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CSI UNDERGRADUATE CONFERENCE ON RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP, AND PERFORMANCE* Thursday, April 30, 2015 Center for the Arts, 1P-Atrium 11:00am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4:30pm

*Sponsored by the Division of Academic Affairs with funding from the CSI Student Government, the Office of Alumni Relations, and the CSI Foundation


Conference Schedule

CSI Undergraduate Conference on Research, Scholarship, and Performance 2015

Conference Schedule—Thursday, April 30, 2015

2

1:15am – 12:05pm

CSI Chamber Music Recital Recital Hall 1P-120

Noon – 4:30pm

The Gallery of the College of Staten Island 1P-112

12:15pm

Lunch available for participating students and mentors 1P-116 – pick up

1:15 pm – 2:15pm

Plenary Session —Opening remarks from Dr. Fred Naider —“I know that you know that I know that you know…” Joel David Hamkins —Symbiotic Explorations Jane Saunders (b. 1977) Williamson Theatre, 1P-111

2:15pm - 4:15pm

Poster Presentations 1P- Atrium, East and West Lounges

2:30pm – 4:00pm

CSI Musical Presentations —Chamber Music —CSI Big Band Recital Hall 1P-120

2:30pm – 4:30pm

Panel Discussion 1P-Lecture Hall

2:30pm – 4:30pm

Panel Discussion 1P-223

3:30pm – 4:30pm

Paper Presentations 1P-202

2:30pm – 4:30pm

Paper Presentations 1P-222

2:30pm - 4:30pm

Paper Presentations 1P-201

2:30pm - 4:30pm

CSI Student Art Exhibitions Art Gallery, 1P-118B

2:30pm - 4:30pm

CSI Sculpture Exhibition Atrium – The Glass Case

3:00pm - 3:45pm

Dance Program Dance Studio 1P-220


Message from the President

CSI Undergraduate Conference on Research, Scholarship, and Performance Message from the President It is my pleasure to welcome you to the 14th Annual Undergraduate Conference on Research, Scholarship, and Performance. The conference theme,â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your Passport to Knowledge,â&#x20AC;? exemplifies the breadth and depth of knowledge and talent of our undergraduate students. This annual event showcases the intellect and talent of CSI students, as well as the commitment of our faculty to provide a world-class education for our students. It is through the guidance of and the collaboration with CSI faculty that our students are able to construct research, scholarship, and performances of the outstanding caliber that you will enjoy today. This year, we have more than 200 participants in the conference, representing an extensive range of disciplines within the College.This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presentations include abstracts being presented either by individual students or groups of students, musical and dance performances, and student exhibitions of works of art. Today, you will have the opportunity to immerse yourself in creative musical and dance performances, rigorous analyses of social scientific and literary ideas and theories, and meticulous mathematical and scientific investigations and inquiries. It is important to note that CSI Undergraduate Research Awards sponsored by the CSI Foundation supported 18 of our students' research projects.This year we received additional funding from the CUNY Coordinated Undergraduate Education program which supported an additional 49 research projects. We are also extremely grateful to the office of Academic Affairs for their financial support. I would like to acknowledge Kristen Lindtvedt and Philip Halsey, who have assisted our student participants by providing workshops and technical assistance that enabled them to enhance the visual components of their presentations; and Jessica Stein, Delia Rios, and Barbara Verteramo, Office of the Provost, all of whom created a great team that handled a myriad of tasks and details. Lastly, I would like to thank Charles Liu, Professor of Engineering Science and Physics, and Jonna DeSantis, Office of Academic Affairs, for coordinating the conference. I would also like to thank the Alumni Association for donating t-shirts for the volunteers, Design Services, the Center for the Arts for their technical support, Media Services, members of the faculty review and the planning committee for the conference, and the Verrazano School and Macaulay Honors College volunteers for taking the time to assist with the organization of this event. I am indeed proud that this conference represents a true collaboration of the College community, and I appreciate the many roles played by all in presenting this conference, which highlights the critical research, scholarship, and experimentation that define and enhance the college experience. Congratulations to each and every one of today's participants! Sincerely,

William J. Fritz, PhD President 3


Art, Dance, and Music Exposition

The Department of Performing and Creative Arts

Presents

An Art, Dance, and Music Exposition at The 14th Annual CSI Undergraduate Conference on Research, Scholarship, and Performance

The Atrium,The Recital Hall,The Williamson Theatre, The Dance Studio,The Student Art Gallery, and The Gallery at the College of Staten Island Center for the Arts Thursday, April 30, 2015

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Art, Dance, and Music Exposition

T HE

RE CI TAL

HALL,

1P-120

CSI CHAMBER MUSIC RECITAL 11:15am –12:05pm A showcase of chamber music featuring students of the CSI Music Program Prof. William Bauer, Performance Coordinator Program Saltarello . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vincenzo Galilei (1520-1591) Study in A minor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matteo Carcassi (1792-1853) Rosita (Polka) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Francisco Tárrega (1852-1909) Sons de Carrilhões . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . João Teixeira Guimarães (1883-1947) Cateretê . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . José de Queiróz (1897-1968) Xodó da Baiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dilermando Reis (1916-1977) Timothy Adorno, guitar Die Forelle (The Trout) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Franz Schubert (1797-1928) Frühlingsglaube (Faith in Spring). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Franz Schubert Ständchen-Horch, Horch! Die Lerch (Hark, Hark! The Lark) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Franz Schubert Melissa Casertano, soprano

William R. Bauer, piano

Very Early . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bill Evans (1929-1980) Celia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bud Powell (1924-1966) Mood Indigo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Duke Ellington (1899-1974) Jose Mendez, piano

Dominick Tancredi, electric bass

Sonata No. 2 in D Major, Op. 94a............................................................................Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953) I. Moderato Dr. Dan Auerbach, violin Junwei Jiang, piano

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Art, Dance, and Music Exposition

T HE

W I L L I AMSON

T HE AT RE

1P-111

PLENARY SESSION 1:30pm – 2:15pm Performance section Prof. David Keberle, Faculty Advisor Symbiotic Explorations..................................................................................Jane Saunders (b. 1977) World Premiere I. These Words are a Vessel II. Attachment III. Find a Way Jane Saunders—flute, voice, MAX/MSP Programming and Live Manipulation of Sound Brian Saunders—electronic drum kit, AJ Parascandola—percussion Charles Connelly—guitar, Hanna Cosgriff—voice, Alvin Dan—voice, Faith Walton—voice, Damian LaRocco—voice, William Owens—dance, Amanda Davis— dance This three-movement work is scored for amplified flute, voices, percussion, and dance, with live computer interaction. The performance, including students from the CSI Music Program, is a reflection of the relationships between traditional performance techniques and their interaction with the most recent computer technology. To achieve this effort, I divided the artistic process into three foundational categories. The first portion of my creative process was devoted towards building and designing the applicable audio computer software. Utilizing the object-oriented application MAX/MSP, I built a series of digital devices specifically for this composition. These “patches” designed with MAX/MSP serve not only as a conduit for prerecorded material but also act as active participants in the piece affecting change with each and every performance. This turns technology from a passive application into an active participant in the creative process ultimately providing the audience with a genuinely unique listening experience each time the piece is performed. The second portion of my time was involved in working with the specific instrumentalists/vocalists and inserting the software into their performance techniques and habits. The third element was the creation of the written score. It was my aim to compose a work reflecting and utilizing my research with both the software and musicians arranged into a meaningful and coherent whole. In an emotional context, this piece is derivative of my time as an international touring musician with The Greatest Fear, a dark rock and melodic metal performance group. The first movement, These Words are a Vessel, acknowledges the power contained in the spoken word. Attachment, the second movement, is a reflection of how linear thought can compromise an individual’s ability to be consciously in the moment. Finally, Find a Way, is a celebration of man’s perseverance to communicate with one another.

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Art, Dance, and Music Exposition

T HE

RE CI TAL

HALL

1P-120

CSI MUSIC PROGRAM – CHAMBER MUSIC 2:30pm – 3:00pm A showcase of chamber music featuring students of the CSI Music Program Prof. William Bauer, Performance Coordinator

Program Aufschwung (Soaring) from Fantasiestücke, Op.12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robert Schumann (1810-1856) Sonata in F major, Op. 10, no. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) Junwei Jiang, piano Saltarello . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vincenzo Galilei (1520-1591) Study in A minor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matteo Carcassi (1792-1853) Rosita (Polka) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Francisco Tárrega (1852-1909) Sons de Carrilhões . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . João Teixeira Guimarães (1883-1947) Cateretê . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . José de Queiróz (1897-1968) Xodó da Baiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dilermando Reis (1916-1977) Timothy Adorno, guitar Souvenirs, Op. 28. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Samuel Barber (1910-1981) III. Pas de Deux V. Hesitation-Tango Hosea Mak, piano Tobias Shuangfeng Deng, piano Very Early . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bill Evans (1929-1980) Celia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bud Powell (1924-1966) Mood Indigo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Duke Ellington (1899-1974) Jose Mendez, piano

Dominick Tancredi, electric bass

Sonata No. 2 in D Major, Op. 94a............................................................................Sergei Prokofiev (1891-1953) I. Moderato Dr. Dan Auerbach, violin Junwei Jiang, piano

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Art, Dance, and Music Exposition

T HE

RE CI TAL

HALL

1P-120

CSI JAZZ BIG BAND—featuring student arrangements

3:00pm – 4:00pm Prof. Michael Morreale, Director

The CSI Big Band The CSI Big Band explores literature of that genre ranging from swing to modern with an emphasis on clarity and ensemble performance and development of each individual player's musicianship. Today’s program is called "Stocks, Standards, and Classics" featuring: "stock" arrangements - arrangements of jazz standards by established arrangers like Sammy Nestico, and classics – from giants like Billy Strayhorn and Duke Ellington. This performance will also spotlight the work of student composers Grove Rune and Jose Mendez, both of whom are graduating this spring with a BS in Music. Their compositions and arrangements this afternoon represent an important element of studies in Jazz Harmony, Arranging, and Composition as part of the BS Concentration in Jazz Studies and Performance. The CSI Big Band Tim Adorno—guitar Folaranmi Aremu-Bashir—trombone Michael Basta—tenor saxophone Thomas Christy—electric bass Al DeRosa—piano Sean Feldman—drums Kyle Henry—tenor saxophone Patrick Lane—contra-bass

Jennie Lee—guitar Mauricio Lopez—trumpet Kayade Morris—alto saxophone Ari Parness—guitar Andrew Robles—trombone Faith Walton—piano Brendan Woods—drums Aidan Yurich—electric bass

Program Moten Swing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Benny and Buster Moten, arranged by Sammy Nestico I’ve Never Been in Love Before . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frank Loesser, arranged by Grove Rune From One Place to Another . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . composed and arranged by Jose Mendez Grizzly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . composed and arranged by Grove Rune Featuring Grove Rune – vocalist Black and Tan Fantasy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Duke Ellington, arranged by Michael Morreale Take the A Train . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . composed and arranged by Billy Strayhorn Other selections to be announced, subject to change

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Art, Dance, and Music Exposition

T HE

DANCE

STUDIO,

1P-220

CSI DANCE PROGRAM 3:00pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3:45pm The Training of a Dancer Prof. Niambi Keyes, Dance Instructor Dan 101- Contemporary Dance Technique I Dan 122 - Black Dance Workshop Their presentation will include: A Lecture/Demonstration and excerpts from Spring 2015 Concert Dance Students: Sheena Hall,Toni Curtis, Jalesia Lewis,Tajah Griffiths, Sierra Coombs,Tiffany Fergurson Merritt, Samuel Paasewa Prof. Walter Rutledge, dance instructor Dan 232 Ballet II Excerpt from Spring Concert Big Spender Choreography: Students under the supervision of Prof. Walter Rutledge Music: Cy Coleman and Dorothy Fields from the Broadway musical Sweet Charity Introduction by Ruth Socko Cast Varia E. Auguste Deguene Cisse Sara Cordova Kim Forsyth Alexis Gordon Megan Mallon

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Cayla Pelegrino Ali Romero Ruth Socko Erica Vitale Crystal Zabas


Art, Dance, and Music Exposition

CS I

S T UDE NT

ART

G A L L E RY,

1P-118B

UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH CONFERENCE EXHIBITION 2:30pm–4:00pm The Spring Art Program Exhibition is a student-curated group exhibition representing the wide range of talent in the CSI Art Program. This year’s exhibition includes work in drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, and photography. Curated by CSI Art and Photo majors: Victoria Hertel, Taylor Keating, and Gary Pizzolo Faculty advisor: Professor Marianne Weil

THE

GALLERY

Patrick Serao Jessica Abalos Mariel Elia Jo Cavallo Noelle Nicchi Jeehea Park Gianna Ramage Anthony Manieri Rohini Dewanarayana Jovilyn Caballero Victoria Connely Sidney Veloz Nancy Chan Haiwen Jia Angel Ocampo Amgad Seidi Olivia Brown

Andrew Caddell Edtya Kostka Makowska Amanda Ramos Hollie Syphertt Kiara Lumley Jill Sypniewski Michelle Ovchinnikova Mei Xin Lin Angelica Sanford Christopher Menley Courtney Kennemur Brian Ortiz Jessica Schoberl Troy Welch Janet Gonzalez Darlene Livingston Bridgid Davies Mildred Piccinnini Dennise DeJesus

Elizabeth Peteya Andrei Karpov Tiffany Lazok Yaik Kar Chow Brian Moore Gabriella Cardoza Jessica Maldonado Olivia Brown James Merlis Meeru Chaudhary Enrico Cucco Hao Luo Regina Capasso Kami Kimmel Ryan Nieves Chigozie Okoye Michael O’Shea Jiayong Chen Steve Lopez

OF

THE

COLLEGE

OF

S TAT E N

ISLAND,

1P-112

AN INSTALLATION BY SCHEREZADE GARCIA

Noon – 4:30pm

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Art, Dance, and Music Exposition

CFA

AT RI UM

-

THE

GLASS

CASE

CSI SCULPTURE EXHIBITION 2:30pm - 4:30pm Professor Marianne Weil, Assistant Professor of Sculpture

Inside/Outside For this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Undergraduate Research Conference, students from Intermediate Sculpture, ART 250, investigate the platonic solid and negative space. Polyhedrons cast in plaster with steel, copper, and wood inclusions provide subjective content to each sculpture. Participants Jonathan Bromley Jason Cortes David Giordano Aaron Li Hao Luo James Merlis Brian Moore Ryan Nieves Wioletta Oszczapinski Darius Vialva Special Projects in Sculpture: Ariana Smith: welded steel and stone Rosalie Zawadzki: stone carving Jonathan Bromley: wood carving

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Research Paper Presentations Center for the Arts 2:30pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:30pm

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Research Paper Presentations

1P-222 2:30pm – 4:30pm PAP E R

# 2 2

“The Pope of Silent Action” Martin J. King IV Faculty Mentor: Professor Mark Lewis Department of History Pope Pius XII has become one of the most controversial figures in Holocaust study. His supporters cite thousands of cases of direct Vatican intervention, which he authorized, that saved many lives. However, his opponents accuse him of doing very little.The critics of Pius rest their case on the fact that the Pope never fully and publicly denounced the Holocaust, and some even accuse the Pope of being an avid supporter of Hitler, despite never having met him. In doing my research I have found cases where it was cited or at least implied that the Pope had authorized aid, hiding, or rescue attempts for people sought by the Axis. Additionally, the Vatican conducted clandestine activities such as financially investing its funds into Allied heavy and war-time industries, and passing along Axis war plans to the Allies. Pius’ words and actions reflect a preference of practical action to theoretical or abstract gestures. The Pope also prioritized the Vatican’s neutrality due to his desire to play a role in brokering peace, in addition to the fact that for most of the war the Vatican was surrounded by the Axis Powers. Despite this, Pius and the Vatican were constantly harassed by both Mussolini and Hitler for alleged breaches of Vatican neutrality.These accusations frequently were thinly veiled threats to Vatican sovereignty. With this in mind, the Pope continued to do what he believed was the best course of action. The actions and inactions of Pius XII, like those of any historical figure, will always be subject to criticism and debate. It is important for historians to realize that after years of study, they have a much clearer picture of the events of a period than anyone living during that period. My research shows that Pius was not a supporter of Hitler, nor was he an anti-Semite. Pius, like so many others, was a man caught in a terrible situation, tasked with making “choiceless choices.” 16

PAPER

#31

Research Assistant for “Portrait of a Woman in a Silk Dress” Adriane Musacchio (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Zara Anishanslin Department of History As a recipient of the Undergraduate Research Fellowship, I worked alongside Professor Zara Anishanslin as her research assistant for her book, Portrait of a Woman in a Silk Dress.This book focuses on a 1746 portrait of a colonial merchant’s wife in a silk dress.The History Series at Yale University Press will be releasing this book in Fall 2015. Throughout the Summer/Fall of 2014, I have learned what it means to be a research assistant for a book. As research assistant, I learned how to acquire image permissions and how to fact check/analyze 18th century sources. A big task I completed was coming up with an image log sheet for all of the images that will be used in the book. On this sheet, I included the name of each image and artist, price quotes, contact information of the institutions holding the images, image files, permission forms, and whether or not permission rights have been granted.The log sheet will be submitted to Yale University Press this year. I have also fact checked and researched 18th century primary sources, images in museums, online history collections, and other information accessed through different archives. I tracked down these sources from the U.S. and U.K. Some of my fact checking was also done by ordering the Boston Gazette,The Antiquarian, History of the Baptist Church of Oyster Bay, and Extracts from the Court Books of the Weavers’ Company of London to the NY Public Library and Colombia University’s library. These research materials confirmed information having to do with Robert Feke, Simon Julins, 18th century paintings, and Queen Caroline. I also helped locate an 18th-century probate inventory taken of Charles Apthorp’s estate, located the probate inventory of Thomas Willing, found information on Judah Hayes and Queen Caroline, came to the conclusion that the Rock Hall Museum’s copy of Landscape was fake, and located the wills of Reverend Garthwaite, Reverend Dannye,Thomas Willing, and Anne Willing.


Research Paper Presentations

PAP E R

# 1 6 0

The Effect of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Na+ - K+ ATPase Pump Alexis Gorin Faculty Mentor: Professor Zaghloul Ahmed Department of Physical Therapy Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive technique that has been used in humans and animals to stimulate target brain regions in order to enhance cognitive and motor functions, and to help in the recovery following certain conditions. Literature regarding brain transcranial stimulation shows that anodal current increases while cathodal current decreases excitability of neurons.The expression of Na/KATPase pump protien is differentially affected by anodal and cathodal tDCS of mouse motor cortex. The sodium-potassium ATPase pump is used to create a differential charge of ions across the plasma membrane by transporting 3 sodium ions into the extracellular fluid and 2 potassium ions into the intracellular fluid.The Na/K-ATPase pump keeps the concentration of sodium ions in the cytoplasm at low levels.Therefore, any intracytoplasmic increase of the concentration of this ion will bring the cell membrane potential closer to an action potential. We reasoned that the decrease of the Na/K-ATPase protien expression following anodal tDCS would increase cytoplasmic sodium ions concentration and may contribute to the increase of the neuronsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; excitability.

PAPER

#60

Investigation of the Effect of Trans-spinal Direct Current Stimulation on New Neural Cell Proliferation and Migration Jemima Alice Kadima Faculty Mentor: Professor Zaghoul Ahmed Department of Neuroscience To investigate the effect of trans-spinal direct current stimulation on new neural cell proliferation and migration.The project will elucidate the differential effects of cathodal, anodal, sham treatments on neural cells in the spinal cord.Three groups of animals will be stimulated for 40 minutes/day for 5 days. Animals will be injected with Brdu (150 mg/kg) every day for 5 days. One day after the stimulation/Brdu injection, animals will be sacrificed and perfused. Spinal cord segments under, caudal, and rostral to the DC electrode will be removed, fixed, and cryoprotected.Transverse slices will be obtained from these segments and immuno double stained for Brdu, glial, and neuronal markers. Cell number, location relative to central canal will be compared in the three groups.

However, the effect of anodal and cathodal DC on Na/K-ATPase protien expression is not yet understood. Whether it is directly affected (e.g. through gene expression) or, indirectly affected through neural activity. Lidocaine is a local anesthetic that blocks voltage sodium channels hence the generation of action potentials. We will use this anesthetic to block brain activity during tDCS. We do this to isolate the direct from the indirect effects of tDCS on sodium pump.

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Research Paper Presentations

PAP E R

#

151

Music in Two Different Worlds Natalie Piccione Faculty Mentor: Professor Russell Rosen Department of World Languages and Literatures My study looks at the relationship between American Sign Language (ASL) Deaf people and hearing people. Music is embedded into the hearing culture. People with normal hearing listen to music, some play music and sing songs. Research studies in music consistently show that music contributes to cognitive development, language learning, product identification, marketing, and mechanisms for social control. I find that the hearing people who are taking the courses use music as a part in their learning process and some became interested in analyzing, involving and reinterpreting music in ASL. In contrast, the deaf community, music is not one of the norms in their culture. For deaf people that have some sort of hearing can enjoy music, they are the ones who are motivated to interpret music. Some deaf people do enjoy music even though they cannot hear, but only when music is interpreted in ASL. For the deaf people who do not enjoy music, it is because they cannot enjoy music in general.They develop ASL literature, which do not use or rely on sound, hearing, written or spoken English language. This study will ascertain whether in what way (a) ASL influenced hearing students’ conception and consumption of music, and (b) ASL - interpreted music influenced deaf people’s conception and consumption of music for Deaf people and hearing students will be compared to assess the relationship between ASL and music. I will interview forty people, ten people who are deaf and enjoy music, ten people who are deaf and do not enjoy music, ten people who hearing and learned ASL, and ten people who are hearing never learned ASL. All questions will be related to music, the knowledge of Deaf Culture and ASL to see if there is connection between the depths of exposure of ASL and Deaf culture to the hearing world in music. The study is currently ongoing.The relationships between ASL and music have yet to be determined, and conclusions have yet to be drawn. 18

1P-202 2:30pm – 4:30pm PAPER

#94

Healthcare System Failures: The Prevalence of Type II Diabetes In African Americans Kellie Joseph (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Bilge Yesil Department of Media Culture Based on an analysis of Type II Diabetes among African-Americans, this research paper explores some of the failures found in the U.S healthcare system. It makes the following arguments:The United States has one of the most expensive healthcare systems in the world, yet it has one of the highest rates of diabetes, with AfricanAmericans being the most affected.The unusually high rate of diabetes in this population reveals failures, such as the low number of primary care doctors, the absence of cultural awareness among healthcare providers, and negative economic conditions that limit the availability of healthy food options in certain geographic locations. Drawing on existing research on the relationship between the U.S. healthcare system and racial, cultural and economic factors, I will gather quantitative data from a number of family health centers in Staten Island to learn about their practices concerning African-American patients with Type II Diabetes. Some questions I seek to answer are 1) Among the patients that frequent the center, how many are African-Americans? 2) How many of the African-American patients suffer from Type II Diabetes? and 3) What are these patients’ access rates to primary care doctors and specialists?


Research Paper Presentations

PAP E R

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PAPER

#96

Implication of Intercultural Communication on International Business Veronica LaManna (The Verrazano School)

RFID Applications and Their Implications on Security and Privacy Sidhartha Mishra (The Verrazano School)

Faculty Mentor: Professor Bilge Yesil Department of Media Culture

Faculty Mentor: Professors Bilge Yesil, Xiaowen Zhan Department of Media Culture

Contemporary business organizations are becoming more globalized through access to new technologies and international opportunities. As a result, they seek to increase their FDI, or foreign direct investment, to maximize profits and expand their market share, but often fail when they venture abroad. The main reason for such failure is lack of research concerning the cultural factors that shape a given foreign market and consumer demand. If companies are willing to spend money to go abroad and take a risk, why are they not sufficiently researching the cultural dynamics of foreign markets they are interested in? When a company fails to research the target market, they often make mistakes that cost them money and negatively impact their reputation. A prominent example of a global company is McDonald’s, which has been successful abroad because it has allocated its resources to understand its foreign markets. It has also made costly mistakes, such as offering products that don’t appeal to consumers.To overcome this, McDonald’s has offered menu items that correspond to local tastes. As existing research on this topic shows, there is a relationship between intercultural communication and international business. In light of this, shouldn’t business students be taught intercultural communication courses?

Since the early 2000s, the use of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology has gained popularity in various industries, from medicine to retail. RFID is based on the radio signaling technology which allows an RFID tag to communicate with a stationary or mobile RFID reader within a certain range.This connection between the tag and the reader allows for instant and wireless communication and facilitates fast transfer of data and provides smooth operations in specific areas.The decreasing cost of RFID production has led to wide and varied usage, helping the technology gain more popularity. Consequently, new applications of RFID are being implemented, for instance in credit cards, passports, driver licenses etc. In the meantime, new RFID applications give rise to new concerns about security and privacy, such as data theft and data corruption.This research project seeks to study these privacy and security issues related to the RFID enabled technology by discussing possible vulnerabilities, including the types of attacks. It will also explore some of the possible measurements and approaches that may be implemented to mitigate the possibility of privacy infringement and data loss.

In this research project I aim to understand the benefits of cultural awareness for businesses and explore the most efficient ways to teach such awareness to students.

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Research Paper Presentations

PAP E R

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PAPER

#131

Ernesto Lecuona and “Siboney”: More than Just a Song Sofia Cadavid Arango

The Introduction of a New Element into Religion Blanca Benitez

Faculty Mentor: Professor Francisco Soto Department of World Languages and Literatures

Faculty Mentor: Professor Francisco Soto Department of World Languages and Literatures

My research investigates the life and work of Cuban born Ernesto Lecuona (1895-1963), one of the most celebrated composers and pianists in Latin-America. The child of a Spanish father and a Cuban mother, Ernesto began playing the piano at a very young age, learning from his older sister. From early on it became evident that Lecuona would grow up to be one of the greatest masters in classical music. According to the Juan March Foundation, "[Lecouna’s] music explores Caribbean rhythms and melodies in an imaginative and original way, while introducing elements of fine music (my translation).” Lecuona created more than 600 musical compositions during his lifetime. Especially noteworthy is Siboney, considered his masterpiece, which was composed in 1929.(The Siboney were an indigenous people of Cuba related to the Taíno nation whose number exceeded 200,000 before the Spanish colonization.) In this famous composition, we can see a combination of Lecuona’s Cuban/Caribbean culture and the love he had for his country and its people. With only a few notes from his piano and some very specifically selected lyrics, the world was able to feel Lecuona’s nostalgia and insurmountable love for his homeland and its Caribbean roots. Focusing specifically on this song, I will analyze and examine how Cuban/Caribbean culture dramatically influenced his music. I will textually examine the name of the song as well as the meaning of the lyrics to reveal their anecdotal nature in relation to Lecouna’s own life and Cuban/Caribbean identity. With this presentation we will learn how Lecuona creatively combined his particular personal story and cultural diversity, as well as the history of his homeland to create a masterpiece that allowed him to articulate his deep feelings and respect for Cuba. Lecuona is a fine example of how history, both personal and collective, and music (i.e., any artistic expression) can be merged into one and used as inspiration for artistic creativity.

Events that happened centuries ago have shaped the Spanish-speaking Caribbean of today. AfroCaribbean Santería, a religious syncretism established during the sixteenth century, is a good example. It has been well document that the indigenous populations of the Caribbean were decimated after the arrival of the Spanish empire. As a result, the importation of black African slaves began to replenish the physical work that the indigenous people had performed.

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In addition to being forced by Spaniards to labor on plantations, black slaves were obligated and forced to follow the Catholic religion. If they did not accept the empire’s religion, they would be killed or punished. As a strategy for survival, Africans began a process of syncretism to mix their religious beliefs with the Catholic faith.This hybridization created a system called Santería, which combined Catholicism with aspects of African religions that exist even today. In the practice of Santería, African Gods are placed within figures of Catholic saints; the saints are aligned with orishas (deities) of similar characteristics or attributes. My research will explore the religious worship of Changó, who is syncretized with Santa Bárbara.The cult of Changó has left a cultural mark on the way the Spanishspeaking Caribbean dresses, its food and even the music that is produced. Changó is the oricha of fire, lightning, thunder, and war. He represents beauty and male virility; his energy is represented with the colors red and white. Santa Bárbara, on the other hand, is a young woman, independent and courageous, who was an early Christian saint and martyr; her colors are also represented by red and white.The gender hybridization of this figure, along with other syncretic aspects of Changó/Santa Bárbara will be analyzed and explored in this presentation to better understand the syncretic practices and legacy of Africans in the Caribbean.


Research Paper Presentations

1P-201 2:30pm – 4:30pm PAP E R

# 1 2 3

A Crack in Creativity, a Loss of Identity: An Analysis of Esther Greenwood in Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar Medine Kovacevic (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Cate Marvin Department of English Sylvia Plath's coming of age novel The Bell Jar explores various ideological themes that the heroine, Esther Greenwood, confronts throughout the entirety of her story.This paper explores the narrative of a young woman living in the 1950's who is naturalistically artistic and lives her life as a highly observant, passionate, and analytical individual.This paper also looks at how her eclectic persona affects her during a time where she loses part of herself due to extreme depression. During this bleak time in her life, a metaphorical bell jar descends upon her, crippling her naturally vibrant artistic sense of self.This paper will draw out and explain the phenomena of what caused this seemingly sudden depression, while reflecting on how Esther Greenwood deals with being trapped by the fog of this metaphorical bell jar; how the lack or absence of her artistic and craftsmanship like abilities cripples her. With a new and innovative angle of exploration to this theme of the loss of oneself physically, emotionally, and personally, this paper will open many more forums for discussion of how Esther Greenwood's faces challenges of being a female artist.

PAPER

#51

The Benefits of Neurodiversity for Creative Expression in Poetry Melissa Meyers Faculty Mentor: Professor Ellen Goldner Department of English Scientists recognize that diversity among humans is beneficial to our evolutionary development; however, we often deny this when considering varieties in cognitive functioning. Individuals whose minds behave or perceive differently than the general population are labeled as diseased, as suffering from disorders, such as depression, autism, bipolar disorder, or anxiety disorder. After diagnosis people may feel stigmatized or held back because their neurological differences are seen only as disabilities. I challenge the perception that neurodiversity limits an individual, and focus on how unique perception and functioning prove to be beneficial traits. After identifying the positive attributes of several “disorders,” I examine works by poets– including Emily Dickinson,Tito Mukhopadhyay, Sylvia Plath,T.S. Eliot, and Robert Lowell– to provide examples of how these qualities can flourish as creative expression. I employ an interdisciplinary methodology linking aspects of neurological variation to close attention to the elements of poetry. Poetry provides a flexible environment with the option of control, ideal for a means of expression or an outlet for communication for the neurologically diverse.

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Research Paper Presentations

PAP E R

# 3 4

PAPER

#134

The Instabilities of Teenagers Depicted in Young Adult Literature Meryandree Luna

Comical Misogny: The Degradation of Women in the American Superhero Genre Nicole Adamo

Faculty Mentor: Professor Lara Saguisag Department of English

Faculty Mentor: Professor Sharifa Hampton Department of English

As a current English Literature major I believe this research is a great opportu\nity to look further into young adult literature and adolescence in general. In this project I want to look into the mental instabilities of adolescent characters in young adult literature and how it affects the character by causing them to have an erratic personality. I also want to analyze how these disequilibriums of human growth drives the character to make poor decisions and seek stability not in their inner self but in others.

DC and Marvel are two top grossing comic book companies both widely known for their audacious superheroes and their malicious (and often crazed) villains. What most fans do not realize while reading about or watching their favorite heroes/heroines in action, is the misogynistic elements that are embedded into the majority of their storylines.The women in comic books, both villainous and heroic, are not only constantly over shadowed by their male counterparts, they are subjected to being consistently sexualized, abused and brutally murdered. There is a large and growing body of scholarship that examines and explores the gendered roles of heroes and heroines in the comic book industry.This research illuminates how these misogynistic elements have always been apparent in both DC and Marvel’s traditional storylines from the 1930s, as well as their comic book story relaunches in the twenty-first century.The initial intent of female heroines or villainesses, to be independent and goal oriented, is slaughtered by the modern misogynistic execution; women’s roles in comic books are narrowed down to two distinct and demeaning categories: the love interest of and/or to create a tragic backstory for their male counterparts.

In order to compose a well written, informative research paper I need to analyze this subject carefully and in depth. I will dissect the character of Holden Caulfield in The Catcher in the Rye and how his mental instability drove him to make weak choices by his unsettled personality. I will compare Caulfield’s character to other characters in young adult books and look for scholarly sources that both support and oppose my argument. Besides looking for these irregularities in book characters, I will interview adults and have them explain how they have evolved from their young adult stage and get personal examples of when and where they felt mentally unstable and how it affected them during that time. I will also give personal examples of how I transitioned from having an erratic personality as a teenager into an adult who discovered her true identity. With this information I will be able to compare Holden’s personality and his personal issues to that of contemporary young adults and show how Salinger was able to create the adequate teenage character that to this day other teenagers can relate to.

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As a feminist and a die-hard comic book fan, I could not let this dis-service be “masked” any longer.


Research Paper Presentations

1P-Lecture Hall 2:30pm – 4:30pm PANE L

DI S CUSSION

“Rethinking Literary Classics: Considerations of Shakespeare, Defoe, Burney, Austen, and Walpole” PAP E R

# 6

Incestuous Behaviors in The Castle of Otranto Menat Aly Faculty Mentor: Professor Michael Schuyler Department of English In this paper, I take a closer look at Horace Walpole's The Castle of Otranto, which reveals the existence of incest within the story via its main characters.The incestuous nature evolves due to the characters’ hunger for authority, and lordship. In the most obvious example, as Manfred's desperation to find an heir and to maintain lordship increases, it leads to his incestuous ways. I explore each of Manfred's extreme actions that are driven by his incestuous desires, and through various examples, I explain that Manfred surely recognizes his incestuous acts. While characters such as Manfred and Frederic act upon incestuous intentions, many of the other characters are oblivious to their immoral nature. I explore how other character's desperation leads to their submission to incestuous actions, as well as Fredric's character whose desires lead him to be openly incestuous. While others recognize the presence of incest and rail against it, it – ironically – does not prevent them from later falling into the same incestuous behaviors. n the end, this text -- widely considered the first Gothic novel -- uses early horror tropes as a means of showing that immorality among humans is even more terrifying than the supernatural occurrences.

