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CSI in the News

May 2010


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Arts

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Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Arts

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IFC Center Showing Creepy Documentary 'Cropsey' http://www.bloody-disgusting.com/news/20055

IFC writes in to us that "the spine-tingling documentary Cropsey, which peels back the layers of fact and fiction behind one of New York’s most disturbing unsolved mysteries, will debut theatrically on Friday, June 4 at New York City’s IFC Center, before spreading to Los Angeles, Denver, Austin, Boston, and additional bookings through Cinema Purgatorio." Read on for VOD information and a clip. Gravitas Ventures has picked up North American VOD rights to the doc feature, which will be available nationwide on VOD beginning June 1, 2010. "We are thrilled to bring the visually arresting Cropsey to a nationwide Video On Demand audience. Just a few months ago, indieWIRE had called Cropsey one of the best undistributed films of 2009 and we are excited to collaborate on a such a comprehensive release strategy,” commented Nolan Gallagher, founder and CEO of Gravitas Ventures. Cropsey will also screen as a “special presentation” at the Staten Island Film Festival. This late-night screening will take place on the grounds of the infamous Willowbrook State School (now the College of Staten Island). Willowbrook, a psychiatric ward, was shuttered after its abuses were profiled in a groundbreaking 1972 expose from Geraldo Rivera. Growing up on Staten Island, NY, filmmakers Joshua Zeman and Barbara Brancaccio had often heard the legend of “Cropsey.” For the kids on the island, he was the escaped mental patient who lived in the tunnels of Willowbrook and came out late at night to snatch children off the streets. “Cropsey” remained just that, an urban legend, until the summer of 1987, when Jennifer Schweiger, a 13-year-old girl with Down syndrome, disappeared from her neighborhood. She was found buried in a shallow grave five weeks later on the grounds of Willowbrook. In Cropsey, Brancaccio and Zeman return to Staten Island to undertake their own investigation of Jennifer and four other missing children as well as the real-life boogeyman linked to their disappearances. Brancaccio and Zeman skillfully combine a riveting true-crime drama with a personal exploration of the Cropsey myth, uncovering a reality more terrifying than any urban legend. Cropsey is unrated with a running time of 84 minutes. For screenings, trailer and more, visit www.cropseylegend.com

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AY QUE FUNNY Plays The National Comedy Theater, Begins 5/6 by BWW News Desk The AY QUE FUNNY sketch comedy show, conceptualized, written, directed and produced by Jesenia Bailey and Crystal Roman, will play only five performances at the National Comedy Theater (347 West 36th Street, between 8 & 9 Avenue). AY QUE FUNNY will play Thursdays at 8pm, for five weeks starting May 6, 2010. The Spanglish NYC based sketch comedy show, AY QUE FUNNY? encourages the love of comedy thru off-the-wall sketches, portrayed by a culturally diverse cast, both onstage and in film. Each show features guest performances, spotlighting dance, music, stand-up comedy, and anything else that tickles! Damian Bailey is the filmed skit director, director of photography and sound technician. Dwayne McGleese is the assistant director and light and sound technician. The cast includes Carlos Gonzalez, Nyle Lynn Caisley, Kim MrKulic, Dwayne McGleese, John Sartori, Arielle Rosales, Crystal Roman and Jesenia Bailey. Ay Que Funny plays the following schedule: Thursday, Thursday, Thursday, Thursday, Thursday,

May 6 at 8 p.m. May 13 at 8 p.m. May 20 at 8 p.m. May 27 at 8 p.m. June 3 at 8 p.m.

Tickets are $15 and are now available online at www.brownpapertickets.com or by calling 1800-838-3006. Tickets may also be purchased in-person at the National Comedy Theater (347 West 36th Street - Between 8th & 9th Ave?s.), 1 hour prior to the performance. Page 9 of 155


Running Time: 62 minutes Website: www.ayquefunny.com BIOGRAPHIES

JESENIA BAILEY (creator, director, performer) is a Nuyorican, Bronx native Comedienne/Actress/Writer/Performer/Director/Producer. Bailey has performer stand-up comedy at various clubs throughout New York City, including the Laugh Factory & Caroline?s Comedy Club. Since 2000, she has been acting in theater and film, performing both comedic and dramatic roles. In 2006, she cast in the inspirational feature film Gang Girl, in which she played a 16 year-old Bronx gang member trying to find her way out of gang life. In the film, The Big Wes, she was able to flex her comedic acting abilities by playing two very different roles. CRYSTAL ROMAN (creator, director, performer) was born into an artistic family, her great grandfather was a musician in the Duke Ellington band, and her uncle has played with Latin music legends the likes of the late Tito Puente, Santana, and Mark Anthony. After graduating from the College of Staten Island with a Bachelor of Arts in Marketing and Management with a minor in Socialogy, Roman played the lead role in the film, A Weapon Most Unusual (New York International Film Festival award-winning). She recently completed production on the film, Tangle Eye Blues with Moonshine Films and is the current spokesperson for Mono Machines. In 2009, Roman wrote the play Black Latina about the lives of dark-skinned Latinas and African American Latinas, which she produced by her company, Shaniece Entertainment. She is adapting the play into a feature film.

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SINY Film Festival ticket giveaway By Jodi Lee Reifer May 07, 2010, 5:14PM

AWE/Jan Somma-Hammel Wu-Tang Clan's RZA is serving as celebrity chairman of the SINY Film Festival. His short, "Trophy," screens in a comedy block of flicks as part of the festival. The Staten Island Economic Development Corporation has made available free coupons for allscreening passes at 18 locations throughout the borough.

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Cost of catching an indie flick at the Angelika in Manhattan’s West Village: $13 a ticket. Cost of doing the same at the SINY Film Festival: Priceless. Literally. The Staten Island Economic Development Corporation (SIEDC) is making free screening passes available for anyone interested in seeing all 80-plus movies in the festival, June 2 to 6. To get the all-screening pass, cinephiles can visit one of 18 locations — elected officials’ offices or businesses — to pick up a coupon. It can be traded for the actual screening pass at the event unspooling at the St. George Theatre and the College of Staten Island. Each pass is good for up to four family members. Admission to screenings are subject to seating availability. The sixth annual indie film showcase, presented by the Richmond County Savings Foundation, is a project of SIEDC. The coupon also entitles bearers to free admittance to the SIEDC’s 2010 Health & Wellness Expo, Sept. 28 in

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the Hilton Garden Inn. Thousands of the coupons are available. They can be picked up at any of the following locations: Gateway Arms Realty Corp., 285 St. Marks Place, St. George; Borough Hall, 10 Richmond Terrace, Room 120, St. George; the office of state Sen. Diane Savino, 36 Richmond Terrace, Suite 112, St. George; the office of District Attorney Daniel Donovan, 130 Stuyvesant Place, St. George; the office of Councilwoman Debi Rose, 130 Stuyvesant Place, 6th Floor, St. George the office of Rep. Michael McMahon, 365 New Dorp Lane, 2nd floor; Daszkowski, Tompkins & Weg PC, 1303 Clove Road, Sunnyside; Bay Street Medical Pavilion, 690 Bay St., Stapleton; the Vanderbilt at South Beach, 300 Father Capodanno Blvd.; the office of Assemblywoman Janele Hyer-Spencer, 586B Midland, Ave. Victory State Bank, 4142 Hylan Blvd., Great Kills; the office of Assemblyman Lou Tobacco, 4062 Amboy Rd., Great Kills; the office of Assemblyman Matthew Titone, 853 Forest Ave., West Brighton; Statewide Fire Corp., 2047 Victory Blvd., Meiers Corners; the office of Councilman Vincent Ignizio, 3944 Richmond Ave., Eltingville; the office of Senator Andrew Lanza, 3845 Richmond Ave, 2A, Eltingville; the office of Assemblyman Michael Cusick, 1911 Richmond Avenue, Suite 110, Grant City; Henry Malarkey & Co., 201 Edward Curry Avenue, Suite 203, Bloomfield. Without the screening pass, tickets range from $10 for one block of films to $45 for all-day screening passes and are available on www.ticketweb.com. All-screening passes do not include admission to other special film festival events. Š 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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Â

Classic performances May 9, 2010 Special to Record Publishing Co. Classic performances Thirty-eight members of the Stow-Munroe Falls High School String Orchestra and 12 members of the Stow-Munroe Falls High School Concert Choir, along with 31 parent chaperones and music directors, Frances Hamilton and Emily Engle, participated in the "Big Apple Classic" Music Festival at the College of Staten Island Center for the Performing Arts in New Jersey on March 27. Sixteen total groups from California, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Ohio, Texas and Washington performed at the Festival for competition and critique by three adjudicators. StowMunroe Falls was the only representation from Ohio at the Festival. The String Orchestra received a First Place "Excellent" trophy and the Concert Choir received a Second Place "Excellent" trophy. Both groups went sight seeing in New York City, attended a Broadway Show and an awards banquet at Medieval Times during the weekend following the Festival. Orchestra Parents Association and Choir Boosters helped defray the cost of the trip with fundraisers and parents who serve as officers for both groups assisted in the planning and execution of the trip which was the String Orchestra's first-ever "out-of-state" trip. The matching NYC T-Shirts the students are wearing in the photo were designed by a sophomore String Orchestra member, Josh Smalley. Â

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Coming soon: A piano near you By Staten Island Advance May 20, 2010, 6:13AM STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Got a song to sing? Or maybe you just want to tinkle those ivories? Your moment is close at hand. “Sing for Hope” (www.singforhope.org), a public service organization for artists, will install 60 pianos in the parks and public spaces of the city’s five boroughs, including six locations on Staten Island. The pianos will be available to all who pass by from June 21 to July 5. Piano locations on Staten Island include, on the North Shore, the St. George Ferry Terminal; the Richmond County Bank Ballpark at St. George; the Children’s Museum at the Snug Harbor Cultural Center and Botanical Garden, Livingston, and the Staten Island Zoo, West Brighton; East Shore, on the South Beach boardwalk, and West Shore, on the Willowbrook campus of the College of Staten Island. Each street piano will be decorated and cared for by a “piano buddy” from one of 60 sponsor organizations including schools, hospitals and community partners. The partners will receive a donated piano at the conclusion of the project. The “street pianos” are part of “Play Me, I’m Yours,” a worldwide public art project. Originated by British artist Luke Jerram, “Play Me, I’m Yours” has brought music to the streets of London, Bristol and Birmingham, England, as well as to San Paulo, Brazil, and Sydney, Australia. “Each piano acts as sculptural, musical, blank canvas that becomes a reflection of the communities it is embedded into,” explained Jerram. Opening events will take place on June 21 in conjunction with Make Music New York (www.makemusicny.org), a one-day festival of free concerts in public spaces throughout the city. Closing concerts, organized by Sing for Hope, will take place on July 5. Staten Islanders are invited to post photos and videos of street pianos on the Web site, www.nycstreetpianos.com. The site features maps with piano locations and other information about the project. © 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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NY CULTURE

MAY 28, 2010

Staten Island Boogeyman Haunts Anew New Film Probes 'Real' Urban Legend By STEVE DOLLAR

As a kid growing up on Staten Island in the late 1970s, Joshua Zeman often wandered through the woods in the center of the island. His summer camp was the destination. But the dense brush and shadowy paths held other, darker fascinations. It was notorious as the site of the Willowbrook State School. The institution for mentally disabled children was labeled a "snake pit" in 1965 by Sen. Robert Kennedy and it was shuttered in 1987, 15 years after a young TV reporter named Geraldo Rivera broke his first big story in an exposé about it. Here also were the grounds of the abandoned Seaview Hospital and its crumbling tuberculosis wards. And here was Cropsey. Staten Island's own boogeyman—the escaped mental patient of lore with a hook for an arm who, after the tragic death of his son, snatched up wayward children in a vengeful rage. He was an urban legend that Mr. Zeman and his childhood friends used to scare each other. "Our counselors would lead us through the woods, past Seaview, and we'd beg to go in there," Mr. Zeman, now 38, said. "Inevitably, one of them would come out with an ax yelling that he was Cropsey. That had a big effect on us." Mr. Zeman never shook it. Years later, the film producer and documentarian met Barbara Brancaccio, another Staten Island native. They quickly began sharing their "Cropsey" stories. These dovetailed with the memories of multiple cases of children who had vanished on Staten Island during Cropsey's supposed rampage, including the 1987 disappearance of Jennifer Schweiger, a 12-year-old with Down syndrome. After a 35-day search involving some 5,000 volunteers, her body was found on the Willowbrook grounds near the campsite of Andre Rand, a homeless man, ex-convict and former Willowbrook employee who was later convicted of kidnapping her. Rand was serving a sentence of 25 years to life when, in 2000, he was newly indicted in the 1981 disappearance of another girl, Holly Ann Hughes. Suddenly, Mr. Zeman and Ms. Brancaccio had a real-life embodiment of the Cropsey legend—and a big story to tell. "Cropsey," which opens next Friday at IFC Center as well as at the Staten Island Film Festival (held at the College of Staten Island, which occupies the same site that Willowbrook once did), is less an argument for or against Rand's guilt than it is a study in how a community creates a narrative to deal with tragedies that can't be explained. Through a decade of amateur sleuthing and countless interviews, the filmmakers found a pattern that linked Rand to several other abductions. But the film, which builds steadily into a forensics thriller, also explores how mysteries mushroom.

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"The movie is about what everybody else thinks happened," said Ms. Brancaccio, 39, who is communications director for the New York City Department of Social Services/Human Resources. "No one's going to bring the children back. We will not know what happened." Mr. Zeman uses old images of Rand being led away by police, appearing deranged, to illustrate a point. "The guy is drooling as they lead him out, suspected of killing a child. Central casting. It doesn't get any better than that. But it's almost too good," he said. "At times we would stand on our high horse and ask, 'Is this Boo Radley?' Other times, we wondered, 'Is this guy a full-on serial killer who's killed 15 people and we only know about four or five?'" Former police officers who appear in the film confessed they were still haunted by the cases. "So many of them would take us off to the side and tell us this was the case," Mr. Zeman said. Though the filmmakers had no desire to make a serial-killer flick, their footage of the woods and abandoned buildings that provided shelter for Rand and an unknown number of other homeless characters are decidedly creepy—evocative of 1970s drive-in movie shockers like "The Texas Chain Saw Massacre." In one sequence, Mr. Zeman and Ms. Brancaccio clamber over fences and poke around with a flashlight, coming face to face with ‌ a group of teenagers out to spook themselves. "It's called 'legend tripping,'" Ms. Brancaccio said, noting that the legend of Cropsey has taken on an even darker nature since their childhood: Stories about devil worship and human sacrifices, stories that also resonate with Staten Island's former reputation as a lost borough, a dumping ground, an island of lost souls. Perhaps most chilling is that the movie leaves the mysteries unresolved. Even years of written correspondence with Rand haven't brought the filmmakers closer. "There's just enough weirdness in those letters to lead us to believe there was more than what was on the page," Mr. Zeman said.

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May 30, 2010 FILM

Long Shadows of a Borough’s Boogeyman By JOHN ANDERSON

COUPLES do all sorts of things on first dates. Coffee. Dinner. Dancing. Or strolling around the grounds of the abandoned Willowbrook mental institution on Staten Island. Josh Zeman and Barbara Brancaccio chose to take the walk. The outcome was a movie. “Cropsey,” named for the mythic boogeyman of Hudson Valley campfire stories, is the cinematic version of peeking under the bed and not breathing a sigh of relief. Two parts true crime and one part folklore, the documentary examines a string of child disappearances on Staten Island during the ’70s and ’80s, including two for which the onetime Willowbrook worker Andre Rand is serving time. Mr. Zeman and Ms. Brancaccio, who dated for a time after that initial stroll through the haunted landscape of their Staten Island youth — where one child’s body was literally buried — spent nearly a decade of nights and weekends investigating the cases against Mr. Rand; the other, seemingly unrelated disappearances; and the history and character of the borough. But they also wound up examining the controlling nature of narrative. “ ‘Cropsey’ is really a movie about storytelling,” Ms. Brancaccio said. “It’s about a small-town location, a series of unfortunate events that affects the entire community and what they told themselves about it. By the time we get to court and see the outcome, I think it’s not even relevant. The people had determined what the story of the missing children was, and it had become a part of their own mythology.” It’s a mythology sparked by the collision of urban legend and urban nightmare: missing children; a perpetrator who could have come from Central Casting (and is suspected in the other disappearances); and the location itself, Willowbrook, on the fringe of the island’s Greenbelt, had warehoused the city’s mentally ill under disgraceful conditions. For children growing up around the shuttered institution it was synonymous with horror. As a result, that “Cropsey” is being shown at the College of Staten Island on June 5, as part of the Staten Island Film Festival has taken on a perhaps inflated significance: the college is on the grounds of the old Willowbrook State School. (The film will also be shown on video on demand July 2; opens theatrically June 4 at the IFC Center in Manhattan; and will be broadcast on Investigation Discovery Aug. 13.) Add all the unresolved aspects of the case, and what might have been a straight crime story is now something more volatile. “The facts don’t reveal the truth, is the problem,” said Mr. Zeman, who during the years of making “Cropsey” was co-producing indie films like “The Station Agent,” “Mysterious Skin” and “Choking Man,” as well as Page 17 of 155


writing screenplays. “And I think the only way we’ll ever know the truth is if he tells us, which was our goal.” (He and Ms. Brancaccio never did get an on-camera interview with Mr. Rand, although he communicated with them by letter from prison in Ossining, N.Y., proclaiming his innocence.) Mr. Rand had, after all, become the real-life Cropsey of nightmares — the fictional drooling, child-napping maniac — on the grounds of Willowbrook, the institution where he once worked. Only one of the five children whose disappearances are addressed in the movie was ever found: 12-year-old Jennifer Schweiger, a girl with Down syndrome, whose body was unearthed in 1987. (Mr. Rand was convicted of her kidnapping.) The others simply vanished. While there was never any physical evidence against Mr. Rand, the filmmakers do not suggest he is innocent. But they became fascinated with the way stories develop, evolve and, perhaps, dictate reality. Mr. Zeman and Ms. Brancaccio, a deputy commissioner of the New York City Human Resources Administration, have found supporters of their film. “I think it’s done very well, and I think it tells the truth,” said Donna Cutugno, a Staten Islander who founded the volunteer search group Friends of Jennifer for Missing Children during the Schweiger case. “We still have those other missing children. The boogeyman wasn’t a myth.” There are also critics. The brothers of Holly Ann Hughes, the second girl Mr. Rand is convicted of kidnapping, are boycotting the movie and are opposed to its screening at the College of Staten Island. Reached by phone, Sean Hughes said he had not seen the film and did not want to make a statement but made reference to a “Blair Witch”-style sensationalism he thought the film was trying to generate. It’s a perception abetted by horror fans online, who have found in “Cropsey” a documentary all their own. “I think it’s ‘Blair Witch’ backwards,” Devin Faraci, a writer for the horror Web site chud.com, said via email. “You create a scenario where people assume it’s fake, because we’ve seen so many faux docs/foundfootage films in the horror genre, and then you blow their minds with ‘It’s all true!!!’ ” Mr. Faraci’s problem with the film, echoed elsewhere online, is that there’s no “payoff” or “money shot” — no easy resolution — which is somewhat like complaining that there are no space aliens in “Robin Hood.” The appeal of “Cropsey” to a horror audience has left the filmmakers slightly chagrined. “We sat with this family when no one else showed up in court,” Ms. Brancaccio said, referring to the prolonged pretrial motions that preceded Mr. Rand’s conviction for the Hughes kidnapping. “So they’ve seen us several times a year for the last 10 years. They know there’s no malice here. I don’t think they want to bring it back up, but there’s nothing happening here in this film that takes away from their loss.” Ms. Cutugno, who attended the “Cropsey” premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival last year, agreed. “I never got the reason they don’t want it shown at Willowbrook,” she said of the Hughes family. “Jennifer was found there. The story began there. Andre Rand lived there. It’s not tall tales, it’s truth. Jennifer should be honored and remembered, and maybe some of the other kids in time can be found also. Never give up.” The investigation they undertook, Ms. Brancaccio said, was like “peeling an onion,” as one interviewee led to another, and each person provided another version of the Rand tale. What’s reflected in the film is a specific time and a mood of fear that prevailed in the late ’80s. “The kids’ urban legends were about the escaped mental patients who lived in the woods with a hook for a hand,” Mr. Zeman said. “But the adult urban Page 18 of 155


legends were about the ‘Satanic panic,’ devil worshiping, heavy mental music, child-pornography and childslavery rings. There was this child-snatching hysteria and a convergence of fears that drove Staten Islanders into a frenzy.” And as “Cropsey” takes pains to illustrate, Staten Island itself had already been victimized as a kind of dumping ground for New York City: its garbage was dumped there, its mentally ill were warehoused there, and the borough itself virtually was ignored. “It’s like nowhere else in the world,” Ms. Brancaccio said. “But when you’re not paying attention, bad things are going to happen.”

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Faculty & Staff 

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Urban Foragers Turn City Parks Into Produce Aisles By ERIC WAHLGREN Posted 9:05 AM 05/01/10

Green

On a bright spring day, Iso Rabins wanders through the brush atop one of San Francisco's highest peaks. "Wild radish over there," says the 29-year-old, pointing to a leafy plant with small purplish flowers. A few steps later, he pauses in front of waist-high plant with silky green fronds. "That's wild fennel. I use it a lot." This is Rabins's foodie twist on the nature walk. To most of us, his discoveries might look like weeds that we'd readily douse with Roundup (if they were sprouting in our yard). But to this bearded hipster, they are ingredients for his next meal. Actually, make that his next banquet: an eight-course, $75per-person affair called The Wild Kitchen that showcases all the edibles that can be found in and around America's 12th largest city. On the menu for a recent dinner was a soup made of wild onion, fiddleheads and heirloom potatoes and desserts including a variation on the French mille feuille -- this one made with flour from milled acorns gathered in the San Francisco Bay Area. "Once you start to realize that the things you see around you every day are edible, it changes your relationship with nature," says Rabins, a film major who moved to San Francisco from Massachusetts in 2007. "It becomes even more important to protect it when you really understand its real value in producing food." 'People Like the Idea of Eating Snails' Rabins is considered a pioneer in the growing urban foraging movement. Foraging is an offshoot of the locavore trend that has been sweeping the nation over the past decade. Only instead of eating food from family-owned farms located within a day's drive, urban foragers stay even closer to home, collecting and eating the fruits, vegetables and animals (snails,

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mostly) that are found growing in the sidewalks, street medians and urban parks just feet from their homes. "People like the idea of eating snails that could be in their backyard," Rabins says. "We actually have the same genus of snails here that are found in Europe." Those snail-loving foragers aren't just living in picturesque and eco-friendly San Francisco. They can also be found combing the urban landscapes of much grittier metropolises like Chicago and New York. While there are no figures on the number of urban foragers nationally, foraging blogs lately seem to be popping up like the very Morel mushrooms they chronicle. What's more, Stalking The Wild Asparagus, the book by Euell Gibbons long considered the forager's bible since it initially appeared in 1962, was recently updated and reprinted to keep up with the rising demand. "For me, it's about enjoying the fact that there really is a whole lot of local food that is right under your feet," says Ava Chin, who writes the Urban Forager blog for The New York Times. "I've found the Mexican herb Epazote in a parking lot in Brooklyn. I smashed it up with some avocado and made the best guacamole ever." Turning Wild Mushroom Gathering Into a Business For Rabins, a graduate of Emerson College in Boston, the interest in foraging traces back to 2007 during a visit with his father in Humboldt County in Northern California. That's when he got his first taste of wild mushrooms that some family friends had just picked. "I had this moment when I realized 'Wow, someone actually went out and found these,'" he says. Rabins started helping mushroom foragers in the area sell their fungi to restaurants in the Bay Area -- a fateful move that set him on his unconventional career path. "I decided I didn't want to be waiting tables," he says. "What I wanted to be doing is hanging out in the woods a lot and talking to people about wild food." Rabins has turned his foraging hobby into an expanding enterprise called ForageSF that, among other things, sells "Community Supported Forage" boxes of wild foods to 25 customers once a month. For $20 to $80 a month, depending on the box's contents, subscribers to the CSF might get foraged Black Trumpet and Chanterelle mushrooms, chickweed and Miner's Lettuce, huckleberries and blackberries. Rabins works with area fisherman to add locally-caught fish to the mix. "I'm trying to keep the CSF business a small part of what I'm doing as it's an astounding amount of work," he says.

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An Underground Market for Home Chefs and Growers More time is going into The Wild Kitchen dinners, says Rabins, who also leads Wild Food Walks in and around San Francisco several times a month for $30 per person. But perhaps Rabins's biggest success so far is the SF Underground Market, a venue for area locals to buy food grown and cooked by ordinary citizens. "There are a lot of people who have been making things like jams for years and years, but can't get into a regular farmers market," he says. The first market day held earlier this year drew just eight vendors and 200 customers, he says. But word spread quickly. By the time the last one was held in April, the event attracted some 70 vendors and 2,000 customers. Labeled a "food rave" because of its warehouse setting, the shoppers could purchase Hawaiian baked goods, salumi, Jewish deli fare and jams from locally foraged fruits, to name a few items. "It was pretty epic," Rabins says. Chef Dontaye Ball, who peddles his specialty pulled pork at the market, credits Rabins for turning a city already obsessed with chasing the latest culinary trends onto wild edibles. "He's definitely educating people about the fact that 'Oh, there's wild fennel or dandelion greens in my backyard and they're edible," says Ball, who has worked in some of San Francisco's hottest restaurants and runs Good Foods Catering. The Debate Over Foraging: Safety Versus Taste Not everyone is gaga over foraged foods. Officials with the San Francisco Department of Public Health warn that eating foods found in the wild can be risky. Some mushrooms are toxic, says Richard Lee, director of the department's Environmental Health Regulatory Program. And then there is the issue of pesticides. "No one knows how much pesticide has been applied to certain spots," he says. Rabins insists he goes to great lengths to assure his wild foods are safe. "We're really careful about the places where we harvest and about thinking what has gone on in the areas before and what industry may be located nearby," he says. What's more, he says he steers clear of species of mushrooms for which poisonous ones can resemble the edible ones. Safety concerns like the ones Lee mentions don't easily deter urban foragers. Even while working full-time as a professor of nonfiction and journalism at the College of Staten IslandCUNY, Chin manages to spend two to three hours a week foraging, no matter the season. Last winter, she tapped her first maple tree -- one growing in a neighbor's yard. She boiled

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the sap down into maple syrup, which she used on pancakes. Besides blogging for the New York Times, Chin has no plans to make foraging a commercial venture. She is, however, planning a wild foods dinner with chef Louisa Shafia, author of the cookbook Lucid Food. "Some people think this is totally cool," she says. "Others think it's totally whack. They say, 'the next time you come over for dinner, you're not going to bring anything foraged, are you?'"

