW HOUSES: The extensive amount of vacant land in Beall’s Hill offers a unique opportunity to build mixed-income housing for new homeowners, with minimal displacement of existing residents. The varying topography and lot sizes invite houses of various sizes and programs—and a wide-range of affordability. The new house types reflect the vernacular character of existing houses in the neighborhood and enhance the existing streetscape. Ayers/Saint/Gross, Architects + Planners developed 15 residential model units ranging in size from 600 square feet to 3,200 square feet. Auxiliary units above two-car garages are also permitted where alleys are designated. Curb cuts are minimized to permit continuous sidewalks and visibility of garage doors is prohibited from major streets. Infill houses are sited so as to be contextual with existing adjacent residential structures.

For the  past  year  the  College  Hill  Corridor  Commission  and   the   College   Hill   Alliance   have   undertaken   a   number   of   activities  (events,   media,  speaking   engagements)  designed   to  brand  the  College  Hill  Corridor,  and  attract  residents  to   the   quality   of   life   available   in   it’s   neighborhoods.     The   emphasis   of   these   efforts   has   been   on   promoting   safe   neighborhoods,   affordable   homes,   and   walking   proximity   to   work,   schools,   churches,   hospitals,   and   recreational   facilities.

Mixed-income prototypical housing developed by Ayers/Saint/Gross

HOPE VI: The team suggested slight modifications to the proposed HOPE VI plan. Suggestions included that houses on the periphery of the site should be constructed as duplexes and triplexes that have the look of large houses and the smaller townhouses should be located on the lanes at the interior of the site. This would be consistent with the historic block structure of the neighborhood, which had large homes on the streets and smaller homes on the lanes. A significant change to the urban fabric of the neighborhood is the continuation of two existing streets through the superblock that was created by Oglethorpe Homes. The revised plan creates a more porous fabric, and diminishes the negative impact of impenetrable superblock. Since the charrette in 2001 the public housing project has been demolished and new buildings are under construction.

Construction photograph of Hope VI redevelopment of Oglethorpe Homes

LEGEND

LEGEND

Existing Buildings

Mercer University Existing Buildings

Proposed Buildings

Mercer University

Open Space

Proposed Buildings 0

100'

Open Space

0

300'

500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities. 100' 300' 500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities.

STRATEGIC ACTIONS Development Incentives: Create additional incentives for the development of market-rate housing. Regulating Code: Consider an urban design code, tied to a master plan, that is consistent with the neighborhood’s historic character and pedestrian scale. The code will define and protect the character of the neighborhood’s residential streets and lanes, specify the residential, commercial, and mixed-use building types permitted, the types of frontages permitted, and the disposition of buildings on lots. Drainage: Purchase or swap property at the northwest corner of Telfair and Hazel for drainage and make aesthetic improvements. Funding: Seek non-traditional mortgage financing, bridge financing, and other financial leveraging through LISC, Enterprise, or Seedco, Freddie Mac, HUD and FHA. Street Design: Maintain parallel parking on all streets in the neighborhood, minimize curb cuts, and reduce intersection corner radii. Funding: Seek additional private sector funding for capacity building through Enterprise Foundation, Pew Charitable Trust, CRA funding for community development. Events: Establish a weekly Farmers’ Market in Tattnall Square Park. Street Design: Add metered on-street parking on all sides of the park (to add parking spaces, calm traffic and improve pedestrian character) and provide residents with parking stickers. Parks: Locate a basketball court in the Square or at another neighborhood park location. Tattnall Square: Remove cloth screening from the tennis courts or aesthetically conceal with landscaping. Safety: Bolster community policing with bicycle cops, patrol cars, and resident police officer on City property. Transit: Establish experimental trolley bus service connecting Tattnall Square to downtown; extend service to the HOPE VI site upon redevelopment. Events: Establish a “Parade of Homes” as soon as possible. Safety: Create a police kiosk for hourly stops by officers (and Federal Express pickups) at Lee’s corner store. Legal Issues: Take a comprehensive approach to clearing up confusion over old easements and unclear titles. Safety: Aggressively eliminate known illegal activities within the neighborhood. Parking: Offer incentives to reduce traffic congestion and parking demand, such as bus passes, live-where-you-work home mortgages, location efficient mortgages, cash-out parking at $3.00 per day, and complete shower facilities for bicyclists. Business Assistance: Mitigate effects on existing retailers from HOPE VI construction and relocation of residents. Bridges: Initiate appropriate action to redesign and rebuild the Hazel Street Bridge as a matter of environmental justice. Collaboration and Partnerships: Seek technical assistance to further partnerships and collaborations between faith-based institutions, Mercer, and other stakeholders.


HILLTOP BELVEDERE: The vacant property at the top of Orange Terrace is a very special site in the neighborhood. The highly visible location rises above the Medical Center and provides a marvelous view of downtown and the river. The team proposed that this underutilized site be developed for housing that might include a lookout tower or hilltop belvedere that could be a signature landmark for the neighborhood. In the event that a parking garage is constructed on the Medical Center site across the street, liner buildings wrapping the garage structure should be incorporated in the design, perhaps with offices or apartments that reflect the character of the residential neighborhood. It is important to think of the street as a public space, with buildings on both sides of the street contributing to the character of the public realm.

STREETS AND SIDEWALKS: Streets in the neighborhood have wide and varying rights of way - 60 to 85 feet. The team suggested that these rights of way be made uniform and that some be reduced to 55 or 60 feet. This uniform dimension would accommodate sidewalk paving, street trees, and utilities. The team urged that existing sidewalks be repaired and made ADA accessible. “Little Richard” Penniman Boulevard is a pivotal road accessing the neighborhood. After reviewing the preliminary plans for the extension of “Little Richard,” the team recommended that careful attention be paid to the design, so that the final alignment and scale do not divide the neighborhood. The road should be built close to the existing railroad tracks, with neighborhood access at intersections on all major streets. New home sites could be located along the extension facing the street so that the boulevard is lined with the fronts of new houses rather than the backs of old ones. The space between the boulevard and railroad tracks should be developed as a linear park.

Charrette sketch of residential building and hilltop belvedere

BEALL’S HILL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

HOUSING: The neighborhood’s historic housing contributes to its unique character. The existing variety of housing types should be the framework for all future development within the neighborhood. Recognizing this strength, the team strongly encouraged preserving and renovating as many of the original structures in the neighborhood as possible. The drawing on the left shows lots on the north side of Oglethorpe Street being in-filled to recapture the historic pattern of large houses with spaces between them. Due to the grade change in this area, these new houses would sit several feet above street level and command a prominence and stature within the neighborhood fabric. As other areas in the neighborhood are in-filled, the new construction should reinforce rather than contrast with the existing architectural character of the neighborhood.

Phase II:  Identify  Project  Scope Proposed housing and neighborhood park on Oglethorpe Street

The Alliance  has  been  working  with  the  neighborhood   association   to   reinforce   their   efforts   to   ensure   a   sustainable  quality  of   life.    Those  efforts   included   (1)   identifying   and   prioritizing   issues   of   concern   to   the   residents,   and   (2)   an   inventory   of   properties   owned   by   the   Land   Bank   Authority,   Historic   Hills   &   Heights,   Mercer  University,  and   Historic  Macon.    Approximately   65   properties   are   currently   owned   by   these   four   organizations,   with   an   additional   14   properties   identiOied   by   the   neighborhood   for   possible   demolition. NEW HOUSES: The extensive amount of vacant land in Beall’s Hill offers a unique opportunity to build mixed-income housing for new homeowners, with minimal displacement of existing residents. The varying topography and lot sizes invite houses of various sizes and programs—and a wide-range of affordability. The new house types reflect the vernacular character of existing houses in the neighborhood and enhance the existing streetscape. Ayers/Saint/Gross, Architects + Planners developed 15 residential model units ranging in size from 600 square feet to 3,200 square feet. Auxiliary units above two-car garages are also permitted where alleys are designated. Curb cuts are minimized to permit continuous sidewalks and visibility of garage doors is prohibited from major streets. Infill houses are sited so as to be contextual with existing adjacent residential structures.

Mixed-income prototypical housing developed by Ayers/Saint/Gross

HOPE VI: The team suggested slight modifications to the proposed HOPE VI plan. Suggestions included that houses on the periphery of the site should be constructed as duplexes and triplexes that have the look of large houses and the smaller townhouses should be located on the lanes at the interior of the site. This would be consistent with the historic block structure of the neighborhood, which had large homes on the streets and smaller homes on the lanes. A significant change to the urban fabric of the neighborhood is the continuation of two existing streets through the superblock that was created by Oglethorpe Homes. The revised plan creates a more porous fabric, and diminishes the negative impact of impenetrable superblock. Since the charrette in 2001 the public housing project has been demolished and new buildings are under construction.

Construction photograph of Hope VI redevelopment of Oglethorpe Homes

LEGEND

LEGEND

Existing Buildings

Mercer University Existing Buildings

Proposed Buildings

Mercer University

Open Space

Proposed Buildings 0

100'

Open Space

0

300'

500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities. 100' 300' 500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities.

STRATEGIC ACTIONS Development Incentives: Create additional incentives for the development of market-rate housing. Regulating Code: Consider an urban design code, tied to a master plan, that is consistent with the neighborhood’s historic character and pedestrian scale. The code will define and protect the character of the neighborhood’s residential streets and lanes, specify the residential, commercial, and mixed-use building types permitted, the types of frontages permitted, and the disposition of buildings on lots. Drainage: Purchase or swap property at the northwest corner of Telfair and Hazel for drainage and make aesthetic improvements. Funding: Seek non-traditional mortgage financing, bridge financing, and other financial leveraging through LISC, Enterprise, or Seedco, Freddie Mac, HUD and FHA. Street Design: Maintain parallel parking on all streets in the neighborhood, minimize curb cuts, and reduce intersection corner radii. Funding: Seek additional private sector funding for capacity building through Enterprise Foundation, Pew Charitable Trust, CRA funding for community development. Events: Establish a weekly Farmers’ Market in Tattnall Square Park. Street Design: Add metered on-street parking on all sides of the park (to add parking spaces, calm traffic and improve pedestrian character) and provide residents with parking stickers. Parks: Locate a basketball court in the Square or at another neighborhood park location. Tattnall Square: Remove cloth screening from the tennis courts or aesthetically conceal with landscaping. Safety: Bolster community policing with bicycle cops, patrol cars, and resident police officer on City property. Transit: Establish experimental trolley bus service connecting Tattnall Square to downtown; extend service to the HOPE VI site upon redevelopment. Events: Establish a “Parade of Homes” as soon as possible. Safety: Create a police kiosk for hourly stops by officers (and Federal Express pickups) at Lee’s corner store. Legal Issues: Take a comprehensive approach to clearing up confusion over old easements and unclear titles. Safety: Aggressively eliminate known illegal activities within the neighborhood. Parking: Offer incentives to reduce traffic congestion and parking demand, such as bus passes, live-where-you-work home mortgages, location efficient mortgages, cash-out parking at $3.00 per day, and complete shower facilities for bicyclists. Business Assistance: Mitigate effects on existing retailers from HOPE VI construction and relocation of residents. Bridges: Initiate appropriate action to redesign and rebuild the Hazel Street Bridge as a matter of environmental justice. Collaboration and Partnerships: Seek technical assistance to further partnerships and collaborations between faith-based institutions, Mercer, and other stakeholders.