PAPER

#116

Game of Dress-Up Gone Wrong? The Influence of 19th-Century Class Divisions on Characters and Relationships in Jane Austen’s Emma Elissa Como (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Michael Schuyler Department of English This essay will analyze how social class distinctions, moral values, and the attainment of self-knowledge is presented and developed through the characters in Jane Austen’s Emma. I will begin by examining the social structure and expectations of 19th century England. Aspects of Marxist literary criticism will be utilized to examine how the social and economic forces of Austen’s life are reflected through her characters and their actions. After introducing the acceptable actions and separation of classes during this time period, I will then introduce the disapproved of and unusual relationship between Emma and Harriet. Austen’s emphasis on class distinction and social mobility in this novel, specifically in this relationship, will reflect the importance it held in Austen’s life. Emma is born into a well-known and influential family of high status, while Harriet’s birth class is unknown (resulting in her lower class ranking).The segment of this essay regarding their relationship will begin with Emma’s intentions, as she makes the decision to “reform” Harriet and to move her up in the social rankings. I will then examine how Emma attempts to do this and the reality of accomplishing this goal. I will demonstrate how this attempt at social mobility effects and develops both characters.The conclusion of this essay will show how Austen’s characters and relationships portray the ideas of 19th century England regarding the importance of social class distinctions, moral values, the attainment of self-knowledge, and the impossibility of social mobility.

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Research Paper Presentations

PAP E R

# 9

PAPER

#29

A Woman with Agency in The Winter’s Tale Yara Edrees

Moll Flanders as an Empowering Deviant and Early Feminist Elizabeth Leigh

Faculty Mentor: Professor Michael Schuyler Department of English

Faculty Mentor: Professor Michael Schuyler Department of English

In William Shakespeare’s play,The Winter’s Tale, we see that Paulina has agency, which was looked down upon during the Elizabethan era. Because of the agency that Paulina possesses, she is able to speak out against Leontes. I will explore the many moments throughout the play in which Paulina uses her agency in order to defend and help Hermione. Despite Leontes’ constant demand for her to stop talking, Paulina continues, which makes it seem as if she is questioning Leontes’ rule and, therefore his authority. I will discuss how Paulina’s agency often leads to the misconception of being labeled as a shrew or as too masculine for a woman.

Traditionally in western culture women have been expected to assume demure and subservient positions in society.This common attitude causes us to have a hard time considering women capable of being steadfastly socially defiant.

However, it is because of both Paulina’s courage to stand up to Leontes, while everyone else is unable to do so, and her determination to make Leontes remorseful, that Paulina becomes looked at as a woman with power. Through this paper, I will show that even in Shakespeare's time, women, indeed, had agency.

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In particular, we struggle to imagine a woman triumphing as a criminal. Daniel Defoe crafts a morally reprehensible character in Moll Flanders, but despite this fact (or maybe because of it) Moll as a character can be seen as empowering to the women of her time as well as to women today. Moll Flanders rejects the restrictions her culture tries to apply to her and in doing so encourages other women to do the same. In this essay I will discuss the ways in which Moll Flanders can be seen as an early feminist character because of her non-compliance with social norms and because of her status as a successful female criminal.


Research Paper Presentations

PAP E R

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Evelina: A Story of How Ownership to a Name Affects a Young Lady’s Acceptance into Society Kristen Mastrangelo Faculty Mentor: Professor Michael Schuyler Department of English During the Regency Period of England, literature was being published by primarily male authors. It was looked down upon and regarded as inappropriate for female writers to be published. One of these writers was Frances Burney. Frances Burney’s entrance into the history of the literary world began in 1778 with her anonymous publication of Evelina. She feared being ridiculed by society. Being humiliated in society was one of the worst things that could happen to a woman. I completely understand why Burney would want to publish her novel without her name. However, in doing so, she parallels her title character of the novel. No name brings along unknown ownership and identity. Evelina is a young woman who does not know where she fits into society because the surname by which she can be identified with cannot be claimed. Just as Burney eventually will be found out and acclaim ownership of her novel, so will Evelina claim a last name and understand where she belongs. In this paper, I will look at how ownership of a name allows for someone to understand the importance of identity which was of most importance during the Regency Era.

PAPER

#14

British Imperialist Ideals in Robinson Crusoe Joseph Palumbo Faculty Mentor: Professor Michael Schuyler Department of English In Daniel Defoe’s 1719 novel Robinson Crusoe, Defoe utilizes the titular character as a means of exposing and criticizing expansionist ideals that were present during the imperialistic reign of England. Written during the Augustan Age, Robinson Crusoe was published in a vital historical moment when England was extending its grasp towards foreign territories that the nation soon colonized. The global trade market was booming as exotic commodities and slaves were being sent across the world and as ruling imperial nations purchased them. An outspoken essayist and pamphlet writer who advocated for the expansion of England, Defoe wrote Robinson Crusoe as a means of commenting on the economic growth and domineering stance England was taking toward its colonized lands.This paper analyzes Defoe’s past activism with England’s growing expansion, while also evaluating previous academic articles that have dissected Defoe’s novel in regards to its relation with imperialistic ideologies. In it, I will also explore how the character of Robinson Crusoe comes to dominate and to establish a social hierarchy over the island he is stranded on, all of which further parallels the expansionist principles of England’s growing empire.The actions that Crusoe takes throughout the narrative come to exemplify what the ideal Englishman was thought to be during this era, and I will expose how Defoe depicts Crusoe as being a colonizing “man of his time.”

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Research Paper Presentations

PAP E R

# 1 8

Evelina and the Zone of Proximal Development Jonathan Velez Faculty Mentor: Professor Michael Schuyler Department of English The idea of a coming-of-age narrative has long been one of the true staples of the literary world, in large part, because it allows readers to relate to their favorite protagonist directly through shared experiences and growth. However, growth, especially in literature can be extremely difficult to quantify and to document. I posit that we, as readers, can apply the modern day theory, Zone of Proximal Development, often utilized and studied by teachers, to any coming-of-age narrative so that we can quantify and understand the growth of our favorite characters. As such, in this essay, I utilize the text Evelina, by Frances Burney as an example in my argument for the Zone of Proximal Development's effectiveness in proving growth. I explain the theory of the Zone of Proximal Development, the technique widely utilized in association with the theory, Scaffolding, and how this all relates to the character of Evelina, who, is one of the first true heroines to come-of-age in literature.

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1P-223 PANEL

DISCUSSION

Hot off the Presses: Gender, Identity, and Exile in Today's Multicultural Literature PAPER

#154

The Impact of Femininity upon the Formation, Distortion, and Redemption of Masculine Identity Michael Abenante Faculty Mentor: Professor Maria Bellamy Department of English What does it mean to be a man? What does it mean in 2015? How much of that meaning do we owe to women? The evolving characteristics, societal requirements, and perceptions of masculinity have always been intertwined with the role and standing of women. In their recent novels,The Good Lord Bird and This is How You Lose Her, authors James McBride and Junot Diaz (respectively) take up these issues through their portrayals of Henry and Yunior, their interactions with the women in their lives and their efforts to form their masculine identities. In my presentation, I will highlight specific points in each novel that demonstrate these young men being handed an identity other than their own, as well as how they initially accept and eventually reject them in favor of becoming their true selves. I will also summarize how specific interactions with males, during the young men’s upbringings, distort their manhood and how experiences with women eventually help them identify and define that manhood.The novels demonstrate that historically acceptable and perpetuated notions of masculine strength and feminine weakness are baseless, distorted social constructions. As a society, we have generally failed to acknowledge female strength and influence in developing males, aside from their equality as human beings. McBride’s and Diaz’ works ultimately argue that true masculinity recognizes the impact of strong women upon male identity, society and the need to clarify the blurred lines between sexes. These acclaimed novels show that the discourses regarding masculinity and gender roles are as hotly debated today as at any point in our history.


Research Paper Presentations

PAP E R

# 1 3 8

The Children of the Exiled: Yunior and Goyito’s SelfDestructive Behavior Valeriana Dema Faculty Mentor: Professor Maria Bellamy Department of English My essay examines the self-destructive behaviors of the characters Yunior in Junot Diaz’s 2012 novel This is How You Lose Her and Goyito in Cristina Garcia’s 2013 novel King of Cuba.Their selfdestructive behavior manifests in different ways; Yunior is a serial cheater and Goyito is an obese cocaine addict.Yet, it has similar effects on them. It isolates them and destroys their chances of developing true intimacy with others. It also keeps them from taking responsibility for their lives and maturing as adults. My essay closely investigates the causes and effects of their self-destructive behavior. I believe Junot Diaz and Cristina Garcia are encouraging this kind of investigation. As authors of contemporary literature, they use these characters to show how the children of immigrants can be vulnerable to this harmful behavior. I found that the major cause of this self- destructive behavior was the precarious and limited immigrant status of Yunior and Goyito's parents. Both Yunior and Goyito's fathers prioritize their financial stability and success in the United States over their families. They are unfaithful to their wives and absent in their children's lives. Although Yunior and Goyito’s mothers are physically present, as immigrants in a foreign country they have difficulty giving emotional support to their sons. Finally, the only way for Yunior and Goyito to move past selfdestructive behavior is with imagination and empathy. Ultimately, only Yunior begins to show signs of change because of his talent and drive to write and imagine his story as well as the story of a person very different from himself.Through the act of writing,Yunior embodies one of the key functions in literature, the exercise in understanding and empathizing with people unlike ourselves.

PAPER

#141

Sympathy Sophia Jordan Faculty Mentor: Professor Maria Bellamy Department of English The Good Lord Bird by James McBride and This is How You Lose Her by Junot Diaz follow characters Henry and Yunior from adolescence to adulthood. As both The Good Lord Bird and This is How You Lose Her are contemporary novels, these characters should prove to be relatable to their audience on some levels. In The Good Lord Bird, however, Henry is portrayed as cowardly, apathetic, and self-serving. Meanwhile, in This is How You Lose Her,Yunior is a crass, offensive, womanizer. Because both Yunior and Henry are morally ambivalent, it is difficult for readers to sympathize with either of them. McBride and Diaz purposely draw these characters in ways that cause emotional conflict for readers.Through learning to sympathize with Henry and Yunior, the reader also learns to better comprehend themselves, their peers, and contemporary stereotypes and trends within Latino American and African American society. By portraying Henry as a reluctant revolutionary, McBride helps readers understand the everyday emotional turmoil of an ordinary slave, as well as the hopelessness of combating an institution with little support. Through Yunior, Diaz explores the psychological consequences of a negative environment, poverty, loss, and abandonment. By challenging readers to empathize with these highly controversial characters, McBride and Diaz create an understanding.The reader is guided to rationalize the inner-workings, not only of Henry and Yunior, but of society as a whole.

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Research Poster Presentations

Research Poster Presentations Center for the Arts Atrium 2:15pm - 4:15pm

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Research Poster Presentations

Poster Location by Department Accounting and Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Upstairs Walkway Biology/Neuroscience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bottom Center Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bottom Back Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West Lounge Curriculum and Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West Lounge Engineering Science and Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West Lounge English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Upstairs Walkway English/Linguistics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Upstairs Walkway History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . East Lounge Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Upstairs Walkway Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West Lounge Media Culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .West Lounge Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . East Lounge Performing and Creative Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Upstairs Walkway Philosophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . East Lounge Physical Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .East Lounge Political Science and Global Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . East Lounge Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bottom Front World Languages and Literatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . East Lounge

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Research Poster Presentations

DEPARTMENT OF ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE CONFERENCE LOCATION: UPSTAIRS WALKWAY P OS T E R

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Flat Tax vs. Progressive Tax Musemiu Adeola Faculty Mentor: Professor Laura Farrell Department of Accounting and Finance The pros and cons of flat tax and progressive tax are broad and can be weighed differently. Flat tax is defined as a system that applies the same tax rate to every taxpayer regardless of how much they earned, and can be further explained as tax that applies the same tax rate to all taxpayers with no deductions or exemptions allowed. A flat tax system encourages taxpayersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; incentive to earn more and drive for a higher income because they are not penalized with a higher tax bracket. In addition, supporters argue that a flat tax system is fairer because the tax is imposed on all taxpayers regardless of income. However, In the United States, a progressive-rate tax system is used. According to statistics in 2010, people who earned up to $8,375 fell into the 10% tax bracket, while people who earned greater than $373,650 fell into the 35% tax bracket. A progressive tax system is known to be a tax that takes more percentage from the income of highincome earners than it does from low-income individuals. Under this system, taxpayers are grouped into categories based on taxable income the more one earns, the more taxes they will have to pay once they cross the benchmark cut-off points between the different tax bracket levels. In a progressive tax system, individuals who earn more money are taxed at a higher rate. The goals of this research are to determine which tax system to endorse, either Progressive or Flat Tax, Comparing the similarities and differences between the two tax systems and the positive and negative effects on the citizens of the United States.

POSTER

#1

Walt Disney World: Mickey Mouse or Reedy Creek? Elisa A. Csorba (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Jonathan Peters Department of Accounting and Finance Walt Disney World is typically known as the ultimate vacation destination, a place where families can come together to create memories and have an experience they will always remember. Walt Disney World is an enormous piece of property, 25,000 acres, covering four theme parks, two water parks, over 20 resorts, four golf courses, a downtown shopping area, and more, with continuous expansion every year. In order to continuously stay with the times and improve this massive piece of land, the Florida State Legislature created a municipal entity for the Walt Disney World Resort in 1967, in order to more easily and effectively put into place its land and transportation needs. The municipal alter ego of Walt Disney World is called RCID, or the Reedy Creek Improvement District. All of the land use needs within the Walt Disney World Resort are controlled by one of the two organizations: Walt Disney World Parks and Resorts or the municipal RCID entity. Unlike other theme parks and resorts, this municipal entity provides the Disney Corporation with various opportunities and controls not normally found in the private sector. This paper seeks to explore the various aspects of this interesting hybrid of government and corporation. In particular, we focus on the operational governance and cost sharing aspects of this municipal entity. Further discussion of the ramifications and opportunities presented by these agreements will be explored.

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Research Poster Presentations

P OS T E R

# 56

The Threat of Cybercrime and Its Impact on Small Business Edward Engelson (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Cynthia Scarinci Department of Accounting and Finance In early January 2015, President Obama proposed the Personal Data Notification & Protection Act. This act is part of an effort to improve national cybersecurity following a year that saw major breaches of security in major corporations like Sony, JPMorgan Chase, and Home Depot. These large-scale breaches have served as a wake up call for a problem that continues to grow for businesses both big and small, cybercrime. It has been brought to light that organizations are not properly addressing the potential threat of cybercrime. The preparations made by businesses have not yet been able to match the tenacity and skill of cyber-criminals. This is especially true in small to mid sized businesses that do not have the means to match the advanced cybersecurity of larger firms. The focus of this research project will be to outline the most common sources of cybercrime, the impact on small businesses and the measures that can be taken to minimize the risk of exposure to such crimes.The data for this research will be obtained from surveys from organizations such as PricewaterhouseCoopers, CSO Magazine, and the National Small Business Association.

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#24

Utilizing Taxi Cab Data to Understand Urban Consumers: Micromarket Analysis of Brooklyn Shoppers Michelle Kushnir (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Jonathan Peters Department of Accounting and Finance This project seeks to study urban consumers and understand how they get to and from shopping destinations. Utilizing the detailed information from the Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking of yellow medallion taxi cabs in New York City, the author seeks to explore the patterns of shopping activities in the borough of Brooklyn. The GPS tracking of New York City taxicabs has allowed us to examine detailed patterns of mobility in New York City. This data, made available to the author through the CUNY High Performance Computing Center and in partnership with Columbia University, has over 173 million records each year. In addition, this data is accurate down to the 10 centimeter level (4 inches) and as such we can explore detailed trip level activity that actually originates or destinates around the New York Metro region. In particular, I look to explore individual destination shopping areas in Brooklyn and analyze the projected demographic and income profile of these users based upon U.S. Census data. Brooklyn offers a rich portfolio of shopping destinations and a variety of housing option that I look to explore in terms of shopping behavior. Detail statistical and geospatial analysis will be completed in this project as well as examination of spatial field conditions at various shopping venues..


Research Poster Presentations

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Concealed Fraud Discover Today Diane Saadeh (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Patricia Galletta Department of Accounting and Finance Fraudulent activities in well-established companies have only expanded in number leading to jobless and homeless employees, not to forget the fraudsters being thrown in jail and shareholders at a loss.There are many ways of committing fraudulent activity and the people involved vary from case to case, which makes uncovering fraud very conflicting and uncovered a lot later from when they were started.The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 was enacted by the United States Congress to ensure shareholders and the general public that fraudulent practices in the enterprise will be under control and better the precision of the financial statements disclosed (Brochet 419). Auditors must check the jobs of both the Financial and Information Technology Departments leading to an Independent Auditor Report on Consolidated Financial Statements. With such efforts to investigate and maintain accuracy, fraud has not been stopped, how can this be improved to uncover fraud at an earlier date? Focusing on Satyam, Indian IT services, and Lehman Brothers, global financial services, and their released mishaps, it was revealed that both cases could have been discovered in advance if there were less competitive markets and auditor rotation. Also using statistical evidence, tips from the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners are the most common way that fraud schemes are detected (“Detection”).

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#172

Usage Patterns of Low-Income Citi Bike Users Shenuque Tissera (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Jonathan Peters Department of Accounting and Finance Citi Bike is the largest bike share system in the United States, outperforming other programs such as Boston’s Hubway and Washington’s Capital bikeshare programs.To fully explore the value of this transportation method and to develop better operational practices, the author argues that a full understanding of usage patterns of riders is necessary. In our preliminary analysis, it is clear that bike share users vary considerably and there is not just one type of rider. Citi Bike seems to be skewed towards the more affluent even though lower income riders can receive subsidized memberships.This skew in the program may be due to the spatial arrangement of the program. In fact, only two of the five boroughs have access to Citi Bike. In this study the authors look to uncover and document the patterns of users in low income areas, in comparison to overall usage patterns.The authors plan to analyze Big Data (over 7 million trip records) with Statistical Analysis Software (SAS) and then visualized by mapping with ArcGIS. SAS will be used to manipulate the data and provide regression analysis on rider behavior. GIS will allow the authors to conduct spatial analysis to better understand how spatial arrangement impacts usage. With these tools the author hopes to gain a better understanding of low income rider behavior. A more profound understanding of user behavior has the potential to improve systems operations, as well as assist in planning for future expansion. By understanding how low income users are using bike share compared to other users, the authors hope to conclude whether Citi Bike is sufficiently serving these communities. Furthermore, understanding these patterns can also reveal whether inequality exists within the Citi Bike program.These are the conclusions the authors seek to uncover by understanding these usage patterns.

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Research Poster Presentations

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#33

The Advancement of Accounting Information Systems: An Analysis of Today's Software and Its Benefits to Business Kelly Walsh (The Verrazano School)

Consumer Behavior Impacts of Road Pricing Estimating Own and Cross Price Elasticity Steven Woolverton (Macaulay Honors College)

Faculty Mentor: Professor Jonathan Peters Department of Accounting and Finance

Faculty Mentor: Professor Jonathan Peters Department of Accounting and Finance

In the modern world, accounting information systems have to keep up with the rapid advancement in technology. Companies have to stay up to date by updating their systems with new software periodically. With so much information within a company, having software that can collect, store, and export data properly is extremely important. Microsoft Dynamics GP and QuickBooks are software used by many companies to fulfill that duty.Thus, this paper analyzes the benefits and problems of these specific software’s.

The issue of road pricing is a topic of national interest as we go into the future.This project will examine toll roads operated by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey in order to determine how consumers react to changes in price. Because the Port Authority has introduced several large changes in price year over year for the last decade, we have been presented with a natural experiment that allows us to fully examine this phenomenon.

QuickBooks and GP are amongst the top five most popular accounting software used in companies (Capterra 2014). QuickBooks, however, is usually linked to smaller businesses while Microsoft Dynamics GP is considered more useful to medium sized companies. What separates the two if they both collect, store, and export data? Drawing from personal experience, statistical data, and reviews in accounting literature, we see what factors make one of these software systems preferable to the other. With today’s technology moving towards wireless and the “cloud,” software has an even higher standard to contest with. Luckily, new updates have pushed these software’s to take their businesses to that next level of technology putting them in even more competition with each other. These two competing software both provide many of the same function. However, this analysis illustrates the numerous subtle differences that can be essential to businesses in making decisions.

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Using data publicly available from the Port Authority’s public records, we will determine what effects are had on consumer behavior using a variety of analytical methods.The primary question we wish to answer is how sensitive consumers are to changes in road pricing and what alternatives they pursue should an option no longer be viable to them. Consumers have a variety of choices they can choose such as not changing their transportation habits, switching to alternative methods or even dropping out of the market entirely. Given the monopolistic nature that the Port Authority has with regards to transportation in the New York City, we will also be examining the elasticity of these transportation options.The necessity of these transportation options for the people of New York City along with the lack of available substitutes presents possible issues with the existing market structure. With transportation options remaining inelastic despite drastic changes in price, the worry is that the market will become too segmented by income as many choose to drop out completely.


Research Poster Presentations

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Trading Real Futures in Construction Contracts: Modeling the Value of Project Labor Agreement Ariana Zuberovic (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Jonathan Peters Department of Accounting and Finance This study seeks to explore the area of contract valuation and the issue of no strike clauses in construction contracts. We believe that this area represents an extension of the idea of Real Options. This research is motivated by the Building and Construction Trade Council of NY (the organization of construction unions in New York) who were told by a judge in a labor dispute case that “no-strike clauses” had no monetary value. In prior research, faculty at CCNY and the College of Staten Island worked on developing analytical tools to help understand the value that is created by a no-strike or other labor clauses that are controlled through what is called a Project Labor Agreement (PLA). Using a PLA, the labor and management alter the working conditions and trade various components of value (hours of work, salary, benefits, strike clauses etc) in exchange for the no-strike clause. The faculty at CCNY & CSI have developed a working special case model; however this study hopes to develop a more general model to understand the drivers of value and the value created. In particular, we hope to develop a wage equivalent value for these components of contract value, that is, developing what is the quantitative value in term of wage hours of work that would be needed to exchange for a no strike clause, for example. As indicated above, previous court cases have suggested that a no strike clause has essentially no value in an agreement since to monetary funds were directly exchanged.The desire to have these clauses however and the immense safety-net they provide in the area of risk management suggests otherwise.

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY CONFERENCE LOCATION: BOTTOM CENTER POSTER

#65

To Identify Synergistic Targets That Block Breast Cancer Cell Growth And Migration Sarah Ahmad, Stephanie Clarke, Marina Matta Faculty Mentor: Professor Nancy Liu-Sullivan Department of Biology This research will focus on the synergism between TGFB ( Transforming Growth Factor beta group) and retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) in preventing CAF-mediated breast cancer migration and formation in a 3D cell culture system. "TGFβ is responsible for proliferation and differentiation of cells, embryonic development, wound healing, and angiogenesis" (Blobe 1). It will also observe the Human Mammary Fibroblasts (HMF) interaction with breast cancer cells expressing RNAi-TGFβ receptor II.The cells will be grown separately and then in a co-cultures will allow us to observe the synergism. Our aim is to create RNAi-TGFβ cell lines in Human Mammary Fibroblasts (HMF) and MDA-MB 231 (epithelial mammary gland from the metastatic site) and discover the multicellular spheroid growth and migration, then ATRA IC50 and IC20 values will be determined and lastly, the synergism between RARA and TGFβ in preventing breast cancer formation and migration will be determined.

This research hopes to see a correlation between valuing real options and these no strike clauses.

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Research Poster Presentations

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# 46

The Effect of pH and Inositol upon Vacuolar Morphology Suzanne Ahmed, Paulina Konarzewska Faculty Mentor: Professor Chang-Hui Shen Department of Biology V-ATPase is an enzymatic pump found in acidic organelles, like the vacuole.This pump introduces protons into the organelle and therefore maintains its low pH.The acidic environment of the vacuole allows it to perform its main functions, like the degradation of cell waste. Mutations in V-ATPase have been associated with abnormal acidification and morphology of the organelle. It has been suggested that the presence of inositol may regulate the V-ATPase activity, though it is not fully understood how. OPI1 and INO2 play an important role in the regulation of de novo inositol synthesis through the synthesis of membrane bound inositol phosphatases.Therefore, we are interested in understanding the effect of OPI1 and INO2 on vacuole morphology, acidity, and V-ATPase function. In this study, we used different strains of S.cerevisiae, including wild type, ∅opi1 , ∆ino2 , and ∆vma3 . Microscopic analysis was employed to elucidate the vacuolar morphology of these strains under different conditions. Our results indicated that pH is the main factor affecting vacuolar morphology. Additionally, deletion of INO2 but not OPI1 also affects vacuolar morphology. As such, our initial observation provides the evidence of the importance of INO2 in regulating vacuolar morphology.

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#145

Construction of a Tagged PAH1-HA and OPI1-GFP Yeast Strain Needed for Determining the Interplay between Pah1p and Opi1p in the Regulation of UASIno Gene Expression Dhiwya Alex (Macaulay Honors College), Goldie Sherr Faculty Mentor: Professor Chang-Hui Shen Department of Biology Phosphatidate (PA) phosphatases play a crucial role in the Saccharomyces cerevesia phospholipid biosynthetic pathway. PA phosphatases are key enzymes that catalyze the reaction which dephosphorylate PA to form diacylglycerides (DAG), the first step in the synthesis of triacylglycerols. One of these PA phosphatases, Pah1p, is encoded by the PAH1 gene. There have been a number of studies that have shown Pah1p’s involvement in directly regulating and repressing the transcription of many inositolsensitive upstream activating sequence (UASINO) genes needed for phospholipid synthesis. Pah1p however is only one of the multiple regulators of UASINO gene transcription. Its interaction with other negative regulators has only been minimally researched. For this project we plan to study the interplay between Pah1p, and another major repressor of UASINO containing genes, Opi1p. We aim to determine whether there is a direct interaction of these co-repressors at the promoter region of UASINO genes.To do this, we first had to generate a recombinant clone that contains a tagged OPI1 gene and a tagged PAH1 gene in order to be able to target their protein products.To generate this recombinant strain, the transformation of a plasmid containing a tagged PAH1 (PAH1-HA) was performed, then collected by miniprep, and followed by electroporation.The plasmid was inserted into a strain that contained a tagged copy of Opi1 to the green fluoresce nt protein (OPI1GFP). Verification of this strain is currently being performed and will then be followed by western blot experiments to determine whether there is in fact any interaction between Opi1p and Pah1p at the promoter region of these genes. Overall, the production of this recombinant strain is therefore a crucial component in solving the question of whether Pah1p and Opi1p interact at the promoter region of UASINO containing genes.


Research Poster Presentations

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#127

Anti-Cancer Activity of Garcinia Xanthochymus Plant Extracts on Breast Cancer Cells Dina AlSharif (The Verrazano School), Harini Senthil, Edward Kennelly

A Proposed Investigation into the Distribution of the Rodlet Cell in Atlantic Silverside, Menidia menidia Kirill Antonov

Faculty Mentor: Professor Jimmie Fata Department of Biology

Faculty Mentor: Professor Barbara Gail Montero Department of Biology

Edible Garcinia fruits are recognized as having medicinal qualities ranging from anti-bacterial to anti-malarial. Recent investigations of extracts isolated from Garcinia xanthochymus have also shown anti-cancer activity against colon and prostate cancer cells. Here we investigated whether a seed extract of Garcinia xanthochymus could exhibit anti-cancer activity against the human breast cancer cell line MCF7. Our findings indicate that MCF7 cells exposed to Garcinia xanthochymus seed extract at concentrations (250 µg/ml & 500 µg/ml) exhibited cell death as determined by a WST assay and cell microscopy. However, when MCF7 cells were exposed to lower concentrations ranging from 31.25 µg/ml to 125 µg/ml cell death was not induced. Instead, these lower concentrations induced MCF7 cells to round up significantly and become attenuated in growth. Both death and rounding up could be observed within 24 hours of exposure to extract.To further investigate the anti-proliferative effects induced by the extract we have begun to use flow cytometry, which will allow us to precisely measure the percentage of cells in G1, S and G2 of the cell cycle. Taken together, these findings indicate that the extract from Garcinia xanthochymus exhibits strong anti-cancer activity on MCF7 breast cancer cells. Further investigations will include an analysis of this extract on other human breast cancer cells as well as normal breast epithelial cells.

Rodlet cells (RCs) are wildly distributed within the tissues of freshwaterand saltwater teleosts. However, the role of these cells has been debated over the years. Indeed, they are often though of as mysterious (Manera & Dezfu, 2004).This paper proposes a study aimed to better understand rodlet cells in Atlantic Silverside, Menidia menidia. Currently, we do not know if rodlet cells will be found. But if they’re not, an interesting question emerges: What does Atlantic Silverside use in its immune system to response to environmental changes? Rodlet cells are rod-shaped, with a thick fibrillar capsule, a nucleus located in the basal end and contain several rodlets in the cytoplasm (Manera at el., 2009). Studies have shown that RC’s can play a role as effecter cell in response to environmental changes such as stressors (Abraham et al., 2001), environmental toxicants (Potter & Kramer, 2013), parasitic invasion (Leino, 1996), and bacterial infection (Smith et al., 1995a,b).The Atlantic Silverside is a particularly good fish to study because they are highly sensitive to external environment and freely available. Our samples were collected in Summer 2014 from Princes Bay shore of Staten Island where our samples are less exposed to toxins.Tissues such as gills, heart, gut and gonad were carefully removed and processed through series of fixation, dehydration, clearing. Then they are mounted for further investigation of the distribution of rodlet cells.This would be the first study of RCs in Atlantic Silverside.

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Research Poster Presentations

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#119

Effect of the 3' UTR of H2A.Z on Transcript Stability Jasmine Calle (Macaulay Honors College)

Identifying Fungal Biodiversity in Staten Islandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ponds Using eDNA Tania Castillo

Faculty Mentor: Professor Cesar Arenas-Mena Department of Biology

Faculty Mentor: Eugenia Naro-Maciel Department of Biology

Nucleosomes are complexes that include histone proteins and the DNA wrapped around them. H2A.Z is a gene that codes for a histone protein variant. It plays a role in embryonic development and is involved in the multipotency of embryonic cells.The lab attempted to determine the spatial and temporal expression regulation of H2A.Z by linking its expression with that of GFP.The 3' untranslated region (UTR) of H2A.Z was replaced with Simian Virus 40 (SV40), a very stable UTR often used in expression experiments. Under these conditions, the expression patterns viewed were beyond the expected levels. As such, we believe that the 3' UTR of H2A.Z may be involved in posttranscriptional regulation and therefore, transcript stability. By replacing the SV40 UTR with the endogenous 3' UTR and injecting this new construct into Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryos, we will be able to compare the expression patterns of H2A.Z with the SV40 UTR, the original construct, with that of H2A.Z with its endogenous 3' UTR, the new construct. If the new construct shows enhanced GFP expression, then the 3' UTR has a positive effect on transcript stability. If the new construct shows decreased GFP expression, then the 3â&#x20AC;&#x2122; UTR has a negative effect on transcript stability.There is also the possibility that the 3' UTR of H2AZ will have no effect on transcript stability.The expression will be analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively using fluorescent microscopy and quantitative PCR (qPCR), respectively.This will reveal new aspects of transcript stability that may be highly conserved throughout the species.

Environmental DNA analysis (eDNA) is a cutting edge method that aims to identify even the smallest organisms from samples taken from the environment (e.g. water, soil, or air). Our goal is to identify these organisms in order to examine biological diversity present in pond areas of the highly urbanized New York City, more specifically, Staten Island. We obtained data from seven different ponds from parks around the island: Long Pond, Walker, Sharrotts, Pumphouse, and three in the former Freshkills landfill, which is currently being transformed into a park. We then used a MOBIO Powerwater kit to extract the DNA, which was then quantified and sent to a professional service for Polymerase Chain Reaction and sequencing using ITS, a primer specific to fungi. My contribution to the research was to focus on fungal biodiversity. Fungi represent a large group of eukaryotes that includes microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, that is generally understudied in terms of aquatic environmental DNA analysis. Our findings showed common as well as rare groups of Fungi, including invasive species.This approach shows great promise for characterizing fungal biodiversity along a landscape mosaic of human impact.

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Research Poster Presentations

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Mitochondrial DNA Analysis of Foraging Green Sea Turtles, Chelonia mydas, in Dry Tortugas and Everglades National Parks in Florida Rossana Cruciata (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Eugenia NaroMaciel Department of Biology Green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, are globally endangered, and conservation efforts to prevent their extinction can be improved with a better understanding of the species’ migratory patterns. The purpose of the study is to use mitochondrial DNA analysis in conjunction with ocean current models to determine the connectivity between foraging grounds at Florida’s National Parks, and areas where the sea turtles were born (rookeries). The mitochondrial D-loop and a microsatellite repeat region were sequenced from turtle blood collected from turtles at Dry Tortugas National Park and Everglades National Park.Their haplotypes were determined using the genetic analysis program Geneious. Statistical analyses were done to determine nucleotide diversities, tests of population differentiation, and analysis of molecular variance.The Bayes program was then used to determine natal origins.The results show that the majority of turtles collected from these two feeding grounds have the control region haplotype CMA 1.1, or CMA 3.1; the most common repeat haplotype was 6844, followed by 7744. The results of mixed stock analysis show that these turtles’ natal origins are primarily Costa Rica, Florida, and Mexico. Ocean current modeling results also show that these turtles’ migratory patterns coincide with ocean currents from the rookeries to the feeding grounds. In other words, swimming behavior matches genetics in the Atlantic.The results of this study are significant in that having an understanding of connectivity and migratory patterns of C. mydas will allow for conservationists to focus their efforts in areas encompassing these migratory routes. Such efforts will reduce the many threats that turtles face in such areas, such as habitat loss and poaching.

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#146

Cis-Regulatory Analysis of H2AZ in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus Winnie Darius, Mihai Hajdu Faculty Mentor: Professor Cesar ArenasMena Department of Biology The objective of this project is to investigate the cis-regulatory modules that control the expression of H2AZ in the sea urchin embryo. H2AZ is a histone variant that is expressed broadly trough early embryogenesis, before becoming restricted in the late stages of development. Previous studies suggest H2AZ is for multipotency. Studying the cisregulatory apparatus that controls H2AZ expression could uncover gene regulatory networks involved in controlling multipotency.To this end, a series of GFP reporter constructs are being used to dissect the regulatory modules of the H2AZ gene. My input in this project will include designing more constructs, injecting the embryos and investigate their expression. We can investigate the expression of H2AZ reporters qualitatively through fluorescent microscopy and quantitatively through QPCR which checks the expression over time.