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Historic education official to be graduation speaker By: Staff Report Issue date: 5/6/10 Section: Front

Dr. Muriel A. Howard, president of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, will be speaker for spring commencement. The graduation ceremonies will be held at 10 a.m. May 15 in the Fredrick C. Hobdy Assembly Center.Graduation practice is set for 9 a.m. Wednesday in the Assembly Center. Media Credit: Dr. Howard is the first African-American to lead one of the six Courtesy presidentially based higher education associations in Washington. photo She is also AASCU's first female president. [ As AASCU president, Dr. Howard is an advocate for public higher education at the national level, working to influence federal policy and regulations on behalf of colleges and universities. She serves as a resource to presidents and chancellors as they address state policy and emerging campus issues. A graduate of the City University of New York's Richmond College, Dr. Howard holds a master's degree in education and a doctor of philosophy in educational organization, administration, and policy from the University at Buffalo. Her professional and scholarly interests include support of education, educational leadership, and a long-standing personal commitment to public service. Formerly the president of Buffalo State College in New York, Dr. Howard's volunteer involvement with AASCU includes serving as chair of the board of directors (2006-2007) and committee and commission memberships that include the Voluntary System of Accountability Presidential Advisory Committee, the Millennium Leadership Initiative, the Commission on Public University Renewal, and the Alliance for Regional Stewardship. Dr. Howard also served as a faculty member for AASCU's New Presidents Academy. As president of Buffalo State College from 1996 to 2009, Dr. Howard led a campus of more than 11,000 students, approximately 1,700 faculty and staff, and a financial operation of more than $214 million. Prior to joining Buffalo State, she was the vice president for public service and urban affairs at the University at Buffalo, where she served in various leadership capacities during a 23-year period. She earned a certificate from the Institute for Educational Management at Harvard University. She has also received many awards for her contributions to public higher education, for service to the community, and for her commitment to diversity.

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Stand for Israel, Stand for Reason

To: everyone "CON ISRAELE, CON LA RAGIONE" ENGLISH FOLLOWS L’aggressione a Israele dei firmatari del documento Jcall è ispirata da una visione miope della storia del conflitto arabo-israeliano, da una mancanza di percezione chiara del pericolo che Israele corre oggi di fronte a un grande attacco fisico e morale. E’ addirittura incredibile che personaggi intelligenti e colti come Alain Finkelkraut e Bernard-Henri Levy, invece di occuparsi dell’Iran che ben presto terrà tutto il mondo nel raggio della minaccia della sua bomba atomica, bamboleggino con l’idea che Benjamin Netanyahu sia il vero ostacolo alla pace, che l’impedimento essenziale per giungere a una risoluzione del conflitto sia un ipotetico, riprovevole atteggiamento israeliano. Sembra che gli intellettuali firmatari ignorino la realtà e inoltre che se ne infischino del contributo che il loro documento darà e sta già dando al movimento di delegittimazione senza precedenti che minaccia concretamente la vita di Israele. Voler spingere Israele a concessioni territoriali senza contraccambio significa semplicemente consegnarsi nelle mani del nemico senza nessuna garanzia: lo sgombero di Gaza, compiuto senza trattativa, ha portato risultati disastrosi, il territorio lasciato dagli abitanti di Gush Katif è diventato un’unica rampa di lancio per missili e terroristi; la trattativa di Ehud Barak, intesa a cedere a Arafat praticamente tutto quello che chiedeva, portò semplicemente all’orrore della seconda Intifada, con i suoi duemila morti uccisi da attentati suicidi. Lo sgombero della fascia meridionale del Libano nel 2000 ha rafforzato gli Hezbollah, li ha riempiti di missili, ha condotto alla guerra del 2006. Alain Finkelkraut, Bernard-Henri Levy e i loro amici sostengono di preoccuparsi per il futuro e la sicurezza d’Israele, ma di fatto ignorano l’elemento basilare che ha impedito ai processi di pace di andare in porto, ovvero il rifiuto arabo e palestinese di riconoscere l’esistenza stessa dello Stato d’Israele come dato permanente nell’area. Basterebbe che ogni mattina leggessero la stampa palestinese e araba e se ne renderebbero conto. Nessuna concessione territoriale di quelle che gli intellettuali francesi sembrano desiderare con tanta energia può garantire la pace, ma solo una rivoluzione culturale nel mondo arabo. E nessuno la chiede, nemmeno Obama che invece preme solo su Israele. E’ divenuta la moda di questo tempo. L’attacco a Netanyahu che si legge nell’appello di Jcall è volto a destrutturare la sua coalizione di destra. Ma la realtà è che non è mai contato nulla che un governo israeliano fosse di destra o di sinistra: i Page 28 of 155


Palestinesi hanno sempre comunque rifiutato ogni proposta di pace. Ma che Israele diventi ancora più piccolo non servirà a niente finché Abu Mazen non rinuncerà a intitolare le piazze al nome dell’arciterrorista Yehiya Ayash, finché il mondo palestinese non smetterà di distribuire caramelle quando viene ucciso un ragazzo ebreo in qualche ristorante, finché non accetterà la richiesta davvero minimalista di Netanyahu di riconoscere che lo Stato di Israele è lo Stato del popolo ebraico. Sembrano ignorare questo dato evidente anche gli intellettuali israeliani che hanno firmato un documento addirittura contro il premio Nobel Elie Wiesel che ha scritto una nobilissima lettera in sostegno di Gerusalemme come patria morale e storica del popolo ebraico. E’ una triste epidemia perbenista, con la quale probabilmente si pensa di fornire un po’ d’ossigeno ai movimenti pacifisti che in questi anni non ha saputo altro che fallire ripetutamente sullo scoglio della cultura dell’odio islamista e contribuire alla diffamazione di Israele. Ma non si arriverà a nessun processo di pace (e le generose offerte di Olmert rifiutate da Abu Mazen ne fanno fede) finché una larga parte del mondo non smetterà di sperare che la distruzione di Israele sia dietro l’angolo, sulla scia della nuova eccitazione islamista dell’Iran e dei suoi amici Siria, Hezbollah, Hamas tutti sempre più armati di armi letali, e non solamente di vane parole, come i firmatari dell’”appello alla ragione”. Ma anche le parole possono uccidere e distruggere. Non ci sfugge, di fronte a una così evidente ignoranza della politica della mano tesa di Netanyahu con il discorso di Bar Ilan e il congelamento di dieci mesi degli insediamenti, lo sblocco di molti check point e la promozione di importanti misure per agevolare l’economia palestinese, che sia presente nel “documento Finkelkraut” un traino obamista, un perbenismo da salotto buono cui spesso gli intellettuali non sanno dire no. Esso mette i nemici di Israele, e sono più di sempre e più agguerriti, nella condizione di delegittimare e attaccare lo Stato ebraico, dicendo: “Anche molti ebrei sono dalla nostra parte”. Se questo era lo scopo dei firmatari, lo hanno raggiunto. Primi firmatari/first signatures: Fiamma Nirenstein (giornalista e deputato), Giuliano Ferrara (direttore de Il Foglio), Paolo Mieli (presidente Rcs Libri, ex direttore del Corriere della Sera), Angelo Pezzana (giornalista, informazionecorretta.com e Libero), Ugo Volli (semiologo, Università di Torino), Shmuel Trigano (professore, Universités à Paris X-Nanterre), Giorgio Israel (Università La Sapienza), Giulio Meotti (giornalista, Il Foglio), Gianni Vernetti (deputato, ex Sottosegretario agli Esteri), Peppino Caldarola (giornalista), Alain Elkann (scrittore, consigliere Ministero Beni Culturali), Carlo Panella (giornalista, Il Foglio), Emanuele Ottolenghi (Senior Fellow, Foundation for the Defense of Democracies), Daniele Scalise (giornalista), Giancarlo Loquenzi (Direttore, l’Occidentale), Edoardo Tabasso (professore, Università di Firenze), Leonardo Tirabassi (presidente Circolo dei Liberi Firenze, Fondazione Magna Carta), Giacomo Kahn (Direttore mensile Shalom), Magdi Allam (parlamentare europeo), Luigi Compagna (senatore), David Cassuto (ex vicesindaco di Gerusalemme), Riccardo Pacifici (presidente Comunità Ebraica di Roma), Anita Friedman (Associazione Appuntamento a Gerusalemme), Leone Paserman (presidente della fondazione Museo della Shoah di Roma), Massimo Polledri (deputato), Enrico Pianetta (deputato, Presidente Associazione parlamentare di amicizia Italia-Israele), Alessandro Pagano (deputato), Dore Gold (President, Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs, former Ambassador of Israel to the UN), Norman Podhoretz (Writer, Editor-at-Large, Commentary Magazine), Michael Ledeen (Freedom Scholar, Foundation for Defense of Democracies), Barbara Ledeen (senior advisor, The Israel Project), Phyllis Chesler (Emerita Professor of Psychology and Women's Studies, City University of New York), Nina Rosenwald (Editor-in-Chief, www.hudson-ny.org), Harold Rhode (esperto di Medioriente, ex Pentagono) Caroline Glick (editorialista, Jerusalem Post), Rafael Bardaji (Foreign Policy director, FAES Foundation), Raffaele Sassun (Presidente Keren Kayemeth LeIsrael Italia), Max Singer (a founder and Senior Fellow, Hudson Institute), George and Annabelle Weidenfeld (President, Institute for Strategic Dialogue), Anna Borioni, (associazione Appuntamento a Gerusalemme), Efraim Inbar (Director, Begin-Sadat Center for Strategic Studies), George Jochnowitz (Professor emeritus of Linguistics, College of Staten Island) Page 29 of 155


"STAND FOR ISRAEL, STAND FOR REASON" The attack against Israel by the Jcall document is inspired by a short-sighted view of the history of the Arab-Israeli conflict. In fact, the signatories of this appeal do not have the clear perception of the global physical and moral threat to which Israel is currently exposed. It is indeed incredible that intelligent and cultivated people like Alain Finkelkraut and Bernard-Henri Levy - instead of dealing with Iran that will soon keep the whole world under the threat of the range of its atomic bomb - play with the idea that Benjamin Netanyahu is the true hindrance to peace, that the essential obstacle to a resolution of the conflict is a reproachable attitude of Israel. The intellectuals who have signed the French manifesto ignore history and don’t care about the help that it will give and is already giving to the unprecedented delegitimization threatening the life of Israel. Pushing Israel to concessions without rewards, simply means to surrender the enemy without any guarantee: the unilateral withdrawal from Gaza has produced disastrous consequences, the land Gush Katif inhabitants has been kicked out from, is since then a launching pad for missiles and terrorists; Ehud Barak’s concessions in Camp David, designed to give Arafat practically everything he was asking for, led to the horror of the second Intifada, with its two-thousand people killed by suicide terrorists, shootings and rocket attacks; the evacuation of Southern Lebanon in 2000 strengthened the Hezbollah, supplied them with more than 40,000 missiles and led to the 2006 war. Finkelkraut, Henri Levy and their fellow signatories claim that they are concerned about the future and the security of Israel. But they actually ignore the basic element that has prevented success of any peace process, namely the Arab and Palestinian refusal to recognize the very existence of the State of Israel as a permanent nation-state in the Middle East. This all-encompassing rejection of Israel’s right to exist is reflected day by day in the Palestinian and pan-Arab media. The attack against Netanyahu aims at breaking up his right wing coalition. But it actually never mattered whether an Israeli government was right or left wing: anyhow the Palestinians refused any proposal of peace. Israeli land concessions like the ones the French intellectuals advocate, will never bring peace. Only a cultural revolution in the Arab world can achieve it, but nobody asks for that, not even Obama, who devotes US great strength to pressure only Israel. This is the current fashion. Peace will not come because Israel becomes smaller. What will bring us closer to peace is if Palestinian Authority leader Mahmoud Abbas stops naming public squares after mass-murderers like Hamas bombmaker Yehiya Ayash; if the Palestinians stop passing out candies when Jewish families are murdered by suicide bombers in restaurants; and when the Arab world accepts Netanyahu’s modest request to recognize the State of Israel as the State of the Jewish people. This reality is ignored as well by the Israeli intellectuals who have signed a document attacking the Nobel Peace Prize laureate Elie Wiesel, who wrote a very noble letter to support Jerusalem as the spiritual core and historical homeland of the Jewish people. This sadly politically correct epidemic is probably designed to give some oxygen to the defeated pacifist movement that is actually able only to crash against the rock of the Islamist hatred culture and to defame Israel. But in this approach there is no contribution to any better future for the Middle East: the world must find the courage to face the new Islamist frenzy that springs from Iran, Syria, Hezbollah and Hamas and points to the destruction of Israel. Iran and its allies are of course arming themselves with lethal weapons, not with vain words, like those who signed “The Call for Reason”. But even words can kill and destroy. Page 30 of 155


The signatories of the J-Call manifesto show a blatant ignorance of the extended hand policy adopted by Netanyahu since his Bar Ilan speech in June 2009, the ten-months settlements freeze, the lifting of many check points and the adoption of important measures to ease the Palestinian economy. And you can clearly see that the “Finkelkraut document” has an Obama flavour, a prissy and respectable trendy attitude intellectuals are often unable to say no. This makes possible nowadays to the increasing number of Israel’s enemies to delegitimize the Jewish State by claiming that “even the Jews are with us”. If this was the signatories's goal, they have indeed achieved it.

http://www.PetitionOnline.com/israel48/petition.html

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Thursday, May 13, 2010

Posted on Sat, May. 08, 2010

GOP divided on gov race as polls favor Democrat By BETH FOUHY Associated Press Writer If the national political climate this year is supposed to favor Republicans, participants in the New York governor's race apparently haven't gotten the memo yet. Polls show Democrat Andrew Cuomo overwhelmingly favored at the start of the race to replace departing Gov. David Paterson, even though Cuomo, the state attorney general, hasn't even announced plans to run. Vying to challenge him are three Republicans engaged in a battle heavy on back room drama even as their candidacies barely register with voters. To be sure, New York isn't immune to the prevailing political environment; voters here are freighted with some of the highest taxes in the country, and frustration with state leaders in Albany runs high. "New York is a long-term blue state; everything, demographically, is moving that direction. But the way the economy is going, a Republican running against Albany could have a chance," said Richard Flanagan, a political science professor at the College of Staten Island. The question is whether any of the Republican candidates in this field is strong enough to capitalize on the public mood and slow the Cuomo juggernaut. There is Rick Lazio, a former Long Island congressman best known for losing badly to Democrat Hillary Rodham Clinton in the 2000 Senate race. Lazio has the support of top Republicans like former Gov. George Pataki and former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, who's scheduled to host a campaign fundraiser for Lazio at a midtown hotel Monday night. But Lazio's candidacy has been viewed as so weak by many party insiders that the Republican Governor's Association and state GOP chairman Ed Cox recruited Steve Levy, the Democratic Suffolk County executive, to switch parties and seek the GOP nod. Levy has won praise for trimming taxes and spending in populous Suffolk County, and began the race with a $4.1 million in the bank. But after he launched his campaign with great fanfare in March, he has failed to show any significant momentum just weeks before next month's state GOP convention where the party's nominee will be selected. Because of his recent party switch, state law requires that Levy win the support of at least 51 percent of convention delegates to run as a Republican - a threshold even his most ardent backers worry he may not meet. Lazio insists at least 51 percent of delegates have already committed to him - a claim Levy denies as he travels the state urging party leaders to shift their support. "I am in a much better position than I thought I would be, and we definitely have an ability to win this thing in June. That's all we could have ever expected," Levy said. Then there's Carl Paladino, a wealthy Buffalo real estate developer who pledged to spend $10 million of his own money on the race when he joined the field last month. Almost immediately, he was forced to explain pornographic and racially provocative e-mails he had sent to friends, including one depicting President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama dressed as a pimp and prostitute. Paladino has refused to disavow the e-mails, calling their release a Democratic smear. He attempted to change the subject this week in a YouTube video channeling Cox's late father-in-law, former President Richard Nixon, to ask why Cox, the GOP chairman, would support Levy.

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"Ed, have you lost your mind?" the Nixon character intones, suggesting Levy was "still peeling the Barack Obama bumper sticker off his car." Lazio, who has been campaigning for a year, has also expressed frustration over Levy's emergence and said he worried of unfair favoritism at the convention. "It's not been a perfect process," Lazio told The Associated Press. "I expect, and people will demand, that the rules at the convention will be evenhanded and not manipulated. If that's not the case, it's going to lead to a fracture that could be very damaging." The decision to back Levy has definitely been a gamble for Cox. He took over the moribund state party last September and immediately suffered a very public humiliation when a Democrat, Bill Owens, won an upstate Congressional seat long held by Republicans in a special election. Cox's support for Levy has also irked Mike Long, the influential chairman of the state Conservative Party who supports Lazio and has said publicly he could never back Levy. An endorsement from the Conservative Party is generally considered crucial for Republicans running for office in the state. Still, Cox insists the debate has been healthy for the party and will help select the best candidate to challenge Cuomo in the fall. "It's not a feud that's dividing the party, it's a discussion that's going on among party leaders about who is the best person to head the ticket and serve the state going forward," Cox told the AP.

Also Featured on: timesdaily.com ap.org kivitv.com klfy.com myfoxny.com taragana.com wnep.com woi-tv.com wsoctv.com troyrecord.com KXIILQJWRQSRVWFRP

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S.I. Tech student's art is going to Washington By Maureen Donnelly May 11, 2010, 7:10AM STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — A Staten Island high schooler will enjoy the high honor and distinct privilege of seeing her artwork exhibited in the U.S. Capitol in Washington. Melody Yuan of Staten Island Technical High School placed first in the Staten Island/Brooklyn section of the annual Congressional Art Competition, which was judged yesterday afternoon in the College of Staten Island, Willowbrook. And Kimberly Socci of Michael J. Petrides School and Irene Politis of Brooklyn’s New Utrecht High School, the runners-up, will have their creations exhibited at the Island and Brooklyn offices of Rep. Michael McMahon. “Last year’s submissions were extremely impressive and professional,” said McMahon, from whose congressional district the winners hail. “I am certain that this year’s submissions from our high school students ... will continue in that tradition.” The winning works were culled from 68 entries by students in 14 high schools. Miss Yuan’s artwork will become part of an exhibit in the U.S. Capitol, alongside the winners from the nation’s other congressional districts. The artwork was judged by members of CSI’s Performing and Creative Arts Department. Also attending the event was CSI President Dr. Tomas Morales. Honorable mention was achieved by Steven Russo, Tottenville High School; Stephanie Gourgiotis, New Utrecht High School, and Nico Sforza, Tottenville High School. twitter.com/siadvance -- facebook.com/statenislandadvance © 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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Locals and linguists argue that notorious Queens accent is fading away

Unisphere from a mile away.

BY Leigh Remizowski DAILY NEWS WRITER

"No offense to my brothers and sisters in Queens who feel that there is [a Queens accent], but I really don't think so," said Forest Hills-born actor Hank Azaria.

But one thing that won't prove you hail from the borough is the way you speak, insist e xperts and some notable Queens natives. That, or the Queens English is fast becoming a dead dialect.

Tuesday, May 11th 2010, 4:00 AM

"I didn't hear it, and I have a pretty sensitive ear," said Azaria, a chameleon of diction who voices several of the characters on "The Simpsons." But some locals beg to differ. "I would say I have a Queens accent," said Frank Barone, 62, a cobbler who has lived in Astoria for 44 years. "We all speak New York slang, but there's a slight difference between boroughs."

Corkery/NewsFran Drescher, who's title character was a hit on 'The Nanny,' once called the Queens accent 'melodic and mellifluous, with just a hint of nasality.'

There's a slew of ways to prove you're from Queens. Maybe you're a die-hard Mets fan, or you've perfected the art of crossing Queens Blvd., or you recognize the

Despite the fact that proud locals insist their borough has its own dialect - with drawn-out vowels and a distinct nasal sound - it's just a run-of-the-mill New York accent you're hearing on the streets of Queens, said the city's top linguists.

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"People claim that there is a difference, but no one has been able to show it," said Michael Newman, a linguist and Queens College professor. The idea of a Queens-specific accent originates with people like "All in the Family " character Archie Bunker or actress Fran Drescher, he said. "It's not an accurate description of the way people in Queens talk," Newman said, calling Drescher's distinct nasal twang "the classic New York accent." Drescher, who grew up in Flushing, disagreed. Her title character on the hit '90s TV sitcom "The Nanny" also hails from Queens. Drescher called the Queens accent "melodic and mellifluous, with just a hint of nasality." Life-long Astoria resident Panayiota Pharos said only Queens insiders can detect the borough's signature dialect because it's so subtle. "It's not so different from a generic New York accent," said Pharos, 30. "Words just

take a little longer to come out." Most linguists said the accent that Queens natives call their own has less to do with location and more to do with other factors. "It's influenced by ethnic groups, the people in the neighborhood around you and the social group you hang out with," said dialect coach Amy Stoller, who said teaching the Queens accent is one and the same with teaching a New York accent. "You think you have a Queens accent because you want to believe you have a Queens accent," she said. This desire has something to do with "positive local identity," said Kara Becker, a doctoral candidate at New York University, who has studied the New York accent on the lower East Side. "It may be a pride in your borough," she said, adding that people are actually just hearing the different speech patterns of different social classes. "It makes sense to associate the New York accent with the outer boroughs because there are more working-class people there," Becker said of the accent that has

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traditionally been associated with white, working-class immigrants. Andreas Charalambous, 71, said whichever it is - a Queens-specific or a general New York accent - it's disappearing. "The new generation has less of an accent," said Charalambous, who has lived in Queens for 50 years. Some experts say the New York accent is shifting to Long Island, and others believe it is just evolving. "It's not disappearing altogether," said George Jochnowitz, a linguistics professor at the College of Staten Island. For example, he said, fewer people are dropping the "r" at the end of words like "butter" and "father." "Accents change, that's part of the world," Jochnowitz said.

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Program to shed light on ‘Movies and Magic’ Matthew Solomon, author of “Disappearing Tricks: Silent Film, Houdini, and the New Magic of the Twentieth Century,” will present a program on magic and the beginnings of movie special effects at 1:30 p.m. May 15 at the Old Bridge Public Library Main Branch, Route 516 and Cottrell Road. Solomon, an associate professor in the Department of Media Culture at the College of Staten Island, City University of New York, will show short films and discuss the golden age of theatrical magic and silent films to reveal how professional magicians shaped the early history of cinema. For more information, call 732-721- 5600, ext. 5033, or log on to www.oldbridgelibrary. org.

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Relevant Public Relations President Barton Horowitz of Staten Island, N.Y., Chamber CEO Linda Baran Applauded By Congressman McMahon as SBA Honorees Date:5/13/2010 Horowitz, former senior business writer and columnist for the Staten Island Advance, is presented with the Small Business Administration's prestigious 2010 Financial Services Champion of the Year Award, New York district; Ms. Baran is recognized with the Women in Business Champion of the Year Award. Staten Island, NY (PRWEB) May 13, 2010 -- U.S. Congressman Michael E. McMahon has commended Barton Horowitz and Linda Baran, both from Staten Island, N.Y., for being among this year’s U.S. Small Business Administration award winners. In April, the New York District Office of the SBA honored six of the area’s top small-business advocates in celebration of National Small Business Week. At the April 23 awards ceremony in Manhattan, Horowitz, president of Relevant Public Relations LLC; Ms. Baran, president and CEO of the Staten Island Chamber of Commerce, and four others, were honored for being champions of small businesses. Horowitz was presented with the prestigious 2010 Financial Services Champion of the Year Award. Ms. Baran was recognized with the Women in Business Champion of the Year Award. “I applaud District Director Pravina Raghavan and her SBA staff for recognizing the contributions that Bart Horowitz and Linda Baran have made to Staten Island’s business community for the last two decades,” said Rep. Michael E. McMahon. “And I’m extremely proud that two of the six winners announced today by the SBA are from Staten Island. Bart and Linda are tireless advocates for small businesses and I look forward to working with them going forward to improve economic opportunities throughout the borough.” Both Islanders were been nominated for the awards by Dean L. Balsamini, director of the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at the College of Staten Island. “I am especially proud that the nominees I submitted on behalf of the SBDC at CSI were selected and honored … by the SBA,” Balsamini said. “… Both Linda Baran and Bart Horowitz have been strong advocates for small-business initiatives on Staten Island; and I congratulate them for their welldeserved awards.” Relevant Public Relations may be visited online at http://www.RelevantPR.com.

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Welcome Âť News Âť Archive Âť Campisano to direct Program in Teacher Preparation

Web Stories Campisano to direct Program in Teacher Preparation Posted May 14, 2010; 09:50 a.m.

by Ushma Patel

Christopher Campisano, the coordinator of higher education programs at the New Jersey Department of Education for the past four years, has been selected as the director of Princeton's Program in Teacher Preparation <http://teacherprep.reuniontechnologies.com> , effective July 12. He succeeds John Webb, who will retire at the end of the current academic year. In his current post, Campisano works with institutions of higher education across the state to ensure that teacher and school leader preparation programs maintain consistently high standards. He previously served for eight years as a program development specialist with the state Department of Education, overseeing professional development opportunities, curriculum development and program improvement services for school districts across the state. The Program in Teacher Preparation -- which is open to undergraduates, graduate Christopher Campisano students and alumni -- trains individuals to serve as teachers. In addition to Photo: Denise offering an undergraduate certificate, the program manages the Princeton Applewhite University Preparatory Program <http://www.princeton.edu/~tprep/pupp/> (PUPP), which helps low-income, high-achieving high school students prepare for college; QUEST <http://teacherprep.reuniontechnologies.com/dynamic.asp?id=quest> , a professional development program for local elementary and middle school teachers; and Teachers as Scholars <http://teacherprep.reuniontechnologies.com/dynamic.asp?id=teachers_as_scholars> , an intellectual enrichment program for local elementary and secondary teachers. Deputy Dean of the College Peter Quimby <http://www.princeton.edu/odoc/contacts/peter_quimby2/> , to whom Campisano will report, said that during the national search, Campisano "stood out for his sophisticated knowledge of teacher training, his ability to inspire passion in others, his deep understanding of accreditation and assessment policies and, above all, his unwavering dedication to improving public school education for young people across the state and nation." Campisano will serve as the fifth director in the program's 43-year history. Dean of the College Nancy Malkiel <http://www.princeton.edu/odoc/contacts/nancy_weiss_malkiel/> praised Webb, who has led the program since 2000. "John Webb has been an extraordinary leader and advocate for teacher preparation, both at Princeton University and beyond," she said. "During his tenure as director, among other signal achievements, the certificate program has been thoroughly revamped; the program has won national accreditation; Princeton

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has taken significant leadership in articulating standards for teacher preparation, both in the state of New Jersey and nationally; and the program has launched the highly successful Princeton University Preparatory Program." Miguel Centeno <http://www.princeton.edu/~cenmiga/> , professor of sociology and international affairs, who helped establish PUPP, was part of the search process for Webb's successor. He said Campisano "combines a deep commitment to teaching as a valued and incredibly significant profession with long experience" in policymaking. Campisano has been a visiting professor at the Graduate School of Education at Rutgers University, the College of Staten Island, Hunter College, the College of New Jersey and the University of Hawaii-Manoa. He began his career as a social studies teacher at North Brunswick Township High School. A graduate of the College of New Jersey (then Trenton State College), Campisano holds a doctorate in education from Teachers College at Columbia University. Back To Top <#top>

© 2010 The Trustees of Princeton University · Princeton, New Jersey 08544 USA, Operator: (609) 258-3000 · Copyright infringement · Web page feedback · Last update: May 14, 2010

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Grand marshals set for Pride Parade By Maureen Donnelly May 15, 2010, 6:59AM

Advance File Photo Professor Kathleen Cumiskey, at left, and Robin Garber will be the grand marshals of the sixth annual Staten Island LGBT Pride Parade & Festival, scheduled for June 5.