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Proposed Buildings

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Open Space

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Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities. 100' 300' 500'

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Existing Buildings

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LEGEND

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Construction photograph of Hope VI redevelopment of Oglethorpe Homes

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HOPE VI: The team suggested slight modifications to the proposed HOPE VI plan. Suggestions included that houses on the periphery of the site should be constructed as duplexes and triplexes that have the look of large houses and the smaller townhouses should be located on the lanes at the interior of the site. This would be consistent with the historic block structure of the neighborhood, which had large homes on the streets and smaller homes on the lanes. A significant change to the urban fabric of the neighborhood is the continuation of two existing streets through the superblock that was created by Oglethorpe Homes. The revised plan creates a more porous fabric, and diminishes the negative impact of impenetrable superblock. Since the charrette in 2001 the public housing project has been demolished and new buildings are under construction. 56

58

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Demolition

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Historic Hills & Heights

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NEW HOUSES: The extensive amount of vacant land in Beall’s Hill offers a unique opportunity to build mixed-income housing for new homeowners, with minimal displacement of existing residents. The varying topography and lot sizes invite houses of various sizes and programs—and a wide-range of affordability. The new house types reflect the vernacular character of existing houses in the neighborhood and enhance the existing streetscape. Ayers/Saint/Gross, Architects + Planners developed 15 residential model units ranging in size from 600 square feet to 3,200 square feet. Auxiliary units above two-car garages are also permitted where alleys are designated. Curb cuts are minimized to permit continuous sidewalks and visibility of garage doors is prohibited from major streets. Infill houses are sited so as to be contextual with existing adjacent residential structures. 11

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Zoning Districts

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636

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8

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6

6

12

20 13

35 13

0-

70

76 77

772-70

15

6

73

14

813 809

8

79

84

0

13

84

144

79

845

74

-5 57 14

-17

42-3

Proposed730 housing and neighborhood park on Oglethorpe Street 72

5-5 1

1/ 40 14 48

-2 1-19

854

9

744-

1

14

50 14

833 827-23

864

7

84

-5

2

72 8-7 84

839

R-2 85

6

752-

0

688

6 3

59

7

77

78

85

6

5

75

80

86

1-

13

78

845

81

6

-6

6

6-

754-

4

6

67

92 30

34

-3

39

80

14

14

2

2-

-3

1

-2

4

81

834

86

75

69

840

87

8

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71

844

4

75

59

7-75

74

850

88

4

12

-7

13

13 7 -7 79

17

2

849

860

76

66

83

77

76

25 14

5-

2

14

44

31 82

83

851

880

8

12 74 12

25 13

78

13

-5

3-

8

863 855

4

8

21 12

37 12 45 12 55 12 71

07

9-

2

7 -6 69

7

83

95

14

6

13

83 84

14

869

884

89

4

12

85 12

91

13 15 13

79

73

9

6

28

85

13

2

82

890

0

77

-85

43 22 -2 34

3-

13

6

-3

46

85

86

78

894

90

8

87

4 -1 16 4-2 26 12 12 1239 42 .34

5

0

-5

0

77

74

71 1

62

4

12

81

54

87

14 37 14

-4

48

53 12 12 6

12 1257 54 -6 12 12 73 74

6

13

8

25

87

6

5 80

5 86

6

59 14

81

78

77

91 1

870

1

32

2

87

1

764-

758-

78

80 12 81

8-

79

9

874

772 2

76

4-

13

33

7 88

8

79

-7

88

71

7

91

28

12

83

74

9

2

58

5 92

0-

11

27 12

12

6

13

07 14

89

14

93

36

19

14

9

8-

80

2-

32 -3

93

44

83

7

82

93

46 14

6 -5

1

6-

46

32 13

82

8-

5-

68

7

84

1

8

44

29

13

90 13

6

88

3

4

10

0 -2 12 28 12

40 13

84

4

14

9-

94

94

85

1

82

13

47

3

30 14

76

90

7

8

12

64 12 78 12

13

13

13

9

13 56 13

13

13

14 14

91

80

89

5

14

84 14 90

94

95

88

-27 29 11

11 -73

79 11

19 12 29 12 37 12 49 12 57 12 71 12 77

84 12

90 2-9 94

86

29

13

91

6

88

9

4

20

35 13 47

13

68

7

91

89

97

638

83

12

7

HOUSING: The neighborhood’s historic housing contributes to its unique character. The existing variety of housing types should be the framework for all future development within the neighborhood. Recognizing this strength, the team strongly encouraged preserving and renovating as many of the original structures in the neighborhood as possible. The drawing on the left shows lots on the north side of Oglethorpe Street being in-filled to recapture the historic pattern of large houses with spaces between them. Due to the grade change in this area, these new houses would sit several feet above street level and command a prominence and stature within the neighborhood fabric. As other areas in the neighborhood are in-filled, the new construction should reinforce rather than contrast with the existing architectural character of the neighborhood. 644

4

86

11

87

08

25

9

85

13

13

2 -6

81

44 14

91 8

64 14 70

86

HPD-BH

5 13

14

92 2

92

14

88

657

BEALL’S HILL R-3 DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY M-1 PROPERTY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OWNERSHIP

2

12

1

23

13

5 -5

9

2

94

-9

32

20 12 12 12 17 32

37 12 12 40 29 4 -0 06

5

13 7

94

-6

0

3

32

45 14 57 14 65 14 3

90

90

57

7

95

94

87

84

69

96

14

33

97

-7 81 14

3

4

13

9

8

14

20

14

97

91

31

13 07

96

6-

88

85

14

86

15

4-

96

85

9

45 13 42 1339

65 13 1351 54

13

22

99

14

91

13

13

15

92

81 -7 13 3 76

10

3

2

13

88

30

13

10

93

CBD-2

665

668

12

329

13

74 13

85

40

13

10

710

2

12 12 45 48 64

38

-3

13 60 13

35

Charrette sketch of residential building and hilltop belvedere

9

6-6 72 12

80 12

10 34 6-

41

-3

7-

4 -4 13

13 71

10

13

56

14

10

90

13

55

94

46

57

800

M-1

5

22

89

22

7-

92

10

4-

90

13

37 13 47 13

69

55

10

91 92

12

79

13 47 13 13 46 41 -4 4 13

13 1359 64 -5 2

65 13

95

3

11

67 2 -2

55 2 -8 84 12

08

35

13

10

5

34

12

16

31

66

13

8-

90

26

10

31

28 -3 46 12 60 12

76 12

93

42 13

12

10

13

54

36

9-

92 93

0

9

10

93

0-

12 63 12

06 13

75 12

31

46

5

75

41 12

94

11

12

12

3

12

95

6

38

9

94

46

95

4

12

7

0

12

96

HR-3

0

13

27

5

82

95

69

0

50

97

4-

99

64

10

98

4

2

8 -6

47

19 12

1

2-5

2

0

-45

5

93 94

4-

92

7

7-9

96 97

98

5-

5

9

7

11

9 -5 64 12

54

3

12

-7

-7 72

98

8

0

75 12 15 13

08

29

13

13

26 13

10

93 94

95

96 97

22

12

94 12

1

98

98

7

5

5

3

43

54

98

82 88

STREETS AND SIDEWALKS: Streets in the neighborhood have wide and varying rights of way - 60 to 85 feet. The team suggested that these rights of way be made uniform and that some be reduced to 55 or 60 feet. This uniform dimension would accommodate sidewalk paving, street trees, and utilities. The team urged that existing sidewalks be repaired and made ADA accessible. “Little Richard” Penniman Boulevard is a pivotal road accessing the neighborhood. After reviewing the preliminary plans for the extension of “Little Richard,” the team recommended that careful attention be paid to the design, so that the final alignment and scale do not divide the neighborhood. The road should be built close to the existing railroad tracks, with neighborhood access at intersections on all major streets. New home sites could be located along the extension facing the street so that the boulevard is lined with the fronts of new houses rather than the backs of old ones. The space between the boulevard and railroad tracks should be developed as a linear park.

65

10 10

9

04

4

7

61

89 8-

21

3-

33

61

12

80

99

12

95

5

96

78

92

5-

65

10

10

90

60

11

99

4

98

73

6

HILLTOP BELVEDERE: The vacant property at the top of Orange Terrace is a very special site in the neighborhood. The highly visible location rises above the Medical Center and provides a marvelous view of downtown and the river. The team proposed that this underutilized site be developed for housing that might include a lookout tower or hilltop belvedere that could be a signature landmark for the neighborhood. In the event that a parking garage is constructed on the Medical Center site across the street, liner buildings wrapping the garage structure should be incorporated in the design, perhaps with offices or apartments that reflect the character of the residential neighborhood. It is important to think of the street as a public space, with buildings on both sides of the street contributing to the character of the public realm.

95 2-

8

2

66

-2

47

12

12

08

99

10

10

25

12

10

39

68

71 12

18

-6 11 3 60

10

31

12

24

-71

10

96 98

5 96

3

1

11 57 11 48

28

11 11 87 90 -75 -88

25

10

12

56

12

34

-3-

7-5

8

5

11

16

91

11 11 45 48 11 -40 37 -32 -2 1129 624 11

0 -7 -74 -78

10

63

12

40

82

10

11

49

46

46

-4

4

12

10

-1

90

62

34 11 46 11

58 11 66

35

30

12

12

52

12

2-

5-3

0

-6

7-

98

4

74

68

-8

HPD 99

92

82

25 11

11

97

2

0

11

2

9

6

88

12

70

94

93

74 11

11 12

6 -4 48 12

23

10

12

80

6

10

74

86

10

84

92

1

10

37

96 93

6

92

7

3 10

8

10

2 11

32 12

26

96

95

10

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities.

STRATEGIC ACTIONS Development Incentives: Create additional incentives for the development of market-rate housing. Regulating Code: Consider an urban design code, tied to a master plan, that is consistent with the neighborhood’s historic character and pedestrian scale. The code will define and protect the character of the neighborhood’s residential streets and lanes, specify the residential, commercial, and mixed-use building types permitted, the types of frontages permitted, and the disposition of buildings on lots. Drainage: Purchase or swap property at the northwest corner of Telfair and Hazel for drainage and make aesthetic improvements. Funding: Seek non-traditional mortgage financing, bridge financing, and other financial leveraging through LISC, Enterprise, or Seedco, Freddie Mac, HUD and FHA. Street Design: Maintain parallel parking on all streets in the neighborhood, minimize curb cuts, and reduce intersection corner radii. Funding: Seek additional private sector funding for capacity building through Enterprise Foundation, Pew Charitable Trust, CRA funding for community development. Events: Establish a weekly Farmers’ Market in Tattnall Square Park. Street Design: Add metered on-street parking on all sides of the park (to add parking spaces, calm traffic and improve pedestrian character) and provide residents with parking stickers. Parks: Locate a basketball court in the Square or at another neighborhood park location. Tattnall Square: Remove cloth screening from the tennis courts or aesthetically conceal with landscaping. Safety: Bolster community policing with bicycle cops, patrol cars, and resident police officer on City property. Transit: Establish experimental trolley bus service connecting Tattnall Square to downtown; extend service to the HOPE VI site upon redevelopment. Events: Establish a “Parade of Homes” as soon as possible. Safety: Create a police kiosk for hourly stops by officers (and Federal Express pickups) at Lee’s corner store. Legal Issues: Take a comprehensive approach to clearing up confusion over old easements and unclear titles. Safety: Aggressively eliminate known illegal activities within the neighborhood. Parking: Offer incentives to reduce traffic congestion and parking demand, such as bus passes, live-where-you-work home mortgages, location efficient mortgages, cash-out parking at $3.00 per day, and complete shower facilities for bicyclists. Business Assistance: Mitigate effects on existing retailers from HOPE VI construction and relocation of residents. Bridges: Initiate appropriate action to redesign and rebuild the Hazel Street Bridge as a matter of environmental justice. Collaboration and Partnerships: Seek technical assistance to further partnerships and collaborations between faith-based institutions, Mercer, and other stakeholders.


HILLTOP BELVEDERE: The vacant property at the top of Orange Terrace is a very special site in the neighborhood. The highly visible location rises above the Medical Center and provides a marvelous view of downtown and the river. The team proposed that this underutilized site be developed for housing that might include a lookout tower or hilltop belvedere that could be a signature landmark for the neighborhood. In the event that a parking garage is constructed on the Medical Center site across the street, liner buildings wrapping the garage structure should be incorporated in the design, perhaps with offices or apartments that reflect the character of the residential neighborhood. It is important to think of the street as a public space, with buildings on both sides of the street contributing to the character of the public realm.

STREETS AND SIDEWALKS: Streets in the neighborhood have wide and varying rights of way - 60 to 85 feet. The team suggested that these rights of way be made uniform and that some be reduced to 55 or 60 feet. This uniform dimension would accommodate sidewalk paving, street trees, and utilities. The team urged that existing sidewalks be repaired and made ADA accessible. “Little Richard” Penniman Boulevard is a pivotal road accessing the neighborhood. After reviewing the preliminary plans for the extension of “Little Richard,” the team recommended that careful attention be paid to the design, so that the final alignment and scale do not divide the neighborhood. The road should be built close to the existing railroad tracks, with neighborhood access at intersections on all major streets. New home sites could be located along the extension facing the street so that the boulevard is lined with the fronts of new houses rather than the backs of old ones. The space between the boulevard and railroad tracks should be developed as a linear park.

THE INVESTORS

Charrette sketch of residential building and hilltop belvedere

BEALL’S HILL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

HOUSING: The neighborhood’s historic housing contributes to its unique character. The existing variety of housing types should be the framework for all future development within the neighborhood. Recognizing this strength, the team strongly encouraged preserving and renovating as many of the original structures in the neighborhood as possible. The drawing on the left shows lots on the north side of Oglethorpe Street being in-filled to recapture the historic pattern of large houses with spaces between them. Due to the grade change in this area, these new houses would sit several feet above street level and command a prominence and stature within the neighborhood fabric. As other areas in the neighborhood are in-filled, the new construction should reinforce rather than contrast with the existing architectural character of the neighborhood.