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Research Poster Presentations

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# 110

Increasing Public Awareness of the Health Effects of Diet Soda Arlinda Draga Faculty Mentor: Professor Barbara Gail Montero Department of Biology Are we making a health conscious choice by including diet soda as a part of our everyday diet? The point of this paper is to show that despite the fact that many people think diet soda is a healthful beverage, it has numerous negative health effects. This research aims to bring these negative effects to public awareness. By culling data from numerous research articles in the nutrition science literature, here we elaborate the long term effects of diet soda drinking which include: depression, increased chance of a vascular event, weaker enamel on teeth, etc. This particular beverage is constantly being included in everyday diets by folks all over the world in hopes for a healthier lifestyle. However, most people are completely unaware of what ingredients this beverage contains. This research aims to show that all different types of diet soda beverages contain artificial sweeteners which are known to confuse the human body into storing fat. (Tatjana H. Vasilara, 2002) When the human body stores fat it further leads to weight gain. Yet the main purpose why people drink diet soda is to reduce calorie consumption and lose weight. People are more inclined to drink diet soda because it contains no calories, trans fat or total carbohydrates, however, as will be argued, it still contains ingredients that are toxic for the human body. This research aims to make people aware of what these toxic ingredients are doing to their body so that they can make an informed decision about whether drinking diet soda is a health conscious choice.

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#5

Burrowing Behavior of the Freshwater Bivalve Pyganodon Cataracta Amber Gatling (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Rebecca Chamberlain Department of Biology The freshwater bivalve order Unionida is among the least understood and most endangered animals in the world. It is clear, however, that their populations are dramatically declining in North America. Little is known about the behavior of freshwater bivalves. Burrowing is an important behavior which influences ecological success because it allows bivalves to avoid predators, find food, find mates, avoid adverse environmental conditions, decrease parasitic infestation, and perform the ecosystem service of stirring up sediment. Burrowing may be affected by a variety of factors, including shell dimensions such as width, length, and height, and sediment type. From what little is known about freshwater bivalves, it appears that they do exhibit sediment preferences. This project’s goal was to uncover correlations between various shell dimensions, angle of burrowing, and weight in relation to sediment type. Animals were tested in sediment lined aquaria. Cameras positioned near the test aquaria were remotely controlled by Granite-Bay time lapse software. By looking at thousands of time-lapse photographs of hundreds of specimens of Pyganodon, each specimen’s latency period (the time from the start of the time-lapse photographic record until a specimen’s foot projected from its shell), duration of burrowing, angle of burrowing, and burrowing velocity were recorded. Using Excel, the specimen’s shell dimensions were plotted against the specimen’s latency period, angle of burrowing, and velocity in order to find trends. Our results show that Pyganodon does burrow into the substrates we tested, burrowing most readily into -1 to -2Φ sediment and burrowing the least readily into -2 to -3Φ sediment. We found a negative correlation between shell length and velocity for all sediment types except -2 to -3Φ sediment. We also found a positive correlation between shell length and latency period for all sediment types.


Research Poster Presentations

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#99

Localization of Tau Protein in Candida Albicans Joseph Guarrella

Developmental Reprogramming of Cells in Sea Urchin Embryo Aminat Haruna, Tia Leung, Mihai Hajdu

Faculty Mentor: Professor Elena McCoy Department of Biology

Faculty Mentor: Professor Cesar Arenas-Mena Department of Biology

We have previously expressed the neuronal protein tau in strains of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans.This microorganism has cell surface amyloid type adhesions (ALS proteins) that have a low level (<50%) homology with the tau protein. We have observed surface binding with anti-tau antibody and have been concerned with crossreactivity between the tau and ALS proteins. In an attempt to resolve this issue, we have introduced a plasmid containing a tau-GFP fusion to our yeast strains.

The purpose of this study is to test the spatial and temporal distribution of cellular multipotency during sea urchin development. Multipotency is the ability of cells to differentiate into other cell types and this ability declines during developmental progression. We are testing multipotency by reprograming cells with different fates into skeletogenic mesenchyme cells, one of the embryonic territories that make up the sea urchin larva. Reprograming will be accomplished by ectopically expressing the skeletogenic transcription factor Pmar1 in cells other than the skeletogenic mesenchyme. Pmar1 is a transcription factor known to induce skeletogenic mesenchyme specification during embryogenesis, and we have elaborated an inducible system to gain control of its ectopic expression. Two constructs have been made, one that drives the expression of Doxinducible Tet-3G transcription factor everywhere except the skeletogenic mesenchyme, and another driving the simultaneous expression of fluorescent marker in mCherry and Pmar1 under the control of tet3G-Dox. Both constructs will be injected into embryos together with differentiation reporter construct SM50-GFP that will indicate successful reprogramming into skeletogenic mesenchyme. We expect to observe a decline in the reprogramming potential during developmental progression.

In these experiments, GFP and GFP-tau-containing plasmids were introduced into competent cells of Escherichia coli by transformation. Cells were grown in XYT medium at 37C overnight for plasmid amplification and plasmid DNA was isolated using the Qiagen mini prep protocol. A Lambda35 spectrophotometer was employed to evaluate the DNA purity and concentration that was used subsequently for electroporation. We used 5 microliters of DNA from the respective plasmids and electroporated 100 microliters yeast cells with the Biorad Micropulser electroporator for 5.5 milliseconds. Electroporated cells were plated on yeast extractpeptone-dextrose (YEP) medium containing G418 (500ug/ml) for selection. We have isolated a minimum of 50 clones from these plates and have prepared them for confocal microscopy which will be conducted in the coming weeks.

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Research Poster Presentations

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# 59

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#10

The Role of Insulin-like Growth Factor (Igf) Signaling in Fragile X Syndrome, Using Knockout Mice Desiree Hernandez, Mardia Fahnbulleh

Are Rodlet Cells Reliable Biomarkers in Fundulus Heteroclitus? Stephen Hongach (The Verrazano School)

Faculty Mentor: Professor Abdeslem El Idrissi, Thomas Wise Department of Biology

Faculty Mentor: Professor Charles Kramer Department of Biology

We are studying the role of insulin-like growth factor (Igf) signaling in Fragile X syndrome (FXS), using mice with targeted mutations in specific genes (knockout mice). Fragile X syndrome is an inherited form of intellectual disability caused by expansion of triplet repeats in the X-linked FMR1 gene, which encodes a protein that is a regulator of translation. FXS patients also have some physical developmental abnormalities and some overgrowth features, including enlarged testes. Because Igf signaling is known to play a role in embryonic growth, testis development, and brain function, it is possible that the loss of the FMR1encoded protein affects the levels of Igf signaling proteins. Mice with a targeted mutation in the Fmr1 gene have been created to use as a model for Fragile X syndrome. We are crossing the Fmr1 knockout mice with mice that do not express, or overexpress, Igf signaling proteins in order to determine if Fragile X phenotypes are affected in mice that have different levels of Igf signaling proteins. We were able to identify mice that had both the Igf1r and the Fmr1 knockout mutations. We are testing these mice to determine if the Igf1r knockout corrects the abnormal phenotypes in the Fragile X mice.

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The rodlet cell (RC) is found in both marine and freshwater teleosts.The putative role of the RC as an immune effector cell is based on the increased recruitment and response of the cell to such factors as parasite invaders, stressors and toxicants in the fishâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s environment.The activity of the cell has been used as a reliable biomarker, an indicator of the environmental conditions of the local habitat. However, should the sexual status of the fish be considered when evaluating the validity of this claim? Specifically, does the hormonal milieu i.e., sex hormones affect the RCs. A population of mature male and female killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, was collected from the highly contaminated waters of Saw Mill Creek in Staten Island and compared to a population collected from Lemon Creek, Princes Bay, a far less impacted environment.The gills were removed and studied for the presence of parasites and corresponding RC response. Males and females from the Saw Mill Creek population were equally infested with parasites while the Lemon Creek population was almost pristine.There was no significant difference between the number of RCs and the sex of the fish in both populations; males and females responded the same. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in RC counts between the populations. In addition, there was no correlation between the number of parasites and the number of RCs in either population. According to my findings, the sexual status of the fish does not influence the number of RCs in this species. In contrast to the popular interpretation, it appears that RCs may not serve as reliable biomarkers at least in response to parasite infestation in F. heteroclitus. However, this does not preclude the response of these cells to other factors in the environment that would potentially impact the health of the fish.


Research Poster Presentations

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Passive Avoidance Test Shumaila Irshad (Macaulay Honors College), Sulayman Mughal (The Verrazano School), Penina Safier (Macaulay Honors College), Andrew Rizkalla Faculty Mentor: Professor Alejandra Alonso Department of Biology Accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated Tau has been linked to a common mechanism in dementia, collectively known as Tauopathies. Previous data provides compelling evidence to propose that Tau is a key molecule in neurodegeneration, primarily seen in Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disease (AD). We prepared transgenic mice, expressing pseudophosphorylated Tau in Ser199, Thr212, Thr231 and Ser262 called pathological human tau (PH-Tau). In animals, cognitive function is assessed via experimental models that test memory. Using the behavioral object recognition test, we attempted to perceive the effects of PH-Tau on slow-steady degeneration of the synapse, thereby shedding light on AD progression and identifying new potential therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases. We discovered that when PH-tau is either expressed or subsequently suppressed, it leads to the onset of characteristics often associated with Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disease. To further advance our study, we conducted the passive avoidance test, consisting of a Plexiglas box divided into two compartments, one section being illuminated and the other left dark. An automatic sliding door separating the two chambers was lowered when the mouse entered the dark area for an extended period of time, administrating a shock. Using these mild foot shocks as a deterrent, we trained the mice to avoid the darker region of the box. If the mouse continued to enter the darker area despite the shocking consequence, it can be deduced that the mouse forgot the experience and suffered from neurological impairment. This research provides more evidence supporting our previous findings which indicate that the expression of PH-Tau and the suppressed PH-Tau does in fact induce the onset of AD.

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Effectiveness of Conservational Efforts on the Atlantic Horseshoe Crab, Limulus polyphemus, in Massachusetts Kristina Lam (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Lisa Manne Department of Biology The Atlantic Horseshoe Crab, or Limulus polyphemus, is the only species of the remaining four that are dispersed along the North American east coast. For many years human involvement on their population has shown to be immensely detrimental. Since the mid-19th century, horseshoe crabs (HSC) have been harvested as fertilizer and later on as bait by eel and conch fisheries. In a process called bleeding, amebocytes, or clotproducing cells, are extracted from HSC and is used as a test (Limulus amebocyte lysate or LAL) for bacterial contamination in marketable pharmaceutical drugs. Despite being released after this procedure, it had been recorded that HSC exhibit a mortality rate between 2.1-15%. In recent years, HSC conservation has come under the spotlight due to their interspecies relationship with various shorebird populations, specifically the Calidris canutus rufa, which depend on highprotein HSC eggs to reach the weight requirement to successfully complete their artic migration. Since the formation of the Carl N. Shuster Jr. Horseshoe Crab Reserve in 2001, many local and state organizations have implemented harvesting regulations on high-density HSC areas in states all along the east coast, such as Massachusetts.The purpose of this study to investigate whether current conservation efforts, such as reserves and harvesting limitations, are positively affecting the L. polyphemus population in Massachusetts. HSC spawning survey data was obtained from the Mass Audubon Society in New England.The data was analyzed for positive/negative trends using Microsoft excel and other statistic programs. Results show that the HSC population in regulated areas is demonstrating a positive trend, meaning that conservational efforts are effective in Massachusetts.

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Integration of Transcriptomic and Genomic Analysis to Understand Differential Gene Expression Patterns in Vibrios Rin Zhi Larocque (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Jianying Gu Department of Biology In this study, we will focus on comparative genomics of the bacteria in the Vibrionaceae family. This family of bacteria is abundant in aquarium environments with diversified life styles. In our previous study, we identified a core genome comprised 1,882 orthologous genes among eleven Vibrionaceae genomes. To achieve a better understanding of interplays between gene components, cellular networks and phenotypes, we propose to interrogate and integrate genomic, and transcriptomic data into a systems framework. Different form hybridizationbased microarray analysis, RNA-seq is independent to the prior knowledge of annotations.Thus, it allows for unbiased detection, increased sensitivity, and higher resolution. In this proposed study, we will try to address the following questions by analyze the gene expression pattern under the different experiment conditions in the content of Vibiro core genome and pangenome, and particularly in the LSE gene families: (1) Do the gene expression profiles in core genome different from that in pan-genome? (2) Do the gene expression profiles vary among member genes in the LSE gene family? If so, are there any detectable trends? (3) Are these gene expression pattern variations correlated with the varying phenotypes, such as life style transition (from water to host), or varying levels of virulence? To identify the core genome and pan-genome of Vibrio, A Markov cluster algorithm, OrthoMCL, will be employed to scan the completed genomes of Vibrio species / strains and to identify orthologs and paralogs, in combination with an exhaustive allto-all BLASTP searches across taxa. A hierarchical functional classification was performed for each Vibrio sequence by searching against the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) database. Statistical analysis of transcriptomic data will be conducted using R. 44

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A Review: Integrating Active Learning into General Biology Courses Lisa Li (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Eugenia NaroMaciel Department of Biology This study examines the evidence for whether or not incorporating research into a college lecture course would result in greater learning gains for students. Specifically, we were interested in the effects of embedding research and other forms of active learning into General Biology II lecture and lab courses. For many colleges and universities, a general biology course is among one of the largest courses offered at the institution. General biology courses appeal to a diverse audience because it meets core requirements; furthermore, the course attracts students from all majors, including those from nonscience disciplines.Therefore, it is not surprising that challenges such as low engagement with coursework, lack of student preparedness and few opportunities for students to construct their own understanding exist in the classroom. We decided to examine studies that focused on the difference in learning gains between students who received traditional lectures and labs and those who received lectures and labs in a more active environment. Evaluations of previous research consisted of comparisons of student survey responses. Results demonstrated that the students who received research supplements to their course resulted in greater learning gains than those who did not. In the future, we would like to evaluate the hypothesis that learning in a more active environment for General Biology courses will lead to greater learning gains compared to that of a traditional environment at the College of Staten Island.


Research Poster Presentations

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TPA: A Risk Analysis of Stroke Treatment and Hospital Management Michael Luppino

The Beneficial Role of Antioxidant Consumption in Boosting the Immune Response Michael Maisano

Faculty Mentor: Professor Barbara Gail Montero Department of Biology

Faculty Mentor: Professor Barbara Gail Montero Department of Biology

Worldwide, stroke is the highest leading cause of disability in the elderly, and is the second leading cause of death (Rengen 2015). When a stroke occurs, a passage of the brain is blocked. Oxygen is unable to give nutrients to the brain, and within minutes brain cells begin to deteriorate.That is why it is critical for a person to receive medical attention as soon as possible. In 1996, a blood thinner known as Tissue Plasminogen Activator, (TPA), was approved by the FDA to break down stroke-inducing blood clots. However, this drug significantly works if applied one hour after a stroke attack; the effect of TPA steadily decreases if treatment is delayed. By reviewing literature on this topic, we can propose new methods for administering TPA.

This research paper draws upon the prominent role of antioxidant consumption (such as beta carotene found in carrots, lycopene found in tomatoes) in regards to improving the human immune response in the face of potential infection and disease. In particular, this paper explicitly details the negative impact of free-radicals on the efficiency of the immune response and the harm that it deals within target cells associated with the immune system. In conjunction, the paper explores and argues for the benefits of antioxidant compounds found in readily consumed foods (citrus fruits, berries etc.) in regards to their positive effects in maintaining these cellular processes as well as their vital roles in combating the formation of free radicals within the body. By drawing upon prior research (Griller, David; Ingold, Keith U. (1976). "Persistent carboncentered radicals". Accounts of Chemical Research 9: 13, London:Taylor and Francis (2000) Toxicology of the Human Environmentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the critical role of free radicals ) in conjunction with work done to explore and analyze key components of the chemical compositions of both free radical and antioxidant compounds, the hope is that this research will bring greater awareness to the public regarding the significant role of antioxidants within our daily lives and the crucial role that they play in maintaining a healthy immune state and overall well- being.

In 2014, only 5% of all stroke patients in the US were administered TPA, while most of these patients were treated after two hours (Grotta 2014).The lack of treatment is due to the inability to identify a stroke attack, and the time it takes to travel to the hospital. By examining what protocols hospitals have done to administer this treatment to patients and how ambulances communicate to the Emergency Department, we can suggest improvements for increased drug distribution. A significant number of stroke patients can receive life changing treatment as long as the timing is fast enough. By quickly identifying stroke signs, and establishing a more organized drug delivery, prepared hospitals could potentially decrease deaths and severe disabilities from stroke attacks.

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Research Poster Presentations

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Identifying Synergistic Compounds That Reduce Mammosphere Formation in Breast Cancer Cells Anton Mararenko (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Nancy Liu Sullivan Department of Biology One of the main reasons cancerous cells are so harmful is because of their ability to spread from the primary tumor to other tissues of the body.The initial steps of this cellular process involve the degradation and subsequent invasion through extracellular matrix (ECM) located in basement membranes and interstitial matrix. Our group is interested in developing a cell culture based assay to model this invasive process as it relates to human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB 231).Two similar assays were developed and tested to see whether either contained cellular invasion that could be recorded and analyzed. Using Matrigel, which is ECM very similar to ECM found in basement membrane, we monitored cellular invasion of breast cancer cells plated on top of Matrigel (invading downward) versus cells plated below the Matrigel (invading upward). Our findings indicate that cells plated on top exhibited no overt invasive characteristics, while a significant proportion of those plated below Matrigel invaded upward within 48 hours.This assay will be used to analyze the invasion of MDA-MB 231 cells expressing different mutant genes to see if these genes affect invasion. Obtaining these results will provide insight into how quickly breast cancer cells can spread across a basement membrane-like ECM and how expression of specific genes affects this process.

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Understanding the Interactions between Pathological Alzheimerlike Tau and Normal Tau Viktoriya Morozova Faculty Mentor: Professor Alejandra Alonso Department of Biology Tau protein belongs to the family of the Microtubule-Associated Proteins (MAPs) and its function is to interact with tubulin and to promote its assembly into microtubules as well as stabilization of the microtubule networks in neurons. Tau biological activity depends on its degree of phosphorylation, and hyperphosphorylation decreases its ability to stabilize microtubules dramatically. In Alzheimer’s disease and associated tauopaties brains the phosphorylation of tau is 3-4times greater than in normal brain. We have shown that hyperphosphorylation of tau at Thr212,Thr231 and Ser262sites is the most pathological. It induces tau to undergo conformational changes and misfoldings which makes it unable to bind to tubulin resulting on its aggregation and formation of neurofibrillary tangles, and instead of promoting microtubules assembly it leads to their disruption. In addition, there is a theory that abnormally phosphorylated tau sequesters normal tau from microtubules into cytosolic phase. The experiments designed here are focus on understanding the interactions between normal human tau (wt) and hyperphosphorylated pathological human tau (PH tau) at Ser199,Thr212, Thr231 and Ser262sites.To achieve my objectives I’ve cloned PH tau gene into RFP vector using existing PH tau gene tagged with GFP. Now I’m working on transfection of resulted plasmids (RFPtagged) into Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO) cells and co-transfection with PH or wt tau linked to GFP which will let me study the interactions between these proteins in the cells.


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Environmental DNA Analysis of Freshwater Ponds in Staten Island Yan Mei Nie (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Eugenia NaroMaciel Department of Biology Bacteria, plants, animals, and other life forms that reside within several ponds along an urbanization mosaic on Staten Island are being studied by using cutting edge environmental DNA (eDNA) approaches. It is essential to understand their community composition for purposes of conservation, preservation, and ultimately public health. Environmental DNA (eDNA) has been proven to be useful in taxonomic identification from environmental samples including water and soil.The aim of this research is to investigate patterns among the organisms that reside there, in order to fully understand the ecological health of each freshwater pond.The water samples were collected from the ponds, and the samples were filtered prior to DNA extraction. DNA extraction has been completed using a MOBIO Powerwater Kit, and the extracts were professionally sequenced, then analyzed using the QIIME program. The environmental DNA identified common organisms and exhibits the ability to detect invasive taxa within each pond. For instance, the subclass Copepoda was commonly found in every pond. Additionally, invasive taxa included the Leaf Miner flies under family Agromyzidae.The recovery of DNA samples portrayed the accurate findings of organisms that reside within the pond and taxonomic identifications that were similar to pond water taxa identified using morphology.The correct measure of resolution is at the degree of higher taxonomic positions such as family or class, compared to a particular level at species. Using environmental DNA is a highly robust technique that enables the capability to characterize biodiversity along the urbanization mosaic of human impact.

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Phylogeography of Painted Turtles as Revealed by Nuclear Microsatellites Jenna Pantophlet (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Eugenia NaroMaciel Department of Biology Microsatellites are short repeating sequences of DNA, which occur in non-coding regions of the genome. Such sequences vary in length from organism to organism; yet can often times be conserved in full from parent to offspring. In this investigation, these markers will be utilized to determine relationships between individuals in local populations of Chrysemys picta, or the painted turtle, as well as out of state populations across the native range, such as British Columbia, Indiana, Nebraska, and Wisconsin. For this investigation painted turtle samples were retrieved, their DNA extracted, and then amplified using Polymerase Chain Reaction.The products were analyzed by fragment size and interpreted through the bioinformatics program Geneious.These results have now been compiled into one large spreadsheet and will be further analyzed with the programs Micro-Checker and Arlequin. As it stands, 220 Painted turtles from across the five locations have been genotyped at 12 different microsatellite locations on the nuclear genome. Preliminary results indicate that there is significant population differentiation between states, however on a local scale the Freshkills and Long Pond populations do not appear to be significantly differentiated. Our preliminary results also show that the population at the edge of the Painted Turtles range, in British Columbia, may have lower genetic variation, which could be consistent with a range expansion from refugia after the last glacial maximum. Both the projected and preliminary data will be used to draw more informed conclusions about and make better decisions for local management, as well as to better understand the painted turtles past and present, in the context of its broad range, so as to help secure the species future.

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Biodiversity of Staten Island Ponds Robert Pashayan (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Eugenia NaroMaciel Department of Biology Freshkills Park, once the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest landfill, is being transformed into a recreational area. In order to monitor restoration and ecological recovery at Freshkills, we will be investigating its freshwater communities in comparison to other local sites. In this research we increased our study area to included Sharrotts Pond, Clay Pit Pond, and Walker Pond, in conjunction with our original study locations of Long Pond Park and Freshkills. Our goals include investigating species richness and community composition with respect to ecological health. We will test the hypothesis that more established sites, such as the 100-year-old Long Pond, will have higher species richness and more diverse community composition than more recently established sites such as Freshkills.To this end samples were collected and identified morphologically. We were able to find an invasive species at Freshkills, the mosquito fish, which is generally used as pest control but has a varied diet and can survive on many other food sources. Midge fly larvae of two subfamilies:Tanypodina and Orthocladiinae were present at both locations.This is a key prey item for species such as freshwater turtles, due to its abundance and availability. However, it does not reveal much information about the habitat's health, as midge larvae are very tolerant to pollutants in the water. Further work has allowed us to identify the damsel fly nymph Zygoptera in Long Pond, Freshkills and High Rock Parks, and the dragon fly nymph Anisoptera at Long Pond, Freshkills, and Sharotts.The scud Gammarus has also been identified from Freshkills. The presence of these organisms alludes to a healthy habitat as they are semi sensitive to water pollutants. Caddisfly (Trichoptera) and mayfly (Ephemeroptera) larvae were identified from Sharrotts Pond, while the latter were also found at Freshkills.These organisms are of interest as they are very sensitive to water pollutants and are bioindicators of habitat health. 48

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The Behavioral Effects of Gestational Exposure to Low Levels of Di-n-Butyl Phthalate in Mice Yohanna Quezada Faculty Mentor: Professor Abdeslem El Idrissi Department of Biology While visible histological abnormalities have been documented with high exposures of the plasticizer DBP, exposure to low levels, especially at gestational stages, leads to neurobehavioral abnormalities observed in autism like hyperactivity and anxiety that are thought to be mediated through the interference with neurosteroidogenesis.To date, although the effect of DBP as an endocrine and a reproductive disruptor are well established, there are only few studies that address the effects of low levels of DBP. Additional research analyzing the low-dose effects of these endocrine disruptors need to be further investigated, since it is most unlikely for humans to be exposed to high concentrations of DBP. Our preliminary data suggest that gestational exposure to low doses of DBP causes male-specific neurobehavioral abnormalities in the offspring, which may be mediated by altered maturation of neuronal circuits associated with these behaviors. Adult male mice (2 months old) injected with DBP (1 mg/kg i.p) showed significant neurobehavioral alterations characterized by increased locomotor activity and anxiety measured in the open field and elevated plus maze respectively To determine the effects of DBP on early brain development, we injected pregnant mice with DBP (1 mg/kg s.c) on gestational day 10 and assessed the neurobehavioral effects in the offspring when they reached 2 months of age. During early development, the activation of GABAA receptors is critically important for the maturation of neuronal networks.


Research Poster Presentations

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Anthropometric Measures of Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Turkish Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Ryan Raiola

Regulation of H2A.Z Expression Victor Ramirez

Faculty Mentor: Professor Shiryn Sukhram Department of Biology

The goal of this project is to understand the transcriptional regulation of histone variant H2A.Z which promotes multipotency.The lab is interested in comparing the expression patterns of Sea urchins by designing a red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter that will aid in the analysis and comparison of spatial RFP green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter constructs.

Examining modifiable diabetes-related risk measures could add to important insights to treatment and management in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D).The study examined the associations between measures of obesity and insulin resistance (IR) in patients with T2D. A total of 110 Turkish participants, aged 30 years and older, were recruited in a cross-sectional design. Height and weight were determined using a wall-mounted stadiometer and a digital electronic scale. Waist circumference (WC) and hip circumference (HC) were measured with a non-stretchable measuring tape. Body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHpR), and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) were calculated. Fasting venous samples were obtained. Plasma glucose was measured by enzymatic method. Plasma insulin levels were determined using ELISA method. Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA) index was used to determine IR based on the formula described by Matthews et al [fasting glucose (mmol/L) x fasting insulin (um/ml) / 22.5]. Population wide and within group permutation tests for correlation to evaluate the associations yield the following: WC, HC, WHtR all have a significant association with HOMA-IR. However, within gender we see this relationship may differ. WC has an overall significant association (r=0.26, p=0.003) and is significant for both men and women. HC has a significant association for men (r=0.379, p=0.009) and WHtR has a significant association for women (r=0.279, p=0.012). When we considered the number of years with T2D these measurements are yet significant as well as weight and BMI. Prospective studies to determine ethnicspecific anthropometric cutoff values to predict IR are recommended to further verify these findings.

Faculty Mentor: Professor Cesar ArenasMena Department of Biology

The GFP:H2AZ reporter construct was introduced into SW105 cells by electroporation. A digestion test was conducted to confirm that the intact plasmid was in the cells. We proceeded to remove the kanamycin (KN) resistance in the GFP reporter construct by exposing the SW105 cells to arabinose which activated the flippase gene which removed the KN resistance gene. A digestion was conducted to confirm that the KN resistant gene had been fully removed. Next we used antibiotic plates to select colonies where the KN resistance gene was removed to ensure the cells had lost the resistance. Recombining the RFP cassette which contains KN and RFP into the GFP reporter was conducted followed by the purification of the plasmid for embryo microinjection. We will compare the expression of GFP and RFP constructs in the same embryo and this will allow us to identify functional sequences

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Combinatorial Interaction of Protocadherin Family Cytoplasmic Domains Adam Shonubi Faculty Mentor: Professor Greg Phillips Department of Biology Clustered protocadherins (Pcdhs) are a large family of adhesive like proteins in the nervous system that may mediate interactions at synapses.Different Pcdhs were shown to form a complex in cis that is thought to be the recognition unit. Others have mapped this interaction to the extracellular domains. We have recently found an additional interaction among some Pcdhs in their cytoplasmic domains within the same region we previously mapped to control intracellular trafficking. We are now determining the extent of interaction between various Pcdh representatives. Cytoplasmic domain transmembrane “stubs” fused to RFP are cotransfected into cells together with the same or different full length Pcdh fused to GFP. Colocalization of the two molecules is analyzed by confocal microscopy. Using this approach we have found differences among the various Pcdh cytoplasmic stubs in their ability to colocalize with different full length Pcdhs.This suggests that control of assembly of the Pcdh complex via the cytoplasmic domains may be a factor in intracellular trafficking and cell-surface delivery.

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The Effect of Resveratrol and Pterostilbene on the Proliferation of Hela Cells Palwasha Syar (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Jimmie Fata Department of Biology Based on previous experiments, the plant stilbenoids, resveratrol and pterostilbene have been reported to have significant inhibitory effects against tumors cells derived from the breast, colon, and prostate (Mannal et al 2010).The aim of this study was to determine the anti-proliferative effects of these two compounds on a human tumor cells derived from the cervix (HeLa cells). We were specifically interested in whether resveratrol or pterostilbene could inhibit cell cycle progression and used flow cytometry of HeLa cells exposed for 18 hours to varying concentrations of each compound (5uM, 10uM, 15uM, 20uM and 25uM). These concentrations were predetermined to be non-lethal on HeLa cells – concentrations higher were shown in our laboratory to induce rapid cell death within 24 hours. Our results, which were repeated three times, indicate that both compounds are capable of significantly inhibiting cell cycle progression. Specifically, we found that after 18 hours of exposure, HeLa cells had a significantly delayed S-phase (DNA synthesis) when compared to control cells, which were not exposed to the compounds.This “stalling” in the S-phase also, as expected, led to a decrease in the number of cells in G2. Interestingly, although both compounds delayed DNA synthesis, pterostilbene was significantly more potent than resveratrol. Our results have shown that the stilbenoids, resveratrol and pterostilbene have anti-proliferative effects on human cervical cancer cells by delaying DNA synthesis. Future studies on determining the mechanism of these findings are ongoing.


Research Poster Presentations

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The Importance of INO2 Gene in Bipolar Disorder Treatment Brendon Ursomanno (Macaulay Honors College), Jaclyn Trotta (Macaulay Honors College), Gracie Cai (The Verrazano School), Paulina Konarzewska

The Effects of LiCl and Valproic Acid upon INM-1 Gene Expression Brendon Ursomanno (Macaulay Honors College), Jaclyn Trotta (Macaulay Honors College), Gracie Cai (The Verrazano School)

Faculty Mentor: Professor Chang-Hui Shen Department of Biology

Faculty Mentor: Professor Chang-Hui Shen Department of Biology

The concentration of myo-inositol has important implications in bipolar disorder treatment. Previously it has been shown that ill patients have increased myo-inositol concentration and one way to treat this abnormality is by means of two bipolar disorder drugs: LiCl and valproic acid.This is because both LiCl and valproic acid can lead to reduced expression of the INM1 gene expression resulting the decreased myo-inositol. Since INM1 expression plays important role in de novo inositol synthesis, we are interested in understanding the regulation of INM1 gene expression at the transcriptional level. As a transcriptional activator, Ino2p can regulate the de novo inositol synthesis. In the absence of inositol, Ino2p activates

Myo-inositol is essential component of the phosphatidylinositol second messenger system. Changes in myo-inositol concentation have been shown to play important role in bipolar disorder. Studies have shown that ill patients have increased myo-inositol concentrations in certain parts of the brain.Therefore, depletion in inositol may be used as a treatment for bipolar mood disorder. A common way to reduce inositol is through action of valproic acid, LiCl, or combination of the two. Studies have shown that LiCl treatment results in 30% reduction of myo-inositol in the rat cerebral cortex.Yet another study have shown that valproic acid can also reduce brain’s myo-inositol concentration up to 20%. It has been proposed that the mechanism behind the action of LiCl and valproic acid is most likely by inhibition of inositol monophosphatase. Studies have shown that LiCl as well as valproic acid lead to reduced expression of INM1 gene.This gene plays important role in phospholipid biosynthetic pathway It’s product, Inm1p is required to convert inositol-3-phosphate into inositol. As a result, downregulation of INM1 gene by valproic acid or LiCl results in lower concentration of de novo inositol. In our study we want to elucidate the effect of INO2 gene upon INM1 gene expression. INO2 gene encodes for transcriptional activator that binds inositol/choline responsive elements (ICREs) required for derepression of phospohlipid biosynthetic genes such as INO1. In the absence of inositol, transcriptional activator Ino2p interacts with INO1 gene resulting in conversion of glucose6-phosphate into inositol-3-phosphate which is further converted into inositol with help of inositol monophosphatase. In a situation where inositol is present in the media, transcriptional activator Ino2p is being repressed and as a consequence glucose-6phospate cannot be converted into inositol 3phosphate and further into de novo inositol.

INO1 gene expression through the binding to the promoter. When inositol is present, Ino2p activity is being repressed through the repressor and as a consequence de novo inositol synthesis is aborted. Here, we are trying to establish how Ino2p regulates the the INM1 gene expression through LiCl and valproic. Our approach is to observe growth of wild type and ino2∅ strain yeast cells under different growth conditions to determine how these drugs affect the Ino2p ability to regulate INM1 gene expression. Subsequently, we determine the gene expression of genes involved in the above conditions. Ultimately, from these observations we hope to elucidate the importance of INO2 gene in bipolar disorder treatment through the regulation of INM1 expression.

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Serial Electron Microscopic Analysis of Protocadherin Immunolabeling at Synapses Elena Markov Faculty Mentor: Professor Greg Phillips Department of Biology Synaptic spinules are membrane invaginations that protrude from the presynaptic compartment into the postsynaptic compartment.The role of these spinules in synaptic development or regulation is unknown but they may represent the process of transendocytosis. Furthermore, spinules frequently correspond to perforated postsynaptic densities. Preliminary post-embed immuno-electron microscopic evidence indicates that the clustered protocadherin family of adhesion molecules may be enriched or recruited into synaptic spinules.The present study seeks to examine the relationship of protocadherin immunolabeled synaptic membrane profiles to spinules in serial sections. Antibody concentration and labeling conditions were optimized in single sections and labeling was found within organelles and possible spinules as described previously. Labeled membrane profiles are currently being characterized in serial sections.