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- Robin Garber and Dr. Kathleen Cumiskey have been selected as the grand marshals of the sixth annual Staten Island LGBT Pride Parade & Festival, scheduled for June 5. Ms. Garber and Dr. Cumiskey will lead the parade, which steps off at noon from Central Avenue between Slosson Terrace and Hyatt Street, through the streets of St. George. The festival will run from 1 to 5 p.m. in Tompkinsville Park, at the corner of Victory Boulevard and Bay Street. Food, music and entertainment, coupled with community resources, information tables and vendor tables, will be available throughout the day. The grand marshals will be installed during the Staten Island Pride kickoff on May 22 at 7 p.m. in the Staten Island Museum, 75 Stuyvesant Pl. The fee is $3. The event is sponsored by the Staten Island Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender (LGBT) Center, an initiative of Community Health Action of Staten Island. Ms. Garber and Dr. Cumiskey were married in Canada in 2006. They founded Bent Pages in Stapleton in 2008; it is currently the only LGBT bookstore in New York City. They are founding members of Staten Island Pride Events, an organization that holds LGBT events throughout the year. Ms. Garber helped found the College of Staten Island's LGBT Alliance in the early 1990s, was an educator for the Staten Island AIDS Task Force (now Community Health Action of Staten Island) and coordinator of GMHC's Lesbian AIDS Project, before becoming a special education teacher in 2003.

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Dr. Cumiskey earned her undergraduate degree in psychology at Rutgers University, where her honors thesis was on homophobia and its impact on social interaction. She was also active in establishing Queer CUNY. She holds a Ph.D. and is currently an assistant professor in the psychology department and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies program at CSI, where she is the faculty adviser to the College's Gay/Straight Alliance. For more information or to register to participate or to be a vendor, e-mail siprideparade@gmail.com or call 718-808-1360 or 718-808-1351. Or consult www.silgbtcenter.org. twitter.com/siadvance -- facebook.com/statenislandadvance

Š 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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MAY 15, 2010, 11:00 AM

Urban Forager | A Purse With Herbal Remedies By AVA CHIN

Photographs by Ava Chin for The New York Times The aerial seeds of shepherd’s purse.

A few weeks ago, Louisa Shafia, a chef and author of “Lucid Food,” contacted me after encountering a middle-age Chinese couple foraging for an unidentified green in a desolate area of Williamsburg, Brooklyn. When I met up with her a few days later, I took one look at the plant’s heart-shape seedpods, basal rosette formation and white, fourpetal flowers and knew it was shepherd’s purse. I recently ran across whole patches of delicate-looking shepherd’s purse at the College of Staten Island, where I teach alongside footpaths. Like most plants in the city, it is in flower early this year. While the tiny white flowers probably didn’t garner any prizes during Wildflower Week, the plant as a whole is a bit of a curiosity — edible and medicinal, with its aerial parts reminiscent of a Calder mobile. Shepherd’s purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris) is a member of the mustard family, making it related to broccoli, cabbage and watercress. Though native to Europe, it is found across the United States, and is considered invasive in California, Maryland, and Virginia. The first time the plant was brought to my attention, I loved the whimsical, sculptural quality of its flower stalk, but had trouble identifying it by the rosette base alone — at times it can be mistaken for young dandelion greens, if one is not paying attention. Unlike dandelion leaves, which are serrated and pointing back toward its center, shepherd’s purse leaves are deeply lobed and directed horizontally. If you ever having trouble identifying it, wait until the plant flowers and has gone to seed (i.e., now). The seeds have long stalks, are shaped like a heart and Flower stalk and seed pouches flattened like someone had pressed it between the pages of a in the wilds of Williamsburg, Brooklyn. book. The plant supposedly got its name because its seed pouches resemble the bags medieval shepherds carried, but having grown up in Queens, I will have to trust the common name and leave the history of pastoral fashion to other experts. From a culinary standpoint, it’s a little late in the season to make much use of the edible leaves (before the plant flowers is considered best), which are bit like cabbage in taste and texture when steamed or blanched. The seeds, which taste a bit peppery on the tongue,

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have traditionally been used to add a spicy kick to meals. After doing some research, Ms. Shafia discovered the leaves are sometimes used in northern Chinese dumplings, and that was perhaps why the couple she encountered were foraging for it. In old European folk and Chinese medicine, the plant has a long history of stopping bleeding, which is another reason why it’s often collected. Those who have gardens may know how hardy shepherd’s purse is — having to weed it before it goes to seed (it’s impervious to mowing, no matter how frequent, as a means of preventing propagation). But before you yank it out, consider the benefits of this lovely plant before it hits the compost.

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Cormac Gordon: Nice guy Matty White had a tough side too By Cormac Gordon May 16, 2010, 8:22AM

Staten Island Advance photo by Bill Lyons Staten Island Sports Hall of Famer Matty White with his grandsons, from left, Patrick, Ryan and Kieran Hurley after he received the History Award at the 2008 Staten Island Advance All Star Dinner.

There was a steady stream of people this week stopping by the Hanley Funeral Home on New Dorp Lane to let the White family know how much they thought of Island basketball legend Matty White, who passed away at 74 on Monday. Matty White coached at high schools all over New York, from the Bronx to the Lower East Side and onto Staten Island. And that was before he put in a couple of decades as an assistant to, first, Howie Ruppert, then Tony Petosa, at College of Staten Island. And from the traffic at Hanley’s, and the stories you heard there, you could draw the conclusion that the big, soft-spoken Island native left quite a legacy. Which he absolutely did. White was exactly what a mentor for young people should be, which is a scarce commodity find these days. But an old black-and-white photograph that someone had brought with them to the wake — a picture of a young, raw-boned Georgetown star wrestling for a loose ball with LaSalle All-America Tom Gola — told another part of the Matty White story.

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Sure, the Tottenville native was a gentleman, quiet and thoughtful and genuine in an era of far too many it’s -all-about-me coaching types. But White was also a pretty determined guy — some might even say stubborn — when he decided that was the best route. Take the great CSI parking brouhaha, for instance. This was years ago, and White had not yet affixed his annual college parking permit to the old jalopy he used to get from his New Dorp home to the CSI campus. He had the permit. It was right there on the dashboard, for anyone to see. But it wasn’t stuck to the window in the usual manner. One of the CSI security people took the oversight seriously enough to slap a summons on the car. Matty was furious (or what passed for furious for a guy who never raised his voice or lost his smile, not even when some ref was blowing a call in the final seconds of a close game). He tried to reason with the CSI folks about the parking issue, as was his style. But when they turned a deaf ear, he left his car in the parking lot, summons and all, in protest. He took a couple of buses home to New Dorp that night. The next day he once more pleaded his case with the authorities. Again, he didn’t get any satisfaction. So he left the car in the parking lot once again, and took the bus home. After a few days of more of the same, he arrived on campus one afternoon to find that the security people had put a boot on one of his wheels. Now he couldn’t move the car even if he’d wanted to. So he left it there in the CSI lot ... for several months. All the while he took buses and negotiated with CSI parking people. But no one seemed to want to budge, least of all, quiet, soft-spoken Matty White. By the time spring rolled around, someone finally decided the old wreck with the boot on it in the middle of the parking area was an eyesore. So they told White they were dismissing all penalties and freeing the hostage car. The parking powers had caved! He’d won! The boot was removed and White was told he was free to take the car. Matty White said thank you. But by then he’d decided he hadn’t been 100-percent right, after all. Now he wanted to pay the original cost of the summons because, well, he thought that would be the right thing to do. (For those interested, Matty White’s favorite charity is the CSI Association Tournament of Heroes.)

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United States Small Business Administration honors 2 Islanders By Staten Island Advance May 16, 2010, 6:36AM STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- Linda Baran of Great Kills and Barton Horowitz of Bulls Head were recently honored in Manhattan by the New York District Office of the United States Small Business Administration (SBA). The two are among a select group of individuals lauded by the SBA during the 2010 National Small Business Week Awards Ceremony. Ms. Baran is president and CEO of the Staten Island Chamber of Commerce. She was presented with the SBA District's Women in Business Champion Award. Ms. Baran has worked at the Chamber for the past 22 years. In May 2004, she was elected by the chamber's board of directors as the first woman president and chief executive officer of the organization. Horowitz is president of Graniteville-based Relevant Public Relations. He is a former Advance business writer and columnist. He received the Financial Services Champion Award for the positive impact he made on the Island's business community during his years at the Advance. Both Islanders were nominated for the prestigious recognition by Dean L. Balsamini, director of the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at the College of Staten Island, Willowbrook. Commerce group sites Frank Mandarino Dr. Frank Mandarino of Morganville, N.J., received the 2010 Best of Staten Island Award from the United States Commerce Association (USCA). Dr. Mandarino received the award in the Chiropractors Category of the USCA for the second year in a row. Of the winners selected, only one in 70 recipients qualified for the honor. Dr. Mandarino recently opened a new office in Grant City. Various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the winner in each category. Winners were determined based on information gathered both internally by the USCA and data provided by third parties. The USCA is a New York-based organization funded by local businesses operating in towns, large and small, across America. Their Best of Local Business Award Program recognizes outstanding local businesses throughout the country. Each year, the USCA identifies companies that they believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in the local community and business category. These are companies that enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and community. Global Relief Fund names board member Daniel Kennedy of Manhattan has been named to the advisory board of The Global Medical Relief Fund (GMRF). Kennedy is an award-wining public relations professional who has strong international public relations expertise as well as a clear understanding of GMRF's socially conscious mission. Currently, he heads Daniel Kennedy Communications Services. His PR, media relations and marketing

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communications work have included clients and projects in New York, New England, the Midwest, England, Austria, Romania, The Vatican, Latvia and Afghanistan. He worked previously as director of media relations for Simon & Schuster publishing, as vice president for marketing communications for Ruder Finn Public Relations and as a senior communications project manager for JCPenney. Kennedy has worked for 20 years serving business, travel, design and branding clients. His work has called attention to war-exiled Bosnian refugee textile artisans. His PR consultancy also created and launched the award-winning, socially conscious brand trademark AfghanMark to benefit thousands of Afghan women carpet makers. Kennedy first met Elissa Montanti, executive director of GMRF, in 1997, when he was the U.S. PR advisor to Austrian Airlines, which provided air travel for children being aided by GMRF. Since then, he has volunteered to assist on GMRF projects and programs. The non-profit, non-partisan Global Medical Relief Fund, located in Fort Wadsworth, aids children who have been injured due to war, natural disaster or illness. Since its founding in 1997, GMRF has brought 90 children to the U.S. from Europe, Africa, the Middle East and Asia for treatment, surgery and prosthetic limb fittings. twitter.com/siadvance -- facebook.com/statenislandadvance Š 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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Annadale resident sworn in as Court of Claims judge By Tom Wrobleski May 19, 2010, 7:50AM STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Democratic attorney Wayne Ozzi was sworn in yesterday as a member of the state Court of Claims. “It’s a wonderful day,” said Ozzi, 57, an Annadale resident who was principal law clerk to Surrogate Robert Gigante. “I feel privileged to be part of the bench.” The state Senate approved Ozzi’s appointment by a voice vote in Albany yesterday. He was nominated to the court earlier this year by Gov. David Paterson. As is custom, Ozzi was made an acting Supreme Court justice in order to help with case backlogs in that court. He has been assigned to Manhattan Supreme Court and eventually could serve on Staten Island.

Advance File Photo Wayne Ozzi could eventually wind up serving on Staten Island.

Ozzi was president-elect of the Richmond County Bar Association this year but has now withdrawn his name from consideration for that post. He chaired the group’s Ethics Committee for more than two decades. He began serving with Gigante when Gigante was elected to Supreme Court in 2000. Ozzi previously had served as law assistant to the late Civil Court Judge John Cannizzaro, beginning in 1981.

Ozzi also has served as a Supreme Court Law Department supervising court attorney and as a referee, and as an arbitrator in Small Claims Court. He ran unsuccessfully against Republican Joseph Maltese for a Civil Court seat in 1991. Ozzi taught business law at the College of Staten Island and St. John’s University. He received his law degree from the University of Dayton in 1978 and a master’s degree in law from New York University in 1983.

© 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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Get in a bid at the New York Center's auction By Staten Island Advance May 23, 2010, 8:30AM STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- The New York Center for Interpersonal Development's (New York Center) will hold its third annual auction fundraiser June 9 from 6 to 10 p.m. at the Great Hall at Snug Harbor Cultural Center and Botanical Garden, Livingston. Tickets are $40 each and include dinner and wine, along with the main event, a silent and live auction of a variety of items. To reserve your ticket, contact Amy Lavelle at 718-9474121 or alavelle@nycid.org. Auction items include a vacation for four to Mexico, a variety of sports items, a guitar autographed by Bon Jovi, lunch with Congressman Michael McMahon and tour of capitol, and jewelry. The honorees are: Tomas D. Morales of Todt Hill, president of College of Staten Island; Staten Island Community Television; John T. Tuminaro, principal of Tottenville High School; and Joann Calabro of Great Kills, assistant principal at Tottenville and program administrator of Staten Island Young Adult Borough Center, an alternative high school program offered through a partnership with New York Center. Restaurants donating menu specialties for the event are: Sushi Excellent, New Dorp; Cargo CafÊ and Karl's Klipper, both in St. George; Killmeyer's Old Bavarian Inn, Charleston; and Brurmeister's CHOW and Pastosa, West Brighton. New York Center provides youth, community, and professional development programs and dispute resolution services. It operates a training institute to teach problem-solving and conflict resolution skills. The center also administers the Community Dispute Resolution Center program providing mediation and arbitration services as a court-approved alternative to criminal prosecution and civil litigation. Š 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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SportsÂ

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College of Staten Island captures CUNY baseball title with 14-8 win over Baruch By Jim Waggoner May 01, 2010, 10:08PM

Staten Island Advance photo by Hilton Flores CSI shortstop Mark Glennerster fires over Baruch baserunner Manuel Guerrero to complete the double play Saturday in Brooklyn.

Pat Gale’s smile seemed like it could have stretched from the championship celebration between home plate and the pitcher’s mound at MCU Park to nearby Nathan’s, where the lines had spilled to the street earlier in the day on a sun-soaked Coney Island afternoon.

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The College of Staten Island’s star pitcher/hitter had enjoyed the wild seven-hour ride that eventually resulted in a CUNY Conference baseball title with a 14-8 victory over Baruch, giving the Dolphins their school -record 30th win. "We’re really enjoying this moment," said Gale, the conference’s regular-season MVP. "We fell short last year and we really wanted to bounce back strong. It means a lot to us. "And hopefully it’s another step along the way to bigger things." It’s no secret that CSI second-year head coach Mike Mauro has his eyes on the program’s first NCAA Division III regional invitation in nearly two decades, and the Dolphins hope that their stunning 10-8 loss in Saturday’s championship-round opener won’t come back to haunt them. "We’re 30-10 ... this is a steppingstone," said Mauro of the CUNY crown. "We have our eyes on the bigger picture. This is nice, but we want to get to the regionals. We’re still knocking on the door. We’re not there yet, but I think we’re close." It won’t hurt that Mauro’s on the New York State Region selection committee which will convene via conference call two weeks from Sunday to determine the NCAA field. In the meantime, the Dolphins can count on an ECAC Metro tourney bid when the field is announced next weekend — and a week’s layoff after Wednesday’s makeup game against Yeshiva. Defending champion Baruch spoiled CSI’s bid for a perfect tourney with a five-run ninth-inning rally keyed by Monsignor Farrell product Peter Dinolfo’s three-run triple. His two-out shot tied the score at 8-8 and another Farrell product, John Avona, drove in the go-ahead run with a single. "It happens ... you can’t win every game," said Mauro. "We weren’t panicking ... we felt we were still in the driver’s seat." The Dolphins scored five runs in the first inning and six more in the second to claim an early 11-3 lead in the deciding game. The first five batters greeted David Chestnut with hits, with Tom DeWaters, Joe Cassano and Gale delivering RBI hits before Steve Hession and Devon DiCasoli both walked with the bases loaded. Sal Todaro, Cory Sullivan and Matt Oetting had RBI hits in the second, and the Dolphins went to Tom Matson after the Bearcats had pulled to within 11-7. Matson allowed one run in 3-and-a-third innings of bullpen work. "It’s a great group of guys, we’re very close," said Gale, who went 4-for-5 with six walks in the twinbill. "We really wanted to win for each other." It was the Dolphins’ 14th CUNY title, a record, and their second in three seasons. They’ll get a chance to win their second ECAC Metro title (the first was in 2000) and possibly use that as a springboard into the NCAAs. NOTES: Sullivan, a freshman third baseman from Tottenville HS, was named tourney MVP ... Mauro was named CUNY Coach of the Year and Paul Ciccazzo was Pitcher of the Year ... Dinolfo went 3-for-5 in the opener with four RBI ... CSI led the opener 8-4 after seven innings before Baruch’s rally ... Baruch ended the season with a 14-21 record.

© 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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Longtime Madison HS softball coach Bill Dumont out to build a winner at Brooklyn College BY Lillian Rizzo DAILY NEWS SPORTS WRITER Tuesday, May 4th 2010, 4:00 AM

On a recent afternoon in Brooklyn, Bill Dumont propped himself up against a chain-link fence, hands behind his head, looking a little like he was taking a catnap while his players collected the yellow softballs that had scattered across the field at Avenue U and E. 59th St. "Hey Coach, are you falling asleep on me?" outfielder Annie Brown said, as she stretched out on the diamond. "No, just relaxing," Dumont said, opening his eyes. Coming from the coach who was known for his hovering stance, furrowed brow and red-faced screams across the field during the 17 years he was leading the successful softball program at Madison HS, that seemed like an unlikely response. It seems that Dumont, 47, is no longer the fiery high school coach to whom everyone grew accustomed during his years in Marine Park, Brooklyn. He still teaches chemistry and coaches two other sports at Madison, but now he is running the softball program at Brooklyn College, a job he accepted last June. Those who have known him in both capacities have been saying that Bill Dumont seems like a different man. Dumont has taken himself out of his comfort zone. In the process, he seems to have dialed down his demeanor. Andrea Tepfer, a Baruch College junior pitcher who played at Susan Wagner HS, remembers Dumont as a coach who "knew everything" about the game. Her own high school coach, Marco Altieri, and Dumont were friendly and used to chat often. "He wasn't afraid to speak his mind and he would always voice his opinion," Tepfer said of Dumont. "Now, he seems a lot more laid back." Tepfer is not the only one who says she sees a different Dumont. "I see his behavior and attitude improved," said College of Staten Island coach Stella Porto. "It is a maturity thing; he is different. I used to be at the fields (recruiting), and he would be screaming and yelling. Now, he is very calm." Brooklyn College asked Dumont to take over its floundering softball program after the Bulldogs went 3-9 in the CUNY Athletic Conference last season (6-21 overall). Dumont didn't jump on the opportunity the instant it was offered. In addition to a slight pay cut, Dumont was about to walk away from a situation that took years to build. His stature at Madison was almost too much to give up. There were girls whom he'd molded since their freshman year; he had a field that was only a few years old. Most importantly, he was the backbone of a highly accomplished program, one that had just played an undefeated season and been eliminated from the PSAL playoffs in a heartbreaking loss to Tottenville. "I had everything in Madison," said Dumont, who guided the Knights to the PSAL playoffs seven times, led them to three title games and notched his 600th career coaching win last spring. "I left a program that was top-notch." Dumont's behavior at Madison was decidedly different. "He's very detailed; he's very hands on; he's very proactive," said Anthony Rodriguez, a Baruch College assistant who got to know Dumont when he went to Madison to recruit. "You always hear him yelling instructions from the

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dugout." Brooklyn College is only a short bus ride up Bedford Ave., but the change of locale brings a world of difference. Here, the coach has a chance to start from scratch. The college will be replacing tiny Monsignor Farrell Field with a new, million-dollar stadium in 2011, and Dumont wants the new digs to be home to a champion. Coaching in college also relieves Dumont of many of his former pressures. As a high school coach, Dumont had to spend much of his time at bake sales and other fund-raisers. Now, he no longer worries about how his team will pay its expenses; the Bulldogs have their uniform and equipment costs paid by Nike, and the college covers the rest. The change in his players' age has also made a difference. "I don't feel like a high school coach anymore," Dumont said. "At Madison, I had to teach them how to be studentathletes." College players already grasp the fundamentals and have the ability, Dumont said. He is just there to refine it. Already, he's helped the Bulldogs to get better; they finished the regular season 16-15-1 (7-7 CUNYAC). They'll open the conference playoffs as the fourth seed and face No.5 John Jay tomorrow. The coach could be displaying a facade, trying to appear relaxed simply because he has yet to find his place in the new organization. Dumont, for his part, said he sees little change. "I rarely yell during the games," he said. "Am I intense? Yes. I give directions and that's why I get paid." It was Danielle Maresca, Dumont's former player and assistant, who helped convince Dumont to leave. She graduated from Madison in 2007 and had just finished her first season with Brooklyn as a sophomore (she transferred from Hunter). "She's probably the reason I am here," Dumont said of Maresca. "She sort of prodded me, pushed me, nudged me." Dumont was taking control of a program that longed for his leadership, but he's the first person to say he was nervous. "I had major fears and doubts and all of those 'What am I doing?' moments," he said. The main source of his anxiety was the change in age group. He was no longer teaching 13-year-olds; now, he would coach women. To help make the adjustment, Dumont turned to his former players. In addition to Maresca, he coached senior Jenna Ferrara and freshman Danielle Brovokas. Dumont only serves as a hands-on coach to the pitchers. He offers encouragement or makes an occasional joke during practice, but he prefers to leave the instruction to assistant Frank Izzo, who also worked with him at Madison. When Maresca steps up to the plate, however, Dumont doesn't hold back, perhaps owing to the friendship they built at Madison. Dumont met Maresca before high school, when she participated in summer clinics that he ran as part of the Big Apple Games. "She'd play six hours a day in 90- degree heat," Dumont said. "We both love softball; we can each play 10 hours a day." Dumont has placed Maresca on a pedestal, but he said he's working to build bonds with others. Samantha Lombardi began practicing with him daily during the fall, and he said the commitment of Brown, a graduate

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of Bishop Kearney HS, has been comparable to that of a Madison player. "He treats us all the same: He tells us we have to be little Dumonts," said Brown, a sophomore, describing the coach's interaction with the girls who didn't play for him in high school. Dumont may have altered his disposition, but his mentality is largely unchanged. He still promotes a feeling of family. He encourages the team to function as a clique, similar to the one that always existed among the softball players at Madison, and he's already secured approval to take the team to Walt Disney World next year, as he did each spring with his high school players. Dumont didn't really feel like the coach of the Bulldogs, he said, until he was approached by a player he hadn't already coached. "Samantha Lombardi said 'I want you to teach me like a Madison girl,'" he said. "And I said, 'Okay the gloves are off.' " At that moment, Dumont said, he started to feel like the coach he'd always been. Dumont grew up in Bensonhurst and attended Madison, and although he never played for the school, he played baseball for several travel teams in Brooklyn. He earned a Bachelor's degree in education at NYU, and later added Master's degrees from Brooklyn College and LIU. After he became a teacher at Madison, he hoped to begin coaching baseball, but the first job that opened up was with the JV softball team. Dumont jumped on it, thinking he'd later switch to baseball; soon, he realized that he felt more comfortable where he was. "I discovered softball was a hidden passion," he said. For years, Madison served as an outlet for Dumont to indulge the passion that he could not always share with his own family in Wantaugh, L.I. He tried to interest his sons, Scott and Brian, in baseball but said "they made it clear it wasn't for them." Brian, 15, prefers to play his guitar, and Scott, 19, is an honors student at Baruch College. Happily for Dumont, his 13-year-old daughter, Sarah, has developed a love for the sport. "She didn't know (she loved softball); she was brainwashed," Dumont said. "I gave her a softball instead of a rattle." Five years ago, Dumont founded the Long Island Greyhounds, a travel softball team, for Sarah, who's now in seventh grade. Dumont's wife, Barbara, never cared much for softball either, but Dumont said that she has developed a rooting interest. Dumont said he'd love to help mold Brooklyn College into a winner, but he was unable to say how long he'd stick with it. Trumping his passion for winning softball games, Dumont said, is his desire to watch his daughter grow up. That ultimately could be the main reason he would retire. "I want to see her play more," Dumont said of Sarah. "I can't (coach) forever."

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Updated: Sat., May. 8, 2010, 2:44 AM

CHSAA baseball roundup: Perez tosses no-hitter for Mount vs. Spellman By DYLAN BUTLER

Last Updated: 2:44 AM, May 8, 2010 Posted: 1:32 AM, May 8, 2010

Marcos Perez wasn’t perfect, but he was pretty darn close to it. The senior ace tossed a no-hitter to lead Mount St. Michael to a 3-0 victory against Cardinal Spellman Friday afternoon in The Bronx. It was the Mountaineers first no-no since Tommy Cardona accomplished the feat in 2008. “He’s getting better and better every time he goes out there,” Mount coach Wally Stampfel said. “If we make the playoffs, obviously he’s going to throw the first playoff game. Despite our record, we may wind up being a team you don’t want to face in the playoffs.” Perez faced the minimum through six innings, as a first-inning walk was erased by a caught stealing, before he also issued a free pass in the seventh inning. Spellman (2-10) nearly broke up the no-no in the seventh, but a line drive over third base landed just foul. Perez fanned eight and the Mountaineers played flawless defense behind him. “He hadn’t pitched in 10 days and he was just overpowering early,” Stampfel said. “He didn’t throw many curves and his fastball had to be in the mid-80s. He seemed to get stronger and stronger as the game went on.” Perez’s no-hitter overshadowed a brilliant varsity debut by freshman shortstop Chris Frederique, who was 3-for-3 with three RBIs in a critical win for Mount, which improved to 4-9. Regis 4, Xavier 1: Chris Bates allowed one unearned run on two hits, striking out seven with one walk in six innings. Dan Morris had a pair of walks, a single and scored two runs, Mike Hansen went 2-for-3 and had a clutch two-run single in the fourth, Rafael Dilones was 2-for-3 and Jake Kinsley was 2-for-3 with an RBI double for Regis (8-5) Friday afternoon in Red Hook, Brooklyn. Xavier fell to 8-5. St. Raymond 9, Lasalle 0: Anthony Colon allowed just one hit in four innings, striking out eight, James Santiago fanned six in three no-hit innings of relief and had two hits, one RBI and one stolen base and Richie Sanchez had three hits, two RBIs and two stolen bases for red-hot St. Raymond (9-4), which has won five of its last six games. Lasalle fell to 3-10. St. Joseph by the Sea 4, Moore Catholic 2: Frank Stavola carried a no-hitter into the seventh inning, allowing two earned runs on three hits, striking out four with two walks, and Peter Padovano drove in a pair of runs in a four-run fifth inning to lead St. Joseph by the Sea (9-1) Friday in Huguenot. John Baggs allowed four unearned runs on four hits, striking out seven and walking one for Moore (5-6), which has lost five in a row. Bishop Ford 6, St. Edmund 2: Starter Helbert Estevez allowed one earned run on two hits, striking out four and walking three in 5 1/3 innings, and Matt Molbury allowed just one hit and walked two in 1 2/3 innings of scoreless relief for Bishop Ford (8-4) Friday afternoon at the Parade Grounds in Brooklyn. Jonathan Pineiro was 2-for-4, including a two-run double in the sixth inning. Molbury was 2-for-3 with two runs scored, Andrew King was 2-for-2 with two runs scored and an RBI and Anthony Foust had an RBI for the Falcons. St. Edmund fell to 3-8. Monsignor Farrell 5, St. Peter’s 3: Trailing 2-1, Farrell exploded for four runs in the bottom of the sixth inning to defeat upset-minded St. Peter’s Thursday at the College of Staten Island. Kevin Kelly drove in the game-tying run and scored the go-ahead run. The Lions (8-2) added two more runs on a wild pitch and an infield error. Chris Mione was sharp, allowing two earned runs on five hits, striking out four with no walks. Gary Boardman closed out the game to earn the save. Don Pagano allowed four earned runs on eight hits in 5 1/3 innings for St. Peter’s, which fell to 2-9. St. Raymond 8, All Hallows 6: Jonathan Crucey had two hits and two RBIs, Rob Robles drove in a pair of runs and Kevin Juarbe allowed four runs in five innings for the Ravens Thursday afternoon at Ravens Field in The Bronx. All Hallows fell to 5-7. OTHER SCORES Fordham Prep 12, Salesian 0 Christ the King 5, Monsignor McClancy 4 (nine innings) dbutler@nypost.com

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Champion streak ends By Timothy Petropoulos Sports Editor Published: Monday, May 10, 2010

For the first time in the last seven seasons, the Bearcats will not end the season as champions. They lost to the No. 1 seed College of Staten Island, 5-2, last Tuesday night at the U.S. Tennis Center to end their streak of CUNY Athletic Conference championships at six. The Bearcats youth and inexperience, combined with injuries, was too much to overcome when facing the dominate Dolphins According to Baruch Sports Information the No. 1 seed Dolphins started by winning all three doubles to jump out to a 3-0 advantage against the No. 4 seed Bearcats. But Baruch kept it close, forcing tiebreakers in the first and third sets. In the singles competition, Staten Island won at first singles and eventually clinched the victory by winning at second singles.