Proposed housing and neighborhood park on Oglethorpe Street

NEW HOUSES: The extensive amount of vacant land in Beall’s Hill offers a unique opportunity to build mixed-income housing for new homeowners, with minimal displacement of existing residents. The varying topography and lot sizes invite houses of various sizes and programs—and a wide-range of affordability. The new house types reflect the vernacular character of existing houses in the neighborhood and enhance the existing streetscape. Ayers/Saint/Gross, Architects + Planners developed 15 residential model units ranging in size from 600 square feet to 3,200 square feet. Auxiliary units above two-car garages are also permitted where alleys are designated. Curb cuts are minimized to permit continuous sidewalks and visibility of garage doors is prohibited from major streets. Infill houses are sited so as to be contextual with existing adjacent residential structures.

!

!

Mixed-income prototypical housing developed by Ayers/Saint/Gross

HOPE VI: The team suggested slight modifications to the proposed HOPE VI plan. Suggestions included that houses on the periphery of the site should be constructed as duplexes and triplexes that have the look of large houses and the smaller townhouses should be located on the lanes at the interior of the site. This would be consistent with the historic block structure of the neighborhood, which had large homes on the streets and smaller homes on the lanes. A significant change to the urban fabric of the neighborhood is the continuation of two existing streets through the superblock that was created by Oglethorpe Homes. The revised plan creates a more porous fabric, and diminishes the negative impact of impenetrable superblock. Since the charrette in 2001 the public housing project has been demolished and new buildings are under construction. Construction photograph of Hope VI redevelopment of Oglethorpe Homes

LEGEND

LEGEND

Existing Buildings

Mercer University Existing Buildings Proposed Buildings

Mercer University

Open Space

Proposed Buildings 0

100'

Open Space

0

300'

500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities. 100' 300' 500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities.

STRATEGIC ACTIONS Development Incentives: Create additional incentives for the development of market-rate housing. Regulating Code: Consider an urban design code, tied to a master plan, that is consistent with the neighborhood’s historic character and pedestrian scale. The code will define and protect the character of the neighborhood’s residential streets and lanes, specify the residential, commercial, and mixed-use building types permitted, the types of frontages permitted, and the disposition of buildings on lots. Drainage: Purchase or swap property at the northwest corner of Telfair and Hazel for drainage and make aesthetic improvements. Funding: Seek non-traditional mortgage financing, bridge financing, and other financial leveraging through LISC, Enterprise, or Seedco, Freddie Mac, HUD and FHA. Street Design: Maintain parallel parking on all streets in the neighborhood, minimize curb cuts, and reduce intersection corner radii. Funding: Seek additional private sector funding for capacity building through Enterprise Foundation, Pew Charitable Trust, CRA funding for community development. Events: Establish a weekly Farmers’ Market in Tattnall Square Park. Street Design: Add metered on-street parking on all sides of the park (to add parking spaces, calm traffic and improve pedestrian character) and provide residents with parking stickers. Parks: Locate a basketball court in the Square or at another neighborhood park location. Tattnall Square: Remove cloth screening from the tennis courts or aesthetically conceal with landscaping. Safety: Bolster community policing with bicycle cops, patrol cars, and resident police officer on City property. Transit: Establish experimental trolley bus service connecting Tattnall Square to downtown; extend service to the HOPE VI site upon redevelopment. Events: Establish a “Parade of Homes” as soon as possible. Safety: Create a police kiosk for hourly stops by officers (and Federal Express pickups) at Lee’s corner store. Legal Issues: Take a comprehensive approach to clearing up confusion over old easements and unclear titles. Safety: Aggressively eliminate known illegal activities within the neighborhood. Parking: Offer incentives to reduce traffic congestion and parking demand, such as bus passes, live-where-you-work home mortgages, location efficient mortgages, cash-out parking at $3.00 per day, and complete shower facilities for bicyclists. Business Assistance: Mitigate effects on existing retailers from HOPE VI construction and relocation of residents. Bridges: Initiate appropriate action to redesign and rebuild the Hazel Street Bridge as a matter of environmental justice. Collaboration and Partnerships: Seek technical assistance to further partnerships and collaborations between faith-based institutions, Mercer, and other stakeholders.


HILLTOP BELVEDERE: The vacant property at the top of Orange Terrace is a very special site in the neighborhood. The highly visible location rises above the Medical Center and provides a marvelous view of downtown and the river. The team proposed that this underutilized site be developed for housing that might include a lookout tower or hilltop belvedere that could be a signature landmark for the neighborhood. In the event that a parking garage is constructed on the Medical Center site across the street, liner buildings wrapping the garage structure should be incorporated in the design, perhaps with offices or apartments that reflect the character of the residential neighborhood. It is important to think of the street as a public space, with buildings on both sides of the street contributing to the character of the public realm.

STREETS AND SIDEWALKS: Streets in the neighborhood have wide and varying rights of way - 60 to 85 feet. The team suggested that these rights of way be made uniform and that some be reduced to 55 or 60 feet. This uniform dimension would accommodate sidewalk paving, street trees, and utilities. The team urged that existing sidewalks be repaired and made ADA accessible. “Little Richard” Penniman Boulevard is a pivotal road accessing the neighborhood. After reviewing the preliminary plans for the extension of “Little Richard,” the team recommended that careful attention be paid to the design, so that the final alignment and scale do not divide the neighborhood. The road should be built close to the existing railroad tracks, with neighborhood access at intersections on all major streets. New home sites could be located along the extension facing the street so that the boulevard is lined with the fronts of new houses rather than the backs of old ones. The space between the boulevard and railroad tracks should be developed as a linear park.

Charrette sketch of residential building and hilltop belvedere

BEALL’S HILL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

HOUSING: The neighborhood’s historic housing contributes to its unique character. The existing variety of housing types should be the framework for all future development within the neighborhood. Recognizing this strength, the team strongly encouraged preserving and renovating as many of the original structures in the neighborhood as possible. The drawing on the left shows lots on the north side of Oglethorpe Street being in-filled to recapture the historic pattern of large houses with spaces between them. Due to the grade change in this area, these new houses would sit several feet above street level and command a prominence and stature within the neighborhood fabric. As other areas in the neighborhood are in-filled, the new construction should reinforce rather than contrast with the existing architectural character of the neighborhood.

Proposed housing and neighborhood park on Oglethorpe Street

NEW HOUSES: The extensive amount of vacant land in Beall’s Hill offers a unique opportunity to build mixed-income housing for new homeowners, with minimal displacement of existing residents. The varying topography and lot sizes invite houses of various sizes and programs—and a wide-range of affordability. The new house types reflect the vernacular character of existing houses in the neighborhood and enhance the existing streetscape. Ayers/Saint/Gross, Architects + Planners developed 15 residential model units ranging in size from 600 square feet to 3,200 square feet. Auxiliary units above two-car garages are also permitted where alleys are designated. Curb cuts are minimized to permit continuous sidewalks and visibility of garage doors is prohibited from major streets. Infill houses are sited so as to be contextual with existing adjacent residential structures.

Phase III:  Development  &  Construction Construction   and   rehabilitation   of   15–20   single   family   homes  each  year.    The  focus   will  be  on   providing  houses   in   the   $75,000-­‐$120,000   range   that   will   appeal   to   low-­‐ moderate   incomes,   and;   houses   priced   in   the   $120,000-­‐ $200,000  for  middle  incomes  buyers.    

Mixed-income prototypical housing developed by Ayers/Saint/Gross

HOPE VI: The team suggested slight modifications to the proposed HOPE VI plan. Suggestions included that houses on the periphery of the site should be constructed as duplexes and triplexes that have the look of large houses and the smaller townhouses should be located on the lanes at the interior of the site. This would be consistent with the historic block structure of the neighborhood, which had large homes on the streets and smaller homes on the lanes. A significant change to the urban fabric of the neighborhood is the continuation of two existing streets through the superblock that was created by Oglethorpe Homes. The revised plan creates a more porous fabric, and diminishes the negative impact of impenetrable superblock. Since the charrette in 2001 the public housing project has been demolished and new buildings are under construction.

Construction photograph of Hope VI redevelopment of Oglethorpe Homes

LEGEND

LEGEND

Existing Buildings

Mercer University Existing Buildings Proposed Buildings

Mercer University

Open Space

Proposed Buildings 0

100'

Open Space

0

300'

500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities. 100' 300' 500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities.

STRATEGIC ACTIONS Development Incentives: Create additional incentives for the development of market-rate housing. Regulating Code: Consider an urban design code, tied to a master plan, that is consistent with the neighborhood’s historic character and pedestrian scale. The code will define and protect the character of the neighborhood’s residential streets and lanes, specify the residential, commercial, and mixed-use building types permitted, the types of frontages permitted, and the disposition of buildings on lots. Drainage: Purchase or swap property at the northwest corner of Telfair and Hazel for drainage and make aesthetic improvements. Funding: Seek non-traditional mortgage financing, bridge financing, and other financial leveraging through LISC, Enterprise, or Seedco, Freddie Mac, HUD and FHA. Street Design: Maintain parallel parking on all streets in the neighborhood, minimize curb cuts, and reduce intersection corner radii. Funding: Seek additional private sector funding for capacity building through Enterprise Foundation, Pew Charitable Trust, CRA funding for community development. Events: Establish a weekly Farmers’ Market in Tattnall Square Park. Street Design: Add metered on-street parking on all sides of the park (to add parking spaces, calm traffic and improve pedestrian character) and provide residents with parking stickers. Parks: Locate a basketball court in the Square or at another neighborhood park location. Tattnall Square: Remove cloth screening from the tennis courts or aesthetically conceal with landscaping. Safety: Bolster community policing with bicycle cops, patrol cars, and resident police officer on City property. Transit: Establish experimental trolley bus service connecting Tattnall Square to downtown; extend service to the HOPE VI site upon redevelopment. Events: Establish a “Parade of Homes” as soon as possible. Safety: Create a police kiosk for hourly stops by officers (and Federal Express pickups) at Lee’s corner store. Legal Issues: Take a comprehensive approach to clearing up confusion over old easements and unclear titles. Safety: Aggressively eliminate known illegal activities within the neighborhood. Parking: Offer incentives to reduce traffic congestion and parking demand, such as bus passes, live-where-you-work home mortgages, location efficient mortgages, cash-out parking at $3.00 per day, and complete shower facilities for bicyclists. Business Assistance: Mitigate effects on existing retailers from HOPE VI construction and relocation of residents. Bridges: Initiate appropriate action to redesign and rebuild the Hazel Street Bridge as a matter of environmental justice. Collaboration and Partnerships: Seek technical assistance to further partnerships and collaborations between faith-based institutions, Mercer, and other stakeholders.


BEALL’S HILL  REVITALIZATION  PROJECT ORGANIZATIONAL  CHART Knight Foundation $650,000

Historic Macon $500,000

City of Macon $75,000

College Hill Alliance $150,000

Mercer $75,000

Historic Hills & Heights $225,000

Program Planning

College Hill Alliance

College Hill Alliance Historic Macon Land Bank Authority Beall’s Hill N.A.

Program Manager

Beall’s Hill Neighborhood Assn. Sustainability

Construction

Construction Manager

Private Builders

Historic Macon

Land Bank Authority

Developer

Property Acquisition

Sales

Agents MGAR Investors

Economic & Community Development Demolition Homebuyer Programs

MHA $75,000


BEALL’S HILL  REVITALIZATION  PROJECT ORGANIZATIONAL  CHART Knight Foundation $650,000

Historic Macon $500,000

City of Macon $75,000

College Hill Alliance $150,000

Mercer $75,000

Historic Hills & Heights $225,000

Program Planning College Hill Alliance Historic Macon Land Bank Authority Beall’s Hill N.A.

Historic Macon Developer

Beall’s Hill Neighborhood Assn.

Land Bank Authority

Sustainability

Property Acquisition

Construction

Construction Manager

Private Builders

Sales

Agents MGAR Investors

Economic & Community Development Demolition Homebuyer Programs

MHA $75,000


OPPORTUNITIES


HILLTOP BELVEDERE: The vacant property at the top of Orange Terrace is a very special site in the neighborhood. The highly visible location rises above the Medical Center and provides a marvelous view of downtown and the river. The team proposed that this underutilized site be developed for housing that might include a lookout tower or hilltop belvedere that could be a signature landmark for the neighborhood. In the event that a parking garage is constructed on the Medical Center site across the street, liner buildings wrapping the garage structure should be incorporated in the design, perhaps with offices or apartments that reflect the character of the residential neighborhood. It is important to think of the street as a public space, with buildings on both sides of the street contributing to the character of the public realm.