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Development and Analysis of a Breast Cancer Cell Invasion Assay Christina Mazza (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Jimmie Fata Department of Biology One of the main reasons cancerous cells are so harmful is because of their ability to spread from the primary tumor to other tissues of the body.The initial steps of this cellular process involve the degradation and subsequent invasion through extracellular matrix (ECM) located in basement membranes and interstitial matrix. Our group is interested in developing a cell culture based assay to model this invasive process as it relates to human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB 231).Two similar assays were developed and tested to see whether either contained cellular invasion that could be recorded and analyzed. Using Matrigel, which is ECM very similar to ECM found in basement membrane, we monitored cellular invasion of breast cancer cells plated on top of Matrigel (invading downward) versus cells plated below the Matrigel (invading upward). Our findings indicate that cells plated on top exhibited no overt invasive characteristics, while a significant proportion of those plated below Matrigel invaded upward within 48 hours.This assay will be used to analyze the invasion of MDA-MB 231 cells expressing different mutant genes to see if these genes affect invasion. Obtaining these results will provide insight into how quickly breast cancer cells can spread across a basement membrane-like ECM and how expression of specific genes affects this process.


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Engineering Yeast HAT/HDAC Mutant Strains via Homologous Recombination Christine Huynh (The Verrazano School), Dilakshi Mampitiya (The Verrazano School), Alicia Seecoomar, Kristina Lam (The Verrazano School), Michelle Esposito

selectable marker of our homologous recombination construct. POSTER

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Characterization of Breast Cancer Cells and Stromal Cells in 2D Monolayer and 3D Multicellular Cell Culture Model Systems Daniel C. Leahy

Faculty Mentor: Professor Chang-Hui Shen Department of Biology

Faculty Mentor: Professor Nancy Liu-Sullivan Department of Biology

Transcriptional regulation is a complex process in eukaryotes, which involve various proteins for the purpose of gene regulation.Two major categories of these proteins are chromatin remodelers and histone acetylases. Mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were engineered in which these regulatory proteins were deleted in order to allow us to study the significance of these involved in yeast and gene regulation. Chromatin remodelers play a major role in gene activation.They not only condense DNA within the cellular nucleus but also control gene expression. In eukaryotes, genes are not expressed unless they can be accessed by RNA polymerase and proteins known as transcription factors.The structure of the chromatin is characterized by tight coiling which limits access to these substances.

In the U.S. alone, about 1:8 women develop invasive breast cancer in her lifetime with annual diagnostics of approximately 250,000.Transforming growth factor beta (TGF ), a key cytokine for cell growth, differentiation, and migration, has been reported to play a key role in breast cancer carcinogenesis and invasion. Small molecule inhibitors targeting TGF signaling are currently undergoing clinical trials in the U.S. Inhibition of TGF signaling alone, however, appears to be only effective in blocking a portion of cancer cells (~40%), suggesting that additional signaling pathways might be at play.Triple negative breast cancer cells (TNBC) mixed with stromal fibroblasts in 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional co-culture model systems. Primary focus on growth characteristics of a small panel of breast cancer cells along with human mammary fibroblasts that over-express TGF to identify cellular characteristics in 3 dimensional culture systems. Differential effects on cell proliferation between 2D and 3D cell culture systems were observed by means of WST-8 Assay. Induction of morphological changes in TGF /HMF when co-cultured with breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 was observed.TGF /HMF in the presence of triple-negative breast cancer undergoes a reduction of spindle length and organizes in a different manner when compared with TGF /HMF monoculture.

Therefore a cellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chromatin must open in order for gene expression to take place, and the opening process is known as the chromatin remodeling. The purpose of histone acetylases, on the other hand, is to make DNA more accessible by neutralizing the positive charge of lysine residues on the N-termini of histones and thus decreasing the affinity of DNA with these histones. In order to study their interactions with each other and their significance in gene regulation, we engineered a series of mutant yeast strains in which the chromatin remodeler Ino80p contained a FLAG tag and a histone acetylase has been knocked out. We will be engineering HAT deletions of Sas3p, Hat1p, Gcn5p, and HDAC deletions of Hst1p and Rpd3p. These mutants were engineered using miniprep, homologous recombination and electroporation. Once these mutants were engineered, genomic DNA was isolated and subjected to PCR to determine whether the target gene was still present or if it was been successfully replaced by the

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#8

The Effects of Gestational Exposure to Low Levels of Di-nbutyl Phthalate (DBP) in Mice Don Wisidagama (The Verrazano School), Chun-Wei Hsu (The Verrazano School)

Duration of Stopover in Relation to Date of Arrival in Vagrant Western Kingbirds (Tyrannus verticalis) Lucinda Zawadzki (Macaulay Honors College)

Faculty Mentor: Professor Abdeslem El Idrissi Department of Biology

Faculty Mentor: Professor Shaibal Mitra Department of Biology

The effects of DBP as an endocrine and a reproductive disruptor are well established: developmental defects (Miodovnik et al.), infertility (Joshi et al.), lower sperm counts, genetic mutations, etc. However, such studies typically address the effects of high levels of DBP, yet, it is most unlikely for humans to be exposed to high concentrations of DBP.Thus, additional research analyzing the low-dose effects of these endocrine disruptors need to be further investigated. The aim of this study is to determine the neurodevelopmental effects associated with gestational exposure to low levels of DBP. Our preliminary data suggest that gestational exposure to low doses of DBP causes male-specific neurobehavioral abnormalities in the offspring which may be mediated by altered maturation of neuronal circuits associated with these behaviors. Adult male mice (2 months old) injected with DBP (1mg/kg i.p) showed significant neurobehavioral alterations characterized by increased locomotor activity and anxiety measured in the open field and elevated maze respectively.To determine the effects of DBP on early brain development, we injected pregnant mice with DBP (1mg/kg i.p) on gestational day 10 and assessed the neurobehavioral effects in the offspring when they reach 2 months of age. Interestingly, the neurobehavioral phenotype elicited by a single injection of adult mice could be reproduced in the offspring of DBP-injected pregnant mice.The neurobehavioral effects elicited by exposure to DBP were consistent with altered inhibitory function in the brain of these mice.The outcome of this proposal will allow for an elucidation of the molecular, biochemical, electrophysiological and endocrine effects of DBP that lead to the neurobehavioral alterations observed with gestational exposure to DBP.

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The Western Kingbird (Tyrannus verticalis), an abundant migratory bird that breeds in western North America, has a peculiar migratory pattern that has caught the eye of ornithologists. While these flycatchers winter primarily in Central America, a small but growing winter population has been forming in Florida and adjacent states, more than 1000 kilometers from its regular migration routes.This vagrancy has been interpreted variously as mis-oriented migration, displaced migration (e.g., by weather systems), or as a form of long-distance dispersal. We sought to test these hypotheses by analyzing available records of Western Kingbird along the Eastern Coast of the United States and parts of Canada during the months of August to February, using the web-based repository known as eBird. For every bird, the date of its first occurrence was recorded in relation to the duration of its visit, and these patterns were analyzed in comparison to normal migratory behavior of the species. From our data, we were able to conclude that dates of first occurrence of East Coast vagrants extended over a longer period and later into the fall than expected if these birds were only mis-oriented or displaced migrants.The average duration of stay was significantly longer among individuals first detected later in the fall as opposed to those first detected earlier in the fall, closer to the speciesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; normal migratory period.These results suggest that vagrant Western Kingbirds are not mis-oriented migrants but instead appear to be undertaking a more complex form of long-distance movement, perhaps exploring the East Coast as a possible place for new wintering grounds.


Research Poster Presentations

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Theoretical Behavioral Implications on Compounds Counteracting Pathological Human Tau's Toxicity Kawsar Ibrahim (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professors Dan McCloskey and Alejandra Alonso Department of Biology/Neuroscience Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that assists in the stabilization of neuronal microtubule structure. Prior research studies have shown that tau abnormalities due to phosphorylation lead to the destabilization of microtubules, and hence neurodegeneration results, a prime factor contributing to disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In order to mimic the negative charge found at phosphorylated sites in AD tau, we have made a construct named Pathological Human Tau (PH-Tau) a form of tau which has undergone sitedirected mutagenesis at positions Ser199,Thr212, Thr231 and Ser262 to Glutamic acid. In previous studies, we have found that the expression of PHTau in CHO cells induces processes such as microtubule breakdown and retraction, PH-Tau nuclear translocation, PH-Tau detachment from microtubules and membrane aggregation.This study attempts to check if unknown compounds that we have received from a pharmaceutical company can counteract the previously observed toxicity of PH-Tau in transfected Chinese Hamster Ovarian cells. Since caspase-3 is an enzyme that monitors the well-being of the cells, whereby if it is active, the cell has initiated the program to cell death (apoptosis), the absence or minimization of caspase-3 detection indicates a promising effect of the compound. Along with this attempt, we theorize behavioral implications based on our previous results and related works: If a promising compound is found, these drugs can further be applied to the diseased hippocampi of mice to see if the promising compound can too rescue the expected LTP deficits in diseased mice, thereby providing behavioral implications on AD treatment.

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#139

Automated Neurophysiological “Burst” Detection Using MATLAB Patrick Kettyle (Macaulay Honors College), Michael Zions Faculty Mentor: Professors Dan McCloskey Department of Biology/Neuroscience Neurophysiological data can produce signature events that provide keys about the underlying state of a population of neurons. One such event is the epileptiform burst discharge (“Bursts”), a waveform, indicating the abnormal synchronous firing of many neurons. Studying how bursts start and stop, and which conditions increase or decrease their likelihood, may be useful in understanding how to control full-blown epileptic seizures in humans. However, because bursts are often detected on a moving baseline across many channels of recording, analyzing burst duration frequency and amplitude individually is highly prohibitive, especially in studies where subtle changes in bursts are measured under multiple environmental conditions. MATLAB is a widely known computer program that is easy to use and provides tools for users to create and develop efficient algorithms. In my study I sought to develop an effective algorithm for MATLAB that can better analyze the plethora of data collected from the epileptic brain activity of naked mole-rats, and which can be further developed and used to work with other types of neurophysiological data.There will be a presentation of the difference between the automated burst detection algorithm and manually measured data.

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Research Poster Presentations

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY CONFERENCE LOCATION: BOTTOM BACK P OS T E R

# 53

Antibody-Targeted and Lipidencapsulated Forms of Curcumin Attack Glioblastoma Cells Directly or Eliminate Them Indirectly by Stimulating the Immune System Juliet Nana Esi Baidoo (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Probal Banerjee Department of Chemistry Glioblastoma (GBM) is a deadly form of cancer for which there is no clear remedy. Most GBM cells highly express a protein, CD68, on the surface or in the cell body. Curcumin (CC), a food-derived polyphenol, has shown promising results in the treatment of a wide array of cancers and in modulating the immune system.To test the efficacy of CC in eliminating GBM, we intracranially implanted GL261 mouse GBM cells in syngeneic C57BL6 mice and treated them later with CC when the brain tumor occupied about 5-10% of the brain volume. The treatment involved curcumin linked to a CD68 (CC-Ab) and also a lipid-complexed form of curcumin, Curcumin Phytosome (CP). Each of these treatments rescued 50% of the GBM-implanted mice. Immunohistochemical analysis (IHC) also showed repolarization of M2 (pro-tumor) tumor-associated microglia (TAMs) to the M1 (antitumor) phenotype in the treated mice. We are currently working with patient-derived GBM cells and their xenografts in nude mice (the PDX models).The PDX tumors reflect the human GBM microenvironment where the efficacy and immunomodulatory effects of CC can be further investigated. Preliminary in vitro data show that these patient-derived GBM cells also express CD68 and are efficiently killed by CC-Ab. We will next use IHC to study repolarization of microglia associated with the PDX tumors. In addition to confirming the direct tumoricidal nature of CC, we will investigate the additional role of the CC-Ab adduct and CP in eliminating GBM indirectly by repolarizing the CD68-expressing TAMs into the M1 phenotype.

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#190

Enzyme Lithography of Polymer Films by High-Resolution Polymer Pen Printing Cody Cimbal (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Alan Lyons Department of Chemistry The Lyons group has previously demonstrated that the enzyme candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) can be printed onto a polycaprolactone (PCL) film and selectively etch features in the polymer when incubated at 37 degrees C and 85% humidity.The enzyme has a high affinity for the polymer and does not spread laterally across the polymer film surface. Applications for enzyme lithography include biotechnology and electronics. The goal of this project is to examine other enzyme-polymer systems and determine if the strong interactions that enable high resolution pattern formation in PCL by CALB are unique, or a general consequence of systems where an enzyme degrades a polymer.The enzyme trypsin is well known to degrade a variety of polypeptides. This enzyme will be brought into contact with predefined regions of a polymer film made up of polyL-lysine. Other polypeptides in addition to poly-L-lysine will be examined.The polymer film must be of uniform thickness and our surface must be hydrophilic so the polymer can spread across it evenly. Getting the surface to become hydrophilic involves submerging the surface into piranha solution, which is an oxidizing agent that hydroxylates most surfaces. After incubating for different times at 37 degrees C and 85% humidity the size and depth of features degraded by trypsin will be measured by optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy.


Research Poster Presentations

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Stacking Angle Tuning for Improved Charge Transport in Organic Semiconductors Christine Fisher, Dennis Lam (The Verrazano School), Xizhe Zhao Faculty Mentor: Professor Shi Jin Department of Chemistry Although organic semiconductors have commercial potential, they currently face performance issues with low efficiency compared to inorganic counterparts. Organic semiconductors have a flat carbon backbone which is easily stackable, but the side chains attached to it have a pyramidal geometry. Because of the differing space needs, the molecules tend to stack at 90° angles, preventing efficient electrical conductivity.This limitation can be minimized through better contact between adjacent molecules via a non-90° (non-orthogonal) angle, which would allow an electric charge to conduct more rapidly. In order to induce this non-orthogonal angle upon stacking, a perylene compound will be altered to create a sufficient size difference between the two side chains. In the synthesis of this novel compound, a perylene derivative was created to be used as a template and combined with two different reactants, resulting in one compound with similarly-sized chains, and one with sufficiently different-sized chains. With these compounds’ successful synthesis and purification, the desired stacking will allow for a greatly increased frontier orbital overlap which plays a key role in conducting electricity, resulting in increased performance. An emerging and growing market is seen in technology as the development of efficient organic semiconductors continues because organic materials provide an economic and readily-available alternative that show superior flexibly compared to inorganic materials.

POSTER

#163

Preparing Lipid-Encapsulated Forms of Curcumin and Other Food-Derived Anticancer Agents Peter Halat Faculty Mentor: Professor Probal Banerjee Department of Chemistry Food-derived natural agents like curcumin (a component of curry)(C), resveratrol (from grapes) (R), and epicatechin (from green tea) (E) display strong potency to eliminate cervical cancer (CC) cells without injuring normal cells. Since these three agents eliminate cancer cells through complementary mechanisms, we tested the existence of a synergism among these compounds. Using mitochondrial oxidoreductase activity to compute combination indices from CC cells (HeLa) treated with C, R, E and combinations of these compounds, we observed a strong synergism among them. The C+R+E combination (CRE) also elicited rapid down regulation of HPV E6 and NF-kB expression along with simultaneous induction of the tumor suppressor proteins p53 and Rb. Slower tumor growth and prolonged survival was observed in mice subcutaneously implanted with the c-Ha-ras and HPV16 E6-expressing cervical cancer cells TC-1 and then infused with CRE (IP). CRE (also named as TriCurin) infusion yielded no adverse effect in tumor-naïve healthy mice as determined by histochemical analysis. Since curcumin is effective in eliminating a large variety of cancer cells, both TriCurin and curcumin could be used as general anticancer agents. In this project we plan to study multiple food-derived phospholipid mixture to prepare effective delivery forms of TriCurin and curcumin for systemic administration to yield relatively high blood concentrations of curcumin. This would allow us combat not only cervical cancers but also many other cancers such as breast, brain, and pancreatic cancers.

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Research Poster Presentations

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# 155

"Smart-Designed" Nanoparticles with Targeted Antibacterial Properties Edward He (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Nan-Loh Yang Department of Chemistry Antibiotics, though useful in its clinical applications, have been losing ground against bacterial resistance against them in recent decades. Previously treatable diseases are now resulting in unnecessary amputations and even death as a result of bacterial evolution against our current drugs. Thus, a new approach to fight against these infections must be found. In this study, we present a “smart” nanoparticle engineered to target specific properties of bacterial cell walls while minimizing toxicity against mammalian cells. Such discoveries are especially crucial in revolutionizing an increasingly health-demanding world.

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#84

q-CPT-PEG Tail Interactions Using Molecular Dynamics Dennis Lam (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Sharon Loverde Department of Chemistry One of the leading treatments of cancer, camptothecin (CPT), have been readily effective to treat colon and rectal cancer. However, the side effects of these antitumor drugs can be lifethreatening; for example, both medications contain an irritant that, if injected incorrectly in the body, can cause tissue damage; some serious side effects for CPT are tissue damage, anemia, and an increased risk of infection (Musacchio, 2009); this symptoms are caused by the direct interaction between the materials in the blood plasma and the foreign drug. Is there a better way to treat these cancers? Molecular dynamics simulations have been created and analyzed to identify a more efficient way to indirectly treat tumors; it idealizes the concentration and assembly of the antitumor drug and protecting the drug as it enters the body. In 2006, CPT-containing micelles have been similarly incorporated in cell culture and have the same tumor-inducing effect. Dr. Honggang Cui’s team from John Hopkins University has further developed criteria for the self-assembly set up of CPT and polyethylene glycol (PEG).This combination of drug-polymer, also known as qCPTPEG, has been extremely useful because it shields CPT from the elements of the body as it approaches the cancer cells (The Scott Hamilton CARES Initiative, 2015). Dr. Sharon Loverde’s group cluster at the College of Staten Island has been further helping Dr. Cui’s team with the selfassembly of these derivatives via computational chemistry and molecular dynamics.Together, they have been working to make create new improvements from previous cancer-fighting drugs.


Research Poster Presentations

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POSTER

#78

Synthetic Cationic Amphiphilic Copolymers with Antimicrobial Properties Kevin Lee (Macaulay Honors College)

The Development of a Versatile Intermediate for Unsymmetric Perylene Derivatives Michael Luppino (The Verrazano School)

Faculty Mentor: Professor Nan-Loh Yang Department of Chemistry

Faculty Mentor: Professor Shi Jin Department of Chemistry

The war against antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a cycle that only fuels itself. Cationic, amphiphilic polymers with antimicrobial properties, while minimizing hemolytic activity, can potentially serve as an alternative to antibiotics.The polymers are designed to mimic antimicrobial peptides (AMP) that are naturally found in the human body.The main benefits of synthetic polymers are relative cost, and relative ease to mass manufacture compared to AMP synthesis.The mechanism of action focuses mainly between the synergistic effects of the cationic charge and amphiphilic portions of the polymer.The properties of the bacterial cell membrane that are exploited are the external negative charge and hydrophobicity.The combination of the positive charge of the polymerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spacer arm and negative charge of the bacterial cell membrane, along with complementary hydrophobic portions is theorized to puncture the bacterial cell wall, leading to cytoplasmic leakage and ultimately bacterial cell death.The main focus of this research is to increase antibacterial activity, with greater emphasis on decreasing hemolytic activity. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) was observed to have reasonable antibacterial activity, with relatively low hemolytic activity compared to the polyacrylate polymer used. Incorporation of PEG was shown to have increased selectivity, defined by the ratio of antibacterial to hemolytic activity. 30% mole ratio of PEG showed the greatest selectivity of bacterial cells over red blood cells.

Perylene is a chemical compound that is highly carcinogenic, but is useful in creating bioconjugated coding plastics and materials. However, we can create a derivative of this substance to work safely with this compound. By removing the tails of the compound through hydrolysis, the compound becomes more rigid. By converting a Tetraester to a Monohydride (the first phase of the experiment), the compound can then undergo reactions to understand its newfound properties (the second phase of the experiment). The experiment conducted was part one: purifying the sample.There were two techniques attempted: Column Chromatography, for purification, and the other being general chemical reactions to separate a Monoanhydride from a Tetraester. Once performed, the Column Chromatography section of the procedure did not yield expected results, but it was still an opportunity to observe the compoundâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s behavior during the separations. As of the Spring Semester of 2015, more reactions have continued. This will progress until the spot test shows no signs of the Tetraester, where there will be no dark red spot in the middle, and the ring will be colorless; representing a complete transformation into the Monohydride. When this conversion occurs, we can undergo further reactions to understand the compoundâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new found properties, and can potentially become useful for the scientific community, and perhaps considered revolutionary to the field of Chemistry.

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Research Poster Presentations

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# 188

Effect of Temperature and TiO2Polyethylene Film Morphology on Catalytic Deactivation of Bacteria Hosea Mak (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Alan Lyons Department of Chemistry As of 2012, approximately 10% of the world population does not have access to treated surface water.This is a significant issue as many people have died from water-borne diseases (such as cholera and dysentery) caused by a lack of clean drinking water or from inadequate sanitation. Solar water disinfection, also known as SODIS, is a means by which unclean water is purified by making use of ultraviolet radiation from the sun and high temperatures to kill off pathogens using clear plastic water bottles.This method has seen worldwide usage and is particularly effective in regions that receive strong and reliable sunlight, as it requires at least six hours of sun exposure. However, a potentially long exposure time (this process can take up to two days on cloudy days) reduces user compliance and as a result, lowers the effectiveness of SODIS.To overcome these limitations, we have developed an improved water purification method: a TiO2-polyethylene nanocomposite film is inserted into the container to speed up the purification process.This is possible due to TiO2â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to aid in completely oxidizing organic substances to carbon dioxide and water, as well as deactivate pathogens, through the generation of superoxides and peroxides on the TiO2 surface.This method is particularly significant as TiO2 is able to deactivate organic contaminants (such as conjugated ring structures) that conventional water-purifying materials, like bleach, cannot oxidize. In this poster, the effectiveness of the film was studied by comparing it to polyethylene (no TiO2) and the conventional SODIS method. Due to the need to control temperature and light intensity, the experiments used flat-bottom boxes instead of bottles and were conducted indoors by exposing solutions of E. coli to a UV-Vis lamp (370-46 nm) on a thermoelectric (temperature-controlled) plate. Additionally, this study also explores different TiO2 nanocomposite morphologies and their effects on water purification. 60

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#93

Curcumin-loaded Poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) Nanofibres by Solution Blow Spinning for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer Vyshnavi Rajendra, Xue Qing Liang (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Krishnaswami Raja Department of Chemistry Drug releasing nanofiber mats have been studied extensively for localized drug delivery applications. Curcumin, the primary active ingredient in Turmeric, has recently been shown to have anticancer activity. We intend to generate curcumin loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofibers via solution blow spinning, using a commercial air brush and compressed CO2, for using it as an implant for treating cervical cancer. The nanofibres are characterized by scanning electron microscope for morphology and by dynamic mechanical analysis for the mechanical properties.The time dependent curcumin release is studied by monitoring the degradation of nanofiber mat over a period of time.The anti-cancer activity of the nanofibres will be tested against HeLa cells in vitro.


Research Poster Presentations

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Two Computational Studies: The Binding of Curcumin and HPV E6 and Building a Homology Model for a Novel Snake Toxin Tx7335 Phu Tang (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Sharon Loverde Department of Chemistry Curcumin with another name, diferuloylmethane, is a natural yellow pigment found in the root of Curcuma longa linn.We aim to identify the most energetically favorable binding site on HPV E6 for curcumin, as well as the most favorable conformation of curcumin upon binding.To begin with, we ran 10 ns of molecular dynamics simulations to obtain the equilibrium HPV E6 structure (PDB ID: 2FK4).Then, we used AutoDock Vina to find the binding site on E6.As the research progressed, we identified several possible binding sites.According to the authors of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Human Papillomavirus 16 E6 Protein as a Target for Curcuminoids, Curcumin Conjugates and Congeners for Chemoprevention of Oral and Cervical Cancers,â&#x20AC;? the binding sites are residue 8:Gly, 25:Arg, 46:Gln. Nevertheless, our results obtained different binding sites.We predict that the new binding sites are residue TYR (RESID 15), LYS (RESID 44), GLN (RESID 46). Upon structural and functional investigation of potassium channel, KcsA, a new novel snake toxin was found,Tx7335, from the eastern green mamba snake (Dendroaspis angusticeps).To our knowledge, this is the first time a toxin can activate the KcsA just by binding to the extracellular pore region of the KcsA.This can lead to a new way to regulate the activation of KcsA. However, the structure of the Tx7335 is not yet known. Using Bucandin toxin (PDB ID: 1IJC) from the Venom of the Malayan Krait as the closest template, we generated 40 homology models for Tx7335.The model with lowest Discrete Optimized Protein Energy score was chosen as the representative of the Tx7335. NMR study shows that Tx7335 has 4 disulfide bonds, but there is only 3 in Bucandin.Therefore one more disulfide was added. We will investigate this model to determine the stability and electrostatic surface potential of the toxin.This can give a general idea about the binding site of Tx7335 and KcsA.

POSTER

#2

Venom Toxin (Tx7335) and Its Influence on the Potassium Channel Mohamad Yaghi Faculty Mentor: Professor Sebastien Poget Department of Chemistry Potassium channels are integral membrane proteins that allow the highly specific flow of potassium ions at near-diffusion speed through the membrane. These proteins are very essential in many physiological processes including the propagation of the nerve signal and regulation of the heartbeat. Potassium channels have often been shown to be influenced affected by animal peptide toxins. Such a toxin (Tx7335) has been found in the venom of eastern green mamba snake and was shown to activate the bacterial potassium channel KcsA. Interestingly, the toxin binds the channel from the outside and therefore far away from the intracellular pH gate.This interaction changes KcsA conformation, resulting in the opening of the channels, and increased flow of K+ through the membrane.The Poget lab has been conducting experiments with native Tx7335 purified from snake venom, and found a variability in toxin potentcy, possibly linked to changes in amino acid positions. My experiment is to verify the sequence of Tx7335 in different venom batches by mass spec analysis.This is performed by redisolving toxin and subsequent reduction and alkylation of the cysteine residues.Then, completeproteolysis is performed with trypsin.The resulting fragment peptides are observed by MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy, and an analysis of their masses compared to the expected fragments based on the known amino acid sequence will allow the verification of the toxin sequence.

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Research Poster Presentations

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE CONFERENCE LOCATION: WEST LOUNGE P OS T E R

# 185

Minimizing Total Completion Time in Flow Shop with Unavailable Interval on the First Machine Domenic Ariaudo Faculty Mentor: Professor Yumei Huo Department of Computer Science We consider the problem of finding the minimum total completion time in a two-machine permutation flow shop with an unavailable interval on the first machine using the branch and bound algorithm. This problem is strongly NP-hard and the amount of work required solve this problem increases dramatically as the number of jobs, n, is increased. Randomly generated schedules with up to 30 jobs were considered in our experiments.The performances of depth-first and breadth-first search strategies were compared, finding that breadth-first search was unfeasible due to memory issues as n approached 20 jobs. A set of dominance rules were devised, and provided a large increase in performance compared to the na誰ve branch and bound algorithm. Finally, Monte Carlo and simulated annealing metaheuristics were examined to serve as initial solutions to the branch and bound algorithm. Simulated annealing provided the strongest approximation of the solution, and frequently provided optimal solutions. Despite the strong initial solution provided by this metaheuristic, its inclusion in the branch and bound algorithm provided only modest increases in performance. We believe that the poor performance of this algorithm is due to the weakness of the lower bound used to prune branches of the search space.

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#165

Feature Selection Based on Fuzzy C-Means Algorithm in High-Dimension Data Clustering Matthew Chiappa Faculty Mentor: Professor Natacha Gueorguieva Department of Computer Science Data clustering is a process of putting similar data into groups. A clustering algorithm partitions a data set into several groups based on the similarity of the data values.The idea of data grouping, or clustering, is simple in its nature and is close to the human way of thinking. Finding these groupings or trying to categorize the data using a computer, however, is not a simple task. Clustering algorithms are not only used extensively to organize and categorize data, but are also used for data compression and model construction. Fuzzy C-means clustering (FCM) employs fuzzy partitioning such that a given data point can belong to several groups with the degree of belongingness specified by membership grades between 0 and 1. However, FCM still uses a cost function of dissimilarity measure that is to be minimized while trying to partition the data set. The so called "curse of dimensionality" is a phenomenon in which the number of training samples necessary to assure a satisfactory clustering performance is given by an exponential function of the feature space dimension. A traditional approach for solving the above problem is based on representing the data in a suitable similarity space instead of the original highdimensional attribute space. The goal of this research is to develop an algorithm for evaluating the feature informative weights based on calculated membership functions after implementation of Fuzzy C-Means algorithm. We propose a feature elimination approach which includes a procedure for feature reduction having the following steps: calculation of feature information weights, generation of candidate feature subsets base and determination of the optimal feature subset. We evaluated the proposed techniques on unsupervised (as cluster validation measures) and supervised (pattern recognition) cases to validate its abilities for separating different categories.


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Design of Fuzzy Clustering Algorithms for Processing Big Data Cong Du Faculty Mentor: Professor Natacha Gueorguieva Department of Computer Science Clustering technique plays an important role in data analysis as it allows gaining insight into the nature of the data by discovering hidden structures in it. Data are grouped into clusters so that the data objects within a cluster have higher similarity in comparison to one another, but are very dissimilar to data objects in other clusters. Clustering algorithm is a classification method for data with unknown distribution; the goal is to find the structure hidden in data, and as much as possible to make the data with same nature attributed to the same cluster according to some measure of similarity degree. Many clustering algorithms suffer from being applied in highdimensional spaces, where sometimes the cardinality of the data sets available is even less than the number of variables, as is the case of the analysis of many bioinformatics data sets or in web data mining problems. In cases where the space dimensionality is high or even sensible (as low as 10-15), the distance of a point to its furthermost/nearest neighbor tends to become insignificant measure. Increasing the data space dimensionality may introduce a large number of suboptimal solutions (local minima), and the nearest-neighbor criterion, may even become useless. Fuzzy clustering algorithms partition the data set into overlapping groups such that the clusters describe an underlying structure within the data. In order to obtain a good performance from a fuzzy clustering algorithm, a number of issues must be considered.These concern the shape and the volume of the clusters, the initialization of the clustering algorithm, the distribution of the data patterns and the number of clusters in the data.

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#112

Smart Homes for Elderly and Disabled People Brian Kien (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Zhanyang Zhang Department of Computer Science Within the last decade, there has been an increasing amount of elderly within the population, which significantly affects people in many aspects,especially in healthcare. Many studies have shown increases in expenditures on long-term care. New models of care are needed for self-care and home-based services.Thanks to advances in sensor and network technologies, this was made possible. The idea of having devices monitor the elderly at their own home, is known as a smart home. A smart home is a residence that is equipped with smart technologies, providing services that enhance a humanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s way of living, such as safety, security, and entertainment.These devices would allow the elderly to live independently with the comfort of their own homes, without worrying about their safety or healthcare costs that would have popped up if he or she was residing in a nursing home. Typically, these devices often rely on components such as sensors, RFID (radio-frequency identification), and smartphones. What sensors are typical used for is keeping track a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vital signs, movement, and keeping track of possibly unintended appliances, like a stove, or a faucet. When it comes to RFID, it is often used for maintenance of a home or notifications related to appliances. Any information created by sensors or RFID, would be sent to a smartphone.The idea of this project is to explore various smart home technologies that involve these three components, in order to build an ideal smart home network.

In this research we use and extend the clustering algorithms FANNY, PAM and CLARA from R-package and incorporate the extended validation measure Silhouette allowing the program extension to send recommendations about the optimal number of clusters. 63


Research Poster Presentations

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# 164

Modeling Neurotransmitter Effects in Olfactory Bulb Danny Lin Faculty Mentor: Professor Natacha Gueorguieva Department of Computer Science Brain computations (detection, processing and transmitting of information) are primarily carried out by spiking neurons.The latter communicate with each other via synaptic connections and respond to synaptic stimuli by firing spikes through their axons and dendrites. Neurons integrate synaptic inputs which depend on the various (voltage- and time-dependent) conductances in the dendrites and soma.The summated signals of these inputs produce action potentials (APs) that are transmitted to other neurons. The sense of smell, called olfaction, involves the detection and perception of different odors, and allows the identification of food, mates, predators, danger etc. For both humans and animals, it is an important means by which they communicate with the environment.The olfactory bulb functionality is based on neurons, primarily the communication between mitral and granule cells.This process is very complex and involves different types of neurotransmitters.The basic function of neurotransmitters is the realization of communication processes between neurons. Additionally, they are responsible for the efficient and accurate processing of the information, as well as for the generation of cellular changes, which corresponds to the memory functionality. In our research we use the NEURON simulation environment as it provides a powerful and flexible setting for implementing biologically realistic models of electrical and chemical signaling in neurons and networks of neurons. Since it was designed specifically to simulate the nerve cells, its main advantage is that the user deals directly with concepts that are familiar at the neuroscience level. We designed and performed several sets of experiments with different number of mitral and granule cells, AMPA and NMDA conductance, time delays as well as different number of odors with respective intensities and different activation level of GABA receptors. 64

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#150

Using Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks to Track and Monitor Ocean Oil Spill Amy Luo (Macaulay Honors College), Jonathan Zimmer (Macaulay Honors College), Paul Guglielmetti (Macaulay Honors College), Kieran Hepworth (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Zhanyang Zhang Department of Computer Science Oil spills have disastrous effects on the natural environment and coastal residencies if left unchecked. In order to effectively deploy resources to control ocean oil spills, it is important to be able to monitor, track, and predict its propagation. The purpose of this study is to create proof-ofconcept of an accurate simulation of how oil will spread through the sea.The algorithm for the physical mechanics of the simulation is modeled using the light-weight Lattice-Boltzmann Method for fluid simulations.The simplicity of the method lends to rapid simulation calculations, allowing the possibility of real-time simulation.The simulation itself is tentatively constructed using a mixture of Palabos software and python.The accuracy of the simulation will be constantly calibrated using real data gathered from floating sensors currently monitoring oil spills in the Gulf of Mexico -- a strategy which has not been utilized in any other similar research projects. The existence of this tool benefits the first responder teams like the coastguard as well as environmental organizations and researchers interested in tracking oil flow. Knowing which direction and where oil will spread immediately after the disaster will allow responders to allocate resources and organize clean ups more efficiently. Such efforts would help mitigate potential destruction the spillage would have on the local environment and coastal residencies.