Denis Gostev

The Men’s tennis team lost in the CUNYAC championship for the first time in seven years, ending their streak of championships.

Baruch attempted a valiant comeback by winning at fourth and sixth singles, but the match was halted because Staten Island already had enough points to win. “Don’t sleep [on Baruch],” said sophomore Steven Zak in an e-mail. “We’ll be back next year and start the streak all over again. I promise.”

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Baseball Earns Berth To ECAC Metro Tournament 5/10/2010 Contact: Ben Badua CAPE COD, Mass. (May 10, 2010) – The Stevens Institute of Technology baseball team, riding an eight-game win-streak, earned its second-consecutive berth in the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC) Metro Tournament, after finishing the season with a 20-18 overall mark. The fourth-seeded Ducks will host fifth-seeded SUNY Old Westbury (22-21) in opening round of the single-elimination tournament. First-pitch is set for 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 12 at Dobbelaar Baseball Field in Hoboken, N.J. The Ducks defeated the Panthers, 10-3, in a match-up earlier this season. Junior Russ Grimes went 3-for-5 with two homeruns to lead Stevens’ offensively – setting the Ducks’ single-season mark. Senior Anthony Andrews tied a single-game record with five hits and four RBI on the day, while junior catcher Denis Ackermann had a pair of hits. Sophomore T.J. Alcorn and Mike Pagliaro combined for four hits, three runs scored, and an RBI, while senior Mark Rasulo and sophomores Corey Linden, and Sal Amato also recorded hits in the win. Jason Kondra (East Syracuse, N.Y.), Melvin Simmons (Bronx, N.Y.), and Giovanni Jimenez (Brentwood, N.Y.) each had two hits apiece to lead Old Westbury. Freshman Mark Poinsett moved to 4-0 on the season, going five and two thirds, surrendering just two earned runs, while Panthers’ junior starter Marvin Rosario (Lynbrook, N.Y.) fell to 6-3 on the year. Top-seeded Fairleigh Dickinson University-Florham (31-10) will host eighth-seeded Ramapo College (19-17) in Madison, N.J. in one of the day’s other quarterfinal games, while third-seeded College of Staten Island (31-10) of the City University of New York Athletic Conference plays host to Richard Stockton College (19-19) – seeded sixth. The tournament’s final first round match up will pit second-seeded Rutgers-Newark (22-19) against seventh-seeded Rutgers-Camden (20-18). The semifinal round is slated for Saturday, May 15. Should the Ducks advance they would face the winner of No. 1 FDU-Florham/No. 8 Ramapo, while the winner of No. 3 CSI/No. 6 Richard Stockton takes on No. 2 RutgersNewark/No. 7 Rutgers-Camden in the other semifinal matchup. The championship game of the 2010 ECAC Metro Tournament is scheduled for Sunday, May 16. Last season, Stevens defeated the College of Mount St. Vincent, 4-3, in the opening round before scoring a 7-6 victory in the semifinals over Rutgers-Newark – thanks to a Grimes solo homerun in the top of the tenth. The Ducks would fall to Ramapo, 9-6, in the championship game.

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Bearcats come one game short of repeat By Timothy Petropoulos Sports Editor Published: Monday, May 10, 2010  

After making a remarkable ninth inning comeback to force a game seven in the CUNY Athletic Conference tournament, 10-8, Baruch fell just one game short of repeating as champions when they lost to the College of Staten Island, 14-8, on April 30th at MCU Park in Coney Island. After losing the first game of the CUNYAC tournament to the Dolphins, the Bearcats fought back by beating City College and John Jay to advance to the finals were CSI, who had beaten the Bearcats four consecutive times this season, were waiting yet again. “It was tough to lose four games in a row to them, it was really tough, our egos were definitely bruised,” said sophomore David Gega. With the Bearcats down 8-5 in the bottom of the ninth, it looked like the Dolphins were headed for their fifth straight victory when the Bearcats came roaring back. Sophomore Aldo Altamirano was hit by a pitch to lead off the inning, followed by singles by junior Ben RioFrio and senior David Chestnut to load the bases. After strikeouts by sophomore Thomas Daly and junior Richard Melendez, CUNYAC Co-Rookie of the Year freshman Peter Dinolfo hit a base-clearing triple to tie the game.

Denis Gostev I The Ticker

The Bearcats clinched back -to-back playoff berths, but couldn’t secure a second straight championship.

“We never thought we were out of the game, we always felt like that game was ours,” said Chestnut. “We had two outs and we kept fighting and then Peter Dinolfo hit a triple to tie the game and that was huge.” With the momentum in their favor, junior John Avona hit an RBI single to take the lead and stole second, third, and came home on a wild pitch to put the Bearcats up two runs and junior Kellin Bliss shut the door for the save and to force a seventh and deciding game later that day. “That might have been the best game I have ever been a part of [...] you can ask anybody in the stands or even on the other team,” said Chestnut. “That was probably the greatest comeback they have ever seen.” With a Bearcats on a high from their win and their veteran leader Chestnut taking the mound, dreams of back-to-back titles crept into the players’ heads, but CSI had other plans. The Dolphins struck early and often, scoring eleven runs in the first two innings to take a 11-3 lead to start the game. ”I got hit hard and I gave up five early runs,” said Chestnut. Baruch still put up a fight, cutting the lead to 11-8, but for every Bearcat comeback there was an answer by CSI. “Those little knick-knack runs they tacked on at the end hurt,” said Chestnut. “If we could have stopped the bleeding it would have been a whole different game.” Although the season ended in heartbreak, there were many individual accomplishments by the Bearcats that were recognized by CUNYAC. Melendez took home CUNYAC first-team all-star honors. The shortstop, who was filling the shoes of last year’s CUNYAC MVP Jorge Rasado, hit .345 and stole 23 bases.

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College of Staten Island baseball and softball ECAC games postponed today By Daniel O'Leary May 12, 2010, 12:42PM

The College of Staten Island has announced that both their baseball and softball games in the ECAC/Metro NY Tournament are postponed today due to the weather. Both games have been rescheduled for Thursday. CSI softball will host Rutgers-Camden at 3:30 p.m. Baseball will host Richard Stockton at 6 p.m. Neither Š 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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Updated: Thu., May. 13, 2010, 11:31 PM

CHSAA baseball roundup: Farrell falls to Stepinac By DYLAN BUTLER

Last Updated: 11:31 PM, May 13, 2010 Posted: 11:14 PM, May 13, 2010

Monsignor Farrell’s hopes of repeating as CHSAA Staten Island champions took a major hit on Thursday when the Lions gave up four runs in each of the fourth and fifth innings en route to a 9-3 loss to Archbishop Stepinac in White Plains. Farrell (8-3) is now two games behind St. Joseph by the Sea, which crushed Salesian, 15-4, on Thursday with three games remaining. The two rivals clash Monday at the College of Staten Island, but Sea won both of the first two meetings and owns the head-to-head tiebreaker. Farrell ace Joe Fiori, who last pitched in a one-hitter against Moore Catholic on April 29, struggled with his command. The senior gave up four earned runs on six hits, with two strikeouts and three walks in four innings. Led by Carl Triano and Mike Annunizata, who drove in two RBIs apiece, Stepinac (11-4) broke the game open with a fourrun fourth inning and the Crusaders tacked on four more runs in the fifth to take a commanding 8-1 lead. Mike DiPaola was 3-for-3 with a run scored and Kevin Kelly had two RBIs for Farrell, which faces Iona Prep Friday afternoon. St. Joseph by the Sea 15, Salesian 4: Nick Pavia had a two-run single in a four-run second inning and St. Joseph by the Sea didn’t look back in a rout at Salesian Thursday. Vin Garcia had a two-run double, Rob Silvestri belted a three-run home run and Chris Ramanuskas belted an RBI double to pace the Vikings attack, while Frank Stavola flirted with a nohitter for a second consecutive start. Last week, he didn’t allow his first hit until the seventh inning and on Thursday he took the no-no into the sixth inning. He ended up giving up four earned runs on five hits, striking out three with four walks for first-place Sea (11-1), while Salesian fell to 2-13. St. John's Prep 13, St .Agnes 1: Paul Perez homered, freshman Gabriel Gonnel went 4-for-4 with a pair of doubles off the fence and Alex Gounaris, who belted a three-run home run in a 9-4 victory in a completed game earlier, pitched well for St. John's Prep (7-2) Thursday afternoon at Elmjack Little League. St. Agnes fell to 4-5. dbutler@nypost.com

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Updated: Sun., May. 16, 2010, 1:23 AM

Baseball roundup: Poly Prep clinches fourth straight Ivy title By ZACH BRAZILLER and DYLAN BUTLER Last Updated: 1:23 AM, May 16, 2010 Posted: 1:22 AM, May 16, 2010

Poly Prep’s Ivy League win streak was snapped by Fieldston recently, but the Blue Devils string of regular-season titles is still going. Poly Prep blanked Horace Mann, 10-0, Saturday afternoon to clinch its fourth straight Ivy League crown. Sam Gilbert struck out three in five shutout innings, Matt Coposio doubled in a run, and Marcus Hernandez had a sacrifice fly. The Blue Devils broke the game open with four runs in the fourth inning. The league title is the first of three goals Poly Prep, ranked fourth in The Post’s NYC baseball rankings, sets for itself, coach Matt Roventini said. The other two are to win the NYSAISAA championship – it has won two of the last three – and to be recognized as one of the city’s elite teams. "We accomplished No. 1, we still have two steps to take," Roventini said. "No. 3 takes care of itself if we win No. 2. ... As much as losing [last year to Berkeley Carroll in the NYSAISAA final] still stings, and always will, I think it made us hungry this year. We won't take anything for granted." CHSAA Monsignor Farrell 11, Fordham Prep 8: Michael Viegas was 4-for-5 with a triple, two runs scored and a pair of stolen bases, Tom Mandela was 2-for-3 with three RBIs and two runs scored and Nick Mattera drove in two runs for Monsignor Farrell (10-3) Saturday afternon at the College of Staten Island. Dan Turner was 2-for-4 with two runs scored and an RBI, Sal Annunizata drove in two runs and Kevin Brady was 2-for-3 for Fordham Prep (11-5). PSAL Cardozo 20, Forest Hills 0: Nicanor Luna had two hits and four RBIs, Andrew Nunez tripled twice and scored three runs, and Amoni Harris scored three runs and drove in two for Cardozo (12-1), which scored eight runs in the third inning, in Queens A East. Forest Hills fell to 3-11. Health Profession 12, Chelsea 2: Paul Romano struck out seven in six strong innings for his second win on the mound, he also had two hits and four RBIs, and Ernesto Bustos, Irving Pena, and Ivan Romano scored two runs apiece for Health Profession (8-5) in Manhattan B South. Chelsea is 7-6. Washington Irving 15, Baruch 5: Angeuris Morales had three hits and four RBIs, Randy Romero and Ronny Aristy each drove in three runs, and Engel Nunez scored three runs for Washington Irving (13-1) in Manhattan B South. Baruch is 7-5. OTHER SCORES All Hallows 7, Mount St. Michael 2 Washington Irving 14, Lab Museum 4 zbraziller@nypost.com dbutler@nypost.com

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Updated: Sun., May. 16, 2010, 11:42 PM

CHSAA baseball rankings By DYLAN BUTLER

Last Updated: 11:42 PM, May 16, 2010 Posted: 11:06 PM, May 16, 2010

There is one week left in the regular season and now is as good a time as any to have a change atop The Post’s CHSAA baseball rankings. Xaverian suffered its first loss of the season, a shocking 9-2 rout at home by Brooklyn rival Bishop Ford, and as a result drops from its perch for the first time all season. Newly-crowned Staten Island champion St. Joseph by the Sea is our new No. 1 hours after clinching the division title following a 1-0 win against Cardinal Spellman Sunday. No one dropped out of the rankings from last week, but there’s plenty of movement as the playoffs approach. 1. St. Joseph by the Sea (12-1) (Last week: 2) It was going to be the showdown of the year on Staten Island – St. Joseph by the Sea vs. Monsignor Farrell at the College of Staten Island Monday afternoon. The bitter rivals will still play with plenty of emotion, but the game is essentially meaningless after the Vikings clinched the division title Sunday in The Bronx. Next: @ No. 3 Monsignor Farrell (May 17, 4 p.m.) 2. Xaverian (14-1) (1) The storm clouds were gathering and on Tuesday it resulted in a downpour at Shore Road. The Clippers have flirted with danger for weeks and it finally caught up with them in a 9-2 blowout by Bishop Ford. Undefeated no more, Xaverian will look to use that embarrassing loss as motivation in this final week of the regular season. Next: @ Monsignor McClancy (May 17, 4 p.m.) 3. Monsignor Farrell (10-3) (4) The Lions hopes of repeating as Staten Island champions were dashed Sunday with Sea’s win at Spellman. But in reality, it took a major hit when Nick Pavia outdueled Farrell ace Joe Fiori in a 2-0 Vikings win at CSI on April 23 for Sea’s second regular-season win over Farrell. The Lions will play for pride Monday, hoping to avoid a sweep by their rivals. Next: No. 1 St. Joseph by the Sea (May 17, 4 p.m.) 4. St. Raymond’s (12-4) (5) The red-hot Ravens control their own destiny following a 4-3 win against Iona Prep Sunday afternoon. St. Ray’s has a onegame lead on Xavier and has a two-game cushion on Regis in the Bronx/Manhattan division. As was the case the last two years, the hero Sunday was senior righthander Ricky Eusebio, who earned the save. He’ll start Monday against Regis. Next: No. 9 Regis (May 17, 4 p.m.) 5. Fordham Prep (10-5) (3) The Rams lost twice this week, falling to No. 3 Monsignor Farrell and No. 8 Xavier, but remain in the lead for the Bronx/Westchester division title. That’s because Iona Prep and Archbishop Stepinac, tied for second and one game behind Fordham Prep, both lost in crossover games, too. The Rams will play under the lights at Houlihan Park twice this week, including a matchup against Stepinac Tuesday that could decide the division. Next: Mount St. Michael (May 17, 7 p.m.) 6. Bishop Ford (11-4) (7) The giant killers did it again, ending Xaverian’s hopes of an undefeated season for a second straight year. But Ford didn’t act like it just won the intersectional title with its rout of the Clippers. Led by slugger Esteban Gomez and ace hurler Stephen Bove, Ford has higher aspirations. Next for the Falcons is finishing second in Brooklyn/Queens, something they can do with a win against No. 7 St. Francis Prep Tuesday. Next: @ St. Edmund Prep (May 17, 4 p.m.) 7. St. Francis Prep (10-5) (6) The Terriers bounced back nicely following a 7-4 loss to Monsignor McClancy last Monday to beat Christ the King and St. Edmund Prep to remain in the race for second place in Brooklyn/Queens. Why is second so important? That team gets a bye into the final round of qualifying for the Class A intersectional playoffs and avoids a pair of early elimination games. Next: Christ the King (May 17, 4 p.m.) 8. Xavier (11-5) (10) Xavier has won three in a row and remains in contention for a second consecutive Bronx/Manhattan division crown, one game behind first-place St. Ray’s. Sacred Heart-bound Rob Maguire spun a gem in a 2-1 win at Fordham Prep Tuesday and the offensively-challenged Knights exploded for 15 runs – that’s usually about a month’s worth – in a wild 15-13 victory against Stepinac. Page 70 of 155


Next: @ All Hallows (May 17, 4 p.m.) 9. Regis (10-6) (9) The Raiders won back-to-back games last week, edging struggling Salesian and Spellman. On Saturday, senior lefthander Chris Bates was perfect through 3 2/3 innings, striking out eight of the first nine batters he faced. Rob Mohen will attempt to keep Regis’ division hopes alive Monday in a showdown with No. 4 St. Raymond’s at Ravens Field. Next: @ No. 4 St. Raymond (May 17, 4 p.m.) 10. Moore Catholic (6-6) (8) Moore will finish third in the four-team Staten Island division, but consider some of the Mavericks wins outside the borough – a 4-2 win at St. Ray’s, a 7-3 rout of Xavier and an 11-4 blowout of Regis. All three team are vying for division crowns this week. After a one-year hiatus, the Mavericks are back in the playoffs and they’ll be a tough out. Next: @ St. Peter’s (May 17, 4 p.m.) New: None Dropped out: None On the bubble: Archbishop Molloy (9-6), Monsignor McClancy (8-7) and All Hallows (8-8) dbutler@nypost.com

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Staten Island youth sports roundup for May 16, 2010: Bulldogs top Bandits in football By Staten Island Advance Sports Desk May 17, 2010, 12:47PM YOUTH FOOTBALL Nicholas Heffernan (two-point conversion) and Nicholas Lazara each had a 5-yard touchdown run and Thomas Giorgio added a tackle for a two-point safety as the S.I. Boys Football Bulldogs defeated the S.I. Bandits 15-6 in a Big Apple New York Football League 14s contest on Saturday. FAST-PITCH SOFTBALL Panthers split FLEMINGTON, N.J. — The New York Panthers Red 14-U squad split two games, beating the New Jersey Avalanche 2-1 before falling to the Branchburg Blaze, 5-4. In the first game, Amanda Bassano tossed a three-hitter and Melanie Palmieri had two hits and a run. YOUTH SOFTBALL St. Rita’s a winner Winning pitcher Jessica Finn struck out 10 as St. Rita’s defeated Our Lady Queen of Peace Gold 8-4 in Varsity A CYO play. Varsity A St. Rita’s 8, Our Lady Queen of Peace Gold 4 Interleague Valerie Sansevero hit for the cycle, had six RBI and four runs as Rolling Thunder (West Shore) beat Team III (East Shore) 16-10. Winning pitcher Kristen Blanchard fanned 11 as Melissa’s Dance (Mid-Island) beat O’Connor’s Realty (West Shore) 6-0 in a Minor game. Nicole Trani had two hits and three RBI and Nicole Revilla smacked three hits and knocked in three. Melissa’s Dance (M-I) 6, O’Connor’s Realty (WS) 0 Rolling Thunder (WS) 16, Team III (ES) 10 Mandarino Architecht (ES) 15, West Shore 5

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South Shore LL Shannon Damon was the winning pitcher, Sarah Perine had three hits and three and Liz Lanza had two hits as the Blue Diamonds defeated SI Electric 5-0 in Major play. SWIMMING Blessed Sacrament takes another title Blessed Sacrament finished off an undefeated season and won its second straight Staten Island Grammar School Swimming League championship by beating St. Joseph Hill 255-113 at the College of Staten Island in Willowbrook. AAU BASKETBALL Stingrays survive ALBANY, N.Y. — Nicole Sipp had a steal and layup at the buzzer to lift the Staten Island Stingrays to a 38-37 win over the Albany Falcons at the Big Show 13-U tournament. In the Troy May Classic in Albany, the Stingrays boys’ 16-U team finished second after a 5-1 weekend. Michael Michail (18 ppg) and Nick Figueroa (14) were named All-Tournament. ___________________________ HAUPPAUGE, L.I. — The Staten Island Rebels’ 10s won the title in the Metro Region Division 2 championships with a 34-30 win over the Long Island Lightning. ___________________________ SOMERSET, N.J. — The Staten Island Stingrays’ 14s won two games at the Somerset Cardinals tourney, topping Next Level 43-37 behind Nick Meiner (13 points) and Mike Langford (9), and the Clinton Cougars 5543 as Rourke Struthers (11) and Patrick Ryan (9) led the way. ___________________________ Ashley Zito scored 20 points and Jillian Silvestrie added 13 as the SI Rebels defeated the LI Lightning in the finals of the Hooperstown 13-and-under Regional. Girls Metro Region Division 2 Championships 10-U SI Rebels 34, LI Lightning 30 12-U Rebels 46, Westchester Falcons 40 Battle of Bayonne

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10-U SI Diamonds 31, Bulldogs 13 SI Diamonds 40, Hunterdon Hoopsters 17 9-U SI Diamonds 37, Lady Bulldogs Silver 6 SI Diamonds 26, NJ United 8 Hooperstown Regional 13-U SI Rebels 51, LI Lightning 21 Boys Somerset Cardinals Tourney 14-U SI Stingrays 43, Next Level 37 SI Stingrays 55, Clinton Cougars 43

Š 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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Updated: Tue., May. 18, 2010, 1:51 AM

CHSAA baseball roundup: All Hallows ruins Xavier's title hopes By DYLAN BUTLER

Last Updated: 1:51 AM, May 18, 2010 Posted: 1:30 AM, May 18, 2010

Alexis Torres doubled off the leftfield wall and Irwin Zorilla was hit by a pitch with the bases loaded to drive in the winning run for All Hallows, which captured its third consecutive victory Monday at Van Cortlandt Park in The Bronx, beating Xavier, 3-2 in eight innings. James Norwood was solid through seven innings, allowing four hits and fanning seven, while Gilbert Gonzalez earned the one-inning win as the Gaels (9-8) spoiled Xavier’s hopes of a second straight CHSAA Bronx/Manhattan division title. Xavier fell to 11-6. St. Francis Prep 15, Christ the King 3: Ryan Paccione had three hits, including a double, a triple and drove in six runs, Anthony Prainito had three hits and three RBIs, Alex Middlemiss had three hits and two RBIs, and James Paskor had three hits for St. Francis Prep (11-5) Monday at Cunningham Park. Christ the King dropped to 2-14. Bishop Ford 2, St. Edmund Prep 1: Helbert Estevez allowed one run and scattering four hits over seven innings, Matt Molbury was 2-for-3 with an RBI single in the third, and Jonathan Pineiro singled and scored on a wild pitch in the first inning for Bishop Ford (12-4) Monday afternoon in Bergen Beach, Brooklyn. St. Edmund Prep fell to 4-12. St. Joseph by the Sea 8, Monsignor Farrell 4: One day after clinching the CHSAA Staten Island title, St. Joseph by the Sea (13-1) rallied from a 3-0 deficit to beat Monsignor Farrell at the College of Staten Island Monday afternoon. Chris Ramanauskas, Vin Garcia, Nick Galli and Chris Falcone each had two hits, and Falcone and Joe Stabach both drove in a pair of runs for the Vikings, which swept their archrival in three regular-season meetings. Nick Del Prete went 2-for-4 with an RBI for Farrell (10-4), which saw ace Joe Fiori get roughed up for five earned runs on six hits in 4-1/3 innings. Moore Catholic 2, St. Peter’s 1: John Baggs went the distance, allowing one earned run on five hits, striking out three with one walk, while Frank Smith and Rob Ortiz each drove in a run to lead Moore Catholic (8-6) Monday afternoon at Clove Lakes Park. Don Pagano allowed one earned run on five hits, walking three with one strikeout for St. Peter’s, which fell to 3-11. OTHER SCORES Xaverian 5, Monsignor McClancy 2 dbutler@nypost.com

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Staten Island sports bulletin board for May 19, 2010 By Staten Island Advance Sports Desk May 20, 2010, 9:59AM Lions Pop Warner registration The Staten Island Lions Pop Warner Football team will hold registration for boys ages 5-14 tonight at Monsignor Farrell HS from 6-8 p.m. Visit www.statenislandlions.org. SIU soccer registration Staten Island United soccer is hosting tryouts for girls’ and boys’ U-11, U-12 and U-13 Thursday and Tuesday. There is also ongoing tryouts for boys’ U-14 every Monday (5 p.m.) and Wednesday (6:30 p.m.) at the College of Staten Island. For more information, or for children in older age groups or for those who missed earlier tryouts, call 917-714-0299. Shootin’ School Shootin’ School is accepting registration to its summer programs. Beginning June 4 and continuing every Friday during the summer, point guard and sharpshooter instruction will take place. Beginning June 6 and continuing every Sunday during the summer, post player (with Davidson College standout Steve Rossiter) and fundamental and agility instruction will take place. Visit shootinschool.com or contact Anthony Passalacqua at 917-692-6337. Soccer registration Registration for the Lil’ Kicks Soccer League is under way at the South Shore YMCA. Summer sessions begin in June with games played on Thursdays. The coed league is looking for players and teams, ages 4-6, for its eight-game season. All players will receive uniform jerseys. Contact youth and family director Cynthia Bayiokos at 718-227-3200 or e-mail cbayiokos@ymcanyc.org. Soccer tryouts The Silver Lake Soccer Club will hold travel tryouts for ages 5-14 on May 18 and June 1 at 6 p.m. at the Greenbelt turf field, Sea View. Each participant is urged to wear soccer attire and bring a ball and water. Call 718-841-7164 or contact www.silverlakesoccer.org. Staten Island LL Bingo Night The Staten Island LL will hold Bingo Night at the clubhouse Friday at 6 p.m. Call 718-667-0241. Youth football registration The Staten Island Lions Pop Warner football will hold registration for football and cheerleading (ages 5 to 15) tonight and next Thursday from 6 to 8 p.m. at Farrell. Visit statenislandlions.org or call 718-667-0241. © 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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Titans looking for public address announcer Friday, May 21, 2010 By TIMOTHY W. GAFFNEY TORRINGTON — Think you have what it takes to be a public address announcer? An opportunity exists right now that may just help you fulfill that dream. The Torrington Titans, the newest addition to the Atlantic Collegiate Baseball League, will open their inaugural season on Thursday, June 3 when they face off against the North Jersey Eagles. The team is looking for someone to take their spot behind the microphone in the Fuessenich Park press box behind home plate. Torrington will play 20 home games over the course of the season, which runs from June 3 through the end of July. Additional games may be played if the team makes the playoffs and earns home games in early August. Interested individuals can contact the partners at Our Baseball Haven at info@ourbaseballhaven.com. n Member passes have arrived for the 2010 season and can be picked up at an event being held tonight at the Cambridge House Brew Pub starting at 7 p.m. For those who signed up to be season tickets holders over the past six months, the passes will be their ticket. Once at the gate, holders simply show the pass to the attendants and it’s time to take in a baseball game. n The Titans are not the only new kids on the block this season in the Kaiser Division of the ACBL. Only their Game 1 division opponent, North Jersey, has been in the league before. The Eagles posted a 12-24 overall record a year ago, and play their games at Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey. The Long Island Collegians and the Staten Island Tides are the other two teams to join the Titans as first year teams. Long Island plays their games in Old Westbury, New York at the New York Institute of Technology, while the Tides play at the College of Staten Island. The Titans will know their division foes well by season’s end. They play the Eagles a total of 10 times, the Collegians eight times and the Tides six. Twenty four of their 40 games will be played in the Kaiser.