STREETS AND SIDEWALKS: Streets in the neighborhood have wide and varying rights of way - 60 to 85 feet. The team suggested that these rights of way be made uniform and that some be reduced to 55 or 60 feet. This uniform dimension would accommodate sidewalk paving, street trees, and utilities. The team urged that existing sidewalks be repaired and made ADA accessible. “Little Richard” Penniman Boulevard is a pivotal road accessing the neighborhood. After reviewing the preliminary plans for the extension of “Little Richard,” the team recommended that careful attention be paid to the design, so that the final alignment and scale do not divide the neighborhood. The road should be built close to the existing railroad tracks, with neighborhood access at intersections on all major streets. New home sites could be located along the extension facing the street so that the boulevard is lined with the fronts of new houses rather than the backs of old ones. The space between the boulevard and railroad tracks should be developed as a linear park.

Charrette sketch of residential building and hilltop belvedere

BEALL’S HILL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

HOUSING: The neighborhood’s historic housing contributes to its unique character. The existing variety of housing types should be the framework for all future development within the neighborhood. Recognizing this strength, the team strongly encouraged preserving and renovating as many of the original structures in the neighborhood as possible. The drawing on the left shows lots on the north side of Oglethorpe Street being in-filled to recapture the historic pattern of large houses with spaces between them. Due to the grade change in this area, these new houses would sit several feet above street level and command a prominence and stature within the neighborhood fabric. As other areas in the neighborhood are in-filled, the new construction should reinforce rather than contrast with the existing architectural character of the neighborhood.

Proposed housing and neighborhood park on Oglethorpe Street

WHAT WILL WE BUILD?

NEW HOUSES: The extensive amount of vacant land in Beall’s Hill offers a unique opportunity to build mixed-income housing for new homeowners, with minimal displacement of existing residents. The varying topography and lot sizes invite houses of various sizes and programs—and a wide-range of affordability. The new house types reflect the vernacular character of existing houses in the neighborhood and enhance the existing streetscape. Ayers/Saint/Gross, Architects + Planners developed 15 residential model units ranging in size from 600 square feet to 3,200 square feet. Auxiliary units above two-car garages are also permitted where alleys are designated. Curb cuts are minimized to permit continuous sidewalks and visibility of garage doors is prohibited from major streets. Infill houses are sited so as to be contextual with existing adjacent residential structures. Mixed-income prototypical housing developed by Ayers/Saint/Gross

HOPE VI: The team suggested slight modifications to the proposed HOPE VI plan. Suggestions included that houses on the periphery of the site should be constructed as duplexes and triplexes that have the look of large houses and the smaller townhouses should be located on the lanes at the interior of the site. This would be consistent with the historic block structure of the neighborhood, which had large homes on the streets and smaller homes on the lanes. A significant change to the urban fabric of the neighborhood is the continuation of two existing streets through the superblock that was created by Oglethorpe Homes. The revised plan creates a more porous fabric, and diminishes the negative impact of impenetrable superblock. Since the charrette in 2001 the public housing project has been demolished and new buildings are under construction. Construction photograph of Hope VI redevelopment of Oglethorpe Homes

LEGEND

LEGEND

Existing Buildings

Mercer University Existing Buildings Proposed Buildings

Mercer University

Open Space

Proposed Buildings 0

100'

Open Space

0

300'

500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities. 100' 300' 500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities.

STRATEGIC ACTIONS Development Incentives: Create additional incentives for the development of market-rate housing. Regulating Code: Consider an urban design code, tied to a master plan, that is consistent with the neighborhood’s historic character and pedestrian scale. The code will define and protect the character of the neighborhood’s residential streets and lanes, specify the residential, commercial, and mixed-use building types permitted, the types of frontages permitted, and the disposition of buildings on lots. Drainage: Purchase or swap property at the northwest corner of Telfair and Hazel for drainage and make aesthetic improvements. Funding: Seek non-traditional mortgage financing, bridge financing, and other financial leveraging through LISC, Enterprise, or Seedco, Freddie Mac, HUD and FHA. Street Design: Maintain parallel parking on all streets in the neighborhood, minimize curb cuts, and reduce intersection corner radii. Funding: Seek additional private sector funding for capacity building through Enterprise Foundation, Pew Charitable Trust, CRA funding for community development. Events: Establish a weekly Farmers’ Market in Tattnall Square Park. Street Design: Add metered on-street parking on all sides of the park (to add parking spaces, calm traffic and improve pedestrian character) and provide residents with parking stickers. Parks: Locate a basketball court in the Square or at another neighborhood park location. Tattnall Square: Remove cloth screening from the tennis courts or aesthetically conceal with landscaping. Safety: Bolster community policing with bicycle cops, patrol cars, and resident police officer on City property. Transit: Establish experimental trolley bus service connecting Tattnall Square to downtown; extend service to the HOPE VI site upon redevelopment. Events: Establish a “Parade of Homes” as soon as possible. Safety: Create a police kiosk for hourly stops by officers (and Federal Express pickups) at Lee’s corner store. Legal Issues: Take a comprehensive approach to clearing up confusion over old easements and unclear titles. Safety: Aggressively eliminate known illegal activities within the neighborhood. Parking: Offer incentives to reduce traffic congestion and parking demand, such as bus passes, live-where-you-work home mortgages, location efficient mortgages, cash-out parking at $3.00 per day, and complete shower facilities for bicyclists. Business Assistance: Mitigate effects on existing retailers from HOPE VI construction and relocation of residents. Bridges: Initiate appropriate action to redesign and rebuild the Hazel Street Bridge as a matter of environmental justice. Collaboration and Partnerships: Seek technical assistance to further partnerships and collaborations between faith-based institutions, Mercer, and other stakeholders.


HILLTOP BELVEDERE: The vacant property at the top of Orange Terrace is a very special site in the neighborhood. The highly visible location rises above the Medical Center and provides a marvelous view of downtown and the river. The team proposed that this underutilized site be developed for housing that might include a lookout tower or hilltop belvedere that could be a signature landmark for the neighborhood. In the event that a parking garage is constructed on the Medical Center site across the street, liner buildings wrapping the garage structure should be incorporated in the design, perhaps with offices or apartments that reflect the character of the residential neighborhood. It is important to think of the street as a public space, with buildings on both sides of the street contributing to the character of the public realm.

STREETS AND SIDEWALKS: Streets in the neighborhood have wide and varying rights of way - 60 to 85 feet. The team suggested that these rights of way be made uniform and that some be reduced to 55 or 60 feet. This uniform dimension would accommodate sidewalk paving, street trees, and utilities. The team urged that existing sidewalks be repaired and made ADA accessible. “Little Richard” Penniman Boulevard is a pivotal road accessing the neighborhood. After reviewing the preliminary plans for the extension of “Little Richard,” the team recommended that careful attention be paid to the design, so that the final alignment and scale do not divide the neighborhood. The road should be built close to the existing railroad tracks, with neighborhood access at intersections on all major streets. New home sites could be located along the extension facing the street so that the boulevard is lined with the fronts of new houses rather than the backs of old ones. The space between the boulevard and railroad tracks should be developed as a linear park.

Charrette sketch of residential building and hilltop belvedere

BEALL’S HILL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

HOUSING: The neighborhood’s historic housing contributes to its unique character. The existing variety of housing types should be the framework for all future development within the neighborhood. Recognizing this strength, the team strongly encouraged preserving and renovating as many of the original structures in the neighborhood as possible. The drawing on the left shows lots on the north side of Oglethorpe Street being in-filled to recapture the historic pattern of large houses with spaces between them. Due to the grade change in this area, these new houses would sit several feet above street level and command a prominence and stature within the neighborhood fabric. As other areas in the neighborhood are in-filled, the new construction should reinforce rather than contrast with the existing architectural character of the neighborhood.

Proposed housing and neighborhood park on Oglethorpe Street

WHAT WILL WE BUILD?

NEW HOUSES: The extensive amount of vacant land in Beall’s Hill offers a unique opportunity to build mixed-income housing for new homeowners, with minimal displacement of existing residents. The varying topography and lot sizes invite houses of various sizes and programs—and a wide-range of affordability. The new house types reflect the vernacular character of existing houses in the neighborhood and enhance the existing streetscape. Ayers/Saint/Gross, Architects + Planners developed 15 residential model units ranging in size from 600 square feet to 3,200 square feet. Auxiliary units above two-car garages are also permitted where alleys are designated. Curb cuts are minimized to permit continuous sidewalks and visibility of garage doors is prohibited from major streets. Infill houses are sited so as to be contextual with existing adjacent residential structures. Mixed-income prototypical housing developed by Ayers/Saint/Gross

HOPE VI: The team suggested slight modifications to the proposed HOPE VI plan. Suggestions included that houses on the periphery of the site should be constructed as duplexes and triplexes that have the look of large houses and the smaller townhouses should be located on the lanes at the interior of the site. This would be consistent with the historic block structure of the neighborhood, which had large homes on the streets and smaller homes on the lanes. A significant change to the urban fabric of the neighborhood is the continuation of two existing streets through the superblock that was created by Oglethorpe Homes. The revised plan creates a more porous fabric, and diminishes the negative impact of impenetrable superblock. Since the charrette in 2001 the public housing project has been demolished and new buildings are under construction. Construction photograph of Hope VI redevelopment of Oglethorpe Homes

LEGEND

LEGEND

Existing Buildings

Mercer University Existing Buildings Proposed Buildings

Mercer University

Open Space

Proposed Buildings 0

100'

Open Space

0

300'

500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities. 100' 300' 500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities.

STRATEGIC ACTIONS Development Incentives: Create additional incentives for the development of market-rate housing. Regulating Code: Consider an urban design code, tied to a master plan, that is consistent with the neighborhood’s historic character and pedestrian scale. The code will define and protect the character of the neighborhood’s residential streets and lanes, specify the residential, commercial, and mixed-use building types permitted, the types of frontages permitted, and the disposition of buildings on lots. Drainage: Purchase or swap property at the northwest corner of Telfair and Hazel for drainage and make aesthetic improvements. Funding: Seek non-traditional mortgage financing, bridge financing, and other financial leveraging through LISC, Enterprise, or Seedco, Freddie Mac, HUD and FHA. Street Design: Maintain parallel parking on all streets in the neighborhood, minimize curb cuts, and reduce intersection corner radii. Funding: Seek additional private sector funding for capacity building through Enterprise Foundation, Pew Charitable Trust, CRA funding for community development. Events: Establish a weekly Farmers’ Market in Tattnall Square Park. Street Design: Add metered on-street parking on all sides of the park (to add parking spaces, calm traffic and improve pedestrian character) and provide residents with parking stickers. Parks: Locate a basketball court in the Square or at another neighborhood park location. Tattnall Square: Remove cloth screening from the tennis courts or aesthetically conceal with landscaping. Safety: Bolster community policing with bicycle cops, patrol cars, and resident police officer on City property. Transit: Establish experimental trolley bus service connecting Tattnall Square to downtown; extend service to the HOPE VI site upon redevelopment. Events: Establish a “Parade of Homes” as soon as possible. Safety: Create a police kiosk for hourly stops by officers (and Federal Express pickups) at Lee’s corner store. Legal Issues: Take a comprehensive approach to clearing up confusion over old easements and unclear titles. Safety: Aggressively eliminate known illegal activities within the neighborhood. Parking: Offer incentives to reduce traffic congestion and parking demand, such as bus passes, live-where-you-work home mortgages, location efficient mortgages, cash-out parking at $3.00 per day, and complete shower facilities for bicyclists. Business Assistance: Mitigate effects on existing retailers from HOPE VI construction and relocation of residents. Bridges: Initiate appropriate action to redesign and rebuild the Hazel Street Bridge as a matter of environmental justice. Collaboration and Partnerships: Seek technical assistance to further partnerships and collaborations between faith-based institutions, Mercer, and other stakeholders.


HILLTOP BELVEDERE: The vacant property at the top of Orange Terrace is a very special site in the neighborhood. The highly visible location rises above the Medical Center and provides a marvelous view of downtown and the river. The team proposed that this underutilized site be developed for housing that might include a lookout tower or hilltop belvedere that could be a signature landmark for the neighborhood. In the event that a parking garage is constructed on the Medical Center site across the street, liner buildings wrapping the garage structure should be incorporated in the design, perhaps with offices or apartments that reflect the character of the residential neighborhood. It is important to think of the street as a public space, with buildings on both sides of the street contributing to the character of the public realm.