Research Poster Presentations

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Designing Research Games to Assess Emotion Recognition in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders Melina Mitchell, Edward Peppe Faculty Mentor: Professor Deborah Sturm Department of Computer Science Atypical attention patterns are thought to be at the root of several of the features that characterize Autism Spectrum Disorders (Ploog 2010).These include impaired social and communicative skills, theory of mind, and academic underachievement. The deficiency may be a result of either too much attention to detail or possibly competing stimuli. An analysis of emotion recognition in ASD appears to be central to an understanding of one of the key features of ASD: impaired social behavior. A remediation of abnormal attention patterns would target a core deficit in ASD and could present an effective treatment for ASD in the areas of emotion recognition and social behavior. We report on our development of a research game to systematically assess emotion recognition. An administrator can interactively create matching games using photos, cartoons or shapes.The game is written for iOS platforms and is coded in Objective C.

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#162

Reducing High-Dimensional Data with Fuzzy Principle Component Analysis Dennis Shpits Faculty Mentor: Professor Natacha Gueorguieva Department of Computer Science Feature selection has been very active area of research and development of clustering and pattern recognition in biology, machine learning, data mining, statistics etc. It was noticed that: a) a large number of features are not informative because some of them are either irrelevant or redundant with respect to the cluster (class) concept; b) learning can be achieved more efficiently and effectively with just relevant and non-redundant features. Features are classified into the following three disjoint categories: strongly relevant, weakly relevant, and irrelevant where: a) strong relevance of a feature indicates that the feature is always necessary for an optimal subset and therefore it cannot be removed without affecting the original conditional cluster (class) distribution; b) weak relevance suggests that the feature is not always necessary but may become necessary for an optimal subset at certain conditions; c) irrelevance shows that the feature is not necessary at all. Principal component analysis (PCA) extracts smaller uncorrelated data from original high dimensional data space and is widely used for data analysis. However, in some cases when the PCA cannot capture the data structure, its implementation does not really confirm the real similarity of data in the higher dimensional space. In order to avoid the above problem for the purposes of high dimensional data clustering, we propose an approach and algorithm based on Fuzzy PCA (FPCA). The latter defines weight (fuzzy membership function) as a degree of belongingness of each object to the clustering (classification) structure.The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm was tested on artificial and existing benchmark data sets.We also evaluated the clustering efficiency of our approach by experimentally comparing the performances of FPCA with the popular Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) as well as with those achieved by implementing similar clustering algorithms without fuzzification.

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Research Poster Presentations

DEPARTMENT OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION CONFERENCE LOCATION: WEST LOUNGE P OS T E R

# 118

Literacy and Language Acquistion Kaitlin Lillo

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Reflections on Helping Early Childhood Learners Gain a Deeper Understanding of Number Sense and Number Relations Minyoung Park

Faculty Mentor: Professor Gail Wangel Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Faculty Mentor: Professor Judit Kerekes Department of Curriculum and Instruction

I propose to write a children’s literature piece that was inspired by one of my educational professors. It will be a piece that I have created and illustrated with drawings and pictures. I will also include a research paper on the importance of children’s literature and the effects of valuable influential pieces for young minds. Children require inspiration, this can be achieved in literature. Literature helps a child to develop language.

My poster will describe my experience working with early childhood learners as they explored number sense and number relations concepts in their classes. This experience provided a firsthand view of the cognitive development of young children while they were building a foundation for academic skills that would help them to grow as effective learners. Through my fieldwork, I observed that it is easier for young children to learn addition by expanding numbers gradually than by giving them random numbers to add, because many of them do not understand the concept of quantities fully.

This is essential for children of foreign descent. A child needs encouragement, this can be found in a child’s book.There is a need for classic pieces of literature that teaches a moral or a message.Today’s children need to be exposed to this same literature that has influenced so many of us today.The access to a variety of literature is extremely important for young learners’ success. As an educator, I need to help students develop a love and passion for reading.

In my poster, I will show how I used manipulatives, including a rekenrek and dice, to help the students learn the relationship of expanding/adding quantities. I worked with two different age groups (kindergarteners and second graders). I had created math learning activities for each of the age groups. Using both the rekenrek and dice, the kindergarten students learned different ways to make ten by adding, while students from the second grade learned different ways to make twenty by adding and subtracting. By working with the students, I saw how powerful manipulatives were as a great math teaching and learning tool for young children. Children were learning an amount as it is, rather than counting from one to tell how many it is.This concept and practice is the key for young students to grasp the mathematical understanding of quantities. When these children actually visualized and manipulated numbers with objects, they understood the concept of quantities better and more quickly. Not only did I learn a great deal about the young students’ needs for manipulatives, but also their need to discover math concepts for themselves. The firsthand experience creating math learning activities which were hands-on was very beneficial for me. By working with the students, I better understand how to create such learning activities in the future.

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Early Exposure of Environmental Print: Leads to Future Literacy Success? Victoria Lokyee Wong Faculty Mentor: Professor Barbara Gail Montero Department of Curriculum and Instruction Early reading skills are critical for school success (Roskos, Christie, Richgels 2003) yet many children enter kindergarten without the ability to read and recognize simple words. How can this problem be addressed? This research aims to provide a partial answer to this question. In the recent years, environmental print has been gaining a place in the spotlight regarding this issue. Environmental print refers to the print that children see in their surroundings. The street signs, restaurant logos, or even simple letters off cereal boxes are considered environmental print. Environmental print is slowly taking responsibility for the job of early exposure to literacy. Research from Roskos, Christie, Richgels has demonstrated the presence of the three major categories in early literacy. These content categories include oral language comprehension, phonological awareness, and print knowledge (Roskos, Christie, Richgels 2003). For young children entering preschool, if they are able to grasp simple concepts of print, it can assist them to succeed and develop further in emergent literacy. By culling data from both case studies that are discussed in the literature and my own observations of preschool classrooms at P.S. 41. I argue that using environmental print as an early tool for literacy can benefit the child in their emergent literacy development.

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#143

A Comparison of Academic Achievement between Studentled Learning and Teacher-led Learning in NYC Schools Laura Xhuglini Faculty Mentor: Professor Barbara Gail Montero Department of Curriculum and Instruction The education policy grade of New York State, according to ALEC Historical Grading, is a C (ALEC). New York Public Schools have, for the most part, traditional classrooms.Traditional classrooms meaning that there is teacher-led learning, where the teacher stands at the front of the curriculum needed for the students to retain and reproduce on standardized tests given from grades 3 and on. Traditional classrooms are what we are accustomed to because it has been the way of public schools for generations. In this research we look into the academic gap between student-led exploration of learning as seen in the Montessori method of learning and the mainstream teaching styles on New York City Public Schools, which calls for little student-led discovery. First, drawing from my on-site observation, I will provide an account of mainstream teaching and learning styles found in NYC Public Schools.Then, based on analysis of research on the student-led discovery, I will compare the success of a deep understanding of the curriculum taught.Through this research it is concluded that student-led learning is more effective than teacher-led styles in the fact that students have deeper understandings of the material as well as making meaning of curriculum and finding enjoyment in learning.

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Research Poster Presentations

DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING AND PHYSICS CONFERENCE LOCATION: WEST LOUNGE P OS T E R

# 159

Smart Door Monitoring System Irfan Bhatti, Ishmam Haque

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#38

RC Car Compatible with Bluetooth App Controller with Sonar Sensor and Live Feed Camera Adem Demo, Mohamed Hussein

Faculty Mentor: Professor Dwight Richards Department of Engineering Science and Physics

Faculty Mentor: Professor Dwight Richards Department of Engineering Science and Physics

An Arduino microcontroller is used to identify individuals entering and exiting a room by interfacing to a pair of motion sensors.The logic is based on observing the sequential activation of the sensors. On first entry, the system will turn on the interior light and take a picture of the person entering the room. .The picture will be sent to the owner or manager via text message. Copies of the pictures are also stored on a flash drive for later viewing. A running count of the number of people currently occupying the room will be calculation from the difference between the number of exits and entries.

We develop a remote controlled (RC) car which uses sonar sensors and live camera feed to increase safety. An Android device can be used to control the car via a Bluetooth interface.The implementation is based on an Arduino Uno microcontroller, working together with an Arduino motor shield R3 board and a Bluetooth module. A camera located on the top of the car sends a live feed to a laptop computer and the sonar sensors serve to avoid collisions with obstacles at the rear and at the front of the car.

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Research Poster Presentations

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#153

Self-Driven Car Sundus Elkhatieb, Medha Hanna Faculty Mentor: Professor Dwight Richards Department of Engineering Science and Physics Our project will be based on the idea of developing any moving vehicles, to automatically prevent crashing between the vehicle and any object.This project could be used in various fields and phases such as construction and transportation, and it could be applied to any kind of vehicle. The main idea of this project is to design a selfdriven car, which would prevent any obstacles found on its way by swerving around it. Also at the same time it shows how far the object is on the LCD by showing the change of the distance as it gets closer to the vehicle. We will be adding a warning message with a beeping sound. Our final result is for the vehicle to avoid the obstacle by turning around it, and then it keeps going forward to its direction.

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#67

The Linearly Damped Quantum Harmonic Oscillator Karl Francis Faculty Mentor: Professor William Schreiber Department of Engineering Science and Physics The Caldivoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;la[1] Kanai[2] Hamiltonian leads to a Heisenberg equation of motion for a linearly damped quantum harmonic oscillator similar to that of the corresponding classical oscillator.The solution for the decaying energy of the quantized oscillator in the nth eigenstate[3] is to be analyzed and compared with the classical solution. A semiclassical model for the decaywill be constructed, and its implications for the characteristics of the associated decay in comparison to that of a decaying classical oscillator will be investigated. The extension of the model to other initial states, e.g., the coherent state, will be discussed. 1.P.Caldiro'la, Nuevo Cimento vol.18, 393 (1941). 2.E.Kanai, Prog,Theor.Phys. vol.3, 440 (1948). 3.L.F.Landoitz, A.M.Levine, and W.M.Schreiber, Phys.Rev.A vol.20, 1162 (1979).

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Research Poster Presentations

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# 147

Self-Driven Car That Avoids Obstacles on Its Path Medhat Hanna, Sondos el Khateeb Faculty Mentor: Professor Dwight Richards Department of Engineering Science and Physics Our group will be presenting the project we are working on for the ENS464 class.The project is a self-driven car, that will be controlled using Arduino UNO microcontroller, the objective of it is to avoid any obstacles that's found on its path by swerving around it, and determines which way is better for it to use.

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#36

M&T Rail Thami Kandri, Mykovenski Gisomme Faculty Mentor: Professor Dwight Richards Department of Engineering Science and Physics We will be building a safety system which can be used to control an automatic train in order to prevent fatal accidents.The system is capable of stopping a car approaching a railroad crossing and can also stop a train if there is a car or any other object stranded on the train track.The design utilizes an infrared (IR) sensor to recognize the car/object and measure the distance between the train and the stranded car/object to determine if the train has enough time to stop. If it is determined that the collision cannot be avoided due to speed and distance calculations, the system will automatically alert the emergency responders so that the rescue can be as quick as possible.The Arduino Uno microcontroller is the brain behind the system.


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#135

Into the Light of a Faint Star Justice Lenon

T&S Cocktail Mixer Tatiana Rasolka, Stewart Romhin

Faculty Mentor: Professor Emily Rice Department of Engineering Science and Physics

Faculty Mentor: Professor Dwight Richards Department of Engineering Science and Physics

Brown dwarfs are objects between 15-75 times the mass of Jupiter which are unable to sustain fusion of hydrogen like a regular star also known as a failed stars.They were predicted about 50 years ago, but the classifications of spectral types from M to Y hadn't been developed until the 1990s.The M and L dwarfs are the hottest of the brown dwarfs. The T dwarfs are cooler, with their atmosphere containing H2O, CH4, and NH3 gases. While Y dwarfs are the coolest ranging below 600 Kelvin (K).The search for brown dwarfs was long and difficult because they are so faint.To find these dwarfs we look in the near-infrared to help expedite the search and analysis of the detected brown dwarfs. Near-Infrared refers to wavelengths of light that are longer than visible light. A spectrum is the entire range of wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation, which radiates from these stars. Spectral lines are used to determine the physical properties of the dwarf such as composition and temperature. I will use Python to plot and compare the spectral data.Thousands of brown dwarfs have been discovered since the original discovery in 1995.The aim of my research is to analyze the spectra of these would-be stars in hope to understand these objects and their formation process. Are they born more like stars or more like planets?

We use an Audino microcontroller to control an automatic cocktail mixer.The mixer allows a user to create a perfect alcoholic or nonalcoholic beverage at the simple push of a button.This frees the user from having to know anything about the recipe or the need to have any special tools for measuring and mixing. A menu will be offered to the user with a one-to-one mapping of each item to a pushbutton.The design is intentional kept simple to keep the cost at a minimum. Furthermore, our design incorporates an RFID scanner to check IDs while verifying legal drinking age. Underage users will not be served alcoholic beverages.The microcontroller performs all the necessary intelligence.

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Research Poster Presentations

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Minerology of Contact Metamorphosis of the Palisades Sill Victoria Rivelli Faculty Mentor: Professor Jane Alexander Department of Engineering Science and Physics Due to recent construction in Fort Lee, NJ, a new outcrop between the Palisades Sill and the Stockton formation has been exposed. We have collected several samples from the metamorphosed rocks near the sill, and from the sedimentary rocks nearby.This site provides a good place to investigate transects through the sill and into the unaltered sedimentary rock to determine what effect the sill had on the preexisting formation.Field investigations have shown interesting structures, such as the remobilization of sediments as the sill intruded. Mineralogical changes interpreted from thin sections reveal changes resulting from metamorphism. Sedimentary logs made during field work allow us to separate sedimentological variations from variations due to metamorphism due to the presence of minerals indicating metamorphism.

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#187

Pet SMS Food Dispenser Ariel Rodriguez, Juan Franco Faculty Mentor: Professor Dwight Richards Department of Engineering Science and Physics We present our Pet SMS Food Dispenser. With this device, there is no longer a need to give away your pets because of your busy lifestyle. A text message from your wireless device will give pet owners the ability to feed their pet while they are away from home.The dispenser includes a motion sensor which is connected to an Arduino microcontroller, which includes a GSM shield.The Arduino is programmed to notify the owner when the pet is looking for food. Therefore, the Pet SMS Food Dispenser provides pet owners with the opportunity to know when their pets want to be fed and complete control over when they are fed via a mobile device.


Research Poster Presentations

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Geochemistry of Accretionary Wedge Pore Fluids Sam Rubin Faculty Mentor: Professor Jane Alexander Department of Engineering Science and Physics Geochemistry of Accretionary Wedge Pore Fluids The Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) was an international cooperative effort to explore and study the composition and structure of the Earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ocean basins. It began in 1985 and drilled thousands of cores from all over the planet, including several accretionary wedges associated with subduction zones. The Northern Barbados Ridge Leg was significant because it was the first ever penetration of a decollement zone. For my research I have collated data from Leg 110 to investigate the geochemistry of interstitial pore fluids collected during drilling. Interstitial pore fluid is the water that has flowed through the accretionary wedge and its geochemistry gives us an idea of its makeup and behavior. Previous work showed interesting relationships among various chemical components in the pore fluids. Statistical modelling allowed some of these relationships to be described numerically by the following formulae. Magnesium concentration is: 3.19993062036645+0.52025739527218(Cl) +1.09686833860454(SO_4_)+1.0495817712271(Ca) +-0.5304110736286(Na) Calcium concentration is: 3.49914626165293+ 0.4939635392039(Cl) +1.03769295750701(SO_4_) +-0.9487199048605(Mg) +-0.5092830695127(Na). This work has focused on testing the application of these formulae to other sites in Barbados and to other accretionary wedges.The fit is good in some places, but less accurate in others, and these discrepancies are being interpreted based on likely geochemical and hydrologic processes. Initial interpretation shows spikes to be related to thrust faults and decollement zones.These faults occur when settled layers of sediment and rock are pushed from underneath until they break and are pushed upwards, and this allows water to flow through the cracks and change the chemical concentrations. More gradual changes in chemistry with depth are related to interactions between the pore fluids and the sediments.

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#73

Geochemistry of Sedimentary Rocks Affected by Contact Metamorphism from the Intrusion of the Palisades Sill Sean Thatcher (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Jane Alexander Department of Engineering Science and Physics In North Bergen, New Jersey, a new sedimentary outcrop has been exposed by construction from the base of the Palisades Sill to the Stockton Formation. Many previous studies in this location have focused on the alterations of sodium concentrations within the rocks from the contact of the sill to the unaffected zones, although no study has investigated the full suite of major, trace, and rare earth elements that have also been altered from the intrusion. Because this location contains visibly altered and unaltered zones associated from the intrusion of the Palisades Sill, it provides an ideal study site for this type of study. Several samples have been collected from this study site in numerous locations ranging from the unaffected sedimentary strata, to metamorphosed rocks close to the intrusion.These samples have been crushed into a fine powder and sent to labs with appropriate equipment to provide a detailed chemical analysis, specifically from ICP-AES and ICP-MS testing, to determine the variations of major, trace, and rare earth element concentrations with increasing proximity to the sill.This will allow us to highlight changes that have occurred in the Lockatong Formation, which is younger and lays on top of the Stockton Formation, caused from increases in heat and pressure associated with metamorphism. Because the Lockatong Formation contains a greater concentration of rare earth elements than the Stockton Formation, a full chemical analysis will also be able to clearly illustrate the boundary between these two formations. Lastly we hope to find evidence of volcanic ash deposits which has been found previously in a near-by location, which is now inaccessible.

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Research Poster Presentations

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH CONFERENCE LOCATION: UPSTAIRS WALKWAY P OS T E R

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The Fault in Our Discourse: Defending the Young Adult Novel Jamie Sterner (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Lara Saguisag Department of English Young adult literature, more commonly known as “YA,” is one of the most quickly expanding genres in modern popular culture.The popularity of certain YA novels has sparked a widespread conversation about the cultural and intellectual value of this genre.These conversations have resulted in a substantial amount of online commentary that denounces these teen novels as being poor quality literature. Writer Ruth Graham, in her controversial article “Against YA,” has suggested that YA novels lack complexity and sophistication and only serve the purpose of escapist reading. Graham’s opinions are representative of other cultural commentators’ views, but in criticizing young adult literature, she is also criticizing young adult readers and building an inflexible hierarchy of young adult versus “adult” literature. This paper uses the popular YA novel The Fault in Our Stars by John Green as a case study to analyze representations of adolescents within young adult novels. Green utilizes what Sara K. Day calls “narrative intimacy,” but also uses stereotypical character types. Green’s different depictions of teens both challenge and reinforce stereotypes of adolescents, and cause the reader to reimagine conventional representations of adolescents.The young adult genre is important to the study of literature whether the novels are complex or not, as they reflect the way we see and construct images of young people, and at times cause us to reconsider those images.

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#136

Variation in Appalachian Verb Forms: Evidence for a General Past Steve Arriaga, Frances Blanchette, Theresa O’Neill Faculty Mentor: Professor Christina Tortora Department of English/Linguistics For many non-regular verbs, Standardized Englishes exhibit two distinct forms for the simple past and past participle (They gave vs.They’ve given). Several researchers have observed, however, that many English speakers exhibit leveling of the forms (They gave vs.They’ve gave). Linguists claim this reflects the speaker’s desire to model non-regulars on the regular pattern while others claim that it represents a less frequent use of the perfect. One feature that many previous studies have in common is the assumption that many speakers mentally represent “past” and “participial” forms as distinct categories, who model speaker-knowledge as organized around three part paradigms (e.g. givegave-given). In this project, we are challenging the validity of this idea, at least for some English speakers’ grammars. In the Appalachian speech under study, there is no evidence for the mental representation of paradigms that conceptually distinguish the categories “past” vs.“participial.” Rather, evidence points to speaker-knowledge of a single “general past,” which is equally employed for both simple and compound tenses.That speakers exhibit variation (even individually) in the forms used within the simple past or compound tenses (e.g. He did – He done, and He’s did – He’s done) is argued to be an independent reflex of the otherwise commonly accepted idea that speakers readily allow for equivalent variants in their lexicons, such as the normatively accepted He dreamed – He dreamt, and He’s dreamed – He’s dreamt.This hypothesis is supported by statistical analysis, showing that speakers are just as likely to use did/done in both the simple past and in compound tenses.The Appalachian speaker variation thus does not support the traditional three part paradigm which distinguishes “participle” from “past.”


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Dialect Leveling: The Case of Non-Rhoticity in Staten Island English Steve Arriaga, Juliana Colon, Julia Correale, William Quilty Faculty Mentor: Professor Christina Tortora Department of English/Linguistics Staten Island English is one of the most identifiable, yet under-studied micro-dialects of New York City English. As a part of the Corpus of NYCE Project, we’re surveying the frequency of non-rhoticity, also known as r-dropping, among speakers of Staten Island English.This investigation collects evidence using a methodology of single-blind interviews where the informant is aware that recordings of their speech are being made for research purposes, but are unaware of the experiment’s linguistic nature.The purpose of this investigation is to collect evidence of a phenomenon known as dialect leveling, explained as the “reduction of variation between dialects of the same language in situations where speakers of these dialects are brought together” (Lefebvre, 1998:46). We’ll consider to what extent the migration of Brooklyn residents to Staten Island has changed the aforethought isolated dialect, since variations can be observed between generational speakers of Staten Island New York City English (SINYCE), most notably as a distinction between speakers from pre vs. post-Verrazano Bridge (1964) generations. Our working thesis is that the several hyper-regional NYCE dialects are folding into one leveled dialect. According to other scholars, this systematic reduction of dialect variation is not a regional phenomenon. Perhaps resisting the phenomenon, New York City English is still one of the most identifiable accents of English. Our questions are 1) whether dialect leveling is occurring and 2) how still-robust are some of the prototypical features of the regional accent. Bill Labov (1966) identifies rdropping (“car” vs.“caa”) as an aspectual marker of native New Yorkers. However, this phenomenon seems to be fading away (Brown, 2013).Therefore, our investigation centers on identifying whether rhotic speech can still be considered as an identifying marker of the micro-dialect SINYCE.

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#111

Autism Spectrum Traits Predict the Perception of Linguistic Prosody in Neurotypical Adults Juliana Colon, Nicole DiMeglio Faculty Mentor: Professor Jason Bishop Department of English/Linguistics Prosody, or speech rhythm and melody, conveys a range of information to a listener, including nonlinguistic information such as emotion, and linguistic information about how words and sentences relate to a larger discourse. A command of the expressive power of prosody is one of the key language-related deficits associated with autism spectrum conditions (ASCs). In the present study, we attempted to shed light on how prosody is perceived in ASCs using an individual differences approach.This individual differences approach takes advantage of the fact that autistic-like characteristics exist in the healthy, neurotypical population as well, and can be measured using standardized personality inventories. Here we tested for correlations between autistic-like personality traits prosody perception in 80 neurotypical adults. Specifically, we asked whether people with more autistic-like personality traits had a more difficult time perceiving aspects of speech prosody: stress/emphasis and pauses. A primary finding is that the perception of prominence is highly (and inversely) correlated with measures of autistic personality traits while perception of spoken pauses in speech is less sensitive. This study supports the hypothesis that to a certain degree, different measures of autistic traits can predict the perceptual sensitivity to linguistic prosody.

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# 168

Do You Really Know? Variation in the Use of “yanno” in NYC English Nawal Doleh, Angelica Maninno, Erin Moreno, Natalie Palladino Faculty Mentor: Professor Christina Tortora Department of English/Linguistics It is well known that many English speakers use hedge words in everyday speech. According to Holmes (1986), a hedge word is a “word that conveys the sense that the speaker is uncertain about what he or she is saying, or cannot vouch for the accuracy of the statement.” Consider, for example, the hedge word yanno in the following sentence from Tortora et al.: Mommy put some pepper in the stove, you know, and let it get hot. In this sentence, the words you know (which in this work we spell as the single word yanno) do not have a specific meaning; that is, these words do not have the same meaning as the semantically contentful phrase you know (as in the sentence You know John, don’t you?). Rather, yanno serves as a filler that allows the speaker to pause in thinking (but not in speaking). Holmes (1986) studies the range of forms and functions of you know, and its use in women and men’s speech. In our study, we expand on the work of Holmes (1986), by examining yanno in the English of New York City. In particular, based on Holmes (1986) (and also on some preliminary observation), we hypothesize that the hedge word yanno in New York City English is used more frequently by younger people than by older people, and more frequently by women than by men.To test our hypothesis, we are interviewing native speakers of New York City English. Each of the fourteen interviews is approximately 30 minutes (=5,000 words). We will then transcribe the interviews using the phonetics software Praat, and then use the time-aligned transcripts in depth analysis of the linguistic item in question.

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#23

A Linguistic Analysis of Rhythm in English Writing by NonExperts Nawal Doleh, Erin Moreno Faculty Mentor: Professor Jason Bishop Department of English/Linguistics Unlike poetic forms designed to conform to a particular meter, English prose writing does not have a set rhythm. Nonetheless, a common intuition is that writing—at least “good” writing—is in some way rhythmic. In this study, we set out to test whether there were any objective bases for this intuition, and what the measurable correlates of rhythmicity might be.To do this, we took actual writing samples from the essay section of the Graduate Records Examination (GRE).These writing samples were previously assessed by professional raters from Educational Testing Services (ETS) for a range of factors, which did not include rhythm. Here we explore whether these ratings of writing quality correlated with measures of rhythm related to metrical concepts such length of inter-stress intervals and the occurrence of “stress clashes” (words positioned so that lexicallystressed syllables are directly adjacent). We present our analyses based on annotations of rhythm in the GRE corpus.


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#169

A Corpus-based Analysis of “spurious have” in English Medine Kovacevic (The Verrazano School), Melynda Kuppler, Dana Melendez

On the Use of Non-standard Participles in Staten Island English Julianne Millen, Sergio Napoletano, Kaitlyn Pellicano

Faculty Mentor: Professor Christina Tortora Department of English/Linguistics

Faculty Mentor: Professor Christina Tortora Department of English/Linguistics

In all varieties of English, the verb have is understood to be either an auxiliary or a main verb. Consider for example I have a book (where have is a main verb), and I have eaten (where have is an auxiliary verb). However, one finds apparent uses of this verb in English speech where its status is unclear. Consider for example the second have in I should’ve never’ve done that or in If only John hadn't’ve come home so late.These two examples suggest that the second have (spelled ‘ve here) may not be a have at all. Let us call this usage of have “spurious have.”

Since Wolfram & Fasold (1974), it has been wellknown that English speakers often use nonstandard past participles in compound tenses with the auxiliary have. For example, some speakers use the form ate instead of eaten, in present perfects such as I’ve ate there many times. While Wolfram & Fasold have discussed this kind of variation in the context of social class, Bloomer (1998) was the first to note that syntactic context can play a role in the distribution of these non-standard participles. Specifically, in his study of Michigan and Long Island English, he noted that speakers are more likely to use non-standard participles with perfect infinitives following modal auxiliary verbs, than they are with regular finite perfects.Thus, I should’ve saw that movie (with non-standard saw) is more likely to occur than I’ve saw that movie 10 times.

Kayne (1997) hypothesizes that such instances of what we are calling “spurious have” may actually not be a verb at all, but rather a complementizer, in the form of the preposition of. Kayne argues that standard orthography masks the true nature of this element, and that in fact, many speakers of English use of, or its reduced form with a deletion of /v/, as follows:You should’a called. Kayne discusses where have and of are plausible syntactically, and shows that the latter (namely, spurious have) functions in different ways. This project further investigates “spurious have” as it occurs in colloquial American English. Specifically, using corpus data, we test Kayne’s hypothesis (which was merely preliminary and based only on personal intuitions), and investigate where have can reduce phonologically to of, and where it cannot be reduced to a, with an eye towards establishing the syntactic distribution of “spurious have.” For this project, we are creating our own corpus data, as part of the New York City English Corpus Project. In particular, our methodology is as follows: (i) we are collecting data through the sociolinguistic interview process; (ii) interviews are recorded and then transcribed using the software program Praat, and (iii) the timealigned transcripts are analyzed for the distribution of have and of.

In this study, we ascertain whether Staten Island English speakers exhibit the same linguistic patterns as Bloomer’s subjects.This is a Human Subjects Research based study conducted among a total of fourteen individuals varying in age, gender, and background.The data derives from face-to-face interviews each 30 minutes in duration (about 5,000 words each). Subjects are asked a series of questions and dialogue is documented with professional recording equipment and later transcribed using PRAAT.The methodology involves careful orthographic transcription based precisely on what is heard in the recordings.This audioaligned data will be a part of an initial 200,000 word corpus of NYC English, ultimately being incorporated into a one-million word database. Our study will thus expand on and refine the original Wolfram & Fasold (1974) and Bloomer (1998) studies, and allow for further analysis of the various dialects of NYC English speakers residing in the five boroughs.

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#35

Linguistic and Social Factors in the Use of “Spanglish” Julissa M. Peralta

The Role of Executive Function in Predicting Linguistic Prosody Nadia Zaki

Faculty Mentor: Professor Jason Bishop Department of English/Linguistics

Faculty Mentor: Professor Jason Bishop Department of English/Linguistics

As Spanish speakers come to the United States and establish a life, exposure to English causes a form of “linguistic convergence” in which their native Spanish and their second-language English vocabularies interact.The result is what is sometimes referred to as “Spanglish”. In this study, I investigated how some social factors predict a preferred use of Spanglish word forms (over the use of native Spanish versions). Native Spanishspeaking males and females, varying in age, were presented with pictures in a picture-naming task. The task was designed to allow for the use of either native Spanish words, or their Spanglish counterparts. Results show that people differ with respect to whether they prefer Spanglish terms.

All languages utilize prosody—rhythm, melody, and tone. A poorly understood issue, however, is how individuals differ from one another, and whether there are specific cognitive factors that underlie any systematic differences. Here we present the results of a phonetic production study designed to test a set of cognitive factors related to memory and executive function (verbal working memory and inhibition) and cognitive processing styles (“autistic traits”). We explore both explicitly produced prosody (in speech read aloud) as well as implicitly generated prosody (“internal” prosody generated during silent reading). A particular question we ask is whether these cognitive factors predict prosodic phrasing (the chunking of speech into groups separated by pauses).

However, this variation is not random, but rather is systematically related to social variables, such as age and gender.These results and their implications for linguistic variation are discussed.

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Research Poster Presentations

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY

DEPARTMENT OF MARKETING

CONFERENCE LOCATION: EAST LOUNGE

CONFERENCE LOCATION: UPSTAIRS WALKWAY

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Creating a Virtual Archive for the Federal Art Project: How Archives Shape the Stories That Can Be Told Kevin Jay Gomez, Andrew Fairley Faculty Mentor: Professor Catherine Lavender Department of History We worked with Professor Catherine Lavender (Department of History/Program in American Studies) to make a virtual archive for the Federal Art Project, an important Depression-era New Deal agency. In part because the agency's closing coincided with the U.S. entry into WWII, the papers and files of the Federal Art Project (FAP) are now scattered across many agencies' collections in the National Archives.This has limited historians' research about the FAP.We set out to gather these scattered documents into a virtual archive in the form of a searchable electronic database.The project allowed us to understand how archival practices shape the availability of historical documents, even for recent time periods, how the availability of documents shapes whether a historical story will be told by historians, and what stories can be found when the documents are gathered together and reviewed. On the one hand, through the creation of the virtual archive, we can illustrate where the gaps in the documentation exist so that new efforts to locate this information can begin. On the other, we can show that there are actually documents that show some interesting stories that need to be told. We used the archives to focus our research on two stories centered in New York that are supported by this surviving evidence to show how the archives contain important stories, but also obscure some parts of these stories.The two that we were interested in were the cases where the government censored some art projects and murals based on the political views they were thought to represent, and also the evolution of a strike by relief workers, led by the FAP's sister agency the Federal Writers' Project but supported by many in the FAP, that led to riots in New York City.

#126

Achieving Transparency of Public Organizations through Data Visualization and Analytics Chathura Athauda Faculty Mentor: Professor Soon Ae Chun Department of Marketing/Information Management The New York State Office for People With Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) is responsible for coordinating services for more than 126,000 New Yorkers with developmental disabilities. It provides services directly and through a network of approximately 700 nonprofit service providing agencies, with about 80 percent of services provided by the private nonprofits and 20 percent provided by state-run services. The large number of branch organizations and service providers complicate the tracking of the number of people and disability types, service types, the budgets and expenses rendered by these multiple locations. This study intends to enhance the transparency of the information from these different locational offices through visualization tools, such as GIS and charts with various data manipulation by end-users, including citizens, service providers as well as the government and legislative entities. The end-user based analytics of data will include the number of regions, where are they located, the services they provided, eligibilities to receive services, approximately number of individuals they offered services, how they are funded, and the programs they offered in different levels. The drill down and data mining tools will provide the details views and patterns and trends to see the variability across different branch offices as well as the detection of service provision abnormality. We develop an integrated data warehouse. The visual analytics functions can be utilized to depict the services and different resource allocations of OPWDD.The comparative analysis of different regions in New York can provide an insight to understand the equitability and fairness of distribution of their services to the community.

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Designing and Developing Fraud Ontology Azmira Ljekperic Faculty Mentor: Professor Soon Ae Chun Department of Marketing/Information Management Businesses and individuals are affected by various fraudulent activities, affecting the normal business processes and causing financial damages. It is not easy to research and study all the different frauds and preventive measures. All the different fraud types can affect any information system in banks, corporations, governments, personal, etc. In order to keep up to date with the new types of fraudulent acts and different counter measures, the students and employees are to be trained with the awareness and knowledge to be able to recognize different types of frauds and to prevent or minimize risks in your business. A company can agree that no mix of policies and controls can be 100 percent effective if the humans are not in the loop and their skills and knowledge are not up to date with threats, vulnerabilities or exploits, etc. This research intends to enhance the training of the current and future workforce, by providing a concept-based learning tool. We develop a taxonomy of fraud classes (concepts) that are rampant in real and virtual world. The ontological organization of fraud types allows to link the related multi-media learning resources by concepts and will enable a search capability for the learning resources, such as videos, slides, books, articles, etc. Since the ontology captures not only the concepts but also the relationships between concepts, one can learn the different relationships, such as a fraud type and its related counter-measures, its definitions, its book pages, etc.This linked data and the search capabilities will enhance not only exploring the concepts in the fraud domain but also the related learning objects. We present the method of collecting the fraud types, and designing the ontology of the fraud domain using web-based ontology design tool. The end result of ontology is used for developing a learning application to search and explore the ontology concept-based learning materials.