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n The team is still looking to fill one last host family position for this season. Anyone interested can contact the teams Host Family Outreach Chair, Dawn Dell’Agnese at 860-482-1498 or by e-mail at dadellagnese@yahoo.com n Non-Profits who own the first three night’s walk up gates are busy making plans to make their night one to remember. One of the most unique benefits of the OBH model is how it can affect so many local non-profits who could really use some help. LARC, who won the right to opening night, Thursday, June 3 in a lottery in April, is hoping to raise as much money as they can to help one of their camps. The Northwest Chamber of Commerce has the Friday, June 4 gate when the Titans continue their three game series against the Eagles, starting at 7 p.m. Plans are still being formulated for the Chamber’s event. The Warner Theater Center for Arts Education will be the beneficiary of the gate from the Saturday, June 5 game which also starts at 7 p.m. Isabel Carrington, the Center’s Education Director, will be the Master of Ceremonies that night, while Aubrey Van Allen, a student at the Center, will perform the National Anthem. More information will be available in next week’s Friday update as the Torrington area prepares to welcome the Titans and the ACBL on Memorial Day Weekend. Timothy W. Gaffney is a sports correspondent for The Register Citizen, and host of the Litchfield County Sports Program on WAPJ FM (105.1 And 89.9). Mr. Gaffney can be reached at tgaffney@marketedgewriters.com.

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Staten Island sports bulletin board for May 24, 2010 By Staten Island Advance Sports Desk May 25, 2010, 8:51AM HS Basketball positions St Joseph Hill is looking for an assistant varsity basketball coach, and a head coach and an assistant for the junior varsity. Please contact athletic director Janice Philipps at 718 447-1374, ext. 158 or e-mail her at jphilipps417@yahoo.com. Basketball clinic The CYO Beyond the Arc basketball clinic has openings for its June 1 session at the CYO-MIV for boys and girls grades 3-8. Clinics will consist of six sessions. Call Artie Conroy at 718-987-2603. Roundball basketball clinic The Roundball Basketball Clinic, featuring Felician College womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball coach Steve Fagan, will take place on Wednesday nights at Our Lady Star of the Sea for boys and girls in grades 8-12. Each player will receive individual attention. Call John Lanza at 917-817-4310 or email him at coachlanza@aol.com. Touch Tackle registration The Staten Island Touch Tackle League will celebrate its 55th season by launching a new Silver division, exclusively for players over age 40. Registration for all divisions is ongoing. Call Charlie Margiotta at 718761-8321 or e-mail the league at sitouchtackle@aol.com. SITTL awards will also be presented tomorrow night at the Armory at 8 p.m. Baseball showcase Athelite Player Development will be hosting its annual high school baseball exposure combine for all high school players on Aug. 11 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at St. Joseph by-the-Sea HS. Visit the website www.AthelitePlayerDevelopment.com or call 917-755-2747. Soccer travel team needs players The Staten Island United travel soccer team is looking for U-15 boys (born between Aug. 1, 1995 and July 31, 1996). Open tryouts are held Mondays at 5 p.m. and Wednesdays at 6:30 at the College of Staten Island. Call Vinny Bommarito at 917-217-0400. Š 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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ABCA/Rawlings names three CSI baseball players to All-Region Teams By Staten Island Advance Sports Desk May 27, 2010, 5:15PM

Staten Island Advance file photo by Hilton Flores CSI junior Pat Gale has racked up the postseason awards. The latest honors are the ABCA/Rawlings All-Region First Team and the D3baseball.com All American honorable mention list.

The American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA)/Rawlings selected College of Staten Island basball players Pat Gale, Devon DiCasoli and Joe Cassano to their 2010 All-Region teams. Gale, a junior pitcher/infielder and the CUNYAC Player of the Year, was a first team honoree. Senior infielder DiCasoli was tabbed for the second team and Cassano, a sophomore outfielder, was a third teamer. For Gale it is the latest in a host of honors. He was also just named a D3baseball.com honorable mention All American. The ace of the CSI staff, Gale was 8-2 this season, setting single season CSI record in wins, innings pitched, and strikeouts. The left-hander from Tottenville HS finished in the top five in the nation in strikeouts per

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nine innings. With the bat, he also had a big year, hitting .418 with 47 RBI and five triples. DiCasoli played virtually every position for the Dolphins batting a team-best .425 — the 14th highest average in CSI single season history. The Moore Catholic product set the career record for stolen bases with 64 (24 this season). He was also a CUNYAC First Team selection. Cassano, a sophomore in his first year at CSI, hit .351 while starting 40 games. He led the Dolphins with 15 doubles and had two triples and a pair of homers. CSI finished 31-11 this season — the 31 wins were the best in program history — while winning their 14th CUNYAC Championship before earning a berth into the ECAC Metro NY/NJ Postseason Tournament. © 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved. Staten Island Advance file photo by Hilton Flores Devon DiCasoli was named to the ABCA/Rawlings second team.

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Updated: Thu., May. 27, 2010, 2:31 AM

CHSAA baseball third round qualifying preview BY DYLAN BUTLER

Last Updated: 2:31 AM, May 27, 2010 Posted: 2:17 AM, May 27, 2010

The Post’s CHSAA baseball beat writer Dylan Butler breaks down the best-of-three third-round series for the Class A intersectional tournament. For live updates during the games, check out Dylan Butler’s Twitter page here. Here are the matchups and schedule: No. 5 Bishop Ford vs. No. 14 Moore Catholic Game 1 – Thursday 4 p.m. at Parade Grounds Game 2 – Saturday 3:30 p.m. at St. John’s University Game 3 – Sunday if necessary at TBA No. 6 Monsignor Farrell vs. No. 13 All Hallows Game 1 – Thursday 7 p.m. at College of Staten Island Game 2 – Saturday 10:30 a.m. at St. John’s University Game 3 – Sunday if necessary at TBA No. 7 Iona Prep vs. No. 10 St. Francis Prep Game 1 – Friday 4 p.m. at Iona Prep Game 2 – Sunday 11 a.m. at St. John’s University Game 3 – Monday if necessary at TBA No. 8 Xavier vs. No. 9 Fordham Prep Game 1 – Thursday 4 p.m. at Red Hook Game 2 – Saturday 1 p.m. at St. John’s University Game 3 – Sunday if necessary at TBA No. 5 Bishop Ford Falcons Head coach: Mike Hanrahan Record: 13-4 Player to watch: Esteban Gomez No. 14 Moore Catholic Mavericks Head coach: Nick Doscher Record: 9-7 Player to watch: John Baggs Outlook: The pitching matchup in the opener is a doozy, with Bishop Ford ace Stephen Bove (1.03 ERA) meeting Moore sophomore John Baggs (1.43 ERA). Baggs is one of several left-handers in the Mavericks' arsenal and he certainly won’t be intimidated by Bishop Ford’s solid lineup, highlighted by senior slugger Esteban Gomez. The first baseman, who has garnered interest from several area major league scouts, is batting .427 with 11 doubles and 21 RBIs. Pitching around Gomez, though, could be a mistake with lethal hitters Anderson Mateo and Matt Molbury behind the first baseman in the lineup. Chris Ahearn and Frank Smith, who drove in the lone run in a 1-0 win at Molloy Monday, are the top hitters for Moore, which has struggled at the plate. But the Mavericks are supremely confident with a 6-0 record against non-Staten Island foes. “We know it’s going to be a battle,” Moore coach Nick Doscher said. “But we’ve been in battles every game all year.” No. 6 Monsignor Farrell Lions Head coach: Bob Mulligan Record: 11-4 Player to watch: Mike Viegas No. 13 All Hallows Gaels Page 83 of 155


Head coach: Ed Gutierrez Record: 11-8 Player to watch: James Norwood Outlook: All Hallows might be the hottest team entering the third round of qualifying. The Gaels have won five straight and six of their last seven. On Monday, All Hallows beat Regis and ace Chris Bates, 5-3, in nine innings. There were heroes galore for the Gaels, including ace James Norwood, who allowed three earned runs on eight hits, striking out nine in seven innings and going 2-for-4 with an RBI. Gilbert Gonzalez is a solid third baseman and the Gaels closer. You want to be playing your best baseball heading into the playoffs and All Hallows is doing just that. Monsignor Farrell finished second in Staten Island, losing three of its four games to rival St. Joseph by the Sea. The Lions went on a long playoff run last year and several players, including third baseman Gary Boardman, shortstop Nick Del Prete and center fielder Mike Viegas were key cogs to that squad. The speedy Viegas has been red-hot of late and is the Lions' top hitter. Farrell has always been built on solid pitching and this year is no different. With quality starters Joe Fiori, Matt Cascello and Chris Mione, Farrell is built for a three-game series. No. 7 Iona Prep Gaels Head coach: Fred Gallo Record: 13-5 Player to watch: Colin Moran No. 10 St. Francis Prep Terriers Head coach: Bro. Robert Kent Record: 12-6 Player to watch: Chris Fesler Outlook: Iona Prep finished with the same record as Archbishop Stepinac, but lost out on a tiebreaker to the Crusaders. The Gaels are led by North Carolina-bound Colin Moran, arguably the best player in the CHSAA. The senior plays shortstop, hits third and even comes in to close games. Pitch around Moran and you have to deal with Justin Palladino, Beau Kiklis and Justin Muratore. St. Francis Prep has a deeper rotation, led by Adelphi-bound lefty Lebro Burnette, who tossed a complete-game two-hitter in a 4-3 win against McClancy and could pitch Game 2 or Game 3. Senior Chris Fesler has had some very good outings and some bad, but he’s been consistently one of the Terriers better hitters. But there are other good hitters, including Alex Middlemiss, Jason Perrone and Chris Brudie. Freshman Taso Stathopoulos could be Prep’s ace in the hole, a future No. 1 pitcher coming out of the bullpen. No. 8 Xavier Knights Head coach: Rich Duffel Record: 12-6 Player to watch: Rob Maguire No. 9 Fordham Prep Rams Head coach: Pat Deane Record: 13-6 Player to watch: Mike Maschi Outlook: On the gridiron, the Xavier-Fordham Prep rivalry is one of the best in the city. The two Jesuit schools have battled for 86 years on Thanksgiving Day for the Turkey Bowl. No such trophy is at stake on the baseball diamond, but this best-of-three should certainly be closely contested and, perhaps, heated. That is, if the regular-season meeting at Houlihan Park is a precursor. In that game, Xavier ace Rob Maguire, who is 6-1 with a 0.55 ERA, outdueled Fordham Prep’s No. 1 Joe Pareres as the Knights left Rose Hill with a 2-1 win. Maguire, the Sacred Heart-bound senior, allowed one hit in six innings, striking out seven and walking five. Pareres allowed just four hits and struck out two in seven innings, giving up a pair of unearned runs. He also got into a verbal confrontation with Xavier reliever Sean Meekins after the final out. Fordham Prep, which is led by versatile senior center fielder Mike Maschi and power-hitting junior first baseman Sal Annunziata, is the defending CHSAA Class A intersectional champions, advancing out of the qualifying round to win the title. dbutler@nypost.com

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Updated: Sat., May. 29, 2010, 9:40 PM

Say it ain't so, Joe: Fiori throws gem in 2-1 loss BY DYLAN BUTLER

Last Updated: 9:40 PM, May 29, 2010 Posted: 3:50 PM, May 29, 2010

Joe Fiori deserved a better fate. The Monsignor Farrell ace was outstanding in his best outing of his senior season. He didn’t allow a hit until the fifth inning and his lone walk came in the sixth. Yet, Fiori left Kaiser Stadium on the campus of St. John’s University Saturday afternoon as the hard-luck loser, dropping a 2-1 decision to All Hallows in Game 2 of a best-of-three CHSAA Class A intersectional third round qualifying series. “Joe was fantastic,” Farrell coach Bob Mulligan said. “The effort he gave was as good an effort as he gave all year. We made a couple of mistakes in the sixth and it cost us.” Fiori struggled in his last two outings, but he came back in a big way Saturday. Utilizing a devastating curveball and spotting his fastball, Fiori struck out four in six innings. The only base runner that reached in the first four innings was Julian Mateo, thanks to an error by first baseman Pete Guinta. A bloop single to right by Isiah Reyes with one out in the fifth inning broke up Fiori’s no-hit bid. “He was getting his curveball over, which makes him a much better pitcher and he’s always got life on his fastball,” Mulligan said. “He threw strikes today, but unfortunately that two-out walk in the sixth came back to haunt him a bit.” Indeed. Norwood, who lined out to Gary Boardman at third in the fourth, took a Fiori fastball and launched it into left field. Mike DiPaola took a step in and then sprinted back, but the ball sailed over his head. Norwood had an RBI double and the game was tied at 1. “The ball hit to left field was a tough play, a line drive right at him,” Mulligan said. “They say that’s always the toughest play. He might have taken a step in and before you knew it, it was over his head.” Boardman then threw away Irwin Zorilla’s chopper, allowing pinch runner James Kane to score. Suddenly, Fiori’s 1-0 lead was a 2-1 deficit. “[Fiori] had a good breaking pitch so he was changing speeds a lot,” All Hallows coach Ed Gutierrez said. “We basically were pulling off the ball a bit on his breaking ball, but I was trying to get them to be aggressive early with a fastball. We did that later on in the ballgame.” Farrell, which won the opener, 7-4, Friday night at the College of Staten Island, returns to Kaiser Stadium Sunday at 2:30 p.m. for the decisive third game. Mulligan is unsure who he’ll go with in the elimination game, but he does hope Fiori hasn’t thrown his last high school pitch. “He pitched great and it was good to see,” Mulligan said. “Hopefully he’ll get another chance in the intersectionals.” dbutler@nypost.com

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Updated: Sat., May. 29, 2010, 2:20 AM

Cascello helps lead Farrell to Game 1 win vs. All Hallows BY DYLAN BUTLER

Last Updated: 2:20 AM, May 29, 2010 Posted: 2:18 AM, May 29, 2010

Matt Cascello had 24 hours to mull over a situation that he's never been in before. The Monsignor Farrell pitcher stepped back on the mound facing a bases-loaded jam with one out in the top of the first inning that he got himself into Thursday night before the opener of a best-of-three CHSAA Class A intersectional thirdround qualifying series against All Hallows was suspended because of rain in the top of the first. “That was the first time I ever had to do that, come back the next day,” Cascello said. “I take my bullpens before the game really seriously. I was thinking of coming in out of relief, to get a ground ball with one out and then after that I started thinking about it as another start.” Cascello got just want he wanted. Irwin Zorilla grounded out to third, driving in one run and that was all the 13th-seeded Gaels would get as No. 6 Monsignor Farrell took Game 1, 7-4, Friday night at the College of Staten Island. A little more than 12 hours after the marathon opener, the teams will step on the field at Jack Kaiser Stadium on the campus of St. John’s University for Game 2. Farrell ace Joe Fiori will oppose All Hallows star James Norwood Saturday at 10:30 a.m. “Their team is definitely a momentum team and if they would have had this win, tomorrow they’d be up and into the game more,” Cascello said. “This was big for us.” Cascello allowed just two earned runs and struck out five through six innings. Gary Boardman came in to close out the game for Farrell, which was victimized by three seventh-inning errors. All Hallows, meanwhile, was sloppy defensively throughout the game as its five-game winning streak was snapped. Farrell (12-4) scored twice in the second inning without a hit as Nick Matera scored on Zorilla’s wild pitch and Mike Viegas drove in a run on a groundout to third. Mike DiPaola scored on a throwing error by shortstop Jeremy Tejada in the third inning and, after Nick Del Prete’s RBI bloop double in the fourth, two more All Hallows errors opened the door for the Lions to score twice in the fifth to take a commanding 6-1 lead. The miscues appeared to be infectious as the Gaels (11-9) scored three runs in the final two innings after three Farrell errors, but Boardman struck out Dilson Hernandez and Julian Mateo flew out to left to end the 2 1/2-hour game, which was twice delayed because of injuries. In the bottom of the fourth, Kelly was cut over his right eye after getting hit with the ball on an attempted pickoff at second and had to leave the game. Moments later All Hallows center fielder Alexis Torres left the game after sustaining an injury diving for a shallow fly ball. “Knowing him, he’ll be ready,” Mulligan said of Kelly, Farrell’s starting second baseman. “I think he’ll go to the hospital tonight. I imagine he’ll get stitched up and hopefully we’ll see him there tomorrow.” Bright and early, at that. dbutler@nypost.com

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StoriesÂ

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McMahon Announces Another NSF Grant for CSI 04.05.10 - 01:28

... May 3, 2010 4:04PM Staten Island, NY - Today, Rep. Michael E. McMahon announced that the College of Staten Island (CSI) is the recipient of another federal grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The $450,000 grant, which is called a CAREER award and begins on May 1, 2010, will support research aimed at further developing our understanding of the electronic properties of various materials. "Since the NSF was created by Congress in the early 1950's, the agency has promoted the progress of science, discovery and learning," said Rep. McMahon. "As a result of federal funding in years passed, many of the technologies developed have truly been revolutionary. Now, graduate and undergraduate students at CSI will have the opportunity to further expand their research capacities on an entirely new level." "I am please that the NSF has recognized CSI for the center for excellence in education that it is," continued Rep. McMahon. ...

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CUNY's new policy puts college freshman lives on hold By Peter N. Spencer May 06, 2010, 7:48AM

Staten Island Advance/Jan Somma-Hammel The City University of New York, of which the College of Staten Island is a part of, has already received more than 70,000 freshman applications for fall 2010.

With their classrooms already bursting at the seams, officials at the City University of New York (CUNY) have decided to wait-list freshman applications they receive after tomorrow. CUNY officials announced the unprecedented move yesterday, after receiving a record number of first-time freshman applicants for schools that already have record enrollment. On top of that, the schools are facing a $43.4 million budget cut from the city and another $84 million from the state. As of late April, CUNY, which includes the College of Staten Island (CSI), had already received more than 70,000 freshman applications for fall 2010, more than were received last year through the end of August, the usual cut-off date for enrollment. "We are doing the very best we can to balance the need to keep the University open and available to the students who wish to study here," CUNY Chancellor Matthew Goldstein said, discussing the school's burgeoning enrollment at a board of trustees meeting April 26. "But we will do it a responsible way so that we can educate our students." Students who apply after tomorrow will be placed on a wait list for fall 2010 "in the event additional space becomes available." But with total student enrollment expected to increase to about 265,000 -- the highest in CUNY history -- it appears more likely those students will have to start their college careers in January 2011, at the earliest.

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City Councilwoman Debi Rose (D-North Shore), who was the director of a dropout prevention at CSI for 20 years, said delaying college for possibly thousands of students could have "far-reaching implications." "There is a momentum that you lose. You are asking people to put their lives on hold, their careers on hold," Ms. Rose said. About 14,000 students currently take classes at CSI's Willowbrook campus. That is expected to increase to 18,000 over the next nine years, according to the school's own projections. School officials credit the surge in enrollment to a sluggish job market and a partnership with the city's Department of Education to groom more students for college and CUNY's "burnishing" reputation among other colleges and universities. This spring, 16,137 students applied to transfer to the bargain CUNY schools, compared with 9,093 for the same period in 2009. A group of Council members, students and educations activists gathered on the steps of City Hall yesterday to protest the cuts to CUNY in Mayor Michael Bloomberg's proposed budget. Bloomberg's executive budget is due today. But even if the mayor, the Council or the state Legislature restore some of that funding, it won't likely change the wait-list policy this year, spokesman Michael Arenas said. "This about demand, more than anything else," Arenas said.

Š 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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Wait-list deadline looms for CUNY freshman applications By Staten Island Advance May 07, 2010, 10:03AM

Advance file photo The City University of New York, of which the College of Staten Island is a part of, has already received more than 70,000 freshman applications for fall 2010.

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- Today is the last day for potential students to apply to City University of New York (CUNY) schools and avoid being wait-listed. Students who apply after today will be placed on a wait list for fall 2010 "in the event additional space becomes available." But with total student enrollment expected to increase to about 265,000 -- the highest in CUNY history -- it appears more likely those students will have to start their college careers in January 2011, at the earliest. CUNY officials announced the unprecedented move earlier this week, after receiving a record number of first-time freshman applicants for schools that already have record enrollment. On top of that, the schools are facing a $43.4 million budget cut from the city and another $84 million from the state. As of late April, CUNY, which includes the College of Staten Island (CSI), had already received more than 70,000 freshman applications for fall 2010, more than were received last year through the end of August, the usual cut-off date for enrollment. Š 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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Students honored at History Day By Staten Island Advance May 08, 2010, 7:40AM STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Curiosity and enthusiasm for local history was everywhere last night as part of the second annual Staten Island History Day Fair and Awards Ceremony held at the College of Staten Island, Willowbrook. The event is designed to bring together the best local history projects prepared by students, in celebration of the borough’s history and heritage. Fourth- and fifth-graders from the borough’s public, private and parochial schools, some working collaboratively, contributed projects. The results were enough to impress Borough Historian Thomas Matteo, who called the projects “extraordinary.” This is extraordinary. The parents love this, the kids love this. These kids are really into what they’re doing.” The event was sponsored by Matteo, Borough President James Molinaro and the New York Public Library, with support from CSI. Among those speaking, in addition to Matteo, were Tomas Morales, CSI president, and Andrew Wilson, NYPL digital producer. The winners were: Genevieve Steinmetz, Our Lady Star of the Sea School, Huguenot, first place individual; Heather Popovics, PS 6, Richmond Valley, second place individual; Erica Paniss, Gateway Academy, Richmond Valley, third place individual, and Jordan Boone, St. Peter’s Elementary School, New Brighton, honorable mention individual. Samantha Perham, Regina Licitra, Gabrielle Fliorent, Daniella Franceschi, Philip Calderon and Oahdan Lynch, PS 6, Richmond Valley, first place group; Sara Gigliotti, Brittany Bross and Jenna Mangogna, PS 1, Tottenville, second place group; Savana Tuccillo, Alyssa Mello-Laperuta and Sara Khalid, PS 60, Graniteville, third place group, and Michelle Anzalone and Max Becker, PS 58, New Springville, honorable mention group. The other schoolwide winners, who were presented with certificates, were: Luke Valdes, Madeline Carrera, John Kelly, Erin Boyle, Our Lady of Good Counsel School, Tompkinsville; Tia Wright, Ramius X. Sanchez and Filobatir Ibrahim, PS 22, Graniteville; Isis Masterpalo, PS 60; Gabrielle Zanone, St. Joseph-St. Thomas School, Pleasant Plains; Nailea Escobar and Javier Galindo, PS 19, West Brighton, and Emily Zhang, PS 53, Bay Terrace. twitter.com/siadvance -- facebook.com/statenislandadvance © 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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A new era for the College of Staten Island with $257M plan By Amy Padnani May 10, 2010, 8:36AM

An artist's rendering of the Interdisciplinary High Performance Computational Center at CSI, which will have lecture rooms, offices, computers and research labs.

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- Soon enough, students won't be elbowing each other for study space in the College of Staten Island library. Or waiting in a long line of cars on Victory Boulevard to get onto the campus during rush hour. Or taking courses at 10:30 p.m. because there wasn't any classroom space to meet earlier. School officials have developed a $257 million master plan to upgrade and revamp the campus after studies showed the demographics of students is rapidly growing and changing. The design includes 477,735 square feet in new buildings and additions. It is the first major redesign since the college moved to the campus -- the home of the former Willowbrook State School -- in 1993, combining its Sunnyside and St. George locations. The campus serves about 14,000 people, but that number is likely to jump to more than 18,000 by 2019, said Tomas Morales, president of College of Staten Island. The number of full-time students has increased 23 percent in the past 12 years, and is expected to grow another 38 percent by 2018. Yet the college has far less classroom space than most of the other City University of New York schools. Though there is plenty of room to grow, the sprawling 205-acre campus is frequently packed with students in the existing buildings, Morales said. The design includes filling in some of the areas between buildings to make it more walkable. IMPROVED TRANSIT

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According to Morales, more students are traveling to the school from other boroughs. He envisions creating a 4,000-square foot welcome center with a transit hub, so that buses can pull in, drop off students, and loop around to the exit. Bicycle paths will line the entire campus and students will be able to rent bikes on site. A 607-bed dorm -- a plan that has been tabled for many months pending financing -- will provide on-campus housing. But just when those projects will get done is still up in the air. Morales said it depends heavily on how and when the school can secure funding from a variety of sources: Private donors and city, state and federal funds. "My job as president is to work closely with elected officials, CUNY and alumni, to keep this on the front burner and get them to take interest in the evolution of this campus," he said. Topping the priority list is a research lab that has been awkwardly named the Interdisciplinary HighPerformance Computational Center. The 175,000-square foot building will feature a computer center, classrooms, offices, lecture rooms and labs. It's where some of the college's most advanced research will take place, with engineering and psychology students studying side by side and looking at real-time simulations. They'll seek to answer questions like: How can traffic be alleviated? What makes a city tick? How can we determine the weather? "We want people to get excited, to feel good about the institution that they attend," Morales said. "It's really going to be a transformational educational experience." Officials have secured about half the $11.5 million in funding for the research center and are hoping the facility will be built in the next five years. ON THE HORIZON The next plan is a $40 million-retrofit of building 2M, which is vacant, to include more classrooms and a childcare center for faculty and staff. Tthe existing center only accommodates students. Other plans include: Alleviating traffic in the area by moving the guard station and constructing a new entry from Willowbrook Road. The existing entrances are on Forest Hill Road and Victory Boulevard. Expanding the library to add more seats and double their collection of books by using compact shelving.Widening the sports and recreation building. Building a privately run parking garage with 400 to 900 spaces. Creating a greenhouse to support life science research. Designing an imaging center for biology and chemistry research. Expanding the administration building, the student center and the center for the arts. Adding landscaping, trees and a playground for the childcare center. Upgrading the water system and other 80-year-old infrastructure.

Š 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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He's pointing worried parents in right direction By Elise G. McIntosh May 11, 2010, 5:36AM

Staten Island Advance/Irving Silverstein Last month, Joe McBratney led a drug awareness workshop at the College of Staten Island, in which he and other drug addiction experts spoke to parents about the warning signs of teen drug use.

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Joe McBratney is on a mission: To help parents who suspect their children are abusing drugs get the support they need. Last month, the Port Richmond native hosted a conference at the College of Staten Island featuring several substance abuse experts who spoke to parents about the warning signs of teen drug use and places they may turn for help. A consultant with Behavioral Health of the Palm Beaches, Inc., an alcohol, substance abuse and mental health treatment center in Florida, McBratney also is setting up dates to speak about drug addiction at local high schools. Ultimately hoping to reach a larger audience, McBratney, an actor, is in talks with TV producers about developing a reality show in which he would spy on teenagers to see if they are using drugs. McBratney says that through the show he hopes to educate parents about this problem plaguing America. The way it’ll work, he said, is he will travel cross-country, meeting with parents who suspect their kids are using drugs. The parents will report to McBratney — or Joe Brat as he likes to be called — what their children claim they’re getting up to and he will see if the story checks out.