STREETS AND SIDEWALKS: Streets in the neighborhood have wide and varying rights of way - 60 to 85 feet. The team suggested that these rights of way be made uniform and that some be reduced to 55 or 60 feet. This uniform dimension would accommodate sidewalk paving, street trees, and utilities. The team urged that existing sidewalks be repaired and made ADA accessible. “Little Richard” Penniman Boulevard is a pivotal road accessing the neighborhood. After reviewing the preliminary plans for the extension of “Little Richard,” the team recommended that careful attention be paid to the design, so that the final alignment and scale do not divide the neighborhood. The road should be built close to the existing railroad tracks, with neighborhood access at intersections on all major streets. New home sites could be located along the extension facing the street so that the boulevard is lined with the fronts of new houses rather than the backs of old ones. The space between the boulevard and railroad tracks should be developed as a linear park.

Charrette sketch of residential building and hilltop belvedere

BEALL’S HILL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

HOUSING: The neighborhood’s historic housing contributes to its unique character. The existing variety of housing types should be the framework for all future development within the neighborhood. Recognizing this strength, the team strongly encouraged preserving and renovating as many of the original structures in the neighborhood as possible. The drawing on the left shows lots on the north side of Oglethorpe Street being in-filled to recapture the historic pattern of large houses with spaces between them. Due to the grade change in this area, these new houses would sit several feet above street level and command a prominence and stature within the neighborhood fabric. As other areas in the neighborhood are in-filled, the new construction should reinforce rather than contrast with the existing architectural character of the neighborhood.

Proposed housing and neighborhood park on Oglethorpe Street

NEW HOUSES: The extensive amount of vacant land in Beall’s Hill offers a unique opportunity to build mixed-income housing for new homeowners, with minimal displacement of existing residents. The varying topography and lot sizes invite houses of various sizes and programs—and a wide-range of affordability. The new house types reflect the vernacular character of existing houses in the neighborhood and enhance the existing streetscape. Ayers/Saint/Gross, Architects + Planners developed 15 residential model units ranging in size from 600 square feet to 3,200 square feet. Auxiliary units above two-car garages are also permitted where alleys are designated. Curb cuts are minimized to permit continuous sidewalks and visibility of garage doors is prohibited from major streets. Infill houses are sited so as to be contextual with existing adjacent residential structures. Mixed-income prototypical housing developed by Ayers/Saint/Gross

HOPE VI: The team suggested slight modifications to the proposed HOPE VI plan. Suggestions included that houses on the periphery of the site should be constructed as duplexes and triplexes that have the look of large houses and the smaller townhouses should be located on the lanes at the interior of the site. This would be consistent with the historic block structure of the neighborhood, which had large homes on the streets and smaller homes on the lanes. A significant change to the urban fabric of the neighborhood is the continuation of two existing streets through the superblock that was created by Oglethorpe Homes. The revised plan creates a more porous fabric, and diminishes the negative impact of impenetrable superblock. Since the charrette in 2001 the public housing project has been demolished and new buildings are under construction. Construction photograph of Hope VI redevelopment of Oglethorpe Homes

LEGEND

LEGEND

Existing Buildings

Mercer University Existing Buildings Proposed Buildings

Mercer University

Open Space

Proposed Buildings 0

100'

Open Space

0

300'

500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities. 100' 300' 500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities.

STRATEGIC ACTIONS Development Incentives: Create additional incentives for the development of market-rate housing. Regulating Code: Consider an urban design code, tied to a master plan, that is consistent with the neighborhood’s historic character and pedestrian scale. The code will define and protect the character of the neighborhood’s residential streets and lanes, specify the residential, commercial, and mixed-use building types permitted, the types of frontages permitted, and the disposition of buildings on lots. Drainage: Purchase or swap property at the northwest corner of Telfair and Hazel for drainage and make aesthetic improvements. Funding: Seek non-traditional mortgage financing, bridge financing, and other financial leveraging through LISC, Enterprise, or Seedco, Freddie Mac, HUD and FHA. Street Design: Maintain parallel parking on all streets in the neighborhood, minimize curb cuts, and reduce intersection corner radii. Funding: Seek additional private sector funding for capacity building through Enterprise Foundation, Pew Charitable Trust, CRA funding for community development. Events: Establish a weekly Farmers’ Market in Tattnall Square Park. Street Design: Add metered on-street parking on all sides of the park (to add parking spaces, calm traffic and improve pedestrian character) and provide residents with parking stickers. Parks: Locate a basketball court in the Square or at another neighborhood park location. Tattnall Square: Remove cloth screening from the tennis courts or aesthetically conceal with landscaping. Safety: Bolster community policing with bicycle cops, patrol cars, and resident police officer on City property. Transit: Establish experimental trolley bus service connecting Tattnall Square to downtown; extend service to the HOPE VI site upon redevelopment. Events: Establish a “Parade of Homes” as soon as possible. Safety: Create a police kiosk for hourly stops by officers (and Federal Express pickups) at Lee’s corner store. Legal Issues: Take a comprehensive approach to clearing up confusion over old easements and unclear titles. Safety: Aggressively eliminate known illegal activities within the neighborhood. Parking: Offer incentives to reduce traffic congestion and parking demand, such as bus passes, live-where-you-work home mortgages, location efficient mortgages, cash-out parking at $3.00 per day, and complete shower facilities for bicyclists. Business Assistance: Mitigate effects on existing retailers from HOPE VI construction and relocation of residents. Bridges: Initiate appropriate action to redesign and rebuild the Hazel Street Bridge as a matter of environmental justice. Collaboration and Partnerships: Seek technical assistance to further partnerships and collaborations between faith-based institutions, Mercer, and other stakeholders.


HILLTOP BELVEDERE: The vacant property at the top of Orange Terrace is a very special site in the neighborhood. The highly visible location rises above the Medical Center and provides a marvelous view of downtown and the river. The team proposed that this underutilized site be developed for housing that might include a lookout tower or hilltop belvedere that could be a signature landmark for the neighborhood. In the event that a parking garage is constructed on the Medical Center site across the street, liner buildings wrapping the garage structure should be incorporated in the design, perhaps with offices or apartments that reflect the character of the residential neighborhood. It is important to think of the street as a public space, with buildings on both sides of the street contributing to the character of the public realm.

STREETS AND SIDEWALKS: Streets in the neighborhood have wide and varying rights of way - 60 to 85 feet. The team suggested that these rights of way be made uniform and that some be reduced to 55 or 60 feet. This uniform dimension would accommodate sidewalk paving, street trees, and utilities. The team urged that existing sidewalks be repaired and made ADA accessible. “Little Richard” Penniman Boulevard is a pivotal road accessing the neighborhood. After reviewing the preliminary plans for the extension of “Little Richard,” the team recommended that careful attention be paid to the design, so that the final alignment and scale do not divide the neighborhood. The road should be built close to the existing railroad tracks, with neighborhood access at intersections on all major streets. New home sites could be located along the extension facing the street so that the boulevard is lined with the fronts of new houses rather than the backs of old ones. The space between the boulevard and railroad tracks should be developed as a linear park.

Charrette sketch of residential building and hilltop belvedere

BEALL’S HILL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

HOUSING: The neighborhood’s historic housing contributes to its unique character. The existing variety of housing types should be the framework for all future development within the neighborhood. Recognizing this strength, the team strongly encouraged preserving and renovating as many of the original structures in the neighborhood as possible. The drawing on the left shows lots on the north side of Oglethorpe Street being in-filled to recapture the historic pattern of large houses with spaces between them. Due to the grade change in this area, these new houses would sit several feet above street level and command a prominence and stature within the neighborhood fabric. As other areas in the neighborhood are in-filled, the new construction should reinforce rather than contrast with the existing architectural character of the neighborhood.

Proposed housing and neighborhood park on Oglethorpe Street

NEW HOUSES: The extensive amount of vacant land in Beall’s Hill offers a unique opportunity to build mixed-income housing for new homeowners, with minimal displacement of existing residents. The varying topography and lot sizes invite houses of various sizes and programs—and a wide-range of affordability. The new house types reflect the vernacular character of existing houses in the neighborhood and enhance the existing streetscape. Ayers/Saint/Gross, Architects + Planners developed 15 residential model units ranging in size from 600 square feet to 3,200 square feet. Auxiliary units above two-car garages are also permitted where alleys are designated. Curb cuts are minimized to permit continuous sidewalks and visibility of garage doors is prohibited from major streets. Infill houses are sited so as to be contextual with existing adjacent residential structures. Mixed-income prototypical housing developed by Ayers/Saint/Gross

HOPE VI: The team suggested slight modifications to the proposed HOPE VI plan. Suggestions included that houses on the periphery of the site should be constructed as duplexes and triplexes that have the look of large houses and the smaller townhouses should be located on the lanes at the interior of the site. This would be consistent with the historic block structure of the neighborhood, which had large homes on the streets and smaller homes on the lanes. A significant change to the urban fabric of the neighborhood is the continuation of two existing streets through the superblock that was created by Oglethorpe Homes. The revised plan creates a more porous fabric, and diminishes the negative impact of impenetrable superblock. Since the charrette in 2001 the public housing project has been demolished and new buildings are under construction. Construction photograph of Hope VI redevelopment of Oglethorpe Homes

LEGEND

LEGEND

Existing Buildings

Mercer University Existing Buildings Proposed Buildings

Mercer University

Open Space

Proposed Buildings 0

100'

Open Space

0

300'

500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities. 100' 300' 500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities.

STRATEGIC ACTIONS Development Incentives: Create additional incentives for the development of market-rate housing. Regulating Code: Consider an urban design code, tied to a master plan, that is consistent with the neighborhood’s historic character and pedestrian scale. The code will define and protect the character of the neighborhood’s residential streets and lanes, specify the residential, commercial, and mixed-use building types permitted, the types of frontages permitted, and the disposition of buildings on lots. Drainage: Purchase or swap property at the northwest corner of Telfair and Hazel for drainage and make aesthetic improvements. Funding: Seek non-traditional mortgage financing, bridge financing, and other financial leveraging through LISC, Enterprise, or Seedco, Freddie Mac, HUD and FHA. Street Design: Maintain parallel parking on all streets in the neighborhood, minimize curb cuts, and reduce intersection corner radii. Funding: Seek additional private sector funding for capacity building through Enterprise Foundation, Pew Charitable Trust, CRA funding for community development. Events: Establish a weekly Farmers’ Market in Tattnall Square Park. Street Design: Add metered on-street parking on all sides of the park (to add parking spaces, calm traffic and improve pedestrian character) and provide residents with parking stickers. Parks: Locate a basketball court in the Square or at another neighborhood park location. Tattnall Square: Remove cloth screening from the tennis courts or aesthetically conceal with landscaping. Safety: Bolster community policing with bicycle cops, patrol cars, and resident police officer on City property. Transit: Establish experimental trolley bus service connecting Tattnall Square to downtown; extend service to the HOPE VI site upon redevelopment. Events: Establish a “Parade of Homes” as soon as possible. Safety: Create a police kiosk for hourly stops by officers (and Federal Express pickups) at Lee’s corner store. Legal Issues: Take a comprehensive approach to clearing up confusion over old easements and unclear titles. Safety: Aggressively eliminate known illegal activities within the neighborhood. Parking: Offer incentives to reduce traffic congestion and parking demand, such as bus passes, live-where-you-work home mortgages, location efficient mortgages, cash-out parking at $3.00 per day, and complete shower facilities for bicyclists. Business Assistance: Mitigate effects on existing retailers from HOPE VI construction and relocation of residents. Bridges: Initiate appropriate action to redesign and rebuild the Hazel Street Bridge as a matter of environmental justice. Collaboration and Partnerships: Seek technical assistance to further partnerships and collaborations between faith-based institutions, Mercer, and other stakeholders.


HILLTOP BELVEDERE: The vacant property at the top of Orange Terrace is a very special site in the neighborhood. The highly visible location rises above the Medical Center and provides a marvelous view of downtown and the river. The team proposed that this underutilized site be developed for housing that might include a lookout tower or hilltop belvedere that could be a signature landmark for the neighborhood. In the event that a parking garage is constructed on the Medical Center site across the street, liner buildings wrapping the garage structure should be incorporated in the design, perhaps with offices or apartments that reflect the character of the residential neighborhood. It is important to think of the street as a public space, with buildings on both sides of the street contributing to the character of the public realm.

STREETS AND SIDEWALKS: Streets in the neighborhood have wide and varying rights of way - 60 to 85 feet. The team suggested that these rights of way be made uniform and that some be reduced to 55 or 60 feet. This uniform dimension would accommodate sidewalk paving, street trees, and utilities. The team urged that existing sidewalks be repaired and made ADA accessible. “Little Richard” Penniman Boulevard is a pivotal road accessing the neighborhood. After reviewing the preliminary plans for the extension of “Little Richard,” the team recommended that careful attention be paid to the design, so that the final alignment and scale do not divide the neighborhood. The road should be built close to the existing railroad tracks, with neighborhood access at intersections on all major streets. New home sites could be located along the extension facing the street so that the boulevard is lined with the fronts of new houses rather than the backs of old ones. The space between the boulevard and railroad tracks should be developed as a linear park.