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#63

Big Trend, Mobile Apps Are Changing Consumersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Daily Lives Yiwen Zhang Faculty Mentor: Professor Dan Zhang Department of Marketing Mobile Applications are software programs that can be downloaded and run directly through mobile devices such as smartphones, tablets or other devices. Thanks to the technology innovation and the expansion of high speed network, mobile apps provide users with fun and convenience in information gathering, communication, shopping, gaming, and even banking. The increasing usage of mobile devices has transformed consumers into an app-driven society. Smartphones and tablets are becoming a ubiquitous part of consumersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; daily life in many parts of the world. This paper aims to explore the reasons why consumers move their lives to the mobile space, to provide understanding on the new emerging consumer behaviors along with the mobile apps trend, and to analyze the social culture impacts, economic effects and advertising value brought by the new consumer behaviors. A case study was conducted to analyze the new consumer behaviors resulting from the consumption of mobile apps services. The study concludes that the new consumer behaviors are characteristics of susceptibility, diffusion, and mutability. This study suggests that mobile apps should stick to consumersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; needs, keep themselves innovated, and maintain good relationships with consumers.


Research Poster Presentations

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS

DEPARTMENT OF MEDIA CULTURE

CONFERENCE LOCATION: WEST LOUNGE

CONFERENCE LOCATION: WEST LOUNGE

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Game Theory Fateeha Amjad (The Verrazano School), Lauren DeStefano (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Kevin O’Bryant Department of Mathematics Research students will consider normal form games and their various classifications. Research students will learn how to use linear algebra and advanced calculus to locate optimal strategies. Research students will consider examples from biology and sociology, comparing both the theory and the actual behavior of participants in games. Research students will consider combinatorial games with random elements along with learning how to better game player. Students will use Winning Ways by Conway, Berlekamp, and Guy, and A Course in Game Theory by Osbourne and Rubinstein as references.

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Food and Nutrition Options in Neighborhoods around CUNY Campuses Rin Zhi Larocque (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Bilge Yesil Department of Media Culture This research was conducted in collaboration with six other student researchers from six CUNY campuses.The objective of our study was to map the environment around the nineteen CUNY campuses to illustrate what nutritional options students may have when off campus. Compared to their four-year counterparts, two-year colleges tend to be located in less affluent neighborhoods, which affect their food environments. We developed “mapping areas” to speculate possible routes that students take to arrive to individual campuses. We used proximity to nearby transportation facilities and possible walking routes.These maps were finalized by consulting Google maps and by drawing on individual research team members’ knowledge of transportation options available in remote campuses. Food density was measured in order to see if different campuses present different food options. Body-Mass-Index (BMI) categories were created with 865 food establishments being considered healthy, intermediate or unhealthy.The research team also developed a food metric used to assign a BMIcategory to individual food establishments throughout the mapping area.The use of this food metric was influenced by Cynthia Gordon’s study on measuring food deserts in NYC's low-income neighborhood and James Starks’s study on neighborhood food environments and BMI among New York City adults. The research study was inductive and not experimental; our variables were food density in neighborhoods, proximity, and healthy options. Statistical analysis using SPSS was conducted to conclude this research.This purpose of this study is to construct a basis for future research concerning the food and nutrition options available to CUNY students and healthy eating habits.

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Gendered Marketing in Children's Toys Theresa Pessolano (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Jillian Baez Department of Media Culture Drawing on secondary sources, the research was conducted to examine and understand gendered marketing in children’s toys. From a young age, children’s toys get separated into categories: boys’ toys and girls’ toys.These toys contain certain markers that give clues into who should consume them. While some toy companies veer from the norm, the gendered distinction is prevalent throughout a child’s life.The aisle for girls’ toys is categorized by pink while the boys’ aisle is categorized by darker, masculine colors.The types of toys have distinctions as well: dolls and household themed toys for girls and superhero and other action themed toys for boys. Advertisements in catalogs and commercials reinforce the gendered distinction between toys.They show girls playing with kitchen sets and boys making Batman stop the bad guys. Using various modes of analysis such as data interpretation and content analysis, this thesis will study the gendered distinction in children’s toys.This topic is significant because it will provide insight into the market in connection with enforcing gender roles and the implications it has on young children as consumers.

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#3

Text as Image: American Political Figures Allison Scully Faculty Mentor: Professor Michael Mandiberg Department of Media Culture After presenting the first part of my senior honors project in the Undergraduate Research Conference in May 2014, I have given thought to taking this project in another direction, keeping with the same idea—using text as image. Many students/people enjoyed seeing an image made up of words and wanted to see text based portraits of more modern, notorious figures in American History. During the fall 2014 semester I did a great amount of research on the 10 figures that I came up with, and picked out an important speech that they had given to make up the image of their portrait. I used scholarly sources as well as the CSI Library database to conduct my research. After researching, I broke down the speech and pin pointed an excerpt in which I thought best described the purpose of the speech or an excerpt that the person is famous for, such as Kennedy’s “Ask what you can do for your country”. I then outlined the portrait I was going to use and began to add the words to the outline to make up the full portrait. Once drawn, the image was scanned onto my PC and then drawn again with a Wacom Tablet in the Adobe Illustrator program for completion. Completed are color portraits made up of the speeches of President Richard Nixon: Resignation Speech 1974, President Barack Obama: Victory Speech 2008, President Ronald Reagan: Address from the Brandenburg Gate 1987, President Theodore Roosevelt: Address at Milwaukee, Wisconsin 1912, President John F. Kennedy: Acceptance Speech 1960, Hilary Clinton: Remarks on Internet Freedom 2010, First Lady Michelle Obama: National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards 2014, Sandra Day O'Connor: The Importance of Having A Fair and Independent Judiciary 2006, Shirley Chisholm: For the Equal Rights Amendment 1970, and Lady Bird Johnson: Remarks on Beautification, 1963-1969.


Research Poster Presentations

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING CONFERENCE LOCATION: EAST LOUNGE P OS T E R

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Flu Vaccination among College Students Maria DelRosario (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Susan Mee Department of Nursing Influenza is a highly contagious illness and a serious threat to health. In 2014-2015, over 56,000 deaths were attributed to influenza and pneumonia in the US. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that everyone over the age of six months receive an annual influenza vaccine, yet influenza vaccination rates remain low. College students are at particularly high risk for influenza due to their close social contact and living conditions. The purpose of this project is to assess college studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; perception of: a) the benefits of the influenza vaccine; b) risks of influenza and c) to provide information to assist them to make informed decisions. This project was conducted in three stages. First, a review of the relevant, current health literature was conducted. The literature identifies factors influencing low vaccination rates among college students as lack of knowledge and misconceptions about both influenza and the influenza vaccine. Second, based on a review of the literature, a survey was identified for a formal assessment of knowledge and intent to receive influenza vaccination.

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#148

Resiliency Training for Burn Nurses: Translating Literature into Practice Megan Eisler-Grynsztajn, RN Faculty Mentor: Professor Marie Giordano Department of Nursing Nurses caring for burn patients encounter stressful, traumatic events on a daily basis including physical, psychological, social, and development needs of critically ill burn patients spanning the lifecycle. Working on a burn unit can evoke strong emotions including feelings of helplessness, guilt, and anger. The need for emotional and clinical support is so significant that the nurse's health and psychological well-being can be compromised if these needs are not addressed, thereby affecting their ability to provide quality care. Resilience has been identified in the literature as a characteristic that enables nurses to maintain healthy and stable psychological functioning despite exposure to extreme stressors. The Nursing Standard's Care campaign recognized the need to build nurses' resilience as one of ten action points requiring focus. There is currently little support available for nurses dealing with the issue of how to effectively manage emotions while caring for patients with severe burn injuries. A resilience training program, comprised of a series of interventions that strengthen and teach resilience has been developed to address the psychosocial needs of burn nurses.The goal is to build resilience thereby reducing the incidence of burnout and post-traumatic stress disorder in nurses caring for burn patients.

Third, an educational PowerPoint presentation was developed and conducted by a Registered Professional Nurse to provide accurate information and clarify common misconceptions about influenza and influenza vaccine. Among participants (n=12), 92% reported intention to receive the vaccine after participating in the educational program.This reflects a 30% increase in participantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; intention to receive the influenza vaccine based on survey results.

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Chikungunya Michael Gratkowski Faculty Mentor: Professor Regina Lama Department of Nursing Chikungunya is a debilitating vector borne virus prominent in areas where mosquitos are ubiquitous. Most affected are areas by the equator, including countries of Central/South outh America, Africa, India, and even the United States. Chikungunya is a potentially fatal problem that mosquitos can bring to the residents, or visitors to these countries.The virus' onset is similar to the flu with the presentation of muscle pains and cramps with high fever and joint pain.This is due to inflammation in the joints which is the pathophysiology of the virus. Chikungunya is transmitted only by the mosquito bite and spreads to climates that the mosquitos can survive. The virus can be carried by two mosquitos, the aeges aegypti and the aeges albopictus. Measures to contain chikungunya include all measures to reduce the amount of stagnant, standing, or still water available for these mosquitos to procreate. With effective insect repellant, people can save themselves from cumbersome, and even fatal mosquito bites.

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#42

Vaccines: Why Your Child Needs Them Kaitlyn Kelly (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Nora Maloney Department of Nursing According to the Center for Disease Control (2015), vaccines administered to infants and children over the last twenty years will prevent over 300 million illnesses, over 20 million hospitalizations and over 700,000 deaths. However, because of the anti-vaccination movement we are now seeing a resurgence of diseases that had once been declared eradicated in the United States. Among these are whooping cough or pertussis, mumps and measles. This study was done to explore the reason why parents do not vaccinate their children or decide to defer their vaccination. From this an investigation was done on the impact these decisions have on the nation, such as outbreaks of previously eradicated diseases. Then the study explains the nurseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role of teaching about the benefits of vaccinations to prevent further outbreaks. This study is a literature review utilizing electronic databases, scholarly journals and national statistics.


Research Poster Presentations

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A Comparative Analysis of Breastfeeding Beliefs and Practices between New York and Costa Rica Jessica Larsen (The Verrazano School)

Nursing Care of Patients throughout Renal Replacement Therapy in Calderon Guardia Hospital in San Jose, Costa Rica Anna Supinska

Faculty Mentor: Professor Danna Curcio Department of Nursing

Faculty Mentor: Professor Regina Lama Department of Nursing

The purpose of this honors research project will be to compare the practices, beliefs, and traditions of breastfeeding in New York and Costa Rican populations. Information obtained will provide facts concerning breastfeeding rates and incentives. Also, by studying the comparison of breastfeeding practices, a greater understanding of cultural differences will be understood.

Renal transplantation has become the treatment of choice for most patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It offers the benefits of freedom from dialysis routine, release of fluid and dietary restrictions and improves self- image and sense of well being. Despite economic limitations, Costa Rica, a small country in Central America, has universal access to a health system that covers 98% of the whole population. Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT) is accessible to all who need it and the number of kidney transplants per million population (pmp) is the highest among other countries in Latin America.

Methodology:The information included in this research project has been obtained through a thorough search of evidence-based literature resources, observations, and interviews with Costa Rican nurses and families pertaining to breastfeeding practices and beliefs. Results:A review of the literature, as well as scholarly cultural immersion, will reveal information about breastfeeding similarities and differences between the two countries, emerging a greater understanding of breastfeeding. Culture plays a dramatic role in breastfeeding practices in Costa Rica due to a high incidence of poverty. Breastfeeding is often the only affordable means for infant feeding and is observed as typical practice. Also, it is found that babies are put to the breast immediately after birth in 100% of maternity units, and formula is given only when medically indicated. In the United States, there are more social stigmas places on mothers who choose to breastfeed their infant. It has also been increasingly difficult for mothers to breastfeed their infants for extended periods of time, due to maternal employment issues and the cost of living. To answer this issue,The Affordable Care Act details standards for supporting a breastfeeding environment.According to the World Health Organization (WHO, 2015) breastfeeding is the normal way of providing needed nutrients for healthy growth and development. Breastfeeding has become an important topic in the maternal-newborn community and initiatives have been implemented to increase breastfeeding rates.

The first kidney transplant in Costa Rica was performed in 1969. Since that time, much has been learned about how to prevent rejection and minimize the side effects of medicines. In 2001, the acceptance rate was 91.7 %. Nurses play a vital role in patients recoveries after renal transplantation. The key issue in managing transplant patients is to tailor individual immunosuppressive regimen to maximize patient and kidney graft survival and to aid concordance with treatment. Nurses role is not limited to management of care after surgery, they care of all recipients and donors before surgery as well. In Calderon Guardia Hospital proper care of cadaver with healthy organs designed for transplantation is also the nurses duty. This project will present data about kidney transplantation in Calderon Guardia Hospital (HNCG) in San Jose, the capital city of Costa Rica.This hospital is the leading organ transplant center in the whole country where 70% of all transplanted kidneys comes from living donors.The data was gathered during a three week study abroad course on Cultural Immersion and Global Health Program in Costa Rica. Collected data then was analyzed and supplemented with information from reputable sources.

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Wound Care and the Autonomous Nurse

DEPARTMENT OF PERFORMING AND CREATIVE ARTS CONFERENCE LOCATION: UPSTAIRS WALWAY

Rosalind Weiss

POSTER

Faculty Mentor: Professor Regina Lama Department of Nursing

A Stranger Space Laura Hollingsworth

Wound care is a significant issue for nurses and their patients because if not treated properly, it can lead to severe illness, infections, and even fatalities. Moreover, wound care is an indicator of the quality of nursing care in a facility. Since pressure ulcers are considered to be preventable, it may even be an indicator of nursing malpractice (Sprakes & Tyrer, 2010).

Faculty Mentor: Professor Beatrix Reinhardt Department of Performing and Creative Arts

In Costa Rica, wounds are assessed in the same way as in the United States (U.S.). The Braden Scale is used for predicting pressure sore risk on admission and whenever the patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s condition changes. Accurate staging of pressure ulcers in accordance with the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (NPUAP) standards is utilized by the nurses for appropriate care planning. Preventative measures including repositioning and protecting bony prominences are performed as in the U.S. The only distinction in wound prevention and treatment between the nurses in Costa Rica and those in the U.S. is that the nurses in Costa Rica are authorized to treat pressure ulcers upon formation autonomously, unlike in the U.S. where nurses must obtain an order from a physician. The purpose of this project is to determine whether nurses in Costa Rica, who act autonomously to prevent pressure ulcers, are more successful in reducing stage III and IV pressure ulcers in comparison to their American counterparts. Based on my observations of nurses in Costa Rica working with bed bound patients and patients in the Intensive Care step-down unit, I found that no patients had pressure ulcers beyond stages I and II. This suggests that nurses who act autonomously in preventing and treating pressure ulcers are more successful than nurses who wait for physician orders. A large-scale comparative study between nurses in the U.S. and nurses in Costa Rica should be conducted to confirm these findings and to expand the current knowledge for the nursing profession in wound care prevention.

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#166

My work explores aspects of physical touch and what "touch" can or may mean to the world around me as well as to myself. I am interested in investigating some of the ideas and feelings that our society has about experiencing physical interactions with one another. I think that as a society we tend to put up barriers between ourselves and the "strangers" that surround us. With this work I try to break through these barriers and create a spontaneous yet sincere moment with "strangers" from various parts of my community. My intentions are to step outside the lines of my comfort zone and to look at, using the photographic medium, how we may feel about or react to being touched by, or touching, another person with whom we are not exactly comfortable.


Research Poster Presentations

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DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

A Sinful Game: Terror in Salem Amanda Nicole Mendez

CONFERENCE LOCATION: EAST LOUNGE

Faculty Mentor: Professor Maurya Wickstrom Department of Performing and Creative Arts

The Truth of Spiritual Phenomena Thomas Cintula

When I was a little girl Arthur Miller’s The Crucible was a play that truly captivated me. Arthur Miller wrote The Crucible in the early 1950’s.The play centers on The Salem Witch Trials of 1692. Miller’s original intention was to use the factual events of the Salem Witch Trials to show the McCarthyism of his period. He did this by making his characters allegorical references to the real people during the trials.There are many similarities between McCarthyism and the Salem Witch Trials. Both communism and witchcraft were used as political leverage for society’s issues. By calling someone a witch you could gain their land. If you called someone a communist you could be compensated by boosting your political campaign. Senator Joseph McCarthy and The House Committee on UnAmerican Activities planned to fight the attraction of communism and accused influential people (people in the state department, actors, writers, and producers) as being communists and subjected them to publicized trials. Both McCarthy and the young girls who started the Salem Witch Trials were both hailed for their bravery at the time. Miller wanted the American public to see that the hysteria that existed in the 1600s was alive in this modern day witch hunt. My goal in my directorial project entitled A Sinful Game:Terror in Salem was to examine themes within the actual historical witch hunt. As part of my directorial project, I took a dramaturgical trip to Salem in the summer. During my trip I found that Miller’s play contains not a lot of factual information on the actual people from the trials and is more historically accurate on the events during the trials. It is a very controversial play to many locals in Salem. My script combines Miller’s text, Miller's own notes from his play, songs from Frank Wildhorn’s Jekyll and Hyde, the words of award winning historian Mary Beth Norton, and the journal entries of the Salem Witch Trials written by Reverend John Hale in 1697, in A Modest Inquiry into the Nature of Witchcraft.The combination of these works helps highlight the theme of mankind’s struggle between good and evil and brings a story that was more factual about the treatment of the victims and the inflictions of the accusers.This show debuted with three successful performances this past October.

POSTER

#91

Faculty Mentor: Professor Peter Simpson Department of Philosophy Does God exist? My research evaluates two philosophical arguments that address this question. One is by philosopher Thomas Aquinas (1274/2009), who argues for the existence of God. The other is by philosopher William Rowe (1996), who argues against the existence of God. In The Five Ways, Aquinas discusses how we can know that God exists based on empirical knowledge. Rowe’s argument presents an argument for the nonexistence of God based on the presence of evil in the world. According to Rowe’s Evidential Argument from Evil, he claims that if evil exists, God does not exist. If God exists, then pointless evils do not exist (Piippo, 2009). In this research paper, using the tools of philosophical analysis, I make the case that both of these arguments are flawed. I conclude with a proposal about how to better address this question. I will argue that the answer may lie at the moment of one’s death. While believers may feel God’s presence around them, non-believers will claim that they do not feel this. For the non-believer, the only thing that could change their minds is hard evidence. Believers claim that God has a reason why things happen, whether good or bad. However, I will argue that we will find the truth after our death. While these two opposing views by Aquinas and Rowe are measured, the alternative result I give will also play a role in how this age old debate will be discussed by skeptics.

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DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY CONFERENCE LOCATION: EAST LOUNGE P OS T E R

# 55

Numerical Molecular Approach to Children’s Bones: A First Step to Optimize Pediatric Orthopedics Andre G. Duarte, Imke Fielder

deformation (higher plastic energy dissipated) of the collagen fibril when more immature cross-links are present.This is the first step of validation of the model and it confirms the experimental results previously obtained.

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE AND GLOBAL AFFAIRS CONFERENCE LOCATION: EAST LOUNGE POSTER

#132

Faculty Mentor: Professor Jean-Philippe Berteau Department of Physical Therapy

Corporate Social Responsibility: Do Corporations Really Care? Taiwo Adenekan

In clinics, children can present green-stick fracturesdisturbing their motion biomechanics. They are in vivo plastic bending fractures affecting mainly the cortical part of children’s long bones, in which they become curved along their longitudinal axis. Cortical bone is a highly specialized connective tissue composed of an organic matrix of type I collagen with mineral hydroxyapatite and water. Collagen is responsible for the post-yield and creep behavior of bone and its toughness, while the mineral apatite acts on stiffness (Bala et al., 2011; John D. Currey, 2003).

Faculty Mentor: Professor Anat Niv-Solomon Department of Political Science and Global Affairs

Starting from atomic scale, it is possible to study the influence of collagen cross-links and mineral on whole-bone mechanical properties. Knowing the structure at one scale, modeling the interactions between the components of the bone allows to build a coarser model at a larger scale based on bottom-up approach.The goal of this project is to validate a children bone numerical model (Depalle et al., 2014) by comparison with experimental values previously obtained on bone samples (Berteau et al., under review).MATERIAL AND METHOD: Available experimental values of immature-to-mature cross-link ratios are implemented in an already developed molecular model of a collagen fibril using LAMMPS ("Largescale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator"). Based on two different values, two models are built representing fibrils of a 10-year-old child and a 79-year-old adult respectively. A tensile test is numerically performed and the energy dissipated before fracture is evaluated.RESULTS:The total energy dissipated is higher in the children fibril model than in the adult fibril model.CONCLUSION: During numerical simulation of a tensile test, the model shows a plastic 88

Many multinational corporations have adopted “Corporate Social Responsibility”(CSR), as they seek to show their commitment to ethical practices and respect human rights. With the increased popularity of such policies and practices comes the question about the effectiveness of these practices in their impact on societies and people in general. This research project attempts to study the relationship between the adoption of CSR guidelines and policies, and how effective these CSR policies are in fulfilling the promises that corporations make to societies. People often wonder if these CSR policies and guidelines are just a cover up for these corporations to deceive the public and continue to earn profits. Perhaps, they believe that these corporations should be doing a lot more to make significant differences within the society. This paper will attempt to show that CSR policies can contribute towards positively impacting societies, if only corporations understand the need to integrate CSR at the core of business with systems of accountability. After defining CSR policies and reviewing social impact indicators, a qualitative analysis will be conducted on the essence of sustainability needs to be integrated into the way markets operate in order for the short-term considerations that currently have a strong influence on our financial markets to diminish, eradicating barriers to significant advancement.


Research Poster Presentations

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Stopping ISIS: Protecting Human Rights Ahmed Ahmed Faculty Mentor: Professor Anat Niv-Solomon Department of Political Science and Global Affairs With blistering speed, IS has become of the most violent groups to spawn out of the Middle East since the emergence of Al Qaeda. IS’s newly reestablished “Caliphate” has been recognized for their sheer brutality, disregard for human life, and repressive governance in conquered cities.The human right violations and war crimes IS has committed is evident from the high-quality propaganda videos they produce showcasing mass executions, beheadings, and immolations of captured prisoners of war.Their governance in the city of Raqqa, Syria, the so-called capital of IS is ruled by brutal terror tactics that publicly executes citizens for crimes ranging from smoking cigarettes, watching football matches, to selling drugs. For the International community the emergence of IS, and their human rights violations has resurrected the debate of a forceful international intervention to prevent these atrocities. As evident by the United States and coalition actions against IS military targets in Syria, and Iraq, where groups such as the Yazidis in Iraq and Kurds in Syria were protected from sure genocide if IS were able to overwhelm the largely defenseless populations. In my research I will explore the governing International documents relating to the defense of Human rights. Using the legal framework of these documents to defend the actions taken against IS positions across the globe

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#68

Managing Revolution: The Egyptian Military Role in Ousting Hosni Mubarak Ahmed Ahmed Faculty Mentor: Professor Roshen Hendrickson Department of Political Science and Global Affairs Four years ago in 2011 the Egyptian youth took to the streets across Egypt demanding freedom from the corrupt, autocratic, and repressive Mubarak regime. Within days, tens of millions of Egyptians demanded the resignation of President Mubarak, who had ruled the country for 30 years.They were fed up with the rampant corruption of the ruling National Democratic Party (NDP). Democratic activists warned that the Presidential election slated for September 2011 were not going to be competitive, rather it would be successional, so that Mubarak’s son Gamal would become President.The Egyptian military played a key role in forcing the resignation of Hosni Mubarak in February of 2011. Discontent within the military establishment against the rule of Mubarak had been building up, before climaxing in 2011. Military officials cited the mismanagement of Egypt’s economy, even though a large of portion the military controlled.They also had strong objections to any move of establishing familial rule. In my research I explore the relationship between the 30 year reign of Mubarak and the military, by analyzing the factors of emerging opposition movements, youth discontent, and crony economic liberalization, as a method of explaining the military’s actions during the uprisings. Using resources including academic journal articles, books, newspapers, and Arabic reports written about the subject, I provide an alternative explanation of the dynamics leading to the 2013 reinstallation of military rule. While other analysts focus on the role of the demonstrators, I conclude that the Mubarak regime, although seriously threatened by the social movement, was not shaken at all. Signs of collapse did not originate from the millions on the ground, rather it stemmed from the abandonment of Mubarak by the military, who let him fall from grace in order to protect their role in ruling Egypt.

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Is There a Correlation between a Neighborhood’s Social Capital and the Time It Takes for a Neighborhood to Bounce Back from a Natural Disaster? A Comparative Analysis of the Rebuilding Efforts PostSuperstorm Sandy in Livingston and Red Hook Naomi Edwards (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Richard Flanagan Department of Political Science and Global Affairs For years, social scientists have understood the link between social constructs, and the impact of natural disasters. In 2006, in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, which ravished New Orleans, Neil Smith wrote that contrary to popular belief,“There is no such thing as a natural disaster”. Natural Events occur, but the disaster occurs when people aren’t adequately prepared to deal with the consequences of natural events. This paper takes this idea that there is no such thing as a natural disaster and applies it to the rebuilding efforts after Superstorm Sandy. I will be investigating the process of rebuilding post Superstorm sandy in two regions, Livingston Staten Island and Red Hook Brooklyn. Through a comparison of these two neighborhoods, I will explore the ways in which they were able to rebuild post Sandy and how quickly. The focus of my research will be on a neighborhood’s social capital. In order to measure social capital I will look at the average income of these neighborhoods and the various organizations and groups that helped in the rebuilding effort. It is my hypothesis that there will be a direct correlation between the social capital of a neighborhood and the time it took for the neighborhood to rebuild after Superstorm Sandy.

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#28

An Unlikely Marriage: Soviet Ideals and Christian Messianism in Vladimir Putin’s Russia Anastasia Hayes (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Peter Kabachnik Department of Political Science and Global Affairs Some Western observers have accused Vladimir Putin of lacking political vision and simply dismiss his Russia as a corrupt gangster state. While criminal activity has played a large role in creating and supporting the current government, it is inaccurate to categorize the Federation as a rogue state devoid of a coherent political roadmap.There is strong evidence that Putin is driven by a particular worldview. Indeed, if one looks closely at his dealings with Russian minorities, the plan becomes clearer. He has transformed Russian nationalism into xenophobia. Black Russians find themselves increasingly alienated and attacked for their skin color and religion while ethnic Russians feel they are under siege. For this reason, I will examine the Chechen conflict through which Putin established his legitimacy as a political leader to illustrate his vision of Russia. In the Chechen conflicts, we see most clearly the cleverly manipulated clash of civilizations between Islam and Orthodoxy, the leveraging of the War on Terror to manipulate the West, and the desire to preserve Soviet territories and resurrect tsarist Novorossiya. Moreover, I intend to demonstrate that Putin’s vision is a uniquely modern one, an interpretative construct culled out of the recent as well as more distant Russian history. Putin has combined elements of the Soviet past with much older ideas of Russian messianism to serve his aims in what he sees as a battle of Russia versus the world. I will also discuss to what extent this vision is dependent on his survival: Is his personal vision transferable to a state that will outlive him? This is a key consideration as Russia is one of the U.S.'s most pressing concerns in what many experts have dubbed a neo-Cold War era. Americans need to consider whether the issues facing them will be resolved through Putin’s passing or if they may be more persistent, tightly woven into the complex social, political and cultural fabric that is the Russian Federation.

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The Failure of Sanctions on Sudan

Shahd Khidir Faculty Mentor: Professor Roshen Hendrickson Department of Political Science and Global Affairs Sudan has been under sanctions by the United Nations Security Council since 2005 and the United States since the late 1990’s.The purpose of the sanctions is to bring pressure on the government to change its policies, using international isolation from trade.The sanctions have damaged the economy of the country and thus undermined employment for the youth and opportunities for Sudanese citizens in foreign and mainly Western countries. The sanctions on Sudan are backfiring and not serving their purpose. One set of sanctions is in response to the conflict in the Darfur area where human rights violations have been recorded.The United States has imposed economic sanctions that have limited trade with Sudan of weaponry and technologies, but not Arabic Gum.The sanctions have backfired by causing immense poverty for the citizens and harder living conditions, while failing to influence government policy. The Sudanese government and its ruling elite have not suffered the consequence of being truly isolated. Sudan has strong ties with many members of the African Union, with whom the president shares the same ideas about governing. Sudan also has important economic ties with China, a permanent member of the Security Council. Much like the Iraqi regime, Sudan has used western criticism as a means to impose its nationalist ideals for its population. Using research from academic journal articles, newspaper reports, and Sudanese government documents I detail the Sudanese government’s response to the sanctions. I also compare this case to the failure of sanctions on Iraq to draw out similarities and differences.The sanctions have ruined the Sudanese economy, undermined employment opportunities for the youth, while strengthening the government of President Omar al-Bashir.

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Human Trafficking in the Gaza Strip Nicole Liebman Faculty Mentor: Professor Anat Niv-Solomon Department of Political Science and Global Affairs In today’s society and culture, Human Trafficking is hitting all over the world without being recognized by individuals, society and the government. In this period, I thought of discovering what is really inside the Gaza Strip and what is really going on with human trafficking.The Gaza Strip, before the Palestinian people and the government originally owned 2006. After 2006, it was taken over by the Hamas and their government way of life. It was thought that women were traditional, meaning that they were into their religion and were obeyed by their husbands. In this time and age, human trafficking is a major issue that is unheard of due to religious purposes. Most women and children are told not to tell due to secretcy and make everyone believe that nothing is wrong.They also have to put a front out up in front of family, friends and relatives to hide this secret.They don’t understand what human trafficking is and what it can do emotional, physically and psychological.The people of Gaza Strip don’t want to admit what is going on and want to hide everything due to religious purpose.

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# 76

Shia Islam’s Effect on Iranian Foreign Policy Michael Nappi Faculty Mentor: Professor Roshen Hendrickson Department of Political Science and Global Affairs In some countries, religion has a significant impact on policy-making.This research project is on the influence of Shia Islam on the foreign relations of the Islamic Republic of Iran. While Shia Islam is the main minority faction of Islam at roughly 10 percent, Sunni being the majority at 87 percent, its adherents are present throughout the world. With a national population of roughly 75 million, and 95 percent of that 75 million claiming Shia Islam as their religion, Iran has by far the largest amount of Shia followers in the world, at 40 percent of the total.The bedrock of the law and order system is based on Sharia, which has its foundations on Islam’s holy scripture, the Qur’an, as well as the ways of the prophet Muhammad, known as Sunnah. Power is mainly concentrated in the Supreme Leader and the Guardian Council, with the parliamentary functions carried out by the president, all together making a regime that speaks as one voice. Within the country the use of morality police is ever present to ensure Qur’anic ideals are followed, and severe punishments are carried out for those who choose not to comply. However, it’s more than just on domestic issues that the grip of Shia Islam is exerted. I argue that the tenets of Shia Islam have a distinct role in shaping foreign policy. The regime determines its stances on a host of issues based solely on how it relates to Islam. My research explores the role that religion plays in the Iranian regime’s foreign policy, from their nuclear program and aspirations of nuclear advancement, their attitudes towards major Western countries (i.e. the U.S. and the U.K.), their relations with Sunni regimes in surrounding countries, and issues related to combatting the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). I use data gleaned from Iranian government documents, academic journals and newspaper articles to show how each issue is approached from a platform that furthers the Shia Islamic cause.

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#125

The Ebola Virus Disease Crisis Ibrahim Sidik Sangare Faculty Mentor: Professor Aaron Gilbraeth Department of Political Science and Global Affairs Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), formerly known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever, is a severe, often fatal illness in humans. Since March 2014, the Ebola Virus Disease has caused thousands of deaths in West Africa above all in Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia.The last figures counted more than 6,000 people who have died from the virus.Thus, World Health Organization (WHO) decided to rank it as a global epidemic concern. Many countries closed their frontiers to citizens of those areas instead of helping them to reduce the risk of contamination and to fight against the plight. Is the Ebola virus crisis the most deadly contemporary disease that affected West African countries and caused fear through the whole world?In order to help grasp the extent of the problem, I have created a map; I found my shapefiles in the website named Global Administrative Areas at www.gadm.org. I selected the excel table which gave data about country care facilities with fields such as the Ebola care facility and the number of opened beds and I exported them to my map. Also, I used the newest number of Ebola cases per country which was from November to December 2nd, 2014.Then I added the cases to the layer to see which areas have the higher amount of cases compared to the number of opened bed to the treatment centers. I made a range of 5 to show the less affected to the highest affected areas with the Ebola virus.In conclusion, I will talk about the involvement of the local, regional and international community to stop the spread of the disease and whether the actions they took have been effective up to today.


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Germany and Its Memory of the Holocaust Rachel Smalle (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Peter Kabachnik Department of Political Science and Global Affairs In the 70 years since the end of the Second World War and the liberation of the concentration camps by the allies, it has been said that Germany (in all of its forms) has had a particular responsibility to memorialize its victims.This research examines the cultural memory of the Holocaust in the unified Germany of today, the Federal Republic of Germany and the German Democratic Republic by examining a number of films about the Holocaust made in the decades since the end of World War II. In addition, reviews about the films and the scholarly literature on German cultural memory were used to guide the research.The portrayal of Jewish characters,“normal” Germans, and members of the Nazi party were scrutinized. I have found that German cinema has produced narratives that lift the responsibility of the Holocaust from the shoulders of either the intended audience, or their ancestors.There is always a “them” to assume the unwanted burden, be this fascists and capitalists, or the SS.“Good” Germans and good communists are free from blame and are often portrayed as victims themselves. In addition, despite Jewish people being disproportionally victimized by the Nazis, their experiences are deprioritized in these cinematic representations. According to this narrative, everyone suffered in some way, and no one’s suffering was any more important than anyone else’s. Furthermore, even while acknowledging the diminished representations of Jewish characters, other non-German victims are virtually ignored.This gap has received little attention in the literature, but it is nonetheless important when considering Germany’s cultural memory of the Holocaust.