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If it doesn’t, “we’ll intervene and find out what they’re really doing,” he said. McBratney is dedicated to helping teens avoid drugs because he knows firsthand how easily they may slip into addiction. He developed a problem with prescription pills after being prescribed opiates for back surgery in the 1990s. McBratney, who was immersed in the promotion and introduction of the “Addiction Project” headed by HBO a few years ago, has seen what drug and alcohol addiction can lead to. “Jails, institutions and death, those are the only three options they [addicts] have,” McBratney said. He realized the truth behind his words when speaking at a prison recently and asking one of the inmates what he was in for. The prisoner told him, “I woke up in the precinct handcuffed to the bench and I thought they got me on a DUI. “I was laughing and said, “What? Did you get me drunk again?” “No,” he was told by the officers, “last night you went home and your wife told you to get out and you shot her six times in the head.¤” McBratney said the prisons are filled with people with similar stories.

© 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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NY1.COM

YOUR CITY, YOUR NEWS. NYCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 24-HOUR NEWSCHANNEL ON THE WEB.

05/11/2010 12:33 PM

College Of S.I. To Get Quarter-Billion-Dollar Facelift By: Sheri Richardson

NY1 VIDEO: Officials at the College of Staten Island have come up with a $257 million masterplan to expand the 204-acre campus to bear with enrollment increases.

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Hours after DMV announces May 21 closure, judge rules furloughs a no-go By Doug Auer May 13, 2010, 5:17AM

Staten Island Advance/Irving Silverstein The DMV, originally planned to close May 21 for a one-day state furlough, will now be open after a judge temporarily halted the furloughs.

Announced furloughs at the state Department of Motor Vehicles office in Travis and the College of Staten Island, Willowbrook, have been put on hold as a federal judge has issued an order blocking Gov. David Paterson from imposing furloughs on about 100,000 state workers. U.S. District Judge Lawrence Kahn said yesterday in his order that public employee unions have shown their members would be irreparably harmed if they permanently lose 20 percent of their wages or salaries during weeks they’re forced not to work. Kahn set a hearing on the dispute for May 26. “Until we go to court, the state work force will not be making any sacrifice, and that’s unfortunate,” Paterson said. “But this is a system of laws and a society of rules, and we’ll go to court to try to persuade them that our position is right.” He wouldn’t say if layoffs would be necessary if furloughs are struck down. Prior to the injunction, the DMV had announced yesterday that its branches in 11 New York counties, including the location in Travis, would close May 21 as a result of the one-day furlough required for state workers. Driving tests and traffic hearings would have been rescheduled as a result.

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Also, the staff of CSI was notified that employees of the senior colleges of CUNY FURLOUGHS, PAGE A 14 would be required to take a furlough on May 21 as well, according to a letter by Dr. Tomás D. Morales, president of the college, posted on the school’s Web site. All final exams were to proceed as scheduled, with faculty and staff administering tests expected to be on campus. Those faculty and staff members would therefore be furloughed on a substitute day during next week, Morales noted. CLARIFYThe Legislature reluctantly approved the furloughs Monday night to help keep the state solvent. The budget is more than 40 days overdue and negotiations among legislative leaders on how to contend with a $9.2 billion deficit have ground to a halt. Leaders of the Civil Service Employees Association, the Public Employees Federation, the United University Professions with the New York State United Teachers union sought the court order. They are suing Paterson and the Legislature, arguing furloughs violate the U.S. Constitution’s protection of contracts. Paterson ordered the furloughs of “nonessential” workers and said they would save $30 million a week. The unions rejected requests for less severe measures, such as postponing their 4-percent raises to save the state money. Paterson has taken a 10 percent cut in pay, or more than $17,000, as he called for shared sacrifice during the fiscal crisis. --twitter.com/siadvance -- facebook.com/statenislandadvance © 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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Comptroller to demystify city budget By Peter N. Spencer May 15, 2010, 7:15AM STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- Confused about the city's $62.9 billion budget? You're not alone. City Comptroller John Liu will hold an informational meeting Monday at the College of Staten Island in Willowbrook to help residents understand the complex budget process, including revenue projections and funding cuts in programs and agencies that will directly affect Islanders. The meetings, which are being held in all five boroughs, are in response to queries by community boards. Liu, deputy comptroller for budget Marsha Van Wagner and other financial experts from the comptroller's office will explain how city elected officials create the annual spending plan, and will be available to answer questions about specific budget items. Mayor Michael Bloomberg's latest budget has a number of deep cuts, including closing 20 fire companies and as many as 75 senior centers, slashing library hours and reducing the city workforce by 11,000 employees. The mayor will negotiate those and other measures with the City Council over the coming weeks, before a final budget is passed prior to June 30, the end of the fiscal year. The comptroller's meeting will be held between 6 and 7:30 p.m. at CSI's Green Dolphin Lounge. twitter.com/siadvance -- facebook.com/statenislandadvance Š 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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8 CSI students spending the spring term in China By Staten Island Advance May 16, 2010, 6:38AM

College of Staten Island president Tomas Morales, second from left, and CUNY/Nanjing University program director Yang Zhizhong, second from right, pose with CSI students Matthew Greger, left, Walter Rozenfeld, center, and Ain Richardson, right, during their visit to China.

By Michelle Checchi STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- When students head to college, they enter a world of opportunity, and eight students from the College of Staten Island are taking full advantage by spending four months studying more than 11,000 miles away from home. The students are spending the spring term studying in China. Seven are attending Nanjing University, while one student is studying at the City University of Hong Kong. The CSI students are living in modern dormitory facilities while studying in China. According to Ken Bach, director of communications at CSI: "This semester, students will also enjoy about 10 program-led field trips to historic and cultural sites in and around Nanjing." One of the highlights of the student excursions is a week-long visit to Beijing, the capital of China , where they will visit sites such as the Forbidden City, the ornate Lama Temple, and have the opportunity to climb the Great Wall of China. Any credits the students earn while in China are recorded on their CSI transcripts, and can be applied to their course requirements. Students studying at Nanjing University can also earn credit toward a certificate in CSI's Modern China Studies certificate program. "The purpose of offering this study abroad program is to provide students the opportunity to explore the world," Bach said. In addition, the program helps students "to better understand an important world culture and language, and to integrate an international dimension to their thinking and studies," he continued. The study abroad program is paid for by the students themselves, though there are aid and scholarship opportunities.

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Since 1993, CSI has been sending students to study at Nanjing University. The school has offered study abroad programs for the past 30 years. Currently, the school sponsors 14 study abroad programs in eight countries, with six exchange programs. Following the spring semester, CSI will be sending about 30 students to take part in a one-month program this summer in Shanghai. twitter.com/siadvance -- facebook.com/statenislandadvance Š 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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U.S. Department of State's Partnership with the National Italian American  Foundation Assists  The U.S. Department of State joined forces with the National Italian American Foundation (NIAF) in a  public‐private partnership to bring a generous American response to the people of Abruzzo  Publish Date: 2010‐05‐17    The U.S. Department of State joined forces with the National Italian American Foundation (NIAF) in a  public‐private partnership to bring a generous American response to the people of Abruzzo, Italy, in the  aftermath of the devastating April 6, 2009 earthquake. The focus of this partnership has been to direct  aid to the University of L’Aquila and restore its role as an important academic, social, and economic  engine for the Abruzzo region. In the year since the earthquake, this partnership has generated a  number of projects that have helped restore the University of L’Aquila:    Adopt‐a‐Scholar: NIAF worked with several U.S. universities to provide scholarships for the students of  the University of L’Aquila who were displaced by the earthquake’s damage. NIAF formed partnerships  with the University of Miami, Sierra Nevada College, the College of Staten Island, and the University of  New Mexico, among others, to offer full tuition and room and board scholarships for the students of the  University of L’Aquila to have the opportunity to study at one of these American universities. More than  100 students applied. Over the past year, 52 students from the University of L’Aquila have benefited  from the scholarships (23 for the full academic year; and 29 for the Fall 2009 or Spring 2010 semester).  The scholarship packages’ total value was over $1.5 million. The program will continue as additional  University of L’Aquila students will benefit from scholarships in Fall 2010.    Building an Earthquake‐Resistant Modular Multipurpose Center: NIAF together with the State  Department and the University of L’Aquila have assessed the university's building needs and have  determined that a permanent construction of a modular dormitory will be built in the coming months  for the value of $250,000. NIAF and the University of L’Aquila have signed a Memorandum of  Understanding regarding this project.    University of L’Aquila / Capacity‐Building in the Mental Health Field: A State Department grant was given  to the Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma (HPRT), which hosted a four‐day workshop for a team of five  mental health professionals including the head of the Psychology Department of the University of  L’Aquila’s School of Medicine, and the Director of Family Medicine (Federazione Italiana Medici –  Medicina Generale Abruzzo). An additional State Department grant will support the Harvard Program  with the training of all mental health practitioners in the Abruzzo region in order to diagnose and treat 

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the long‐term effects of the earthquake. This is scheduled to take place in L’Aquila at the end of  September 2010.    Exchanges to the United States: Six local government and University of L’Aquila leaders traveled to the  United States in September 2009 under a State Department exchange program (IVLP) to visit academic  and non‐academic institutions experienced in disaster recovery and university development. Another  State Department‐sponsored exchange program brought University of L’Aquila department heads to San  Francisco and New Orleans to examine how American universities have coped with rebuilding after a  natural disaster, and their links with the private sector and local governments. The meetings with U.S.  academic interlocutors have laid the groundwork for future independent exchange agreements between  the University of L’Aquila and the U.S. universities. In April 2010, a special initiative on volunteerism  brought a volunteer from the Volunteer Support Center of the province of L’Aquila to the United States  to participate in a multi‐regional International Visitor Leadership Program.    Exchange to Italy: The U.S.‐Italy Fulbright Program is supporting a Fulbright Specialist at the University of  L’Aquila. The specialist ‐‐ who holds an MBA and has expertise in aiding disaster impacted businesses ‐‐  is assisting the University in building capacity so that it can be a stimulus for restoration of economic  development in the area. The specialist, who is currently the Executive Director of the Louisiana  Business and Technology Center, will present lectures, consult, and perform a needs assessment with  the goal of assisting the University to: 1) plan for the establishment of a sustainable business incubator,  2) develop strategies for recovery of disaster impacted businesses, and 3) promote new business  startup. The specialist will also consult with the local governments because of their leading role in the  reconstruction and in fostering economic development. He will be in L’Aquila a total of 42 days,  departing mid‐June 2010.    English Language Teaching & Learning: A State Department grant to TESOL‐Italy (Teachers of English to  Speakers of Other Languages) was given for a pilot project in Abruzzo targeted at schools serving  displaced students from L’Aquila. This project included the acquisition and distribution of Italian text  books of English for the primary, secondary and university levels, and supported seminars, talks, and e‐ tutoring with educators in Abruzzo in order to make effective use of TESOL materials. The members of  TESOL are volunteering their time to support the educators in Abruzzo. In November 2009, a group of 22  secondary school teachers of English from L’Aquila and surrounding areas attended the annual TESOL  conference in Rome on Multiplying Voices. TESOL distributed English teaching materials that included a  book by keynote speaker Dr. Janet Zadina, who returned to Italy a few months later to work more  closely with the teachers from Abruzzo.    Preserving Archives: The State Department brought an expert archivist from the United States to  perform an in‐depth assessment of information resources in L’Aquila and to evaluate the needs of  various libraries in L’Aquila, including digitalization of records. As a follow‐on, the State Department also  funded a University of L’Aquila archivist/librarian’s participation in a regional conference on the  digitalization of cultural heritage.   

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Donation of Information Resources: The State Department donated information and reference materials  to assist L’Aquila’s public libraries and school libraries. One contribution included giving 5,000  dictionaries for English learners that are being distributed to all high school students in the earthquake‐ stricken area.    Fine Arts Curator: The U.S. Embassy has offered its experienced curator/conservator to the University of  L’Aquila for the period of one month to assist the university in an art inventory or restoration project to  help assess its art collection and any damage to the art caused by the earthquake.    Summer Activities for Youth: The State Department supported projects in the summer and fall of 2009,  undertaken by civil society groups in Abruzzo, to engage youngsters in the many tent camps with  recreational activities, such as sports and games. In particular, U.S. Embassy Rome worked with the  Italian Civil Protection Agency and the Italian National Basketball Federation to provide a basketball day  camp for 130 young people affected by the earthquake. The reaction of the youngsters, aged 6‐12, on  "graduation day" showed the program’s value in helping to bring joy back into the lives of earthquake  victims. 

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U.S. Department of State's Partnership with the National Italian American Foundation Assists the University of L'Aquila in its Earthquake Recovery Office of the Spokesman Washington, DC May 17, 2010 The U.S. Department of State joined forces with the National Italian American Foundation (NIAF) in a publicprivate partnership to bring a generous American response to the people of Abruzzo, Italy, in the aftermath of the devastating April 6, 2009 earthquake. The focus of this partnership has been to direct aid to the University of L’Aquila and restore its role as an important academic, social, and economic engine for the Abruzzo region. In the year since the earthquake, this partnership has generated a number of projects that have helped restore the University of L’Aquila: Adopt-a-Scholar: NIAF worked with several U.S. universities to provide scholarships for the students of the University of L’Aquila who were displaced by the earthquake’s damage. NIAF formed partnerships with the University of Miami, Sierra Nevada College, the College of Staten Island, and the University of New Mexico, among others, to offer full tuition and room and board scholarships for the students of the University of L’Aquila to have the opportunity to study at one of these American universities. More than 100 students applied. Over the past year, 52 students from the University of L’Aquila have benefited from the scholarships (23 for the full academic year; and 29 for the Fall 2009 or Spring 2010 semester). The scholarship packages’ total value was over $1.5 million. The program will continue as additional University of L’Aquila students will benefit from scholarships in Fall 2010. Building an Earthquake-Resistant Modular Multipurpose Center: NIAF together with the State Department and the University of L’Aquila have assessed the university's building needs and have determined that a permanent construction of a modular dormitory will be built in the coming months for the value of $250,000. NIAF and the University of L’Aquila have signed a Memorandum of Understanding regarding this project. University of L’Aquila / Capacity-Building in the Mental Health Field: A State Department grant was given to the Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma (HPRT), which hosted a four-day workshop for a team of five mental health professionals including the head of the Psychology Department of the University of L’Aquila’s School of Medicine, and the Director of Family Medicine (Federazione Italiana Medici – Medicina Generale Abruzzo). An additional State Department grant will support the Harvard Program with the training of all mental health practitioners in the Abruzzo region in order to diagnose and treat the long-term effects of the earthquake. This is scheduled to take place in L’Aquila at the end of September 2010. Exchanges to the United States: Six local government and University of L’Aquila leaders traveled to the United States in September 2009 under a State Department exchange program (IVLP) to visit academic and non-academic institutions experienced in disaster recovery and university development. Another State Department-sponsored exchange program brought University of L’Aquila department heads to San Francisco and New Orleans to examine how American universities have coped with rebuilding after a natural disaster, and their links with the private sector and local governments. The meetings with U.S. academic interlocutors

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have laid the groundwork for future independent exchange agreements between the University of L’Aquila and the U.S. universities. In April 2010, a special initiative on volunteerism brought a volunteer from the Volunteer Support Center of the province of L’Aquila to the United States to participate in a multi-regional International Visitor Leadership Program. Exchange to Italy: The U.S.-Italy Fulbright Program is supporting a Fulbright Specialist at the University of L’Aquila. The specialist -- who holds an MBA and has expertise in aiding disaster impacted businesses -- is assisting the University in building capacity so that it can be a stimulus for restoration of economic development in the area. The specialist, who is currently the Executive Director of the Louisiana Business and Technology Center, will present lectures, consult, and perform a needs assessment with the goal of assisting the University to: 1) plan for the establishment of a sustainable business incubator, 2) develop strategies for recovery of disaster impacted businesses, and 3) promote new business startup. The specialist will also consult with the local governments because of their leading role in the reconstruction and in fostering economic development. He will be in L’Aquila a total of 42 days, departing mid-June 2010. English Language Teaching & Learning: A State Department grant to TESOL-Italy (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages) was given for a pilot project in Abruzzo targeted at schools serving displaced students from L’Aquila. This project included the acquisition and distribution of Italian text books of English for the primary, secondary and university levels, and supported seminars, talks, and e-tutoring with educators in Abruzzo in order to make effective use of TESOL materials. The members of TESOL are volunteering their time to support the educators in Abruzzo. In November 2009, a group of 22 secondary school teachers of English from L’Aquila and surrounding areas attended the annual TESOL conference in Rome on Multiplying Voices. TESOL distributed English teaching materials that included a book by keynote speaker Dr. Janet Zadina, who returned to Italy a few months later to work more closely with the teachers from Abruzzo. Preserving Archives: The State Department brought an expert archivist from the United States to perform an in-depth assessment of information resources in L’Aquila and to evaluate the needs of various libraries in L’Aquila, including digitalization of records. As a follow-on, the State Department also funded a University of L’Aquila archivist/librarian’s participation in a regional conference on the digitalization of cultural heritage. Donation of Information Resources: The State Department donated information and reference materials to assist L’Aquila’s public libraries and school libraries. One contribution included giving 5,000 dictionaries for English learners that are being distributed to all high school students in the earthquake-stricken area. Fine Arts Curator: The U.S. Embassy has offered its experienced curator/conservator to the University of L’Aquila for the period of one month to assist the university in an art inventory or restoration project to help assess its art collection and any damage to the art caused by the earthquake. Summer Activities for Youth: The State Department supported projects in the summer and fall of 2009, undertaken by civil society groups in Abruzzo, to engage youngsters in the many tent camps with recreational activities, such as sports and games. In particular, U.S. Embassy Rome worked with the Italian Civil Protection Agency and the Italian National Basketball Federation to provide a basketball day camp for 130 young people affected by the earthquake. The reaction of the youngsters, aged 6-12, on "graduation day" showed the program’s value in helping to bring joy back into the lives of earthquake victims.

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America.gov Engaging the world

Topics: Opportunity Keywords: Public-Private Partnership, National Italian American Foundation, earthquake, education, assistance, recovery

17 May 2010

U.S., Italian American Foundation Partner to Aid Abruzzo Region Highlights public-private partnership in aftermath of Italian earthquake U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE Office of the Spokesman May 17, 2010 FACT SHEET U.S. Department of State's Partnership with the National Italian American Foundation Assists the University of L'Aquila in its Earthquake Recovery The U.S. Department of State joined forces with the National Italian American Foundation (NIAF) in a public-private partnership to bring a generous American response to the people of Abruzzo, Italy, in the aftermath of the devastating April 6, 2009 earthquake. The focus of this partnership has been to direct aid to the University of L’Aquila and restore its role as an important academic, social, and economic engine for the Abruzzo region. In the year since the earthquake, this partnership has generated a number of projects that have helped restore the University of L’Aquila: Adopt-a-Scholar: NIAF worked with several U.S. universities to provide scholarships for the students of the University of L’Aquila who were displaced by the earthquake’s damage. NIAF formed partnerships with the University of Miami, Sierra Nevada College, the College of Staten Island, and the University of New Mexico, among others, to offer full tuition and room and board scholarships for the students of the University of L’Aquila to have the opportunity to study at one of these American universities. More than 100 students applied. Over the past year, 52 students from the University of L’Aquila have benefited from the scholarships (23 for the full academic year; and 29 for the Fall 2009 or Spring 2010 semester). The scholarship packages’ total value was over $1.5 million. The program will continue as additional University of L’Aquila students will benefit from scholarships in Fall 2010. Building an Earthquake-Resistant Modular Multipurpose Center: NIAF together with the State Department and the University of L’Aquila have assessed the university's building needs and have determined that a permanent construction of a modular dormitory will be built in the coming months for the value of $250,000. NIAF and

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the University of L’Aquila have signed a Memorandum of Understanding regarding this project. University of L’Aquila / Capacity-Building in the Mental Health Field: A State Department grant was given to the Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma (HPRT), which hosted a four-day workshop for a team of five mental health professionals including the head of the Psychology Department of the University of L’Aquila’s School of Medicine, and the Director of Family Medicine (Federazione Italiana Medici – Medicina Generale Abruzzo). An additional State Department grant will support the Harvard Program with the training of all mental health practitioners in the Abruzzo region in order to diagnose and treat the long-term effects of the earthquake. This is scheduled to take place in L’Aquila at the end of September 2010. Exchanges to the United States: Six local government and University of L’Aquila leaders traveled to the United States in September 2009 under a State Department exchange program (IVLP) to visit academic and non-academic institutions experienced in disaster recovery and university development. Another State Department-sponsored exchange program brought University of L’Aquila department heads to San Francisco and New Orleans to examine how American universities have coped with rebuilding after a natural disaster, and their links with the private sector and local governments. The meetings with U.S. academic interlocutors have laid the groundwork for future independent exchange agreements between the University of L’Aquila and the U.S. universities. In April 2010, a special initiative on volunteerism brought a volunteer from the Volunteer Support Center of the province of L’Aquila to the United States to participate in a multi-regional International Visitor Leadership Program. Exchange to Italy: The U.S.-Italy Fulbright Program is supporting a Fulbright Specialist at the University of L’Aquila. The specialist -- who holds an MBA and has expertise in aiding disaster impacted businesses -- is assisting the University in building capacity so that it can be a stimulus for restoration of economic development in the area. The specialist, who is currently the Executive Director of the Louisiana Business and Technology Center, will present lectures, consult, and perform a needs assessment with the goal of assisting the University to: 1) plan for the establishment of a sustainable business incubator, 2) develop strategies for recovery of disaster impacted businesses, and 3) promote new business startup. The specialist will also consult with the local governments because of their leading role in the reconstruction and in fostering economic development. He will be in L’Aquila a total of 42 days, departing mid-June 2010. English Language Teaching & Learning: A State Department grant to TESOL-Italy (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages) was given for a pilot project in Abruzzo targeted at schools serving displaced students from L’Aquila. This project included the acquisition and distribution of Italian text books of English for the primary, secondary and university levels, and supported seminars, talks, and etutoring with educators in Abruzzo in order to make effective use of TESOL materials. The members of TESOL are volunteering their time to support the educators in Abruzzo. In November 2009, a group of 22 secondary school teachers of English from L’Aquila and surrounding areas attended the annual TESOL conference in Rome on Multiplying Voices. TESOL distributed English teaching Page 110 of 155


materials that included a book by keynote speaker Dr. Janet Zadina, who returned to Italy a few months later to work more closely with the teachers from Abruzzo. Preserving Archives: The State Department brought an expert archivist from the United States to perform an in-depth assessment of information resources in L’Aquila and to evaluate the needs of various libraries in L’Aquila, including digitalization of records. As a follow-on, the State Department also funded a University of L’Aquila archivist/librarian’s participation in a regional conference on the digitalization of cultural heritage. Donation of Information Resources: The State Department donated information and reference materials to assist L’Aquila’s public libraries and school libraries. One contribution included giving 5,000 dictionaries for English learners that are being distributed to all high school students in the earthquake-stricken area. Fine Arts Curator: The U.S. Embassy has offered its experienced curator/conservator to the University of L’Aquila for the period of one month to assist the university in an art inventory or restoration project to help assess its art collection and any damage to the art caused by the earthquake. Summer Activities for Youth: The State Department supported projects in the summer and fall of 2009, undertaken by civil society groups in Abruzzo, to engage youngsters in the many tent camps with recreational activities, such as sports and games. In particular, U.S. Embassy Rome worked with the Italian Civil Protection Agency and the Italian National Basketball Federation to provide a basketball day camp for 130 young people affected by the earthquake. The reaction of the youngsters, aged 6-12, on "graduation day" showed the program’s value in helping to bring joy back into the lives of earthquake victims. (Distributed by the Bureau of International Information Programs, U.S. Department of State. Web site: http://www.america.gov)

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Gooey-sweet marshmallows with chocolate By Pamela Silvestri May 19, 2010, 4:00PM STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — In a month or so, your little ones might be headed off to camp. Whether that’s in the 04040 zip code or at The College of Staten Island in Willowbrook, you don’t need a roaring campfire to enjoy a gooey-sweet dessert with the family. Heck, you won’t even need a green twig to stick marshmallows into the flames. We’ll suggest turning the sweet into a pie. So, why are they called s’mores anyway? Because you’ll always want some more molten marshmallows sandwiched between graham crackers and a Hershey bar square. I do prefer a hunk of dark chocolate myself. A childhood campfire buddy would plug peanut butter into the pile. That was a good little trick although, as an adult, one could frown at the calorie factor. When making this pie, keep an eye on the marshmallow topping: It can become incinerated if left under the broiler for too long. Perhaps the crunchy singe is a pleasant experience on the palate reminicent of camping and simpler times. — Pamela Silvestri RECIPE: S’MORES PIE (Makes 8 servings) AP Photo

For the crust: 2 cups graham cracker crumbs

2 tablespoons honey ¼ teaspoon cinnamon 6 tablespoons butter, melted For the chocolate filling: 8 ounces dark chocolate, chopped 2 (14-ounce) cans sweetened condensed milk 6 egg yolks 1 teaspoon vanilla extract For the marshmallow topping: 2 cups sugar ½ cup water

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3 tablespoons corn syrup 6 egg whites 2 ¼ teaspoon (¼-ounce packet) powdered gelatin 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Heat the oven to 350 F. Coat a deep 10-inch pie plate with cooking spray. In a medium bowl, combine the graham cracker crumbs, honey, cinnamon and melted butter. Mix with a fork until well combined. Using the back of a spoon or lightly oiled fingers, press the crust mixture into the bottom and up the sides of the prepared pie plate. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes, or until slightly darker golden around the edges. Meanwhile, mix the filling. In a medium microwave-safe bowl, melt the chocolate in 30 second intervals, stirring between. Once completely melted, stir in the sweetened condensed milk, egg yolks and vanilla. Pour into the baked crust. Return the pie to the oven and bake for 25 to 30 minutes, or until the filling is set and just jiggles slightly at the center. Set aside to cool. When the pie has cooled to room temperature, make the marshmallow topping. In a small saucepan over medium-high, combine the sugar, water and corn syrup. Heat until the sugar has dissolved and the syrup reaches 240 F on a candy or instant thermometer. While the sugar heats, in the bowl of a stand mixer, use the whisk attachment to beat the egg whites on medium until they hold soft peaks. In a small bowl, combine the gelatin and 3 tablespoons of water. When the sugar syrup reaches 240 F, with the mixer running, pour the sugar down the inside edge of the mixer bowl into the egg whites. Add the gelatin mixture and beat to combine. The mixture should be thick and glossy. Scrape down the bowl with a rubber spatula to ensure all of the gelatin is incorporated. Beat for another 5 minutes on medium-high, then add the vanilla. Use a large spoon to top the pie with the marshmallow, making large dollops and peaks with the spoon and completely covering the surface of the pie. Using a kitchen torch, lightly brown the marshmallow, being careful not to burn it. Alternatively, place the pie under the oven’s broiler until just browned, rotating the pie as needed for even browning. — Recipe by Alison Ladman, The Associated Press

© 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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High-school students get a taste of college By Mark D. Stein May 27, 2010, 10:40AM

Rich Brown, a lab technician at the College of Staten Island in Willowbrook, teaches high school students digital logic using a mechanical switch. STATEN ISLAND ADVANCE/MARK STEIN

CSI’s Liberty Partnership Program pairs with National Grid to introduce teens to wonders of engineering STATEN ISLAND, NY - WILLOWBROOK - It wasn’t just another workshop where nine wide-eyed teenagers learned to plug wires and operate switches to make working mechanical connections. It was a step in moving ahead to the next level: College. On May 19, in building 4N of the College of Staten Island, the teens – seven from Curtis High School, one from Port Richmond High School, and a pre-freshman student from Morris Intermediate School in New Brighton – practiced engineering for the second time that week. They are all part of the college’s Liberty Partnership Program, a drop-out prevention initiative and collaborative college, school and community-based project that provides instructional enrichment and support services to students and families. “We help these kids discover their dreams,” said Shawn Landry, youth organizer and intern coordinator for Liberty. “We develop a plan to actually get them there.” Key to the plan is learning about engineering, typically a subject available at the college level. But staff involved with the CSI Liberty Partnership saw an opportunity to engage youngsters earlier and paired with National Grid, which provided a $15,000 grant to give high school students an opportunity to explore the

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subject. This is the third year of the collaboration. Neo Antonides, associate professor of engineering science who instructs the students, said it’s important to get them involved with the topic at an early age. “That’s a big thing we want to do. We try to expose them to different parts of engineering,” the professor said, referring to the practice of aeronautical engineering – constructing and flying model planes – which occurred two days earlier. On this particular day, the nine teens were huddled together in the engineering room, tinkering with mechanical switches and using zeroes and ones to form a combination. Ms. Landry oversees 240 at-risk students from Curtis, Port Richmond, New Dorp and Susan E. Wagner high schools. She strongly believes that setting a student in a campus atmosphere and professional environment can lead them to greater success. “They get interested and they discover, ‘Hey, I could do this type of stuff,’ “ she said. CSI Liberty Partnership boasts a 92-percent graduation rate. Vincent Panepinto, a Port Richmond High School 16-year-old and Westerleigh resident, said he likes what he’s experienced in the engineering field. “If you pick a trade, this is a good one to do,” he said. Nasir Abdullah, 57, whose daughter, Inshirah, was participating in the session, was thrilled with the program. “I think it’s great. It’s an opportunity for a light to come on, literally and figuratively,” the computer technician said. “As a parent, we always have to take advantage of every opportunity that comes along for our children.” Ms. Landry said spots are open in the CSI Liberty Partnership. She can be reached at 718-982-2352. © 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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College of Staten Island graduates told to remember their mentors By Amy Padnani May 27, 2010, 4:29PM

Staten Island Advance/Irving Silverstein Kimberly Julien of Granitville waves to family and friends during the College of Staten Island commencement ceremony.