Charrette sketch of residential building and hilltop belvedere

BEALL’S HILL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

HOUSING: The neighborhood’s historic housing contributes to its unique character. The existing variety of housing types should be the framework for all future development within the neighborhood. Recognizing this strength, the team strongly encouraged preserving and renovating as many of the original structures in the neighborhood as possible. The drawing on the left shows lots on the north side of Oglethorpe Street being in-filled to recapture the historic pattern of large houses with spaces between them. Due to the grade change in this area, these new houses would sit several feet above street level and command a prominence and stature within the neighborhood fabric. As other areas in the neighborhood are in-filled, the new construction should reinforce rather than contrast with the existing architectural character of the neighborhood.

ASSUMPTIONS

1. Construction  Costs  @  $60sf;          Rehab  Costs  @  $65/sf

Proposed housing and neighborhood park on Oglethorpe Street

NEW HOUSES: The extensive amount of vacant land in Beall’s Hill offers a unique opportunity to build mixed-income housing for new homeowners, with minimal displacement of existing residents. The varying topography and lot sizes invite houses of various sizes and programs—and a wide-range of affordability. The new house types reflect the vernacular character of existing houses in the neighborhood and enhance the existing streetscape. Ayers/Saint/Gross, Architects + Planners developed 15 residential model units ranging in size from 600 square feet to 3,200 square feet. Auxiliary units above two-car garages are also permitted where alleys are designated. Curb cuts are minimized to permit continuous sidewalks and visibility of garage doors is prohibited from major streets. Infill houses are sited so as to be contextual with existing adjacent residential structures.

2. Construction:  90  days 3.  Sale  Price  @  $85/sf

Mixed-income prototypical housing developed by Ayers/Saint/Gross

HOPE VI: The team suggested slight modifications to the proposed HOPE VI plan. Suggestions included that houses on the periphery of the site should be constructed as duplexes and triplexes that have the look of large houses and the smaller townhouses should be located on the lanes at the interior of the site. This would be consistent with the historic block structure of the neighborhood, which had large homes on the streets and smaller homes on the lanes. A significant change to the urban fabric of the neighborhood is the continuation of two existing streets through the superblock that was created by Oglethorpe Homes. The revised plan creates a more porous fabric, and diminishes the negative impact of impenetrable superblock. Since the charrette in 2001 the public housing project has been demolished and new buildings are under construction.

LEGEND

LEGEND

4. Sale  Period  -­‐90  days

Proposed Buildings

Mercer University

Open Space

Proposed Buildings 0

100'

Open Space

0

Existing Buildings

Mercer University Existing Buildings

300'

500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities. 100' 300' 500'

5. Inventory  turns  over  twice    per  year

Construction photograph of Hope VI redevelopment of Oglethorpe Homes

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities.

STRATEGIC ACTIONS Development Incentives: Create additional incentives for the development of market-rate housing. Regulating Code: Consider an urban design code, tied to a master plan, that is consistent with the neighborhood’s historic character and pedestrian scale. The code will define and protect the character of the neighborhood’s residential streets and lanes, specify the residential, commercial, and mixed-use building types permitted, the types of frontages permitted, and the disposition of buildings on lots. Drainage: Purchase or swap property at the northwest corner of Telfair and Hazel for drainage and make aesthetic improvements. Funding: Seek non-traditional mortgage financing, bridge financing, and other financial leveraging through LISC, Enterprise, or Seedco, Freddie Mac, HUD and FHA. Street Design: Maintain parallel parking on all streets in the neighborhood, minimize curb cuts, and reduce intersection corner radii. Funding: Seek additional private sector funding for capacity building through Enterprise Foundation, Pew Charitable Trust, CRA funding for community development. Events: Establish a weekly Farmers’ Market in Tattnall Square Park. Street Design: Add metered on-street parking on all sides of the park (to add parking spaces, calm traffic and improve pedestrian character) and provide residents with parking stickers. Parks: Locate a basketball court in the Square or at another neighborhood park location. Tattnall Square: Remove cloth screening from the tennis courts or aesthetically conceal with landscaping. Safety: Bolster community policing with bicycle cops, patrol cars, and resident police officer on City property. Transit: Establish experimental trolley bus service connecting Tattnall Square to downtown; extend service to the HOPE VI site upon redevelopment. Events: Establish a “Parade of Homes” as soon as possible. Safety: Create a police kiosk for hourly stops by officers (and Federal Express pickups) at Lee’s corner store. Legal Issues: Take a comprehensive approach to clearing up confusion over old easements and unclear titles. Safety: Aggressively eliminate known illegal activities within the neighborhood. Parking: Offer incentives to reduce traffic congestion and parking demand, such as bus passes, live-where-you-work home mortgages, location efficient mortgages, cash-out parking at $3.00 per day, and complete shower facilities for bicyclists. Business Assistance: Mitigate effects on existing retailers from HOPE VI construction and relocation of residents. Bridges: Initiate appropriate action to redesign and rebuild the Hazel Street Bridge as a matter of environmental justice. Collaboration and Partnerships: Seek technical assistance to further partnerships and collaborations between faith-based institutions, Mercer, and other stakeholders.


HILLTOP BELVEDERE: The vacant property at the top of Orange Terrace is a very special site in the neighborhood. The highly visible location rises above the Medical Center and provides a marvelous view of downtown and the river. The team proposed that this underutilized site be developed for housing that might include a lookout tower or hilltop belvedere that could be a signature landmark for the neighborhood. In the event that a parking garage is constructed on the Medical Center site across the street, liner buildings wrapping the garage structure should be incorporated in the design, perhaps with offices or apartments that reflect the character of the residential neighborhood. It is important to think of the street as a public space, with buildings on both sides of the street contributing to the character of the public realm.

Charrette sketch of residential building and hilltop belvedere

STREETS AND SIDEWALKS: Streets in the neighborhood have wide and varying rights of way - 60 to 85 feet. The team suggested that these rights of way be made uniform and that some be reduced to 55 or 60 feet. This uniform dimension would accommodate sidewalk paving, street trees, and utilities. The team urged that existing sidewalks be repaired and made ADA accessible. “Little Richard” Penniman Boulevard is a pivotal road accessing the neighborhood. After reviewing the preliminary plans for the extension of “Little Richard,” the team recommended that careful attention be paid to the design, so that the final alignment and scale do not divide the neighborhood. The road should be built close to the existing railroad tracks, with neighborhood access at intersections on all major streets. New home sites could be located along the extension facing the street so that the boulevard is lined with the fronts of new houses rather than the backs of old ones. The space between the boulevard and railroad tracks should be developed as a linear park.

Project Performance Goals

BEALL’S HILL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

HOUSING: The neighborhood’s historic housing contributes to its unique character. The existing variety of housing types should be the framework for all future development within the neighborhood. Recognizing this strength, the team strongly encouraged preserving and renovating as many of the original structures in the neighborhood as possible. The drawing on the left shows lots on the north side of Oglethorpe Street being in-filled to recapture the historic pattern of large houses with spaces between them. Due to the grade change in this area, these new houses would sit several feet above street level and command a prominence and stature within the neighborhood fabric. As other areas in the neighborhood are in-filled, the new construction should reinforce rather than contrast with the existing architectural character of the neighborhood.

Year 1

Partner Contributions

Year 2

$875,000

$1,100,000

Net Construction Costs

$1,573,250

$2,605,000

Net Sales

$1,660,518

$2,646,858

$61,310

$97,360

$497,328

$1,062,500

$95,078

$230,750

$58,015

$53,040

$27,819

$44,343

17

24

13

20

4

7

Proposed housing and neighborhood park on Oglethorpe Street

NEW HOUSES: The extensive amount of vacant land in Beall’s Hill offers a unique opportunity to build mixed-income housing for new homeowners, with minimal displacement of existing residents. The varying topography and lot sizes invite houses of various sizes and programs—and a wide-range of affordability. The new house types reflect the vernacular character of existing houses in the neighborhood and enhance the existing streetscape. Ayers/Saint/Gross, Architects + Planners developed 15 residential model units ranging in size from 600 square feet to 3,200 square feet. Auxiliary units above two-car garages are also permitted where alleys are designated. Curb cuts are minimized to permit continuous sidewalks and visibility of garage doors is prohibited from major streets. Infill houses are sited so as to be contextual with existing adjacent residential structures.

Developer Fees (Historic Macon) Mixed-income prototypical housing developed by Ayers/Saint/Gross

Market Value Units Remaining HOPE of VI: The team suggested slight modifications to the proposed HOPE VI plan. Suggestions included that houses on the periphery of the site should be constructed as duplexes and triplexes that have the look of large houses and the smaller townhouses should be located on the lanes at the interior of the site. This would be consistent with the historic block structure of the neighborhood, which had large homes on the streets and smaller homes on the lanes. A significant change to the urban fabric of the neighborhood is the continuation of two existing streets through the superblock that was created by Oglethorpe Homes. The revised plan creates a more porous fabric, and diminishes the negative impact of impenetrable superblock. Since the charrette in 2001 the public housing project has been demolished and new buildings are under construction.

LEGEND

LEGEND

Net Value of Units Remaining

Mercer University Existing Buildings Proposed Buildings

Mercer University

Profit From Sales

Property Tax Value

Total Units Built/Rehabilitated

Construction photograph of Hope VI redevelopment of Oglethorpe Homes

Units Sold Units Remaining

Existing Buildings

Open Space

Proposed Buildings 0

100'

Open Space

0

300'

500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities. 100' 300' 500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities.

STRATEGIC ACTIONS Development Incentives: Create additional incentives for the development of market-rate housing. Regulating Code: Consider an urban design code, tied to a master plan, that is consistent with the neighborhood’s historic character and pedestrian scale. The code will define and protect the character of the neighborhood’s residential streets and lanes, specify the residential, commercial, and mixed-use building types permitted, the types of frontages permitted, and the disposition of buildings on lots. Drainage: Purchase or swap property at the northwest corner of Telfair and Hazel for drainage and make aesthetic improvements. Funding: Seek non-traditional mortgage financing, bridge financing, and other financial leveraging through LISC, Enterprise, or Seedco, Freddie Mac, HUD and FHA. Street Design: Maintain parallel parking on all streets in the neighborhood, minimize curb cuts, and reduce intersection corner radii. Funding: Seek additional private sector funding for capacity building through Enterprise Foundation, Pew Charitable Trust, CRA funding for community development. Events: Establish a weekly Farmers’ Market in Tattnall Square Park. Street Design: Add metered on-street parking on all sides of the park (to add parking spaces, calm traffic and improve pedestrian character) and provide residents with parking stickers. Parks: Locate a basketball court in the Square or at another neighborhood park location. Tattnall Square: Remove cloth screening from the tennis courts or aesthetically conceal with landscaping. Safety: Bolster community policing with bicycle cops, patrol cars, and resident police officer on City property. Transit: Establish experimental trolley bus service connecting Tattnall Square to downtown; extend service to the HOPE VI site upon redevelopment. Events: Establish a “Parade of Homes” as soon as possible. Safety: Create a police kiosk for hourly stops by officers (and Federal Express pickups) at Lee’s corner store. Legal Issues: Take a comprehensive approach to clearing up confusion over old easements and unclear titles. Safety: Aggressively eliminate known illegal activities within the neighborhood. Parking: Offer incentives to reduce traffic congestion and parking demand, such as bus passes, live-where-you-work home mortgages, location efficient mortgages, cash-out parking at $3.00 per day, and complete shower facilities for bicyclists. Business Assistance: Mitigate effects on existing retailers from HOPE VI construction and relocation of residents. Bridges: Initiate appropriate action to redesign and rebuild the Hazel Street Bridge as a matter of environmental justice. Collaboration and Partnerships: Seek technical assistance to further partnerships and collaborations between faith-based institutions, Mercer, and other stakeholders.


HILLTOP BELVEDERE: The vacant property at the top of Orange Terrace is a very special site in the neighborhood. The highly visible location rises above the Medical Center and provides a marvelous view of downtown and the river. The team proposed that this underutilized site be developed for housing that might include a lookout tower or hilltop belvedere that could be a signature landmark for the neighborhood. In the event that a parking garage is constructed on the Medical Center site across the street, liner buildings wrapping the garage structure should be incorporated in the design, perhaps with offices or apartments that reflect the character of the residential neighborhood. It is important to think of the street as a public space, with buildings on both sides of the street contributing to the character of the public realm.