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY CONFERENCE LOCATION: BOTTOM FRONT POSTER

#177

Views of Sexual Relationships between Males and Females among Various Religious Groups Mirna Abdelsayed (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Florette Cohen Department of Psychology Sexual relations before marriage have been a widely studied field despite the broadness of the topic. A number of studies have taken initiative to correlate the affiliation between religious involvement and sexual behavior whereas this study takes it one step beyond the various religious groups and religiosity.This study was conducted to show the relationship between males and females views on sexual behaviors before marriage. Different tests such as analysis of variance, Pearson’s correlation coefficients and frequencies were made to determine these relationships. It is believed that less religious males will be more accepting of pre-marital sexual activity over religious males and both religious and less religious females.The general consensus on the data was that gender did influence views on pre-marital sexual relations, but it was the level of religiosity. Both moderate and high levels of religiousness had similar impacts on non-supportive opinion towards pre-marital activity. Low levels of religiosity had very significant results towards an accepting attitude for physical activity before marriage.

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Eye Contact, Gestures, and Disclosure of Personal Information during a Mock Job Interview in College Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Other Disabilities Ashley Albanese Faculty Mentor: Professor Kristen GillespieLynch Department of Psychology Difficulties exhibiting proper interview skills could potentially be detrimental to employment opportunities. Challenges communicating effectively may be particularly apparent for students with disabilities, such as autism. Previous research about why people with disabilities struggle to find employment focus on their verbal responses during job interviews, rather than their physical behaviors that occur during the interview. However, these physical behaviors could potentially make or break an opportunity for employment. Certain verbal behaviors, such as the timing of disclosure of personal information including disability status, also have not been sufficiently investigated in prior work. In this study, 23 college students with various disabilities, including autism, participated in video-taped mock job interviews.These videos were coded by research reliable coders at 15-second intervals to see if students with heightened autism traits, as assessed with the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), differed from students with fewer autistic traits in terms of nonverbal and verbal communicative behaviors including eye contact, gestures, and the timing and type of verbal disclosures.The hypotheses guiding this work were that students above the SRS cutoff score for heightened autism traits would make less eye contact and fewer gestures during interviews, would be more inclined to ignore or respond to a greeting rather than to initiate one, and would be more inclined to disclose personal information earlier in the interview relative to students below the SRS cutoff. Unfortunately, the results thus far suggest that students above and below the SRS cutoff score perform similarly during the interview in regards to physical behaviors and verbal greetings.Analyses of disclosure timing are ongoing and will also be reported. Hopefully, this study will be able to help people with disabilities figure out coping mechanisms to use during job interviews. 94

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#61

Testing Social Media Sites and Electronic Devices Can Affect Test Anxiety among College Students Sarah Aladhamy Faculty Mentor: Professor Florette Cohen Department of Psychology Students from the College of Staten Island participated in a survey on Social media sites and electronic devices being used in the classroom.The objective of this study was to determine people who are on social media during lectures in class could become distracted and develop high or lowtest anxiety on exam day.This will help society to understand more clearly why many college students develop test anxiety on the day of the exam.The major hypothesis of this research study is that students who have laptops, iPads or any electronic device during class donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t actually take notes or follow along with the power points they have received from the professor. Usually students are on social media sites such as, Facebook,Twitter, Instagram, etc. Thus, students become distracted during lecture.Then, when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the day of the exam, students develop high levels of test anxiety and do poorly on their exam(s). Subjects were recruited by signing up on the database Sona Systems. Before subjects entered the psychology social lab, a phone was placed in each room of the lab that would go off every few minutes or so depending on which condition they were in. Participants were not told about the phone going off as part of the study after they were administered the survey. A classroom was also used in order for many participants to take the survey at once. Participants in the classroom would all be placed under one condition at a time, while the phone would go off. All Subjects were in three different conditions. Condition one, phone would go off every 2 minutes. Condition two, phone would go off every 5 minutes and condition three, the phone didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go off at all. After Participants finished the survey, they were then debriefed about the study they participated in. All hypotheses were not supported. Results show there were no significant main effects or interactions. Limitations and possible personality differences are to be discussed.


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History of Monogamy: Unnatural, Unrealistic, and Undone by Polygamy Amanda Boglio Faculty Mentor: Professor Darryl Hill Department of Psychology Throughout history monogamous relationships have been ingrained in societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paradigm for marriage and mating. History reveals the untold truth for this phenomenon by proving that societies were influenced by higher powers to become a monogamous culture.This contradicts the science behind humans as a polygamous species. Historical research was used to analyze the discourse on monogamy. During the Middle Ages, the battle for monogamy became an important system enforced by the Catholic Church. Christian theory also influenced the practice of monogamous relationships.Yet, the Old Testament included many forms of polygamous mating, contradicting the newly imposed trend. Later in history, during the 19th century, the United States also began to terminate any practice of polygamy, directly toward the Mormon Jesus Christ Church of the Latter-day Saints. By examining the reasons for this phenomenon it can be claimed that although monogamous relationships served as a social purpose in history, it is unnatural from a biological standpoint, never existed in a pure form, and is likely to change at some point in the future. Research indicates that during the evolution of early primates to present day human beings, polygamous behaviors are still embedded in the biology of human nature. Current relationship trends in the 21st century include young adults engaging in multiple sex partners, high rates of infidelity as well as high divorce rates. Analyzing marriage and mating trends throughout history reveals that people with supreme power have superimposed monogamous behaviors, but biological innate tendencies of polygamy continue to revisit human nature.

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Emotional Face Scanning in the First Year of Life as It Relates to Social Development Sabrina Bragerton-Nasert (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Jennifer Wagner Department of Psychology Understanding emotional faces is important for infants as they gather information about their social surroundings. Studies using eye-tracking have shown that infants visually attend to different features of the face in the first year of life (Wagner et al., 2013). Further, differences in scanning patterns of emotional faces can relate to a development in both typically-developing kids and those at risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD; e.g., De Klerk et al., 2014).The present study examines scanning patterns of emotional faces in 6and 12-month olds who were either at high risk for ASD (HRA), due to an older sibling with the disorder, or low risk controls (LRC), with no family history of ASD.This investigation asks 1) How do infants scan emotional faces in the first year of life?; and 2) Does attention to faces predict later social outcomes? Infants were presented with happy, fearful, and neutral faces on a computer monitor, and eyetracking was used to measure where the infant were looking while the faces were presented. Analyses focused on attention to the eye and mouth regions and showed that overall, infants spent more time looking at the eyes rather than the mouth. Also, a main effect of emotion was shown, as infants spent more time looking at fearful faces than happy or neutral ones. Several interactions were revealed, including one showing a difference in attention to eyes and mouth depending on the emotional face. An interaction between region and group showed that HRA looked longer at the eyes than LRC, but LRC looked longer at the mouth than HRA. Additionally, the LRC group showed a negative correlation between the amount of time spent on mouth at 12 months and later social outcome at 18 months of age.These findings contribute to our understanding of how infants develop and pay attention to faces in the first year of life, and whether early social attention might relate to later development.

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The Effect of Gender on Garbage Disposal at the Staten Island Mall Jenna Carmoega, Someers Ramirez, Jerome Galloway Faculty Mentor: Professor Irina Sekerina Department of Psychology There are tons of garbage bins throughout New York City, however many new Yorkers do not throw out their trash. Male groups are less likely to dispose their waste as oppose to female groups. Our study will include observing human behavior at the Staten Island mall; through a tally chart we will compare garbage disposal data between males and female groups. With support from our hypothesis, we why food court trash will most likely be thrown out by women and why sometimes it isn’t thrown out by men. In conclusion our hypothesis states that females will pick up after themselves more than males at the Staten Island mall.

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#181

The Effect of Cell Phone Usage on Crossing Street Behavior Torimarie Casale, Tierra Johnson, Gwendolyn Barnes Faculty Mentor: Professor Irina Sekerina Department of Psychology More than a handful of deaths and injuries occur every year due to the carelessness of people. Particularly pedestrians, have been shown to be responsible, or at least semi responsible, for many accidents in which they are involved in.The law allows pedestrians the right of way, but it does not excuse them from taking the appropriate precautions to ensure their own safety. Pedestrians are likely to act less cautiously when distracted. Distractions are defined as anything that can take the attention and focus off safely crossing the street away from the pedestrian. A major distraction proposed today is the use of cell phones. Whether it is wearing headphones to listen to music, texting, social media surfing, or talking on the phone. These simple everyday habits have the ability to put one’s life in danger.The lack of crossing safely due to cell phone use is measured by the pedestrians behavior when crossing the street; does the crosser look both left and right before crossing, and do they cross at the appropriate time. Due to the distraction of a cell phone, a pedestrian’s awareness of his or her surroundings is negatively impacted.

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Does Peer Mentoring Reduce Test Anxiety in Mentees Ben Cheriyan

The Effect of Gratitude on Death Thought Accessibility Melissa Collins

Faculty Mentor: Professor Kristen GillespieLynch Department of Psychology

Faculty Mentor: Professor Florette Cohen Department of Psychology

Test anxiety is a serious issue that many students face. Although it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a physical impact on an individual, it does impact a studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance on an exam that they might have studied really hard for. Studies have shown that certain interventions might benefit people who suffer from test anxiety.The success of these interventions will result in a gradual decline of test anxiety.This study examines whether having the guidance of a peer-mentor will improve test anxiety, accessed by the Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI), in college students with autism and other disabilities from the beginning to the end of the semester. Participants were in a mentorship program called Project REACH. Participants completed pre-tests in the beginning of the semester and post-tests after finals. The students met with a mentor once a week for an hour and/or participated in weekly hour-long group meetings. One-on-one meetings included discussion of any issues the student might be struggling with which can include upcoming exams or papers.The mentor goes over techniques to ease the anxiety the student is experiencing such as relaxation strategies.The group meeting consisted of theater modules about self-awareness and time management. My hypothesis was that participation in mentorship would gradually reduce test anxiety by the end of the semester and that students would gain more confidence when taking an exam. However, there was no significant change in test anxiety for students with disabilities from when they started the mentorship program (M = 30.2; SE= 1.8) to the end (M = 28.3, SE = 1.9; p =.15). The results may not support the hypothesis but it brings up other questions that I will also address in myposter, such as whether test anxiety is related to trait anxiety and/or self-esteem.

The following study tested gratitude as an anxiety buffer for death. Previous experiments have found that humility can be seen to effect someone's feelings about the idea of death. In a similar fashion, the hypothesis for this study states that thinking about ones level of thankfulness and appreciation can greatly reduce a persons feelings on life assessments consisting of thoughts of pain and death. A random sample of forty undergraduate students at the College of Staten Island, CUNY participated in taking an anonymous survey where they were asked to answer a series of open ended questions as honestly as possible. Four different manipulations of this study were given. Note: results have not yet been analyzed for future assessment. Limitations and implications will also be further discussed later on.

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# 85

Seasonal Effects on Infant Motor Development Sara Cordova Faculty Mentor: Professor Lana Karasik Department of Psychology Previous research has documented seasonal effects on infant motor development: Infants who reach crawling age during summer months crawled 3-4 weeks earlier than infants who reached crawling age during the winter. Researchers explain these differences in terms of having to wear bulkier clothing, fewer daylight hours, and having less outdoor play. I examined infants in Tajikistan who spent much of their day restricted in a traditional cradle,“gahvora.” I examined whether gahvora use varies with season, and whether changes in gahvora use affect the onset of locomotor skills, particularly crawling. I focused on 8- and 12-month-old infants because by this age Western infants begin crawling and have several months of crawling experience. A local researcher who conducted home visits interviewed mothers about their gahvora use and video-recorded infants in a standard locomotor assessment: Infants were encouraged to crawl on a 10-ft gridded mat.To measure infants’ locomotor status and ability, I scored the number of crawling bouts and steps. Preliminary analyses show that temperature is related to gahvora use and mobility: Infants tested during warmer months who were crawling, spent less time in the cradle (M=11.2 hours/day) than infants who did not yet crawl (M=13.4 hours/day). Infants tested during cooler months, spent more time in the cradle (M=12.0 and 14.1 hours/day for crawling and not crawling infants).These findings suggest that changes in season affect childrearing practices, which in turn affect motor development.

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#186

Exploring Vocal-Motor Contingencies Over the Transition to Crawling in Infancy Marian Cunsolo Faculty Mentor: Professor Sarah Berger Department of Psychology The acquisition of motor skills provides opportunities for infants to practice skills relevant to language acquisition (Iverson, 2004). Previous work does not examine simultaneous motor and language acquisition nor does it capture the transition from pre-locomotor to locomotor ability. This transition reflects changing motor expertise as language also changes.To address this, we conducted a longitudinal case study of the contingency of vocal behaviors and motor actions at four time points across the transition to crawling: pre-crawling, crawling onset, two weeks postcrawling, and four weeks post-crawling. Results suggest that as infants gain experience with a posture, they are then able to vocalize more.The posture becomes less demanding on infants’ attentional load, making resources more readily available for speech. Attaining motor stability gives infants the opportunity to explore their speech skills.


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Psychological Outcome for Adolescents Impacted by Parental HIV/AIDS in South Africa Kadiatou Diallo Faculty Mentor: Professor Comfort Asanbe Department of Psychology Increasing evidence demonstrates major negative psychological health and developmental outcome for children associated with Parental HIV/AIDS illness and death. Many orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) in South Africa are at greater risk of having a psychological distress due to parental HIV/AIDS. The major goal of this research study is to evaluate the impact of the Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) program on the psychological health of the OVC. Researchers from CSI/CUNY and colleagues from the University of Pretoria (UP), South Africa collected comprehensive data on the overall functioning of 175 children; male (n=87) and female (n=88); Ages 11-18, from a low income, nonurban community in South Africa using the Child Behavior Checklist Self-Report (CBCL/YSR). Participants consisted of non-orphans (n= 57), orphans due to HIV/AIDS (n= 62), and orphans due to other causes (n= 56). Raw data were converted to clinical scale data using the Assessment Data Manager (ADM). MANOVA tests were used to determine whether there were significant differences among the three groups on the clinical/mental health scales.The data showed significant group differences in 8 of the 20 scales.

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Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors in the Brain of Naked Mole-Rats Keegan Fernandes, Mangmang Zhu Faculty Mentor: Professor Dan McCloskey Department of Psychology The African naked mole-rat (heterocephalus glaber) is rare among mammalian species in that this small rodent spends most or all of its long life (>30 years) in burrows with up to 300 other colony-mates. The environment within these underground dwellings is very strenuous because the air concentration is markedly low in oxygen and markedly high in carbon dioxide. Past research has shown that naked mole-rats have developed adaptations within their blood and metabolism to aid in surviving under these conditions. Studies in the field and in our laboratory demonstrate that colony behavior is not adversely affected by low oxygen conditions. Therefore, we are interested in understanding how the brain, a high oxygen need organ, has adapted to tolerate low oxygen conditions in the naked molerat. One protein of interest is Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), which is typically increased due to hypoxia in the mammalian brain. VEGF is important for the formation of blood vessels, and we and others have shown that it influences behavior and neuronal synaptic transmission. We have found that expression of VEGF protein in the naked mole-rat brain is very low, and therefore unlikely to have any effects on the neurons.To confirm this, we measured the density of VEGF receptors on neurons both in brain tissue and on primary cultured hippocampal neurons in the naked mole-rat. Immunostaining confirmed lack VEGF receptors in brain tissue, and we have successfully developed primary culture system staining. Future studies will involve exposing slices and cultured cells to hypoxic conditions to determine whether this stimulates an increase in expression. The potential effects on low brain VEGF on behavior are discussed.

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To Friend or Not to Friend, That Is the Question: Friending and Blocking Behaviors of College Students on Facebook Naomi Love Gaggi (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Patricia Brooks Department of Psychology This study identifies gender differences in friending behaviors, blocking/defriending, and preferences and dislikes of Facebook among college students. An online survey was given to 471 college students identified as Facebook users (n=318 men, n=153 women; age M=19.81; SD=3.45).The online survey asked open-ended questions, in which each response was qualitatively coded with above 80% reliability for all codes. Women were more likely to search for friends using identifiable information (p=.004). Women were more likely than men to block/de-friend others (p< .001) and more likely to block someone because of repetitive contact (p<.001), being incompatible (p=.016), inappropriate content (p<.001), privacy issues (p=0.50), sexual issues (p=0.03), or abusive language (p=.007). Women liked Facebook because they could maintain contact with others (p=.024). Consistent with previous findings that women are more attentive to privacy (Bonds-Raacke & Raacke, 2010), women wanted more privacy settings on Facebook (p=.006). Men wanted better security settings such as protection against hackers (p=.044). Gender differences were found on Facebook, where women were overall more active, supporting studies in which women engaged in more maintaining-contact behaviors (Weiser, 2000) and communication online (Weiser, 2000; Jackson, 2001). However, this study also found no differences between genders for much of the coded data, suggesting that men and women generally use Facebook similarly. Future research should explore entertainment aspects of SNS, geared more towards men, to identify whether there are gender differences in social vs. nonsocial information-seeking behaviors.

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Documenting the Sleep Patterns of Typical School-Aged Children Lisa A. Gniewkowski Faculty Mentor: Professor Sarah Berger Department of Psychology Children undergo dramatic and prolonged changes in their sleep-wake cycles over their first few years, not conforming to the typical 8 hour night of sleep until approximately 18 years of age. Most current developmental sleep research focuses on the sleep patterns of typically developing infants and adolescents.The goal of this research was to address the dearth of literature on the typical sleep cycles of healthy school-aged children.This study used actigraph technology, a watch-like device that records all activity in one minute epochs. A healthy 9-year-old boy wore the actigraph for a total of 56 days.To create a foundational data set, we documented the participantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sleep efficiency, percent of time spent sleeping; duration of sleep, total minutes spent in bed; wake after sleep onset, total minutes awake during the night. Days were distinguished between non-school and school. Sleep efficiency and duration were higher on nonschool days (M=89.43 mins, SD= 7.24; M= 572.31 mins, SD= 61.67, respectively) than school days (M= 87 mins, SD= 7.55; M= 564.77 mins, SD=32.39). Sleep duration was more consistent on school days. Non-school days had fewer awakenings (M=56.48 mins, SD= 37.26) than school days (M=71.84 mins, SD= 43.58).This study is one of the first to document the typical sleep patterns in school-aged children based on non-school days or school days. Preliminary data suggest that sleep might be less efficient during weekdays, possibly due to the stressor of school. More data is needed to determine whether these differences are significant.


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Tourette Syndrome: From Demonic Possession to Neurological Disorder Katelynn Hotchkiss (The Verrazano School)

Restrictive Cradling Practices and Effects on Infants’ Object Exploration Spogmay Khan (Macaulay Honors College)

Faculty Mentor: Professor Darryl Hill Department of Psychology

Faculty Mentor: Professor Lana Karasik Department of Psychology

Tourette Syndrome is now known as a neurological disorder, but it wasn’t always the case.This historical analysis of early medical accounts will show that what we now know as Tourette Syndrome was perceived as a fault of character partly or mostly due to the individuals suffering from demonic possession or controlled by sex. In the Middle Ages, the Catholic Church asserted those showing the symptoms of Tourette Syndrome were possessed by demons, due to the prevalence of witches at the time.The first scientific account was a case study on the Marquise de Dampierre (Itard, 1825) which shifted the focus to psychological causes of the disorder. Following this theory, Sandor Ferenczi (1921) proposed that these symptoms were those of someone controlled by sexual desire and resulted in “erotic vocalizations.” The turning point in these beliefs began in 1968 when neuroleptics were found to treat the symptoms of Tourette Syndrome.

Cross-cultural research highlights differences in childrearing practices and children’s experiences. In Tajikistan, in Central Asia, caregivers use a traditional cradle,“gahvora,” which restricts infants’ movements. In the cradle, infants are laid on their backs, swaddled, and their arms and legs are tightly bound. Presumably, time spent in the cradle decreases infants’ opportunities to move and explore on their own, thereby, limiting practice with manual and exploratory actions. In my study, I examined whether the amount of time infants spend in the gahvora affects how infants engage with and explore objects. A local researcher videorecorded 28 Tajik 8- to 12-month-old infants during structured object tasks. She also interviewed caregivers about gahvora use with help of a timediary. From time diaries, I calculated the time infants spend in the cradle during the previous typical day.To get measures of object exploration, I examined infants’ exploratory behaviors as they engage with 2 novel, commercially available toys for 2 minutes each. I coded durations and frequencies of various visual-manual activities: (1) time in visual-manual contact; (2) total actions on or with objects; and (3) variety of actions on objects. Preliminary analyses indicate that infants readily explored toys by engaging with the objects for M=3.8 min during the total 4-min observation. In additional analyses, I will examine how gahvora hours relate to infants’ object exploration skills.

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Self-Awareness in College Students with ASD Enes Kilman Faculty Mentor: Professor Kristen GillespieLynch Department of Psychology Self-awareness is a necessary skill for all college students to have. College students who are faced with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and various other types of disabilities may have difficulty recognizing selfawareness when faced with social or academic situations.The objective of the current study aims to examine self-awareness in college students with ASD and college students diagnosed with non-ASD disabilities enrolled in the Project REACH mentorship program. Project REACH is a program geared towards helping students with ASD and other disabilities improve or strengthen their selfawareness skills by way of group and individual mentoring sessions. Group mentoring focuses on presenting different modules revolving around a particular theme, in this case self-awareness. Individualized mentoring sessions are geared towards addressing similar concerns presented by the mentee. Prior to the onset of the program, participants completed a pretest interview.The interviews have been transcribed and participantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; responses to questions regarding how they define selfawareness, what self-awareness skills they feel they already have and what self-awareness skills they feel they need assistance in developing have been coded. Analysis focuses on the comparison of the understanding self-awareness between students with ASD and non-ASD disabilities. Expected results are that although it is hypothesized that all students have some degree of self-awareness, evidence may present the possible conclusion that self-awareness may be limited in students with ASD.

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How Does Neighborhood Impact Vitamin D Level for Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients? Takuya Kishimoto Faculty Mentor: Professor Ellen-ge Denton Department of Psychology Our research investigates the relationship between neighborhoods and vitamin D3. Vitamin D3 is an important element in our body because it protects us. Vitamin D3 is inversely associated with atherosclerosis and hypertension. We can get vitamin D3 from some methods, especially to get from the sun. Some people, like urban residents, suffer by the vitamin D3 deficiency. We suggest that vitamin D3 levels are associated with neighborhood variables, among cardiovasculardiseased patients. In particular, due to the association between residential density and racial diversity, vitamin D3 levels may decrease. In contrast, physical activity can treat vitamin D3 deficiency. We longitudinally assess acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients, at baseline (N = 324) and 1 month (N = 271). Our dependent variable is vitamin D3 levels drawn from ACS patient blood samples. Our independent variable of interest is neighborhood. Neighborhood is measured by Residential Density, Racial Diversity, and Transportation to work in a neighborhood. Residential Density is measured by the number of persons in households divided by the number of households in the neighborhood census tract. Diversity Index is a general variance estimate of selecting two individuals who are racially/ethnically different from each other. Transportation to work is examined by the mode of activity used to commute to work, walking, driving, or using public transport. Our results show that neighborhood crowding is not related to vitamin D level. However, we found that neighborhood racial/ethnic composition is associated with vitamin D3 deficiency, among ACS patients. Specifically, for every one unit increase in neighborhood racial/ethnic diversity, there is a 6 ng/ml decrease in vitamin D3 level. We did not find a significant association between physical activity to work and vitamin D3 level, in this patient sample.


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Narcissism and Social Networking: The Contrast Between Perception and Reality Christopher Maniscalco (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Kristen GillespieLynch Department of Psychology Social Networking sites allow users to create a profile, share information, as well as create and maintain contacts with one another. With the rapid growth of social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, compromises in security and privacy of these sites are being held in question. While previous studies have examined how major personality factors influence social networking site usage, this study examines how potential relationships may exist between narcissism and consumer privacy concern versus consumer privacy behavior. We predicted that narcissistic traits would have a significant influence over consumers trust in security safeguards of select social networking sites, as well as consumer usage of security features. A self reported survey outlining these measures was distributed to over 800 willing volunteers. Implications of the study will be discussed.

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Testing for the Presence of Sublimation Patrick Mele (The Verrazano School) Faculty Mentor: Professor Florette Cohen Department of Psychology Sublimation is a theoretical process by which unconscious sexual impulses change into creative, educational, and pro-social means of expression. College students were subliminally exposed to sexually suggestive images. Following this brief exposure, their creative ability was measured using the Guilfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alternative Uses Task. If sublimation occurs, then students who were subliminally exposed to the sexually suggestive images should have performed higher on the creativity tasks than those who were subliminally exposed to neutral stimuli. Preliminary data analysis indicated that exposure to sexually suggestive images did not effect creative ability.These results are premature; more testing, scoring, and analysis must be conducted before any conclusive data can be produced.

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Have Humans Evolved to Be Monogamous?

Tamara Moseley Faculty Mentor: Professor Barbara Gail Montero Department of Psychology Have human beings evolved to be monogamous or polygamous? This report summarizes and synthesizes some of the key research findings on the question of whether evolutionary pressure has led us to be monogamous.This research will take a look into the relationship between infidelity, monogamy, and human evolution. Although the data is not conclusive, it is argued here that part of the reason why infidelity occurs is that humans, in fact, evolved to be polygamous. It is sometimes claimed that 54-57% of men and women confess to committing infidelity in any relationship (e.g. http://www.statisticbrain.com/infidelity-statistics/). Much of the data examined comes from research done by David M. Buss in 2000 regarding social and demographic influences on infidelity and evolutionary influences on our mating behavior. In his book,The Dangerous Passion: Why Jealousy Is as Necessary as Love and Sex, Buss points out that women who cheat on their husbands do so when they are most likely to conceive, but have sex with their spouses when they are least likely to conceive. It is argued that these findings show that evolutionary tendencies to acquire better genes through different partners still lurk beneath modern sexual behavior. Researchers currently believe that the biology plays an even more significant role than originally thought in factor relevant to human infidelity and the difficulty of monogamy. As will be shown, an integrated theory is beginning to emerge from the realization that males and females have overlapping but nonidentical reproductive interests and that the type of mating system of a species results from interactions between these interests (James F. Wittenberger, Roland L.Tilson, 1980). In particular it will be shown that it revolves around two major issues: the factors that determines which sex leads in shaping each mating system, and the factors that determine which mating system is optional for members of the controlling sex in that species.

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Relations between Early Attention to Faces and Later Communication Abilities in Infants at High-Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder Hana Moustapha Faculty Mentor: Professor Jennifer Wagner Department of Psychology In an effort to identify early markers of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), prospective research is studying infant siblings of children with ASD, a group at high risk for developing the disorder.The present study examined early attention to faces in infants at high risk for ASD (HRA) and low-risk controls (LRC) to ask how early visual attention might relate to later communication abilities.Visual scanning was measured in 113 6-month-old infants: 62 HRA (having at least one older sibling with ASD) and 51 LRC infants.A Tobii eye-tracker recorded eye gaze to the eye and mouth regions, while infants viewed side-byside images of their mother’s face and a stranger’s face. The infants were followed longitudinally through 18 months and communication skills were assessed using laboratory and parent-report measures. When examining time spent on the eyes and mouth for mother and stranger, an interaction between identity and group revealed that LRC looked longer to the eyes and mouth for mother as compared to stranger, but no difference was found for HRA.A threeway interaction further showed that LRC showed greater attention to mother’s eyes than stranger’s eyes, but no difference in the mouth region, and HRA showed no difference between mother and stranger for either region. Correlations between 6 month eyetracking and 18 month language revealed that for HRA, significant negative associations were found between 6 month attention to eyes and language scores, but LRC showed no significant relations. In summary, the present work found differential attention to familiar and unfamiliar faces in the two groups, and also that HRA who spend more time scanning the eye region at 6 months show worse communication abilities at 18 months.This work extends previous findings with HRA and suggests that increased attention to core features of the face might have negative consequences for their later development. Future work will examine the stability of these associations.


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Scanning of Familiar and Unfamiliar Faces in Nine-MonthOld Infants at Low and High Risk for Autism Roseline Nkama Faculty Mentor: Professor Jennifer Wagner Department of Psychology Attention to and early identification of faces is an essential part of social development. Even shortly after birth, infants prefer to look at faces and can tell the difference between a familiar and unfamiliar face. Eye tracking has provided insight into which features of the face infants find most salient across development. Recent work has found face processing difficulties in individuals with autism spectrum (ASD) and their first-degree relatives. The present work examined how 9-month-old infants at high and low risk for ASD (high risk due to an older sibling with the disorder) scan familiar and unfamiliar emotional faces. Dynamic videos were used to determine if infants spent more time looking at their motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s face compared to the that of the stranger and if their attention changes when the faces differ in emotion (happy vs. neutral). The sample consisted of 29 9-month-olds (20 lowrisk, 9 high-risk). Infants saw up to 14 videos, half of their mother talking with no sound, and the other half with a stranger.The first 16 seconds of each video showed the individual speaking with a neutral facial expression while the second 16 seconds showed a happy facial expression. Preliminary results revealed that for the percentage of time spent on eyes and mouth (out of time spent on the face), an interaction between identity and group was found: infants at high risk for ASD showed greater attention to the eyes and mouth for mom, while the low risk control group spent greater attention to these areas for stranger. When examining the duration of time scanning the face overall, emotion was found to be a main effect; infants spent more time on the neutral face than the happy face, but this result was explained by order-of-presentation effects. Future work will further examine 12-month-old infants in the same experimental task.

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Check Your Nerves at the Door Michael Picone Faculty Mentor: Professor Kristen GillespieLynch Department of Psychology For some people, interviewing for a job can be extremely stressful. Many people struggle in exhibiting proper interview skills and this could potentially be detrimental to their employment opportunities. One group of particular interest is people with developmental disabilities, especially people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). People with autism tend to have difficulties interacting socially. The people within this population struggle to find work, but prior studies have not assessed whether this struggle is due to poor interview skills or high anxiety rates. In previous studies of people with developmental disabilities, researchers have examined how the subjects responded verbally to questions asked during employment interviews. In my study, verbal and physical behaviors college students with developmental disabilities (n =23), including ASD, exhibited during mock job interviews were compared to scores on standardized measures of anxiety and autism symptoms. My research questions were the following: Are autism traits associated with standardized measures of anxiety and measures of self-reported anxiety during interviews? Are autistic traits associated with heightened nonproductive physical behaviors (such as jitters) during the interview? Coding for physical behaviors such as eye contact, slouching, crossing arms, jitters, and gestures along 15-second time intervals was conducted by two independent coders who achieved research reliability. Verbal indicators of anxiety during the mock interview are also being coded. Based on the data, there is a correlation between standardized measures of anxiety and autism symptoms, r (21)= .67, p < .001, but neither standardized measure was associated with nonverbal behaviors (ps > .16). We will also report on qualitative coding of verbal behaviors and provide recommendations concerning job interview training for people with disabilities.

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An Exploratory Analysis of Eye Movements in Nonverbal Problem-Solving Krista Polly

How Romantic Relationship Commitment Is Affected by Selfesteem and Emotional Risk Stephanie Randazzo

Faculty Mentor: Professor Irina Sekerina Department of Psychology

Faculty Mentor: Professor Florette Cohen Department of Psychology

To understand how people solve complex nonverbal problems when taking an IQ test, an eyetracking experiment was conducted. College-age students (N=18) were administered Cattell’s (1963) Culture Fair Intelligence Test, a 12.5-minute assessment with 4 scales. During the test, they looked at the question set-up that consisted of several boxes with progressively changing images and one empty box on the left. They had to choose the answer box from several possible choices on the right.The experiment tests two hypotheses, Heron’s (1957) post-perceptual scanning hypothesis and the gaze-bias effect (e.g. Glaholt & Reingold, 2009a, 2009b, 2011; Glaholt et al., 2009; Glaholt, Wu, & Reingold, 2010; Krajbich & Rangel, 2011; Pieters & Warlop, 1999; Schotter, Berry, McKenzie, & Rayner, 2010; Simion & Shimojo, 2006). According to the former, individuals will scan the answer boxes from left to right, irrespective of the correct answer location whereas the latter claims that they tend to fixate towards only those answer choices that are later explored/chosen. Eye-movement patterns of participants will allow us to determine which strategy they use during complex nonverbal problem-solving.

When an individual is involved in a romantic relationship the question, how does state selfesteem affect their commitment when an emotional risk is present was proposed.There were a total of three possible emotional risks, chronic illness in ones self, ones partner, and loss of employment. State self-esteem was viewed to coincide with one’s choice of accepting the emotional risk. Low-self esteem was most likely to withdraw from commitment and high-self esteem would accept the risk. A total of 300 participants were randomly given one of the three conditions and were asked various questions on state selfesteem, relationship satisfaction and the risk. Results show that chronic illness did not affect commitment, yet lose of employment did.

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A Psychological Understanding of the BDS Movement on College Campuses George Ritorto (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Florette Cohen Department of Psychology The current experiment searches to understand the Boycott Divestment Sanctions Movement (BDS) on college campuses. Using mortality salience, the study sought to determine if there were feelings or views of anti-Semitism and support for BDS on the campus of the College of Staten Island. It was hypothesized that we would find more BDS in the Death-Israel condition; the thoughts of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own death would evoke more of a desire for BDS once the participant was presented with a violent excerpt of current events in Israel and Palestinian territories. To accomplish this task, a questionnairesurvey was administered to 171 students taking classes at the College of Staten Island. There were a total of four conditions amongst the surveys: DeathRussia, Death-Israel, Pain-Russia, Pain-Israel. As predicted, the Death-Israel participants showed more support for BDS than any other condition, according to results shown by a 2-way Anova. The results support the notion that under mortality salience, more people are prone to support BDS.

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Effects of Race on Own Group Orientation Sonia Saleem, Junhee Rhee, Mark Petraglia Faculty Mentor: Professor Irina Sekerina Department of Psychology Own-group orientation influences the likelihood of tables in the library to contain students within their own racial group. Caucasian and non-Caucasian students were studied at the College of Staten Island Library, hoping to find a trend in the ratio of students of the same race sitting amongst each other at the same table.Tables with three or more students were considered as representing owngroup orientation if and only if at least 60% of them were of the same race. After observation, we concluded that non-Caucasian students were more likely to sit together, with Asians being the subgroup most likely to conform to own-group orientation.