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- Though they were leaving behind their classrooms, textbooks and professors, 2,106 graduates from the College of Staten Island were encouraged today to keep learning. At the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 34th annual commencement, the speaker, Dr. Muriel Howard, said she discovered more about life each time she allowed herself to be helped by her friends, family and colleagues. She told graduates to never forget the support of those around them, because they are the ones who will help them move forward. "After you have celebrated what you have accomplished, maybe taken a little vacation, you will be entering a fascinating, mysterious, exciting and sometimes scary place I call the real world," she said. "Try to remember that the reason you are sitting in this audience today, poised to leave college, is that you had mentors." Dr. Howard, who graduated from CSI in 1971, when it was known as Richmond College, is the first female president of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. She was also the president of Buffalo State College for 13 years. Click here for a full list of graduates.

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Post your photos of the commencement ceremony in the Celebrations gallery. Here are more photos from the event:

Š 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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NY Nursing Students Attend Lobby Day in Albany, NY

More than 50 students from Hopfer School of Nursing, Mount Vernon, NY, students and faculty traveled to Albany on April 20 to participate in the annual Lobby Day sponsored by the New York State Nurses Association (NYSNA). In advance of their arrival in Albany, students corresponded with their elected officials and requested meetings to talk about their concerns. After the morning program, they spent the afternoon visiting their legislators and advocating for laws designed to help patient safety and reduce the shortage of nurses. In addition to lobbying for healthcare issues and experiencing the camaraderie of the day, Hopfer students were pleased to be part of the process that is an important part of their curriculum - advocacy in the form of political action. Twenty Nursing Leadership Students from the College of Staten Island, Staten Island, NY, also participated in Lobby Day in Albany. "Nurses represent the profession by being the largest healthcare force to affect patient outcomes. They are with patients 24/7 providing direct care, advocating and coordinating. Who better to be in Albany affecting law?" asked Marie Giordano, MS, RN, assistant professor of nursing at the College of Staten Island. CSI nursing students participated in a presentation by members of NYSNA focusing on the "dos and don'ts" of lobbying and visited local legislators including State Reps. Lou Tobacco (R-Staten Island), Matthew Titone (D-Staten Island) and Diane Savino (D-Brooklyn).

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Students & Alumni 

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Shoddy bus service makes students late for class By Letters to the Editor/Staten Island Adva... May 03, 2010, 10:02AM By SEAN CROWE, THE BRONX I, like many others, rely on the “service” provided by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority for my transportation needs. Living in the Bronx, I have a long commute to my school, the College of Staten Island, and as such I afford myself a decent amount of time to travel. Usually, I’ll leave around 5 o’clock for my 8 class. Three hours should be more than enough time to reach the college on time, but I’ve been having problems. Normally, I would take the shuttle bus provided by the college, but many other commuters also take that bus and it can’t always fit us all. Also, this bus does not run on weekends. As the only alternative, I take the MTA’s S-62 bus. This has almost never worked out well for me. I recall one particular Saturday morning. I left my home before 6 o’clock to head for a 9 o’clock class. I made decent times on the subway and ferry but spent over an hour and a half waiting for a bus. The ferry arrived just as the previous bus had left and I was stranded with at least 15 other students. The weather this day was brutal, by the way. It was extremely cold; I had lost all feeling in my fingertips by the time the next bus came. I got to my class 45 minutes late. I suffered a similar waiting time on the return trip. I had a fellow commuter complain to me that she failed a class because of lateness caused by shoddy bus service. I’m not trying to tell the MTA how to run their buses, but if the bus is going to come every 90 minutes, the schedule shouldn’t be telling commuters that it’ll come every half hour. © 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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Lawmaker gave students of destroyed college a second chance By Letters to the Editor/Staten Island Adva... May 07, 2010, 7:23AM By ELIZABETH DAVIS, ST. GEORGE I am a student at the College of Staten Island. A few weeks ago, I learned that two of my classmates were from L’Aquila University, which was destroyed last year in the Abruzzo earthquake in Italy in April 2009. These two young Italians are eager to learn and were given a second chance for their studies through Congressman Michael McMahon’s leadership and position on National Italian American Foundation’s earthquake steering committee. When McMahon learned of NIAF’s program to sponsor L’Aquila students in the U.S., he immediately hosted a congressional briefing with the State Department to get other offices involved, and he even arranged for these two students to attend classes at CSI. Unfortunately, L’Aquila University is still destroyed, but I have hope that the students have a chance thanks to the leadership and compassion of people like Congressman McMahon.

© 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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Desperate warning as Staten Island ferry crashes, 'Brace yourself!'

blared the boat's horn and ordered the crew to push passengers away from the front of the out-of-control ship. "It was coming in [to dock], but it wasn't slowing down," said Danyelle Tellefson, 18, who was traveling to Staten Island to visit her mom for Mother's Day.

BY Kate Nocera, Erica Pearson and Jonathan Lemire DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITERS

"A guy came by yelling 'Brace yourself! Brace yourself!'" Tellefson said. "We all ran to the back, and it smashed into the dock."

Originally Published:Saturday, May 8th 2010, 11:14 PM Updated: Sunday, May 9th 2010, 1:42 AM

Many of the 252 passengers on board the 9 a.m. ferry to Staten Island - some traveling for work and some to visit loved ones - first had an inkling something was wrong when the boat did not slow down as they approached the terminal. "I opened the door to see the front [of the boat] but I didn't see him stopping," said Jose Rivera, 45, a carpenter from Brooklyn. "I asked, 'Isn't he going to slow down?'" Kurdzuk/The Star-LedgerDamage on the starboard side of the Staten Island Ferry Andrew J. Barberi after crashing into it's slip causing over 60 injuries.

They had almost no warning. Seconds before the Staten Island ferry slammed into a pier, the captain frantically

As the Andrew J. Barberi bore down on the ferry terminal, the normal prerecorded message that asks passengers to prepare for landing was interrupted by a voice repeating the word "red" several times, commuters said.

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Though most passengers had stayed off the boat's outdoor platform because of the rain, those inside near the front were desperately corralled by the crew. "When we hit, I saw people crash into the glass and fall down around me," said Nakia Taylor, 19, a student at the College of Staten Island.

the Bronx, said. "I don't know if I'm going to come back to Staten Island unless someone drives me." jlemire@nydailynews.com With Ben Chapman

The deafening impact knocked dozens of passengers off their feet and sent others toppling down the boat's interior stairs, shaken witnesses said. No one was thrown overboard. "It was a worse impact than a car crash," said Alicia Eason, 26, a tourist from Tennessee who was on the ferry. "It felt like an earthquake. "People were tossed everywhere," said Eason, who had been enjoying the ferry's stunning views in the moments before the crash. Though many passengers praised the crew's quick action, others said they were reluctant to make the voyage again. "It makes me feel like I don't want to take the ferry ever again," David Farley, 59, of

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CSI student critical after a.m. accident in Arden Heights By John M. Annese May 13, 2010, 12:58PM STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- A 27-year-old driver remains in critical condition with a fractured skull after he lost control of his car in Arden Heights early this morning. The crash happened at about 5:15 a.m., on Arthur Kill Road, near the Arden Avenue intersection. Police sources say Conrado Dilag, 27, a student at the College of Staten Island, was driving along Arthur Kill Road when he took a bend too fast. He lost control of his Acura and went off the road, plowing through a fence and crashing into a tractor trailer parked in a lot, those sources say.

Google image The accident occurred on Arthur Kill Road near its intersection with Arden Avenue at about 5:15 this morning.

The impact left Dilag with a fractured skull and a broken leg, sources say, but his condition has been stabilized and police believe he may pull through. He’s currently in critical condition at Staten Island University Hospital, Ocean Breeze, a hospital spokesman confirmed. The NYPD’s Accident Investigation Squad, which handles fatal and near-fatal crashes, was initially summoned to the scene, but was called back after Dilag’s condition improved, sources said. --twitter.com/siadvance -- facebook.com/statenislandadvance

© 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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College of Staten Island commencement ceremony graduates more than 2,100 By Staten Island Advance May 27, 2010, 12:32PM STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- The clouds are doing nothing to dampen the spirit of College of Staten Island students who received their degrees today at the Willowbrook school's 34th commencement ceremony. CSI President Dr. Tomรกs Morales recognized recent recipients of the President's Award, Dr. Gordon and Lorraine Di Paolo, Robert Scamardella, and Zane Tankel. --WERE YOU THERE? UPLOAD YOUR PHOTOS AND VIDEOS --Afterward, he asked students to stand based on the group they were graduating with. In all, more than 2,100 degrees were handed out on the school's Great Lawn. Dr. Muriel Howard, president of the American Association of State College's and Universities (AASCU), a CSI alumnus, was the commencement speaker. Log on to SILive.com later for more photos and a story.

College of Staten Island graduates JANUARY, 2010 THE VERRAZANO SCHOOL Adam Birnbaum, Vladislav Klym, Louis Padavano. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE Jaclyn Afflitto, Catherine A. Austria, Lemuel Jones Ayudtud, Erkend Bacelli, Samantha A. Bodden, Andrea Brevetti, Sean M. Broderick, Kenneth D. Browne, Jonathan Burns, Annette Cassella, Michele R. Christensen, Matthew J. Connors, Christopher T. Corcoran, Jennifer P. Deddo, Nicholas A. DiBenedetto, Narkis Dinavitser, Andi Doci, Christina Fatuzzo, Jonathan Feliciano, James Femia, Carissa Gaggi, Jennifer Gagliano, Matthew D. Gallego, Christian A. Garabedian, Philip J. Gardner, Barbara Gawor, Aleksey Geyman, Jesse T. Goff, Samantha Greenberg, Regina A. Hagemann, Jennie A. Jones, Valentina Kareva, Andreas Kotsamanidis, Jessica A. Lamus, Amy M. Lettieri, Chuyu Li, Diana Ljuljic, Jeanette Hafele Lopez, Melissa L. Loughlin, Andrea Lundy, Jeanmarie Martini, Jason Mendiola, Nicole M. Messina, Steven Metcalfe, Larisa Mitoyants, Geeta P. Nakar, Pamela J. Napolitano, Joseph C. Picciotto, Marissa A. Picciotto, Lucy Quach, Ahra Ra, Viktoria Reshetilova, Jesus Ruiz, Katie A. Ryan, Irina Sela, Stanislav Shraybman, Natalia Shumakh, April Soto, Jorge N. Soto, Kristin E. Renninger Spain, Cassandra N. Stern, Patrick D. Taaffe, Antuela Tollja, Alla Tourakhodjaeva, Tabetha Tanae Tyndale, Giuseppe Vitale, Albert Weston, Jr., Kevin Whyte, Anastasia Yakubovich, Jian He Zhou. ASSOCIATE IN ARTS Alma Ajdinovska, Christina Balistreri, Vernice Barnes, Cristy A. Belmer, Richard M. Betancourt, Amanda M. Bolognese, Brian S. Brice, Daniello L. Cacace, Jennifer Caggiano, Nicole M. Candela, Jillian C. Carbonaro, Kristopher Carbonaro, Milind S. Christian, Melissa D. Ciaravino, Maryliz Conroy, Gerard J. Corcoran, Tiffany A. Cordero, Kimberly Cortes, Clare A. Cranston, Patricia A. Crea, Stephanie Crowe, Kristen Cucurullo, Sean J.

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Dawson, Elena M. Delucia, Demetrius G. Dermanis, Amanda R. Diario, Angela C. DiCostanzo, Krystal L. Douchey, Ashley A. Duchi, Majlinda Duka, Andrew D. Espiritu, Diana Fahmy, Amanda A. Falco, Bliss L. Falcone, Heather A. Farley, Lenore Fedele, Kate E. Finley, Allysha L. Francis, Stephanie Franzese, Deanna A. Frascona, Michael G. Froehlich, Suzanne M. Galati, Marlaina Gallo, Jose L. Garcia, Theresa Geandomenico, Robert Glennerster, Patricia A. Gonnella, Lisa Grissler, Kim Y. Grullon, Lauren M. Guercio, Bielka M. Gutierrez, Jordan D. Harrell, Carl C. Haynes, William Heines, Sarah E. Hennig, Kristy A. Herrera, Tanya M. Holowchuk, Timothy M. Hurley, Jesse J. Ingoglia, Cristina Karag, Caroline N. Kardaszweski, Yi Jin Kim, Charles A. Kosa, Marianthi Koullias, Richard F. Lee, Elena Leggio, Loren Lemberg, Glen Levy, Darnella Lashawn Lewis, Qing Li, Michael M. Libert, Alex M. Lilling, Christina I. Mannarino, Lisa A. Marino, Gina Martino, Teresa R. Mayer, Kaitlyn Meilak, Erica L. Meronchek, Felicia A. Mirsky, Francesca D. Morgello, Irene Moroz, Jacqueline M. Murphy, Meghan C. Murphy, Phillip A. Nau, Linda Nieves, Melissa Nunziata, Ashley Orloski, Eman Othman, Veronica Padilla, Nikki L. Pannone, Pranvera M. Papraniku, Marina Pasynkova, Robert J. Patsakos, Amanda R. Perez, Lorraine Perez, Michael T. Piccirillo, Christina R. Pietrunti, John M. Pisani, Farrah J. Pisano, Joseph Pristera III, Danielle R. Randazzo, Kimberly A. Rello, Melissa C. Reneau, Justina Rizzo, Lauren A. Rizzuto, Catherine A. Roca, Diane K. Rozas, Erica Sadagursky, Hebba Saker, Jaclyn Scali, Keith W. Schacht, Michael B. Schiffer, Meghan C. Schwencke, Diana Sciortino, Marylou S. Sciortino, Mark W. Seskin, Denise Sforza, Alyssa Simeone, Tanya Simpson, Martyna A. Sobczyszyn, Sonila Sokoli, Andrew Sookram, Lyubov Soybelman, Wayne T. Springman, Nicole M. Stern, Anita Suberska, Michelle Sy, Naqi Azhar Syed, Tiffany Tam, Elias M. Taweel, Christina M. Tesoriero, Jane A. Thomas, Colleen Tierney, Anthony R. Troise, Joanne Sarah Tseng, Khawlah Turifi, James Valcime, Paul V. Valentino, Kari Drew Varriale, Milagros Vega, Diana M. Villela, Gail L. Wodkiewicz, Ashley E. Wunderlich, Burcin Yalcin, Angus Yip, Dina Kelly Zoumboulis. ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE Danielle Fibikar, Christina N. Germano, Merita Kolarevic, Eriselda Konda, Eugene Lempert, Justine Li, Anthony G. Romano, Aramis W. Zeno, Henry Zou. BACHELOR OF ARTS Toniann Accurso, Antonella Agugliaro, Crystal R. Alexander, Ruth S. Alexandre, Gihan Mohamed Ali, Talika Andrews, Anthony V. Arcabascio, Stephanie D. Archer, Karla J. Arias, Sandy Arias, Elisa M. Arrigo, Danielle E. Ausiello, Robert Barberio, Ola Ayisat Baruwa, Evelyn Beauchamp, Stephanie N. Begley, Thomas A. Bello III, Cristy A. Belmer, Jeremy D. Berliner, Jennifer Bernstein, Michael P. Beyer, ToniAnn Boccadifuoco, Jason A. Bonilla, Michelle Borowski, Ariel Brennan, Nicholas A. Brennan, John V. Buono, Daniello L. Cacace, Maria N. Cambria, Rejmonda Capa, Laura Carboni, Craig S. Carlson, Jennifer E. Carullo, Katherine Patricia-Clare Centrone, Daniel Chambers, Matthew Chambers, Raymond Chan, Susan R. Chapman, Fatima Chaudhry, Rhagina N. Chisolm, Annie Chow, Nicole Cintron, Melanie A. Cisneros, Jennifer M. Cohen, Jason Cotto, Lauren Cristini, Elizabeth A. DeLuca, Christian L. DeMeglio, Jeanette E. Demott, Maria G. Denaxas, Victor S. De Paola, Adrianna Dermanis, Bianca W. DeSantis, Jennifer Devine, Amanda R. Diario, Andrew DiMarco, Francesca M. DiMarco, Debra A. Di Tommaso, Patrick Doodian, Alyssa B. Edgeworth, Dmitry Eremtchouk, Michael Fernandez, Kristen M. Fiore, Dana M. Foley, Kathleen M. Foronda, Dennis R. Gaffigan, Ryan Gallagher, Marlaina Gallo, Enrique Garcia, Brittany N. Gargiulo, Jessica E. Geisler, Chelsea Gendvil, Yury V. Getsin, Antoinette Gill, Jessica A. Giordano, Gabriella Gomez, Armando T. Gonzalez, Yevgeniy Gorban, Meaghan D. Gorman, Adam Grabowski, Maggie K. Grady, Jillian Grzeczka, Charles A. Hack, Marc Hansen, Lanre T. Hassan, Kathryn M. Hennessy, Shannon C. Hood, Alicja Kinga Hus, Nirron Ingwer, Narmeen Iqbal, Tasha H. Irizarry, Michele Karpeles, Matthew Kazlowski, Alisa Komisarenko, Elizabeth Olufunke Komolafe, Marianthi Koullias, Garry L. Kovtun, Bonnie G. Lee, Myung bok Max Lee, Steven Lee, Gregory E. Levin, Jillian N. Levoyer, Melissa S. Lichter, Christina M. Licitra, Nicholas M. Loparnos, Samantha J. Lord, Kathleen Mac Lellan, Teresa Simone Marcus, Frida J. Marson, Jessica N. Martinez, Kristen A. Massimillo, Jamie Mastropasqua, Flora M. Migliaccio, James Miley, Rebecca A. Milinazzo, Stephanie Mininni, Nicole Misiti, Charles L. Montanti III, Hamlet Montero, Kimberly R. Mrowka, Jaclyn M. Nelms, Vincent M. Ng, Annmarie Nix, Trista Nordstrom, Christine M. Nugent, Diana R. Oliveri, Nicole M. Pacello, Kimberly L. Pagan, Anna Pak, Marissa A. Palmieri, Anthony Panayiotou, Melanie S. Papandrea, Anna M. Pasisz, Kameya A. Peralta, Crystal Perillo, Derek Pinto, Farrah J. Pisano, Maria Pissias, Iralda M. Placencia, Jaclyn N. Powar, Jessica Ramirez, Victoria Razhanskayte, Kimberly A. Rello, Melissa C. Reneau, Nicole Luisa Restrepo, Theodhora Rexhepi, Sahar Rimawi, Lauren A. Rizzuto, Jennifer L. Rodrigues, Elizabeth Rodriguez, Susan M. Romero, Rima Asfour Romhen, Elizabeth M. Rosa, Lina M. Rosa, Jessica Ruckert, Rosanna Russo, James F. Ryan, Maureen Ryan, Victoria M. Sainsbury, Laura A. Saldibar, Tania Rae Sanchez, Terri Sangiorgio, Leonarda A. Scolaro, Giuseppe Scudiero, Jacqueline S. Serrano, Samantha Siano, Diane Silvestri, Toni A. Sims, Evangelia Siozos, Greg Sirico, Rachelle H. Sixon, Jennifer M. Smith, Jaclyn Smolin, Martyna A. Sobczyszyn, Evan N. Solanki, Rebecca Sorrentino, Douglas M. Spina, Daniel J. Sternberg, Magan L. Stoll, Anita Suberska, Malgorzata Szacherska, Andrea M. Tanzillo, Saveen Tatla, Richard Terrazas, Shannon R. Torres, Mondry B. Toure, Olga

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Tyan, Charles A. Umana, Kaitlin M. Van Dina, Kristi Viera, Tara L. Villaret, Julia Volfson, Michelle R. Volpe, Melissa A. Von Der Linn, Emil Vukic, Stephen Waldow, Logan M. Walsh, Nadeesha K. Weerasinghe, Timothy J. Whalen, Amani Widdi, Lu Xuan Ye, George Yega II, Margarita Zarkhi. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE Douha Abadi, George Abdelmalek, Stephanie N. Adigun, Diego Aguilar, Andrew J. Aimetti, Roxana Mihaela Airinei-Teel, Joseph Alfredo, Melissa Alicea, Nataliya Alkanovich, Laura A. Allen, Peter J. Annarumma, Rahul Arora, Mohamad Attal, Eshrag Awad, Valbona Balanca, Lauren A. Balbi, Tina M. Balestrino, Christina Balistreri, Uljan Banushi, Kaitlin Ann Barr, Marissa A. Bianco, Adam Birnbaum, Noa Bomgold, Peter J. Bonici III, Kavitha Bonu, Michael J. Brady, Danielle M. Callan, Nazim Capric, Angelo V. Carlucci, Emil Carr, Tuan Zilhan Cassim, Barbara A. Ciccazzo, Aaron J. Panaligan Cinco, Aisa Cinco, Jillian M. Coppolino, Earth J. CruzSantos, Nicholas J. Dellatacoma, Sabrina Del Zoppo, Christopher P. Depuma, Christina V. Dgheim, Kinga M. Dobrowolska-Hughey, Thomas Donohue, Katarzyna A. Drazek, Igor Dubrovinsky, Alex Dushkin, Myroslav Dyeduk, Nadia D. Egas-Pesce, Amr Elkarany, Evgeni Eremeev, Peter Favaloro, Rachel S. Feldman, Kathleen M. Francis, Jennifer L. Frisina, Cesar A. Galeano, Gerald F. Gallardo, Forrest M. Galloway, Joanna Garkowienko, Joseph Gassoso, Olusegun Oyekanmi Gbadebo, Amanda C. Geiser, Alena Gilkeson, Tomasz Mariusz Golik, Amanda F. Gorman, Natalia Gozias, Anthony T. Halloran, Thomas M. Hannula, Tatiana Henderson, Danielle Marivette Hernandez, Yaxiong Huang, Saida Iimira, Robert Imbriale, Debra A. Jacobowitz, Melissa B. Johnston, Heesun Jong, Rachel J. Josaphat, Danielle A. Juliano, Ashley J. Jurkiewicz, January L. Kayser, Christopher Begej Khan.Elsayed S. Khedr.Gennadiy Kilimnik.Natalya Klamkin.Andrea Kleboe.Vladislav Klym, Korto C. Kollie, Kenyah Imani Koonce, Kelly Kouros, Ishu Kumar, Rachel Lafata, Raphael E. Lebovits, Adam P. Lechillgrien, Michael L. Leone, Erik J. Lombardo, Nephili A. D. Magalong, Anna Marchetta, Jessica J. Martinez, Xhevair Maskuli, Ashley Mathai, Mena M. Maximos, Amanda G. Medvedovsky, Deidre N. Miller, Latoya V. Miller, Vicky Mills, Domenica Minniti, Mina Mirhom, Rachel S. Levi Mohebban, Ivonne Morales, Daniel L. Motto, Ellen Mulkerrins, Carolyn Mullen, Zeehan Munawar, William J. Musante, Suljojman Musovic, Remzi Nesimi, Luisa Maribel Ng, Cazimar E. Nieves, Christopher W. Oetting, Errol Ogman, Daniella V. Otaiza, Glenys Otero, Louis S. Padavano, Swapna Paippattuthara, Christopher Palladino, Donald I. Parker, Juan C. Pazmino, Idelie C. Perez, Krishnanjali Perez, Lisa F. Perrotti, Alex Pesochin, James A. Plunkett, Jason Poon, Sujit Raja Potluri, Kristina A. Potts, Steven Pugliese, Yelena Pustovoyt, Olga Rafailov, Fatima Zohra Rafique, Abraham Rajan, Cristina M. Rapisardi, Dimitriy Raynin, Michael J. Restivo, Jonathan S. Reyes, Rodnina Reynolds, Michael N. Rios, Bernardo Rodriguez, Jr., Jason W. Rudder, Alina Saiti, Ramez Samuel, Danielle R. Santangelo, Yuka Sato, John F. Savarese III, John D. Scamardella, Roger Selaez, Pavel Serdyuk, Jay Sethna, Mina M. Shalaby, Maka G. Shermadini, Anthony R. Simpson, James Steinberg, Cassandra Stern, Alexander Stoyko, Digvijay Sura, Yelena Sverdlova, Joseph Tadros, Diana Tranquellino, Lisa B. Treyman, Giorgi Tskitishvili, Kathleen E. Van Manen, Jeffrey M. Vetrano, Anna Viderman, Vladislav Voskoboynikov, Mark A. Vito, Ying Wang, Brian Warshawsky, Marina Wassef, Suet Yee Wong, Wo Qin Yang, Vlada Yanishevsky, Erock Yee, WaiChing Yip, Jonaid Ibrahim Yousaf, Elina Yunayeva, Joseph T. Zancocchio, Jing Rong Zheng, Aleksey Zhulenev, Elda Ziko, Robert P. Zummo. MASTER OF ARTS Nicole E. Jonas. Kenneth S. Imbriale. Yun Chee Chan, Joseph Deodato, Philip A. Ponterio, Janine Smith. MASTER OF SCIENCE David M. Haber, Anney Lifen Li, Joseph Manzour, Joseph Russo. Lenore Bertone, Elana S. Birnbeg, Ann M. Rummo. Olutayo Ajayi, Marissa Danclair. Lauren C. Baydal, Michelle Graziano, Valerie LiPuma, Helen V. Marchak, Maria R. Mollica, Janiece E. Smith. Allaham Alias, Thomas J. Cuccia, Salvatore Degrezia, Jr., Cataldo Fracchiolla, Kaefa K. Kanneh, Rasha Kased, Chaitasiben Bharatbhai Patel, Dhaval Jayantilal Patel, Goraj Mansukhbhai Patel. Fumiko Liezl Coppard, Sylwia Urszula Czernel, Michael H. Klein, Frederick R. Melendez. Roxana M. Airinei-Teel. Larissa A. Aromanda, Darlene B. Bowman, Daiana Espinal, Stephanie S. Fried, Naveen Hadi, Stefanie Hanratty, Venus Martinez-Sharp, Kelly A. Newman, Cheryl A. Occhipinti, Brandi C. Stumacher, Raffaella E. Torres. SIXTH-YEAR PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE Jermel Collins-Day, Barbara Forte, Maria A. Gambino-Dinneny, Allison A. Graham, Jacquelyn M. Graziano, Avi Gvili, Laura M. Kump, Bernadette L. Mikolajczyk, Paul Neglia, Barbara Neis, Malka Plutchok, Leonard M. Trerotola, Veronica M. Zelhof-Ciardiello.