STREETS AND SIDEWALKS: Streets in the neighborhood have wide and varying rights of way - 60 to 85 feet. The team suggested that these rights of way be made uniform and that some be reduced to 55 or 60 feet. This uniform dimension would accommodate sidewalk paving, street trees, and utilities. The team urged that existing sidewalks be repaired and made ADA accessible. “Little Richard” Penniman Boulevard is a pivotal road accessing the neighborhood. After reviewing the preliminary plans for the extension of “Little Richard,” the team recommended that careful attention be paid to the design, so that the final alignment and scale do not divide the neighborhood. The road should be built close to the existing railroad tracks, with neighborhood access at intersections on all major streets. New home sites could be located along the extension facing the street so that the boulevard is lined with the fronts of new houses rather than the backs of old ones. The space between the boulevard and railroad tracks should be developed as a linear park.

Charrette sketch of residential building and hilltop belvedere

BEALL’S HILL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

HOUSING: The neighborhood’s historic housing contributes to its unique character. The existing variety of housing types should be the framework for all future development within the neighborhood. Recognizing this strength, the team strongly encouraged preserving and renovating as many of the original structures in the neighborhood as possible. The drawing on the left shows lots on the north side of Oglethorpe Street being in-filled to recapture the historic pattern of large houses with spaces between them. Due to the grade change in this area, these new houses would sit several feet above street level and command a prominence and stature within the neighborhood fabric. As other areas in the neighborhood are in-filled, the new construction should reinforce rather than contrast with the existing architectural character of the neighborhood.

Proposed housing and neighborhood park on Oglethorpe Street

NEW HOUSES: The extensive amount of vacant land in Beall’s Hill offers a unique opportunity to build mixed-income housing for new homeowners, with minimal displacement of existing residents. The varying topography and lot sizes invite houses of various sizes and programs—and a wide-range of affordability. The new house types reflect the vernacular character of existing houses in the neighborhood and enhance the existing streetscape. Ayers/Saint/Gross, Architects + Planners developed 15 residential model units ranging in size from 600 square feet to 3,200 square feet. Auxiliary units above two-car garages are also permitted where alleys are designated. Curb cuts are minimized to permit continuous sidewalks and visibility of garage doors is prohibited from major streets. Infill houses are sited so as to be contextual with existing adjacent residential structures. Mixed-income prototypical housing developed by Ayers/Saint/Gross

HOPE VI: The team suggested slight modifications to the proposed HOPE VI plan. Suggestions included that houses on the periphery of the site should be constructed as duplexes and triplexes that have the look of large houses and the smaller townhouses should be located on the lanes at the interior of the site. This would be consistent with the historic block structure of the neighborhood, which had large homes on the streets and smaller homes on the lanes. A significant change to the urban fabric of the neighborhood is the continuation of two existing streets through the superblock that was created by Oglethorpe Homes. The revised plan creates a more porous fabric, and diminishes the negative impact of impenetrable superblock. Since the charrette in 2001 the public housing project has been demolished and new buildings are under construction. Construction photograph of Hope VI redevelopment of Oglethorpe Homes

LEGEND

LEGEND

Existing Buildings

Mercer University Existing Buildings Proposed Buildings

Mercer University

Open Space

Proposed Buildings 0

100'

Open Space

0

300'

500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities. 100' 300' 500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities.

STRATEGIC ACTIONS Development Incentives: Create additional incentives for the development of market-rate housing. Regulating Code: Consider an urban design code, tied to a master plan, that is consistent with the neighborhood’s historic character and pedestrian scale. The code will define and protect the character of the neighborhood’s residential streets and lanes, specify the residential, commercial, and mixed-use building types permitted, the types of frontages permitted, and the disposition of buildings on lots. Drainage: Purchase or swap property at the northwest corner of Telfair and Hazel for drainage and make aesthetic improvements. Funding: Seek non-traditional mortgage financing, bridge financing, and other financial leveraging through LISC, Enterprise, or Seedco, Freddie Mac, HUD and FHA. Street Design: Maintain parallel parking on all streets in the neighborhood, minimize curb cuts, and reduce intersection corner radii. Funding: Seek additional private sector funding for capacity building through Enterprise Foundation, Pew Charitable Trust, CRA funding for community development. Events: Establish a weekly Farmers’ Market in Tattnall Square Park. Street Design: Add metered on-street parking on all sides of the park (to add parking spaces, calm traffic and improve pedestrian character) and provide residents with parking stickers. Parks: Locate a basketball court in the Square or at another neighborhood park location. Tattnall Square: Remove cloth screening from the tennis courts or aesthetically conceal with landscaping. Safety: Bolster community policing with bicycle cops, patrol cars, and resident police officer on City property. Transit: Establish experimental trolley bus service connecting Tattnall Square to downtown; extend service to the HOPE VI site upon redevelopment. Events: Establish a “Parade of Homes” as soon as possible. Safety: Create a police kiosk for hourly stops by officers (and Federal Express pickups) at Lee’s corner store. Legal Issues: Take a comprehensive approach to clearing up confusion over old easements and unclear titles. Safety: Aggressively eliminate known illegal activities within the neighborhood. Parking: Offer incentives to reduce traffic congestion and parking demand, such as bus passes, live-where-you-work home mortgages, location efficient mortgages, cash-out parking at $3.00 per day, and complete shower facilities for bicyclists. Business Assistance: Mitigate effects on existing retailers from HOPE VI construction and relocation of residents. Bridges: Initiate appropriate action to redesign and rebuild the Hazel Street Bridge as a matter of environmental justice. Collaboration and Partnerships: Seek technical assistance to further partnerships and collaborations between faith-based institutions, Mercer, and other stakeholders.


HILLTOP BELVEDERE: The vacant property at the top of Orange Terrace is a very special site in the neighborhood. The highly visible location rises above the Medical Center and provides a marvelous view of downtown and the river. The team proposed that this underutilized site be developed for housing that might include a lookout tower or hilltop belvedere that could be a signature landmark for the neighborhood. In the event that a parking garage is constructed on the Medical Center site across the street, liner buildings wrapping the garage structure should be incorporated in the design, perhaps with offices or apartments that reflect the character of the residential neighborhood. It is important to think of the street as a public space, with buildings on both sides of the street contributing to the character of the public realm.

STREETS AND SIDEWALKS: Streets in the neighborhood have wide and varying rights of way - 60 to 85 feet. The team suggested that these rights of way be made uniform and that some be reduced to 55 or 60 feet. This uniform dimension would accommodate sidewalk paving, street trees, and utilities. The team urged that existing sidewalks be repaired and made ADA accessible. “Little Richard” Penniman Boulevard is a pivotal road accessing the neighborhood. After reviewing the preliminary plans for the extension of “Little Richard,” the team recommended that careful attention be paid to the design, so that the final alignment and scale do not divide the neighborhood. The road should be built close to the existing railroad tracks, with neighborhood access at intersections on all major streets. New home sites could be located along the extension facing the street so that the boulevard is lined with the fronts of new houses rather than the backs of old ones. The space between the boulevard and railroad tracks should be developed as a linear park.

Charrette sketch of residential building and hilltop belvedere

BEALL’S HILL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

HOUSING: The neighborhood’s historic housing contributes to its unique character. The existing variety of housing types should be the framework for all future development within the neighborhood. Recognizing this strength, the team strongly encouraged preserving and renovating as many of the original structures in the neighborhood as possible. The drawing on the left shows lots on the north side of Oglethorpe Street being in-filled to recapture the historic pattern of large houses with spaces between them. Due to the grade change in this area, these new houses would sit several feet above street level and command a prominence and stature within the neighborhood fabric. As other areas in the neighborhood are in-filled, the new construction should reinforce rather than contrast with the existing architectural character of the neighborhood.

Proposed housing and neighborhood park on Oglethorpe Street

HOW WILL THE PROCESS WORK?

NEW HOUSES: The extensive amount of vacant land in Beall’s Hill offers a unique opportunity to build mixed-income housing for new homeowners, with minimal displacement of existing residents. The varying topography and lot sizes invite houses of various sizes and programs—and a wide-range of affordability. The new house types reflect the vernacular character of existing houses in the neighborhood and enhance the existing streetscape. Ayers/Saint/Gross, Architects + Planners developed 15 residential model units ranging in size from 600 square feet to 3,200 square feet. Auxiliary units above two-car garages are also permitted where alleys are designated. Curb cuts are minimized to permit continuous sidewalks and visibility of garage doors is prohibited from major streets. Infill houses are sited so as to be contextual with existing adjacent residential structures. Mixed-income prototypical housing developed by Ayers/Saint/Gross

HOPE VI: The team suggested slight modifications to the proposed HOPE VI plan. Suggestions included that houses on the periphery of the site should be constructed as duplexes and triplexes that have the look of large houses and the smaller townhouses should be located on the lanes at the interior of the site. This would be consistent with the historic block structure of the neighborhood, which had large homes on the streets and smaller homes on the lanes. A significant change to the urban fabric of the neighborhood is the continuation of two existing streets through the superblock that was created by Oglethorpe Homes. The revised plan creates a more porous fabric, and diminishes the negative impact of impenetrable superblock. Since the charrette in 2001 the public housing project has been demolished and new buildings are under construction. Construction photograph of Hope VI redevelopment of Oglethorpe Homes

LEGEND

LEGEND

Existing Buildings

Mercer University Existing Buildings Proposed Buildings

Mercer University

Open Space

Proposed Buildings 0

100'

Open Space

0

300'

500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities. 100' 300' 500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities.

STRATEGIC ACTIONS Development Incentives: Create additional incentives for the development of market-rate housing. Regulating Code: Consider an urban design code, tied to a master plan, that is consistent with the neighborhood’s historic character and pedestrian scale. The code will define and protect the character of the neighborhood’s residential streets and lanes, specify the residential, commercial, and mixed-use building types permitted, the types of frontages permitted, and the disposition of buildings on lots. Drainage: Purchase or swap property at the northwest corner of Telfair and Hazel for drainage and make aesthetic improvements. Funding: Seek non-traditional mortgage financing, bridge financing, and other financial leveraging through LISC, Enterprise, or Seedco, Freddie Mac, HUD and FHA. Street Design: Maintain parallel parking on all streets in the neighborhood, minimize curb cuts, and reduce intersection corner radii. Funding: Seek additional private sector funding for capacity building through Enterprise Foundation, Pew Charitable Trust, CRA funding for community development. Events: Establish a weekly Farmers’ Market in Tattnall Square Park. Street Design: Add metered on-street parking on all sides of the park (to add parking spaces, calm traffic and improve pedestrian character) and provide residents with parking stickers. Parks: Locate a basketball court in the Square or at another neighborhood park location. Tattnall Square: Remove cloth screening from the tennis courts or aesthetically conceal with landscaping. Safety: Bolster community policing with bicycle cops, patrol cars, and resident police officer on City property. Transit: Establish experimental trolley bus service connecting Tattnall Square to downtown; extend service to the HOPE VI site upon redevelopment. Events: Establish a “Parade of Homes” as soon as possible. Safety: Create a police kiosk for hourly stops by officers (and Federal Express pickups) at Lee’s corner store. Legal Issues: Take a comprehensive approach to clearing up confusion over old easements and unclear titles. Safety: Aggressively eliminate known illegal activities within the neighborhood. Parking: Offer incentives to reduce traffic congestion and parking demand, such as bus passes, live-where-you-work home mortgages, location efficient mortgages, cash-out parking at $3.00 per day, and complete shower facilities for bicyclists. Business Assistance: Mitigate effects on existing retailers from HOPE VI construction and relocation of residents. Bridges: Initiate appropriate action to redesign and rebuild the Hazel Street Bridge as a matter of environmental justice. Collaboration and Partnerships: Seek technical assistance to further partnerships and collaborations between faith-based institutions, Mercer, and other stakeholders.


1.

Planning Committee identifies lot, house plan, construction cost and sale price

2.

HMF bids project for construction to prequalified bidders

3.

HMF requests funds for construction from one of three sources (HMF, HHH, CHA)

4.

HMF oversees construction and sales CHA markets and promotes Corridor lifestyle

5.

At sale closing HMF reimburses loan, fees, and profits


HILLTOP BELVEDERE: The vacant property at the top of Orange Terrace is a very special site in the neighborhood. The highly visible location rises above the Medical Center and provides a marvelous view of downtown and the river. The team proposed that this underutilized site be developed for housing that might include a lookout tower or hilltop belvedere that could be a signature landmark for the neighborhood. In the event that a parking garage is constructed on the Medical Center site across the street, liner buildings wrapping the garage structure should be incorporated in the design, perhaps with offices or apartments that reflect the character of the residential neighborhood. It is important to think of the street as a public space, with buildings on both sides of the street contributing to the character of the public realm.