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The Effect of a Social Identity Threat on Human Cortisol Levels Stephanie Solanki (Macaulay Honors College)

Prosocial Behavior in the Naked Mole-Rat Michael Stendardi, Lauren Overeem (Macaulay Honors College)

Faculty Mentor: Professor Florette Cohen Department of Psychology

Faculty Mentor: Professor Edward Meehan Department of Psychology

This study examines the effect of a social identity threat on cortisol levels in humans. Numerous studies have demonstrated that increases in cortisol levels directly correlate with the presence of social psychological stressors called social identity threats. The present study is currently a work-in-progress, and a previous studies and literature reviews will be presented on aposter. Participants will be interviewed by a research confederate who will introduce his or herself with either a stereotypical Islamic, Jewish, or Causasian name.The interviewer will ask the participants questions about current events relating to the population he or she is representing. Cortisol levels will be recorded before and after the social identity threat. My hypothesis is that salivary cortisol will increase after the participant experiences a social identity threat. Keywords: social identity threat, Islamophobia, anti-Semitism, cortisol.

African Naked Mole-Rats (Heterocephalus Glaber, NMR) are one of two mammalian species known for having a eusocial cooperative breeding system, a system that shows an advanced level of social organization in which a single female produces the offspring and non-reproductive individuals cooperate in caring for the young. Within this eusocial system, the NMRs exhibit prosocial behaviors for the betterment of the colony.The goal of this study was to confirm the hypothesis that specific individual animals exhibit specific prosocial behaviors. Recently, a study from our laboratory showed for the first time that NMRs have specific prosocial behaviors within the colony. Thirty-five African NMRs within a single colony were observed. An RFID tracking system was used to track the NMRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s movements that were signaled from a Trovan microchip embedded under the NMRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s skin.Three behaviors were measured: Pup Rescuing, Nest Building, and Digging.The research showed that within my study, an average of 40% of NMRs accounted for 80% of data within each behavior, showing that certain behaviors were performed significantly more than others.There was also a direct linear relationship between Digging and Nest Building. No other correlations between behaviors were significant. Correlations were done for each prosocial behavior between the earlier study and the present research.There were significant correlations for both Nest Building and Digging. Pup carrying showed no correlation, perhaps because this type of rescue behavior is not done on a regular basis. Taken together, these data suggest that animals in a NMR colony maintain the same prosocial behaviors over time and provide a foundation for measuring how biological and developmental factors relate to individual differences in prosocial behaviors. We are currently measuring how these behaviors relate to the social hierarchy and stress hormone levels.

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Effects of Race on Food Choice in the CSI Cafeteria Abigail Taylor, Taylor Nygaard, Sasha Kennedy

The Effect of Location on Smoking Katherine Unger, Ashley Ames, Courtney Dowling

Faculty Mentor: Professor Irina Sekerina Department of Psychology

Faculty Mentor: Professor Irina Sekerina Department of Psychology

Race often effects behavior in various settings. In this paper the assessment of whether ethnicity affects food choice at The College of Staten Island Campus Center is made.The method used in this observation was to view students as they exited the food service area and their choice of food was rated along with their ethnicity. Students of the Caucasian descent were compared with students of ethnicity, categorized as students of Black, Asian, and Hispanic descent. Gender was also observed but will not be calculated in the final results. Food choices were rated either healthy or unhealthy. It is predicted that those of Caucasian descent will choose healthier options than the students of ethnic descent.

Despite the tobacco ban on the College of Staten Island's campus, there are many individuals who still smoke even though it's forbidden.Two of the most popular areas on campus were observed; the campus center and the parking lot near the library. It was predicted that the parking lot would be a more popular place to smoke, because it's less likely that a smoker will be caught by campus security.This study was done in order to see if the tobacco ban needs to more strictly enforced.

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Experimental Sabotage: Faking in a Subject Pool Study Divina Wiley (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Darryl Hill Department of Psychology Experimental Sabotage: Faking in a Subject Pool Study As researchers increasingly rely on online subject pool research as a cost effective and convenient source of data collection, they need to be careful to ensure the integrity of their studies. Two classic threats to internal validity are the failure to achieve experimental manipulation and participant faking (Campbell & Stanley, 1963).Thus, researchers sometimes deploy manipulation checks to determine whether the independent variable had its intended effect on the participants (Cozby, 2009). Careful researchers also check for faking by examining the data for common faking patterns (completing survey too quickly, all neutral responses, etc.).This study tested whether students in an on-line experiment and survey would pass a manipulation check and a faking check. In an online experiment, 244 undergraduate students were asked to read one of four passages describing people, complete a task designed to assess whether the experimental manipulation was successful, and then completed a number of questionnaires. Only 32% of participants passed the manipulation and faking check. Based on these results, researchers should be very wary of data from subject pool on-line experiments and surveys, and are encouraged to consider implementation of manipulation, faking and lie checks, and enhancing experimental realism.

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Project Reach: A Comparison of Mentors and Mentees Vincent Wong (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Kristen Gillespie-Lynch Department of Psychology Project Reach is a peer-mentorship program for college students with disabilities.The aim of the program is to help mentees learn to become better self-advocates with deeper understanding of others and themselves. As a result, it is very important for the mentors themselves to be adept in the college environment. Before and after participation in Project REACH, mentors (N = 9) and mentees (N = 36) completed a battery of standardized tests: Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), Academic Self-efficacy, and perceived social support. Mentors exhibited significantly lower state anxiety during pre-test than mentees (Mentors: M=48.50, SE=1.06, Mentees: M=49.84, SE=2.99; t (37.35)=2.179, p= .036). However, mentors exhibited a trend toward higher pre-test trait anxiety than mentees (Mentors: M=48.89, SE=3.37, Mentees: M=46.50, SE=3.41; t (43)=-1.885, p= .066).The insignificance level of this trend may be attributable to the small sample size of mentors. A significant decrease in trait anxiety was observed for both mentors and mentees over the course of the mentorship program (Pre-test: M=47.67, SE=0.76 Post-test: M=37.79, SE=2.96; F (1,28)=11.759, p= .002). State anxiety also decreased from pre-test to post-test for mentors and mentees (Pre-test: M=49.227, SE=0.536 Post-test: M=39.253, SE=2.030; F (1,29)=11.759, p < .001).These findings suggest that mentors have strengths to share with their mentees and that mentorship may help to decrease anxiety for both mentors and mentees. Data from the SRS, Academic Self-efficacy and perceived social support will also be collected to further analyze the comparison between mentors and mentees.


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Slow to Sit: Traditional Cradling Practices and Effects on Sitting Skill in Infancy Juliana Zaloom (Macaulay Honors College) Faculty Mentor: Professor Lana Karasik Department of Psychology Sitting is a premier milestone in early infancy. Previous studies have shown that childrearing practices affect development: when motor skills are acquired. In Western cultures, where movement is encouraged, infants begin to sit independently by 7 months. In Tajikistan, throughout the day infants are held in “gahvora” cradles that severely restrict movement. I examined Tajik 8-to 12-month-old infants to ask if gahvora use affects infants’ sitting skills. Using a time-diary, mothers reported on infants’ locations throughout the previous 24-hour day (e.g., gahvora, floor, arms, furniture).To measure the extent of restriction, I accumulated the total time spent in the gahvora throughout the day.Then, infants were video-recorded in a structured assessment measuring sitting skill.To measure sitting proficiency, I counted instances of independent sitting and the longest duration of independent sitting. Data for 40 8- to 12-month-old infants was coded. On average, infants spent 13 hours/day in the gahvora; there were no differences in gahvora use between 8 and 12 months. At 8 months of age, about half the infants displayed independent sitting; at 12 months 75% sat independently. In additional analyses, I am examining whether cradle hours predict infants’ sitting ability.

DEPARTMENT OF WORLD LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES CONFERENCE LOCATION: EAST LOUNGE POSTER

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Jean-Luc Godard and the Distancing Effect in French Cinema (Verfremdungseffekt) Steve Arriaga Faculty Mentor: Professor Chapman Wing Department of World Languages and Literatures Coined by German director, poet, and playwright Bertolt Brecht, Verfremdungseffekt, or the distancing effect, is a concept involving the use of techniques to emphasize the artificiality of a performance and deny the audience’s ability to become completely engulfed in a staged event. Contrasting with Hugo Mauerhofer’s idea of the “cinema situation,”which argues that films should immerse and produce reactions from the audience, the distancing effect causes viewers to be reminded that the spectacle they are witnessing is in fact not reality.Therefore, the artistic piece ultimately retains, perhaps even enhances the consciousness of the viewer. Applied through artistic techniques appropriate to the medium, such as overly dramatic acting, unorthodox film editing or by breaking the fourth wall, these artists force the viewers to become conscious critics rather than simply mere spectators. Arguably the most controversial critic-turneddirector during the French New Wave era, French film director Jean-Luc Godard is famous for bringing attention to distanciation in filmmaking, most notably in his critically acclaimed 1960 film À Bout de Souffle (Breathless). From jump cutting and unclear storytelling to distortion of continuity, Godard often frustrated his viewers, causing a debate regarding his motives for exploring distanciation.Through this project, I will examine and analyze French film director Jean-Luc Godard’s usage of the distancing effect in his films, ultimately providing an argument regarding whether Godard attempts to frustrate viewers out of contempt for them, or from a genuine impulse to reveal the contours of cinema and our expectations to prevent manipulation which comes from watching films unreflectively.

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Digging to China: Chinese Representations in Italian Literature Jurandir Chan Faculty Mentor: Professor Paola Ureni Department of World Languages and Literatures People say that if we dig a deep hole straight down, we might come out in the other part of Earth, presumptuously China.The Orient is frequently represented as the opposite of the Occidental world for its geographical position as well as for its culture.The term “Orient” refers to Asian territories while “Occident” means a set of American and European nations that share a common social, economic, and cultural system. For this reason, the classification of whether a country belongs to the “Orient” or the “Occident” is not based solely on its geographical location, but also on its politics and traditions. Since the division between the Orient and Occident is profoundly complex, people conform to the generalization of these two terms with few or no regards to the imaginary line of their separation. The Orient is usually associated with exoticism by the ones in the Occident. Writers from the “West” constantly fulfill their lack of knowledge towards the mysterious East.The creation of a distorted Orient is evident from Marco Polo’s medieval travel descriptions reported in Il milione (1300) passing by the postmodernist writings such as Le città invisibili (1972) by Italo Calvino and it goes beyond contemporary works such as the novel Scontro di civiltà (2006) by Amara Lakhous.The novelty of the Orient provokes the authors’ use of imagination. This research illustrates how the Italian writers from different historical periods depict a fictionalized, stereotypical image of the Orient which might not coincide with reality.

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Faculty Mentors

Undergraduate Conference on Research, Scholarship, and Performanceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Faculty Mentors FACULT Y

M ENTOR

DEPARTMENT

POSTER

Jane Alexander

Engineering Science and Physics

73, 101, 104

Alejandra Alonso

Biology

41, 152

Alejandra Alonso

Neuroscience

83

Cesar Arenas-Mena

Biology

99, 100, 120, 146

Comfort Asanbe

Psychology

7

Jillian Baez

Media Culture

26

Probal Banerjee

Chemistry

53, 163

Sarah Berger

Psychology

48, 186

Jean-Philippe Berteau

Physical Therapy

55

Jason Bishop

English/Linguistics

23, 32, 35, 111

Patricia Brooks

Psychology

45

Rebecca Chamberlain

Biology

5

Soon Ae Chun

Marketing

126, 157

Florette Cohen

Psychology

11, 43, 61, 81, 102, 114, 177

Danna Curcio

Nursing

37

Ellen-ge Denton

Psychology

122

Abdeslem El Idrissi

Biology

59,79, 117

Laura Farrell

Accounting and Finance

171

Jimmie Fata

Biology

62, 66, 72

Richard Flanagan

Political Science and Global Affairs

69

Patricia Galletta

Accounting and Finance

106, 174

Aaron Gilbraeth

Biology

165

Kristen Gillespie-Lynch

Psychology

4, 109, 137, 142, 156, 158

Marie Giordano

Nursing

148

Jianying Gu

Biology

86

Natacha Gueorguieva

Computer Science

161, 162, 164, 165

Roshen Hendrickson

Political Science and Global Affairs

68, 76, 128

Darryl Hill

Psychology

19, 49

Yumei Huo

Computer Science

185

Shi Jin

Chemistry

78, 149

Peter Kabachnik

Political Science and Global Affairs

17, 28

Lana Karasik

Psychology

64, 80, 85

Judit Kerekes

Curriculum and Instruction

173

Charles Kramer

Biology

10

Regina Lama

Nursing

25, 71, 88

Catherine Lavender

History

176

Nancy Liu-Sullivan

Biology

65, 70, 179

Sharon Loverde

Chemistry

84, 98

Alan Lyons

Chemistry

188, 190

Nora Maloney

Nursing

42

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Faculty Mentors

Undergraduate Conference on Research, Scholarship, and Performanceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Faculty Mentors by Department (cont.) FACULT Y

DEPARTMENT

POSTER

Michael Mandiberg

Media Culture

3

Lisa Manne

Biology

16

Dan McCloskey

Neuroscience

83, 139

Dan McCloskey

Psychology

54

Elena McCoy

Biology

52

Susan Mee

Nursing

39

Edward Meehan

Psychology

107

Shaibal Mitra

Biology

8

Barbara Gail Montero

Philosophy

75, 108, 110, 115, 127, 130, 143

Eugenia Naro-Maciel

Biology

50, 57, 74, 90, 119, 133

Anat Niv-Solomon

Political Science and Global Affairs

20, 21, 132

Kevin Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bryant

Mathematics

77

Jonathan Peters

Accounting and Finance

1, 24, 33, 170, 172

Greg Phillips

Biology

87, 113

Sebastien Poget

Chemistry

2

Krishnaswami Raja

Chemistry

93

Beatrix Reinhardt

PCA

166

Emily Rice

121

Dwight Richards

Engineering Science and Physics Engineering Science and Physics

Lara Saguisag

English

82

Cynthia Scarinci

Accounting and Finance

56

William Schreiber

Engineering Science and Physics

67

Irina Sekerina

Psychology

129, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184

Chang-Hui Shen

Biology

15, 44, 46, 47, 145

Peter Simpson

Philosophy

91

Deborah Sturm

Computer Science

189

Shiryn Sukhram

Biology

175

Christina Tortora

English/Linguistics

136, 167, 168, 169, 178

Paola Ureni

World Languages and Literatures

12

Jennifer Wagner

Psychology

105, 140, 144

Gail Wangel

Curriculum and Instruction

118

Maurya Wickstrom

PCA

58

Chapman Wing

World Languages and Literatures

13

Nan-Loh Yang

Chemistry

103, 155

Bilge Yesil

Media Culture

92

Dan Zhang

Marketing

63

Zhanyang Zhang

Computer Science

112, 150

114

MENTOR

36, 38, 135, 147, 153, 159, 187


Student Scholars

Research Paper Presentationsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Student Scholars PAPER#/STUDENT

MENTOR

134 Nicole Adamos 40 Sofia Cadavid Arango 131 Blanca Benitez 160 Alexis Gorin 94 Kellie Joseph 60 Jemima Alice Kadima 22 Martin J. King IV 123 Medine Kovacevic 95 Veronica LaManna 34 Meryandree Luna 51 Melissa Meyers 96 Sidhartha Mishra 31 Adriane Musacchio 151 Natalie Piccione

Sharifa Hampton Francisco Soto Francisco Soto Zaghloul Ahmed Bilge Yesil Zaghoul Ahmed Mark Lewis Cate Marvin Bilge Yesil Lara Saguisag Ellen Goldner Bilge Yesil, Xiaowen Zhang Zara Anishanslin Russell Rosen

DEPARTMENT

English World Languages and Literatures World Languages and Literatures Physical Therapy Media Culture Neuroscience History English Media Culture English English Media Culture History World Languages and Literatures

Research Paper Presentationsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Panel Discussion 154 138 141 6 116 9 29 27 14 18

STUDENT

MENTOR

DEPARTMENT

Michael Abenante Valeriana Dema Sophia Jordan Menat Aly Elissa Como Yara Edrees Elizabeth Leigh Kristen Mastrangelo Joseph Palumbo Jonathan Velez

Maria Bellamy Maria Bellamy Maria Bellamy Michael Schuyler Michael Schuyler Michael Schuyler Michael Schuyler Michael Schuyler Michael Schuyler Michael Schuyler

English English English English English English English English English English

115


116


Student Scholars

Undergraduate Conference on Research, Scholarship, and Performanceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Student Scholars P OS T E R# /S TUDENT

FACULTY

DEPARTMENT

177

Mirna Abdelsayed

Florette Cohen

Psychology

132

Taiwo Adenekan

Anat Niv-Solomon

Political Science and Global Affairs

171

Musemiu Adeola

Laura Farrell

Accounting/Finance

65

Sarah Ahmad

Nancy Liu-Sullivan

Biology

21

Ahmed Ahmed

Anat Niv-Solomon

Political Science and Global Affairs

68

Ahmed Ahmed

Roshen Hendrickson

Political Science and Global Affairs

46

Suzanne Ahmed

Chang-Hui Shen

Biology

61

Sarah Aladhamy

Florette Cohen

Psychology

137

Ashley Albanese

Kristen Gillespie-Lynch

Psychology

145

Dhiwya Alex

Chang-Hui Shen

Biology

66

Dina AlSharif

Jimmie Fata

Biology

182

Ashley Ames

Irina Sekerina

Psychology

77

Fateeha Amjad

Kevin O'Bryant

Mathematics

127

Kirill Antonov

Barbara Gail Montero

Philosophy

185

Domenic Ariaudo

Yumei Huo

Computer Science

13

Steve Arriaga

Chapman Wing

World Languages and Literatures

136

Steve Arriaga

Christina Tortora

English/Linguistics

178

Steve Arriaga

Christina Tortora

English/Linguistics

126

Chathura Athauda

Soon Ae Chun

Marketing

Juliet Nana Esi Baidoo

Probal Banerjee

Chemistry

181

Gwendolyn Barnes

Irina Sekerina

Psychology

159

Irfan Bhatti

Dwight Richards

Engineering Science and Physics

136

Frances Blanchette

Christina Tortora

English/Linguistics

Amanda Boglio

Darryl Hill

Psychology

Sabrina Bragerton-Nasert

Jennifer Wagner

Psychology

15

Gracie Cai

Chang-Hui Shen

Biology

47

Gracie Cai

Chang-Hui Shen

Biology

100

Jasmine Calle

Cesar Arenas-Mena

Biology

184

Jenna Carmoega

Irina Sekerina

Psychology

181

Torimarie Casale

Irina Sekerina

Psychology

53

30 105

119

Tania Castillo

Eugenia Naro-Maciel

Biology

12

Jurandir Chan

Paola Ureni

World Languages and Literatures

109

Ben Cheriyan

Kristen Gillespie-Lynch

Psychology

117


Student Scholars

Undergraduate Conference on Research, Scholarship, and Performanceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Student Scholars (cont.) P OS T E R# /STUDENT

FACULTY

DEPARTMENT

165

Matthew Chiappa

Natacha Gueorguieva

Computer Science

190

Cody Cimbal

Alan Lyons

Chemistry

91

Thomas Cintula

Peter Simpson

Philosophy

65

Stephanie Clarke

Nancy Liu-Sullivan

Biology

81

Melissa Collins

Florette Cohen

Psychology

111

Juliana Colon

Jason Bishop

English/Linguistics

178

Juliana Colon

Christina Tortora

English/Linguistics

85

Sara Cordova

Lana Karasik

Psychology

178

Julia Correale

Christina Tortora

English/Linguistics

Rossana Cruciata

Eugenia Naro-Maciel

Biology

Elisa A. Csorba

Jonathan Peters

Accounting/Finance

186

Marian Cunsolo

Sarah Berger

Psychology

146

Winnie Darius

Cesar Arenas-Mena

Biology

39

Maria DelRosario

Susan Mee

Nursing

38

Adem Demo

Dwight Richards

Engineering Science and Physics

77

Lauren DeStefano

Kevin O'Bryant

Mathematics

90 1

7

Kadiatou Diallo

Comfort Asanbe

Psychology

Nicole DiMeglio

Jason Bishop

English/Linguistics

23

Nawal Doleh

Jason Bishop

English/Linguistics

168

Nawal Doleh

Christina Tortora

English/Linguistics

182

Courtney Dowling

Irina Sekerina

Psychology

110

Arlinda Draga

Barbara Gail Montero

Philosophy

161

Cong Du

Natacha Gueorguieva

Computer Science

55

Andre G. Duarte

Jean-Philippe Berteau

Physical Therapy

69

Naomi Edwards

Richard Flanagan

Political Science and Global Affairs

Megan Eisler-Grynsztajn, RN

Marie Giordano

Nursing

111

148 153

Sundus Elkhatieb

Dwight Richards

Engineering Science and Physics

44

Michelle Esposito

Chang-Hui Shen

Biology

59

Mardia Fahnbulleh

Abdeslem El Idrissi,Thomas Wise

Biology

Andrew Fairley

Catherine Lavender

History

54

Keegan Fernandes

Dan McCloskey

Psychology

55

Imke Fielder

Jean-Philippe Berteau

Physical Therapy

Christine Fisher

Shi Jin

Chemistry

67

Karl Francis

William Schreiber

Engineering Science and Physics

187

Juan Franco

Dwight Richards

Engineering Science

Naomi Love Gaggi

Patricia J. Brooks

Psychology

176

149

45

118


Student Scholars

Undergraduate Conference on Research, Scholarship, and Performanceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Student Scholars (cont.) P OS T E R# /S TUDENT

184 5

FACULTY

DEPARTMENT

Jerome Galloway

Irina Sekerina

Psychology

Amber Gatling

Rebecca Chamberlain

Biology

36

Mykovenski Gisomme

Dwight Richards

Engineering Science and Physics

48

Lisa A. Gniewkowski

Sarah Berger

Psychology

176

Kevin Jay Gomez

Catherine Lavender

History

71

Michael Gratkowski

Regina Lama

Nursing

52

Joseph Guarrella

Elena McCoy

Biology

150

Paul Guglielmetti

Zhanyang Zhang

Computer Science

99

Mihai Hajdu

Cesar Arenas-Mena

Biology

146

Mihai Hajdu

Cesar Arenas-Mena

Biology

163

Peter Halat

Probal Banerjee

Chemistry

147

Medhat Hanna

Dwight Richards

Engineering Science and Physics

153

Medhat Hanna

Dwight Richards

Engineering Science and Physics

159

Ishmam Haque

Dwight Richards

Engineering Science and Physics

99

Aminat Haruna

Cesar Arenas-Mena

Biology

28

Anastasia Hayes

Peter Kabachnik

Political Science and Global Affairs

155 59 150 166

Edward He

Nan-Loh Yang

Chemistry

Desiree Hernandez

Abdeslem El Idrissi,Thomas Wise

Biology

Kieran Hepworth

Zhanyang Zhang

Computer Science

Laura Hollingsworth

Beatrix Reinhardt

PCA

10

Stephen Hongach

Charles Kramer

Biology

49

Katelynn Hotchkiss

Darryl Hill

Psychology

79

Chun-Wei Hsu

Abdeslem El Idrissi

Biology

38

Mohamed Hussein

Dwight Richards

Engineering Science and Physics

44

Christine Huynh

Chang-Hui Shen

Biology

83

Kawsar Ibrahim

Dan McCloskey and Alejandra Alonso

Neuroscience

152

Shumaila Irshad

Alejandra Alonso

Biology

181

Tierra Johnson

Irina Sekerina

Psychology

36

Thami Kandri

Dwight Richards

Engineering Science and Physics

42

Kaitlyn Kelly

Nora Maloney

Nursing

Sasha Kennedy

Irina Sekerina

Psychology

Edward Kennelly

Jimmie Fata

Biology

183 66 139

Patrick Kettyle

Dan McCloskey

Neuroscience

64

Spogmay Khan

Lana B. Karasik

Psychology

119


Student Scholars

Undergraduate Conference on Research, Scholarship, and Performanceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Student Scholars (cont.) P OS T E R# /STUDENT

147

FACULTY

DEPARTMENT

Sondos el Khateeb

Dwight Richards

Engineering Science and Physics

Moriel Khaykin

Bilge Yesil

Media Culture

128

Shahd Khidir

Roshen Hendrickson

Political Science and Global Affairs

112

Brian Kien

Zhanyang Zhang

Computer Science

156

Enes Kilman

Kristen Gillespie-Lynch

Psychology

122

Takuya Kishimoto

Ellen-ge Denton

Psychology

46

Paulina Konarzewska

Chang-Hui Shen

Biology

47

Paulina Konarzewska

Chang-Hui Shen

Biology

Medine Kovacevic

Christina Tortora

English/Linguistics

97

167 167

Melynda Kuppler

Christina Tortora

English/Linguistics

24

Michelle Kushnir

Jonathan Peters

Accounting/Finance

84

Dennis Lam

Sharon Loverde

Chemistry

149

Dennis Lam

Shi Jin

Chemistry

16

Kristina Lam

Lisa Manne

Biology

44

Kristina Lam

Chang-Hui Shen

Biology

86

Rin Zhi Larocque

Jianying Gu

Biology

92

Rin Zhi Larocque

Bilge Yesil

Media Culture

37

Jessica Larsen

Danna Curcio

Nursing

70

Daniel C. Leahy

Nancy Liu-Sullivan

Biology

103

Kevin Lee

Nan-Loh Yang

Chemistry

121

Justice Lenon

Emily Rice

Engineering Science and Physics

99

Tia Leung

Cesar Arenas-Mena

Biology

74

Lisa Li

Eugenia Naro-Maciel

Biology

93

Xue Qing Liang

Krishnaswami Raja

Chemistry

20

Nicole Liebman

Anat Niv-Solomon

Political Science and Global Affairs

118

Kaitlin Lillo

Gail Wangel

Curriculum and Instruction

164

Danny Lin

Natacha Gueorguieva

Computer Science

157

Azmira Ljekperic

Soon Ae Chun

Marketing

150

Amy Luo

Zhanyang Zhang

Computer Science

75

Michael Luppino

Barbara Gail Montero

Philosophy

78

Michael Luppino

Shi Jin

Chemistry

Hosea Mak

Alan Lyons

Chemistry

Dilakshi Mampitiya

Chang-Hui Shen

Biology

108

Michael Maisano

Barbara Montero

Philosophy

168

Angelica Maninno

Christina Tortora

English/Linguistics

Christopher Maniscalco

Krisetn Gillespie-Lynch

Psychology

188 44

4

120


Student Scholars

Undergraduate Conference on Research, Scholarship, and Performanceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Student Scholars (cont.) P OS T E R# /S TUDENT

FACULTY

DEPARTMENT

179

Anton Mararenko

Nancy Liu Sullivan

Biology

113

Elena Markov

Greg Phillips

Biology

65

Marina Matta

Nancy Liu-Sullivan

Biology

72

Christina Mazza

Jimmie Fata

Biology

43

Patrick Mele

Florette Cohen

Psychology

Dana Melendez

Christina Tortora

English/Linguistics

Amanda Nicole Mendez

Maurya Wickstrom

PCA

169

Julianne Millen

Christina Tortora

English/Linguistics

189

Melina Mitchell

Deborah Sturm

Computer Science

23

Erin Moreno

Jason Bishop

English/Linguistics

168

Erin Moreno

Christina Tortora

English/Linguistics

167 58

Viktoriya Morozova

Alejandra Alonso

Biology

115

41

Tamara Moseley

Barbara Gail Montero

Philosophy

140

Hana Moustapha

Jennifer Wagner

Psychology

152

Sulayman Mughal

Alejandra Alonso

Biology

169

Sergio Napoletano

Christina Tortora

English/Linguistics

76

Michael Nappi

Roshen Hendrickson

Political Science and Global Affairs

50

Yan Mei Nie

Eugenia Naro-Maciel

Biology

144

Roseline Nkama

Jennifer Wagner

Psychology

183

Taylor Nygaard

Irina Sekerina

Psychology

136

Teresa O'Neill

Christina Tortora

English/Linguistics

107

Lauren Overeem

Edward Meehan

Psychology

168

Natalie Palladino

Christina Tortora

English/Linguistics

57

Jenna Pantophlet

Eugenia Naro-Maciel

Biology

173

Minyoung Park

Judit Kerekes

Curriculum and Instruction

133

Robert Pashayan

Eugenia Naro-Maciel

Biology

169

Kaitlyn Pellicano

Christina Tortora

English/Linguistics

189

Edward Peppe

Deborah Sturm

Computer Science

32

Julissa M. Peralta

Jason Bishop

English/Linguistics

26

Theresa Pessolano

Jillian Baez

Media Culture

180

Mark Petraglia

Irina Sekerina

Psychology

142

Michael Picone

Kristen Gillespie-Lynch

Psychology

129

Krista Polly

Irina Sekerina

Psychology

117

Yohanna Quezada

Abdeslem El Idrissi

Biology

178

William Quilty

Christina Tortora

English/Linguistics

175

Ryan Raiola

Shiryn Sukhram

Biology

121


Student Scholars

Undergraduate Conference on Research, Scholarship, and Performanceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Student Scholars (cont.) P OS T E R# /STUDENT

FACULTY

DEPARTMENT

93

Vyshnavi Rajendra

Krishnaswami Raja

Chemistry

184

Someers Ramirez

Irina Sekerina

Psychology

120

Victor Ramirez

Cesar Arenas-Mena

Biology

Stephanie Randazzo

Florette Cohen

Psychology

135

Tatiana Rasolka

Dwight Richards

Engineering Science and Physics

180

Junhee Rhee

Irina Sekerina

Psychology

114

George Ritorto

Florette Cohen

Psychology

101

Victoria Rivelli

Jane Alexander

Engineering Science and Physics

152

Andrew Rizkalla

Alejandra Alonso

Biology

187

Ariel Rodriguez

Dwight Richards

Engineering Science

135

Stewart Romhin

Dwight Richards

Engineering Science and Physics

104

Sam Rubin

Jane Alexander

Engineering Science and Physics

174

Diane Saadeh

Patricia Galletta

Accounting/Finance

152

Penina Safier

Alejandra Alonso

Biology

180

Sonia Saleem

Irina Sekerina

Psychology

125

Ibrahim Sidik Sangare

Aaron Gilbraeth

Political Science and Global Affairs

11

Allison Scully

Michael Mandiberg

Media Culture

44

3

Alicia Seecoomar

Chang-Hui Shen

Biology

66

Harini Senthil

Jimmie Fata

Biology

145 87

Goldie Sherr

Chang-Hui Shen

Biology

Adam Shonubi

Greg Phillips

Biology

162

Dennis Shpits

Natacha Gueorguieva

Computer Science

17

Rachel Smalle

Peter Kabachnik

Political Science and Global Affairs

102

Stephanie Solanki

Florette Cohen

Psychology

107

Michael Stendardi

Edward Meehan

Psychology

82

Jamie Sterner

Lara Saguisag

English

88

Anna Supinska

Regina Lama

Nursing

62

Palwasha Syar

Jimmie Fata

Biology

98

Phu Tang

Sharon Loverde

Chemistry

183

Abigail Taylor

Irina Sekerina

Psychology

73

Sean Thatcher

Jane Alexander

Engineering Science and Physics

Shenuque Tissera

Jonathan Peters

Accounting/Finance

15

Jaclyn Trotta

Chang-Hui Shen

Biology

47

Jaclyn Trotta

Chang-Hui Shen

Biology

Katherine Unger

Irina Sekerina

Psychology

Brendon Ursomanno

Chang-Hui Shen

Biology

172

182 15

122


Student Scholars

Undergraduate Conference on Research, Scholarship, and Performanceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Student Scholars (cont.) P OS T E R# /S TUDENT

47

FACULTY

DEPARTMENT

Brendon Ursomanno

Chang-Hui Shen

Biology

Kelly Walsh

Patricia Galletta

Accounting/Finance

25

Rosalind Weiss

Regina Lama

Nursing

19

Divina Wiley

Darryl Hill

Psychology

79

106

Don Wisidagama

Abdeslem El Idrissi

Biology

130

Victoria Lokyee Wong

Barbara Gail Montero

Philosophy

158

Vincent Wong

Kristen Gillespie-Lynch

Psychology

Steven Woolverton

Jonathan Peters

Accounting/Finance

Laura Xhuglini

Barbara Gail Montero

Philosophy

33 143 2

Mohamad Yaghi

Sebastien Poget

Chemistry

80

Juliana Zaloom

Lana Karasik

Psychology

35

Nadia Zaki

Jason Bishop

English/Linguistics

Lucinda Zawadzki

Shaibal Mitra

Biology

Yiwen Zhang

Dan Zhang

Marketing

8 63 149

Xizhe Zhao

Shi Jin

Chemistry

54

Mangmang Zhu

Dan McCloskey

Psychology

150

Jonathan Zimmer

Zhanyang Zhang

Computer Science

139

Michael Zions

Dan McCloskey

Neuroscience

170

Ariana Zuberovic

Jonathan Peters

Accounting/Finance

123


URC Committe

Chair Dr. Charles Liu

Office of Academic Affairs

Review Committee

Department

Professor Jane Alexander Professor Jason Bishop Professor Soon Ae Chun Professor Florette Cohen Professor Jane Marcus-Delgado Professor Nuria Morgado Professor Eugenia Naro-Maciel Professor Angela Sammarco Professors Christina Tortora Professor Ming Tang Professor Mark White

Engineering Science & Physics English/Linguistics School of Business Psychology Political Science & Global Affairs World Languages and Literature Biology Nursing English/Linguistics Chemistry Philosophy

Planning Committee

Department

Janice Awerbuch Jonna DeSantis Danielle Dimitrov Tony Gallego Donna Garambone Manny Gonzales Betsy Greene John Jankowski Debbie Mahoney Kristen Lindtvedt Jessica Stein Jennifer Straniere Bill Bauer Joyce Taylor George Mallon Philip Halsey

Design Services Academic Affairs Diversity and Compliance Media Services Alumni Relations President's Office Campus Planning Center for the Arts President's Office Faculty Center for Professional Development Academic Affairs Performing and Creative Arts Performing and Creative Arts Web/Technical Public Safety Reprographics

For comments and questions contact: Office of Academic Affairs College of Staten Island 2800 Victory Boulevard, 1A, Room 211C, Staten Island, NY 10314 718.982.2341, jonna.desantis@csi.cuny.edu The committee gratefully acknowledges the contributions of the many individuals who helped make this conference possible.

124


Undergraduate Research Conference 2015  
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