STREETS AND SIDEWALKS: Streets in the neighborhood have wide and varying rights of way - 60 to 85 feet. The team suggested that these rights of way be made uniform and that some be reduced to 55 or 60 feet. This uniform dimension would accommodate sidewalk paving, street trees, and utilities. The team urged that existing sidewalks be repaired and made ADA accessible. “Little Richard” Penniman Boulevard is a pivotal road accessing the neighborhood. After reviewing the preliminary plans for the extension of “Little Richard,” the team recommended that careful attention be paid to the design, so that the final alignment and scale do not divide the neighborhood. The road should be built close to the existing railroad tracks, with neighborhood access at intersections on all major streets. New home sites could be located along the extension facing the street so that the boulevard is lined with the fronts of new houses rather than the backs of old ones. The space between the boulevard and railroad tracks should be developed as a linear park.

Charrette sketch of residential building and hilltop belvedere

BEALL’S HILL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

HOUSING: The neighborhood’s historic housing contributes to its unique character. The existing variety of housing types should be the framework for all future development within the neighborhood. Recognizing this strength, the team strongly encouraged preserving and renovating as many of the original structures in the neighborhood as possible. The drawing on the left shows lots on the north side of Oglethorpe Street being in-filled to recapture the historic pattern of large houses with spaces between them. Due to the grade change in this area, these new houses would sit several feet above street level and command a prominence and stature within the neighborhood fabric. As other areas in the neighborhood are in-filled, the new construction should reinforce rather than contrast with the existing architectural character of the neighborhood.

Proposed housing and neighborhood park on Oglethorpe Street

NEW HOUSES: The extensive amount of vacant land in Beall’s Hill offers a unique opportunity to build mixed-income housing for new homeowners, with minimal displacement of existing residents. The varying topography and lot sizes invite houses of various sizes and programs—and a wide-range of affordability. The new house types reflect the vernacular character of existing houses in the neighborhood and enhance the existing streetscape. Ayers/Saint/Gross, Architects + Planners developed 15 residential model units ranging in size from 600 square feet to 3,200 square feet. Auxiliary units above two-car garages are also permitted where alleys are designated. Curb cuts are minimized to permit continuous sidewalks and visibility of garage doors is prohibited from major streets. Infill houses are sited so as to be contextual with existing adjacent residential structures.

WHAT IS OUR GOAL? Mixed-income prototypical housing developed by Ayers/Saint/Gross

HOPE VI: The team suggested slight modifications to the proposed HOPE VI plan. Suggestions included that houses on the periphery of the site should be constructed as duplexes and triplexes that have the look of large houses and the smaller townhouses should be located on the lanes at the interior of the site. This would be consistent with the historic block structure of the neighborhood, which had large homes on the streets and smaller homes on the lanes. A significant change to the urban fabric of the neighborhood is the continuation of two existing streets through the superblock that was created by Oglethorpe Homes. The revised plan creates a more porous fabric, and diminishes the negative impact of impenetrable superblock. Since the charrette in 2001 the public housing project has been demolished and new buildings are under construction. Construction photograph of Hope VI redevelopment of Oglethorpe Homes

LEGEND

LEGEND

Existing Buildings

Mercer University Existing Buildings Proposed Buildings

Mercer University

Open Space

Proposed Buildings 0

100'

Open Space

0

300'

500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities. 100' 300' 500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities.

STRATEGIC ACTIONS Development Incentives: Create additional incentives for the development of market-rate housing. Regulating Code: Consider an urban design code, tied to a master plan, that is consistent with the neighborhood’s historic character and pedestrian scale. The code will define and protect the character of the neighborhood’s residential streets and lanes, specify the residential, commercial, and mixed-use building types permitted, the types of frontages permitted, and the disposition of buildings on lots. Drainage: Purchase or swap property at the northwest corner of Telfair and Hazel for drainage and make aesthetic improvements. Funding: Seek non-traditional mortgage financing, bridge financing, and other financial leveraging through LISC, Enterprise, or Seedco, Freddie Mac, HUD and FHA. Street Design: Maintain parallel parking on all streets in the neighborhood, minimize curb cuts, and reduce intersection corner radii. Funding: Seek additional private sector funding for capacity building through Enterprise Foundation, Pew Charitable Trust, CRA funding for community development. Events: Establish a weekly Farmers’ Market in Tattnall Square Park. Street Design: Add metered on-street parking on all sides of the park (to add parking spaces, calm traffic and improve pedestrian character) and provide residents with parking stickers. Parks: Locate a basketball court in the Square or at another neighborhood park location. Tattnall Square: Remove cloth screening from the tennis courts or aesthetically conceal with landscaping. Safety: Bolster community policing with bicycle cops, patrol cars, and resident police officer on City property. Transit: Establish experimental trolley bus service connecting Tattnall Square to downtown; extend service to the HOPE VI site upon redevelopment. Events: Establish a “Parade of Homes” as soon as possible. Safety: Create a police kiosk for hourly stops by officers (and Federal Express pickups) at Lee’s corner store. Legal Issues: Take a comprehensive approach to clearing up confusion over old easements and unclear titles. Safety: Aggressively eliminate known illegal activities within the neighborhood. Parking: Offer incentives to reduce traffic congestion and parking demand, such as bus passes, live-where-you-work home mortgages, location efficient mortgages, cash-out parking at $3.00 per day, and complete shower facilities for bicyclists. Business Assistance: Mitigate effects on existing retailers from HOPE VI construction and relocation of residents. Bridges: Initiate appropriate action to redesign and rebuild the Hazel Street Bridge as a matter of environmental justice. Collaboration and Partnerships: Seek technical assistance to further partnerships and collaborations between faith-based institutions, Mercer, and other stakeholders.


HILLTOP BELVEDERE: The vacant property at the top of Orange Terrace is a very special site in the neighborhood. The highly visible location rises above the Medical Center and provides a marvelous view of downtown and the river. The team proposed that this underutilized site be developed for housing that might include a lookout tower or hilltop belvedere that could be a signature landmark for the neighborhood. In the event that a parking garage is constructed on the Medical Center site across the street, liner buildings wrapping the garage structure should be incorporated in the design, perhaps with offices or apartments that reflect the character of the residential neighborhood. It is important to think of the street as a public space, with buildings on both sides of the street contributing to the character of the public realm.

STREETS AND SIDEWALKS: Streets in the neighborhood have wide and varying rights of way - 60 to 85 feet. The team suggested that these rights of way be made uniform and that some be reduced to 55 or 60 feet. This uniform dimension would accommodate sidewalk paving, street trees, and utilities. The team urged that existing sidewalks be repaired and made ADA accessible. “Little Richard” Penniman Boulevard is a pivotal road accessing the neighborhood. After reviewing the preliminary plans for the extension of “Little Richard,” the team recommended that careful attention be paid to the design, so that the final alignment and scale do not divide the neighborhood. The road should be built close to the existing railroad tracks, with neighborhood access at intersections on all major streets. New home sites could be located along the extension facing the street so that the boulevard is lined with the fronts of new houses rather than the backs of old ones. The space between the boulevard and railroad tracks should be developed as a linear park.

Charrette sketch of residential building and hilltop belvedere

BEALL’S HILL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

HOUSING: The neighborhood’s historic housing contributes to its unique character. The existing variety of housing types should be the framework for all future development within the neighborhood. Recognizing this strength, the team strongly encouraged preserving and renovating as many of the original structures in the neighborhood as possible. The drawing on the left shows lots on the north side of Oglethorpe Street being in-filled to recapture the historic pattern of large houses with spaces between them. Due to the grade change in this area, these new houses would sit several feet above street level and command a prominence and stature within the neighborhood fabric. As other areas in the neighborhood are in-filled, the new construction should reinforce rather than contrast with the existing architectural character of the neighborhood.

“The goal   of   the   project   is   to   produce   a   sustainable   neighborhood   of   well-­‐built   housing   for   a   variety   of   incomes   and   lifestyles.    We   also  intend  to  increase  the   market  value  of    the  houses  we  build  in   Beall’s  Hill   to  encourage   private  builders   to   return   to   the   neighborhood   and   complete  the  work  we  started”

Proposed housing and neighborhood park on Oglethorpe Street

NEW HOUSES: The extensive amount of vacant land in Beall’s Hill offers a unique opportunity to build mixed-income housing for new homeowners, with minimal displacement of existing residents. The varying topography and lot sizes invite houses of various sizes and programs—and a wide-range of affordability. The new house types reflect the vernacular character of existing houses in the neighborhood and enhance the existing streetscape. Ayers/Saint/Gross, Architects + Planners developed 15 residential model units ranging in size from 600 square feet to 3,200 square feet. Auxiliary units above two-car garages are also permitted where alleys are designated. Curb cuts are minimized to permit continuous sidewalks and visibility of garage doors is prohibited from major streets. Infill houses are sited so as to be contextual with existing adjacent residential structures.

Mixed-income prototypical housing developed by Ayers/Saint/Gross

HOPE VI: The team suggested slight modifications to the proposed HOPE VI plan. Suggestions included that houses on the periphery of the site should be constructed as duplexes and triplexes that have the look of large houses and the smaller townhouses should be located on the lanes at the interior of the site. This would be consistent with the historic block structure of the neighborhood, which had large homes on the streets and smaller homes on the lanes. A significant change to the urban fabric of the neighborhood is the continuation of two existing streets through the superblock that was created by Oglethorpe Homes. The revised plan creates a more porous fabric, and diminishes the negative impact of impenetrable superblock. Since the charrette in 2001 the public housing project has been demolished and new buildings are under construction.

Construction photograph of Hope VI redevelopment of Oglethorpe Homes

LEGEND

LEGEND

Existing Buildings

Mercer University Existing Buildings

Proposed Buildings

Mercer University

Open Space

Proposed Buildings 0

100'

Open Space

0

300'

500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities. 100' 300' 500'

Post-Charrette Master Plan prepared by Ayers/Saint/Gross - The difference between the charrette and post-charrette master plans is the identification of additional residential infill opportunities.

STRATEGIC ACTIONS Development Incentives: Create additional incentives for the development of market-rate housing. Regulating Code: Consider an urban design code, tied to a master plan, that is consistent with the neighborhood’s historic character and pedestrian scale. The code will define and protect the character of the neighborhood’s residential streets and lanes, specify the residential, commercial, and mixed-use building types permitted, the types of frontages permitted, and the disposition of buildings on lots. Drainage: Purchase or swap property at the northwest corner of Telfair and Hazel for drainage and make aesthetic improvements. Funding: Seek non-traditional mortgage financing, bridge financing, and other financial leveraging through LISC, Enterprise, or Seedco, Freddie Mac, HUD and FHA. Street Design: Maintain parallel parking on all streets in the neighborhood, minimize curb cuts, and reduce intersection corner radii. Funding: Seek additional private sector funding for capacity building through Enterprise Foundation, Pew Charitable Trust, CRA funding for community development. Events: Establish a weekly Farmers’ Market in Tattnall Square Park. Street Design: Add metered on-street parking on all sides of the park (to add parking spaces, calm traffic and improve pedestrian character) and provide residents with parking stickers. Parks: Locate a basketball court in the Square or at another neighborhood park location. Tattnall Square: Remove cloth screening from the tennis courts or aesthetically conceal with landscaping. Safety: Bolster community policing with bicycle cops, patrol cars, and resident police officer on City property. Transit: Establish experimental trolley bus service connecting Tattnall Square to downtown; extend service to the HOPE VI site upon redevelopment. Events: Establish a “Parade of Homes” as soon as possible. Safety: Create a police kiosk for hourly stops by officers (and Federal Express pickups) at Lee’s corner store. Legal Issues: Take a comprehensive approach to clearing up confusion over old easements and unclear titles. Safety: Aggressively eliminate known illegal activities within the neighborhood. Parking: Offer incentives to reduce traffic congestion and parking demand, such as bus passes, live-where-you-work home mortgages, location efficient mortgages, cash-out parking at $3.00 per day, and complete shower facilities for bicyclists. Business Assistance: Mitigate effects on existing retailers from HOPE VI construction and relocation of residents. Bridges: Initiate appropriate action to redesign and rebuild the Hazel Street Bridge as a matter of environmental justice. Collaboration and Partnerships: Seek technical assistance to further partnerships and collaborations between faith-based institutions, Mercer, and other stakeholders.


Beall's Hill Development Strategy  

Historic Hills and Heights: Beall's Hill Development Stratey

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