JUNE, 2010 CUNY MACAULAY HONORS COLLEGE: UNIVERSITY SCHOLARS PROGRAM Denise Abou-Chrouch, Jennifer K. Blake, John Buono, David T. Di Lillo, Christopher Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Orio, Grigoriy Gelfand,

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Briana Giordano, Goldie Libby Lazarus, Lauren Maria Loprimo, Jonathan Ezra Maltz, Boris Miraliyev, Victoria Isabel Porcell, Marilyn Dawn Schulz, Matthew Signorile, Amanda Rose Siuzdak, Caryl Y. Stingo, Janeth R. Toro, Edward J. Venturi, Michael L. Young. THE VERRAZANO SCHOOL Eleor Cohen, Constance Corsale, Robert Drennan, Nervana Gaballa, Nicholas Imbornone, Christopher Jones, Rosanna Lamatina, Alexandra Leone, Jeffrey Man, John Matsen, Stephanie Musso, Katelynn Nichols, Christina Puliafico, Nora Rahman, Christina Rossi, Andrew Savage, Kristin Spain. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE Frank M. Abbatemarco, Shireen Abdo, Brittni A. Aliberti, Jasmine Alovera, Tumika L. Alston, Kristine Ang, Hayat Barakat, Shannon M. Barback, Alexey Bendersky, Lauren Berger, Cathrine M. Bernardo, Saranda Bilali, Paulina A. Bilar, Shawnee V. Blaize, Sophia N. Blake, Marco Blas, Diana Brud, Oneka Carmichael, Danielle M. Cascio, Na Chen, Sheila M. Lamata Chua, Michael G. Ciluffo, Carissa M. Coccimiglio, Maria Corbisiero, Jennifer N. Cosaluzzo, Regina M. Delos Reyes, Tracy M. De Maio, Joseph DeRenzo, Robin Dolan, Dina Dunn, Taryn Ellis, Joffrey L. Espiritu, Julia Etlina, Frank S. Fertitta, Romany Gaied, Lisa M. Gatti, Gabriel Gelman, Natalya Gershenzon, John A. Giangreco, Roman Gnatenko, Keisha A. Greene, Peter Habib, Jenee V. Jefferson, Janeth Jimenez, Michael B. Kalika, Yury Kalyuzhny, Vijayamala Ketheeswarapaskaran, Elman Khaimov, Thomas P. Knobel, Maryana Kupriyenko, Martin N. Larrosa, Candie Lau, Dina Lemkova-Seryy, Quns S. Liang, Ashley E. Lilavois, Aleksandr Lokshin, Gloria M. Lopez, Irene Lopez, Melissa A. LoughranAmara, Johnathan Luma, Jena L. Luppowitz, Adriana Lusha, Ewa Maliborska, Justin Mark, Shane Mathai, Denis Mayzel, Kerry M. McCormack, Kristen J. McNally, Steven L. Mezzano, Vincent Miller, Maureen F. Morse, Azra Muminovic, Thaer Saleh Musallam, Concetta Muscat, Aurieza Nebab, Katrina D. Oliverio, Maria Oliverio, Nargiza Orozalieva, Artur A. Ostrowski, Daisylyn Gonzales Pascua, Nicholas Passantino, Saurabh Kumar Passi, Cristina R. Perrone, Ariton Popinara, Tommaso Potrich, Anthony Quinto, Rizwan H. Raza, Kimberly Reilly, Arlene Rivera-Lassell, Christopher J. Rosado, Stephanie N. Sang, Maria Sangiorg, iJayson A. Santiano, Nicole Saponaro, Caitlin G. Shulman, Karolina A. Sulkowska, Connie Tse, Julius E. Ubalde, Lynne M. VonSchondorf, Stephanie S. Watson, Brianna M. Worona, Alexandria Xepolitos, Kathleen R. Young, Michele Zarrella, Erick P. Zevallos, Lili Zhamo. ASSOCIATE IN ARTS Monica Abdelmalek, Mohammad Abdelrazeq, Julianne N. Agosta, Judy R. Allen, Sarah K. Aponte, Mariano Arce III, Martin Arroyo, Amswood C. Bastien, Katia Belony, Kimberly R. Bisulca, Mary Ellen Borg, Danielle Bostic, Darya Brodsky, Laura Brody, Richard A. Burghart, Amber D. Caravello, Anthony P. Carollo, Salvatore I. Caruso, Debra Cascio, Jennifer Cassella, Sammy J. Castro, Amy Cheng, Anna Chmielewska, Justine P. Cognato, Francesca D. Cordone, Maria Corona, Buron Cukovic, Laura Ann Curvati, Michael A. Dalessio, Judith Damti, Jennifer De Rosa, Raymond A. Decker, Tonimarie C. DeGennaro, Jamie M. Dellasala, Peterson Desir, Yanet Diaz, Anthony Di Pietro, Mathew Doleimascolo, Jessica L. DosSantos, Alyssa M. Drew, Gizem Elbasanli, Shereen Elfeky, Alyssa M. Fazio, Cristian Benard Flynn, Hassan S. Fofana, Robert A. Forgetta, Leonard J. Francavilla, Jr., Jennifer Francois, Teresa Germino, Nicole M. Gervasi, Lauren M. Glass, Daniel E. Golat, Dominick Gracia, Jr., Angeleta A. Graham, Natalie Gratkowski, Jessica S. Gregorio, Michael F. Guarneri, Jennifer Hallihan, Jessica Herrera, Stephen Hill, Robert T. Hill, RoseMary M. Hines, Connie Hung, Arachchige Priyanga Iddamalgoda, Jacqueline M. Imbemba, Dianna Jaber, Bojana Jovanovic, Michael W. Keenan, Erin K. King, James A. Kingsley, Joanna Kluik, Blerina Korbeci, Inna Kun, William J. LaPlaca, Sotiria E. Lathourakis, Tiffani M. Lomuto, Roseanne E. Loria, John Lotito III, Monica Lucarini, Laura A. Lutz, Janine Maniscalco, Wilmer I. Marquez, Stephen A. Mazzaro, Jaclyn Mazzone, Shadella McGregor, Shameka C. McKenzie, Tamica S. Mcknie, Stephanie A. Medina, Tina Marie Millan, Shalena M. Mines, Jennifer M. Mistretta, Sharmila Shihara Mohammed, Judith Montan, Alicia Morales, Christine M. Moran, Nickollette M. Moran, Elizabeth Nonnenmacher, Katherine N. Norton, Madeline Nunez, Gbemi Odumosu, Haritini Pandis, Hanlin Pao, Laura Pellecchia, Dominick T. Peluso, Christina M. Picaro, Michele A. Pisani, Nicole R. Pisano, Kristin A. Principe, Ashley R. Razzano, Tricia M. Rega, Jaime A. Reilly, Ewelina Reinhart, Danielle M. Riggio, Mayra M. Rivera, Bianca Rodriguez, Michelle Rodriguez, Christopher J. Rosado, Heather A. Rose, Matthew J. Rosiello, Eve Rossi, Jessica L. Rothstein, Jodi Rupelli, Linda A. Sakariasen, Vanessa R. Salguero, Victoria Salvo, Shon Samuel, Donna C. Schwartz, Erica M. Sclafani, Cerissa A. Senzino, Fatima Shirazi, Racquel L. Siclari, Agnieszka Sikorski, Benjamin Silfen, Ashley Sinclair, Keith R. Siragusa, Mariano L. Siragusa, Marisa Sorrenti, Carlos M. Soto III, Melissa A. Spear, Denise Speziale, Jessenia Taveras, Vincent M. Tedesco, Shantelle G. Thomas, Paola Gambino Tranchina, Amanda M. Turner, Jacqueline Urbina, Carly Uribe, Andrea E. Valladares, Johanna E. Villalona, Valente Villarreal, Jamielynn Votto, Sahar Zafar, Emily A. Zaleski, Melissa L. Zipf. ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE Hamdan Mohamed Alzandani, Gabriela E. Asencio, Al Bayk, Simeona Cayetano, Anthony J. Egan, Oksana Page 131 of 155


Kostryyuk, Kimberly A. Leonard-Awuku, Ashley E. Lilavois, Margaret V. Pardee, LeJuan M. Perry-MaysJose A. Saltos, Joseph P. Scarpulla, Ramy S. Shaheen, Mariano L. Siragusa, Syed Zafar Basit Rizvi, Chun Tik Wong. BACHELOR OF ARTS Tarig Abdalatif Abbo, Ahmed S. Abdelhaq, Sherill J. Abraham, Babatunde Adewale Adekanbi, Kristine J. Agosta, Amanda Agro, Rakeya Alam, Abelardo Aleman, Edon Alibegu, Mallory K. Ameneiros, Daniel J. Anfang, Marianna Anzalone, Mariano A. Arce III, Fabiana Armenia, Gella Rivka Astrin, Rafael Asusta, Melissa R. Axelrod, Jim L. Azor, Jonathen Baez, DawnMarie Barbato, Jennifer L. Barlotta, Vernice Barnes, Jillian K. Barris, Erika Barzda, Daren Bastedo, Margaret H. Beattie, Marissa A. Bennetti, Kristin Bermudez, Jaclyn Bierman, Daniel Bilotti, Angela P. Biondolillo, Jennifer K. Blake, Robert J. Blancke, Jr., Shahiddah Blue, Gina M. Boccabella, Marissa Bochichio, Rebecca J. Bowens, Kristen A. Bracco, Mary F. Bradley, Alaphia Brown, Nadia Nikia Bryan, Eithne A. Byrne-McGowan, Gregory P. Caiafa, Rafael I. Calderon, Teresa Caneiro, Erica H. Cano, Daniel K. Campbell, Lauren E. Capdevielle, Melissa Caramico, Christine Carbonella, Rita Caruso, Alyssa M. Castagliola, Janet Castro, Anthony J. Catania, Joshua P. Center, Zachary T. Chapman, Shirma CharlesFortune, Andrea Chattah, Katherine Cheng, Mary Anne Chillemi, Kam Lin Chou, Milind S. Christian, Melissa D. Ciaravino, Christina M. Cicero, Melissa Cimilluca, Jessicalynn Clark, Justine P. Cognato, Nadine Cohen, Kendra N. Coleman, Theodore Colon, Love G. Cooper, Francesca D. Cordone, Justin W. Cortes, Cierra G. Crawford, Patricia Ann Crea, Kelly A. Cregan, Brittany M. Crescenzi, Suzanne Reale Criscione, Christopher J. Cuccia, Elizabeth A. Curtis, Laura Ann Curvati, Kelly A. Cutaia, Derval O. Daley, Shannon Damico, David J. Danischewski, Jennifer Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Auria, Andrew J. Daus, Beatrice Davis, Joseph DeAngelo, Janeury De Leon, Fadila Dedushai, Lennice DeLaine, Angelica Deleo, Jenna Deliberti, Christina Dennedy, Andrew J. DePaulo, Samara Desir, Eric M. Diaz, Rosalie DiMaggio, Diana Di Noto, Laurie-Ann Di Prossimo, Heather S. Dmiszewicki, Natalia Dobrer, Racquel M. Doherty, Mariana Dominguez, Stephanie Dooley, Jessica L. DosSantos, Krystal L. Douchey, Majlinda Duka, Dwight D. Dunkley, Jessica Duval, Maria Edwards, Krystal L. Elliott, Jenna M. Emilio, Andrew J. Espinoza, Andrew D. Espiritu, Nicole Estrada, Oluwatosin Falana, Michael J. Fedele, Abgelina F. Fedna, Deanna E. Feierman, Renee L. Ferrara, Jill Fessler, Jacqueline M. Finnegan, Lisa Flament, Amanda L. Flecha, Shannon L. Foreshee, Gerard Forte, Jose Fortuna, Toni-Ann Frascella, Ezra A. Friedman, Yuan Y. Fu, Stephanie M. Gabriele, Christina S. Gagliardo, Lance R. Gailyard, Patricia L. Gaja, Vanessa Gallo, Alessandro Gaudesi, Heather L. Geissler, Natalya Geraskina, Diana L. Giambrone, Justina Gibbs, Mor Gil, John N. Gioe, Briana Giordano, Jennifer M. Girard, Robert Glennerster, Jr., Garrett M. Goble, Katherine Goffin, Laura Ann Goffredo, Alina Golofayeva, Patricia Gonnella, Leigh Ann Gonzalez, Ione A. Gore, Joseph R. Gori, Kristina M. Granice, Brian L. Grant, Angela E. Gray, Jessica S. Gregorio, Leyna Gregorio, Jennifer Griffin, Alexandr Griss, Eva Guardascione, Jill K. Guariglia, Lauren M. Guercio, Christopher Gulbransen, Carmen Guzek, Carene Hadad, Christine A. Hafele, Janine M. Harouni, Margaret L. Harper, Carl C. Haynes, William Heines, Kenneth A. Hernandez, Stefanie A. Herrera, Monica N. Herschtein-LachmanErika L. HersheyEric R. HoffmanJaclyn C. Holzer, Michael F. Horovitz, Cherri L. Hugee, Fatbardha Husic, Allyse J. Iacurto, Arachchige Priyanga Iddamalgoda, Nicholas Imbornone, Marissa L. Immitt, Jesse J. Ingoglia, Irene Irizarry, Christine M. Jaccarino, Carol A. Jackson, Amani Janini, Rita L. Javier, Maria C. Javois, Ali A. Jawad, Jenjen Joule, Bojana Jovanovic, Kimberly E. Julien, Esther P. Kabalkin, Luljeta Kacaj, Eileen B. Kantor, Spiridoula Karagiannis, Anton Karpukhin, Pawan Preet Kaur, Gabriele Kazakevich, Jeannette Keane, Kelly N. Kenny, Sierra C. Kessler, Amna Khan, Jenna Kiel, Justin Klemas, William Kline, Jr., Amanda Konzelman, Marissa L. Kramer, Kathryn N. Krause, Stephen Krysztoforski, Ashley LaFemina, Claudette A. La Greca, Rosanna Lamatina, Robert J. Lamberti, Ashley M. Lane, Thomas P. Lane, Jannerys Lara, Sotiria E. Lathourakis, Valery Lavaud, Christina A. Lavista, Bernadette M. Leach-Galano, Alexandra Leone, Christopher M. Lettiere, Glen Levy, Bao H. Liang, Sara Lim, Rui Kang Lin, Tiffani M. Lomuto, Jennifer Lin Look, Paul M. Lopez, Marie Lore, Gina M. Lorusso, Christine A. Luisi, Dorothy R. Lundgren, Tamara Lyalina, Michael Madalone, Jaclyn P. Magnussen, Kaushik Majumdar, Jeffrey Man, Lindsey Mandell, Leona Mannuzza, Jaime Manus, Ashley D. Marino, Bleta Marke, Jon R. Marotte, Nancy R. Martino, Veronica L. Marquez, Wilmer I. Marquez, Bethania E. Martinez, Cynthia Martinez, John Matsen, Christine M. Maslankowski, Marthe Massena, Seankelly T. McCauley, Peter R. McElhearn, Shannon Melendez, Tina M. Millan, Keith L. Miller, George F. Mina, Charles Mirabella, Debbie Miranda, Sharmila Shihara Mohammed, Anthony M. Monroe, Kristina D. Montesano, Courtney L. Moorer, Audra N. Morales, Christine M. Moran, Ronald Muwonge Mulindwa, Kristine M. Mullin, Thomas F. Munks, Cynthia Munoz, Flor De Maria Munoz, Rizo Muratovic, Lauren Musco, Stephanie G. Musso, Kaitlin R. Myhre, Pamela J. Napolitano, Phillip A. Nau, Jessica Naylor, Jamie M. Nelson, David Netes, Jessica Nicchio, Katelynn Nichols, Staphania Nicolas, Alfredo Nicolosi, Kristina Niesi, Linda NievesPowell, Erion NoteChioma E. Nwaohuocha, Christopher L. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien, Kristine Ocampo, Cassandra Ohikuare, Keith E. Olsen, Elvin Omeroglu, Andrew H. Oppenheimer, Inna Ostro, Robert A. Palmeri, Jeanine M. Palombo, Haritini Pandis, Francesca Parasole, Sarah Park, Kimberly L. Patella, Eneida M. Patricolo, Diana M. Pedroza, Nicole Peduto, Paul C. Pemberton, Christina M. Pena, Mary E. Pennachio, Ana Peradze, Dana M. Petruzzelli, Justine M. Pinzone, Jessica Pis, John M. Pisani, Victoria I. Porcell, Michelle C. Postler, Yuriy Potashnik, Laquanda Filnora Pough, Janine Priore, Joseph Pristera III, Christina M. Puliafico, Lauren Quinn, Michael J. Quinto, Nora Rahman, Janine E. Randazzo, Nicole A. Rastetter, Amira Rehawi, Cara Rehbein, Page 132 of 155


Denise Reich-Xyloportas, Marissa Resnick, Heidi Reyes, Michael A. Ricci, Emmaleeann Rivers, Catherine A. Roca, Rachaun A. Rogers, Kiera Lynn Rommel, Teresa D. Romolo, Christina M. Rossi, Shirley Roy, Diane K. Rozas, Carmen L. Ruiz, Kathy B. Russell, John J. Russo, Erica Sadagursky, Victoria Safarian, Victoria V. Salvo, David M. Samaan, Kevonn Samlal, Maria A. Sander, Nicole Sanicola, Michelle A. Santino, Caitlin F. Santomauro, Noelle C. Sarno, Andrew Savage, Priscilla J. Scarpati, Keith W. Schacht, Anthony I. Scharf, Nicholas Schettini, Jr., Krystal L. Schiavone, Lorita Schiavone, Meghan C. Schwencke, Diana Sciortino, Marylou S. Sciortino, Steven Serrano, Kerrin Scully, Alexander Shamis, AnnMargaret Shea, Vivian Shenoda, Fatima Shirazi, Lyudmila Shor, Racquel L. Siclari, Jennifer A. Siesto, Janine N. Siggia, Matthew Signorile, Brooke B. Sileo, Jean-Claire Simmands, Tanya Simpson, Amanda R. Siuzdak, Lavderime Skenderi, Jacqueline A. Smith, Magdalena Sojka, Sonila Sokoli, Laura M. Somma, Chi-Hoon Song, Andrew Sookram, Stephanie M. Soriano, Cynthia V. Soto-Santiago, David L. Stagno, Elizabeth R. Stassi, Caryl Y. Stingo, Samantha Striar, Chritine M. Strommen, Christina N. Sudano, Megan M. Sullivan, Deja M. Sweeney, Vincent R. Tartaglia, Seray Taysin, Tracy L. Terrana, Thomas A. Terrusa, Jane A. Thomas, Karim P. Thomas, Brian N. Thomasen, David S. Tiberi, Elizabeth A. Tilelli, Masafumi Toyoda, Laura J. Trimboli, Anthony R. Troise, Joanne S. Tseng, Danielle Turelli, Nahed Turifi, Benjamin Urback, Kari D. Varriale, Colomba A. Varriano, Milagros Vega, Christy J. Velazquez, Vanessa M. Ventre, Edward J. Venturi, Bernda J. Verde, James E. Von Schondorf, Rena A. Wilkerson, Kai H. Williams, Victoria R. Williams, Allyson P. Willner, Navelle C. Wilson, Jennifer Wong, Renee Wood, Urszula Wrutniak, Angus Yip, Michael L. Young, Suhua Zhang, Alex Zusin. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE Diana A. Abadi, Mouwafak Abbas, Antoine Abdel-Malak, Amir Abdelseid, Edward J. Abdenour, Jr., Abid Husnain Abidi, Denise Abou-Chrouch, Ahmed Abouelmagd, Saadllha Aboulissan, Andrea Accurso, Bernard A. Adamitey, Anthonette Omolade Adewale, Borford Gnagne AffiMichael Rocco Aiello, Joanne Albanese, Joanne R. Albano, Sagi Alkobi, Ramy Fawy Aly, Eugenie Sylong Amaisa, Rekha Amar, Christine Amerosa, Besmir Ameti, Tiease Tawana AmmamooEna E. Anicama, Amanda Applebaum, Muhammad Tahir Aqeel, Brian Ariola, Patrizia Armfield, Desiree M. Arroyo, Olaniran Omoniyi Asanbe, Ilham Atir, Fadil Avdiu, Mikhail Azayev, Andre M. Azer, Dana M. Aziz, Anthony C. Azzato, Craig C. Bailey, Sonia Bairak, Yana Balayants, Carmen Barrasso, Amadou L. Barry, Alba Basha, Sal A.w Basile, Robert W. Bates, George D. Bebawy, Lev Bekker, Brian Bekkerman, Grace L. Bello, Tamara A. Benaderet, Julianna R. Bertrand, Olesya Beygelman, David Bochicchio, Carl P. Bombara, Anthony Bonadonna, Brianna L. Bonilla, Jason Brawer, Barakat A. BrightOridami, Charles M. Brown, Ilda Budo, Francisca Bueno, John Buono, Vladislav Bykov, Kristina Caggino, Can Yang Cai, Jessica N. Edlund Calabrese, W. K. D. Shalini Niroshi Camillus, Khimal J. Carbon, Marina Carpova, Annette Cassella, Frank A. Castellano, Grace M. Catanzaro, Christopher Catella, Matthew G. Cavallo, Catherine Ceasar, Mirela Cekic, Leurant Cenovski, Tania Centola, Carol Chan, Cheung W. Chan, Jason Chang, Joey Yam Chau, Susan Chawki, Jamila M. Cheese, Di Meng Chen, Luigy G. Chery, Colin Cheung, Katherine Chladnicek, Tun-Ying Chou, Mohit Choudhary, Clifford A. Christian, Joseph N. Cicero, Jr., Jonathan M. Cisek, Eleor Cohen, Philip M. Connors, Ariana M. Cook, Michael A. Corrado, Constance A. Corsale, Anthony M. Corsini, Herolind Cuca, Joseph B. Cuozzo, Michael Danov, Joseph DeMaio, Melissa E. DeMartino, Daniel S. Demczuk, Anthony J. DePrimo, Candice R. DeRisi, Kedar Deshpande, Christopher A. DeSilva, Collins N. Dialah, Frank R. Di Dio, David T. Di Lillo, Danielle DiMaggio, Karis Doerner, Christopher Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Orio, Artesia J. Dorsey, Anastasia Dovgal, Dmitriy Dubson, Danielle M. Dugan, Ashley S. Duncan, Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Daine A. Duncan, Kingsley Edegbe, Thecla I. Egwuenu, Amal Elatioui, Hadi Ahmad Eldebek, Ibrahim Eleham, Antonio Elgamal, Josiane El Khoury, Brittany A. Emilio, Julia Epelbaum, Edgar Espinosa, Vincent D. Fabiani, Andrew T. Fattorusso, Taicha I. Faublas, Nayanjala Sohani Fernando, Warnakulasuriya Nayomi Fernando, Blythe H. Finn, Andrew B. Fischer, Theone Flessas, John Fontana, Jonathan P. Franco, Edward Friedman, Lisa A. Fritz, Nervana Wail Gaballa, Jillian E. Gabriel, Frank Galati, Michael V. Gall, Gwen N. Gallagher, Matthew D. Gallego, Sera M. Gambino, Yared Garcia, Lucy Gathanga, Grigoriy Gelfand, Anthony J. Gentile, Job A. GeorgeOsama S. Gheith, Nicole T. Giacopelli, Erin N. Gill, David W. Ginsberg, Ismael Gonzalez, Steven A. Gordon, Margarita Gorelik, Jillian Graniero, Sajini Deshani Gundry, Numan Haider, Kirollos F. Hanna, Gihan Maghawri Hassan, Rochelle K. Heath, Ramy Hennedy, Ryan P. Hennessey, Daniela Hernandez, Craig A. Herrera, Joseph W. Hershkowitz, Alvin Hillary, Liviu Mihai Hociung, Chun Chi Hom, Minseon Hong, Jinmei Huang, Mary Huang, Xiao Zhong Huang, Bonitra L. Humphrey, Connie Hung, Naif A. Hussain, Sonia Hussain, Christina Idava, Nicole D. Improta, Cenon Inocent, Gelena Istomin, Dianna Jaber, Tatjana Jacobs, Tringa Jakupi, Shay James, Carolyn Javier, Janaka R. Jayasingha, Jenee V. Jefferson, Christopher R. Jones, Judith J. Jones, Fred Joseph, Ghofran W. Kachour, Alex S. Kagzanov, Anum Karamat, Henry Kats, Francis S. Keleekai, Jr., Thomas J. Kelley, Keisha T. Keymist, Khalil Khaled, Rokyatu Kiawu, Gregory S. King, Stanislav Kirilov Kirov, William Kline, Jr., Ekrem Klobocista, Philip Koshy, Diana Kovalerchik, Alex Kozlovski, Marissa L. Kramer, Jeyananthiny Kumarasamy, Muamet Kurtisi, Maria Kuzar, Zziwa A. Kyangwa, Joseph Lacerra, Alison Lawless, Goldie L. Lazarus , Juan Le, Christopher Lee, Christopher M. Lee, Leo Dongfan Lei, Henry Li, Toniann Ligamari, Halid Likovic, Alex M. Lilling, Zhen D. Lin.Dexter E. Lincoln, Jr., Juliya Lindroos, Feng Liu, Aleksandr Lokshin, Lauren M. Loprimo, Ednita L. Lorenzo, Carmella Lubrano, Andy Luc, Steven A. Lufrano, Peter Ma, Joseph Makar, Jonathan E. Maltz, lhamo Dorje Mar, Melissa A. Marcello, Laura C. Marcucci, Page 133 of 155


Stamatis Maronikolakis, Kristin L. Marra, Mohamed A. R. Massaquoi, Shane Mathai, Michael McNichol, Erica R. Mejia, Joseph C. Melluzzo, David J. Merchant, Joseph M. Merola, Agnieszka Mikolajczyk.Vincent Miller, Boris Miraliyev, Toniann Modica, Zuhal Senuz Modica, Mohsen Mohsen, Stephen Mojica, Ardian Mollabeciri, Heidy Monzon, Tiffany L. Morales, Daniel Muccio, Daniel Mui, Jennifer L. Murphy, Anthony S. Muscat, Joyce Mushumbusi, Yousef Mustafa, Hoor Nadeem, Saroosh Nadeem, Geeta P. Nakar, Annas M. Nassar, Anastasiya Nemirovskaya, Kin Wai Ng, Daniel P. Nilsen, Robert Jett Nilsen, Antoinette A. Noah, Robert Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor, Leif K. Oftedal, Yechenu Aladi Ojile, Kazeem O. Olayokun, Erica L. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Lenick, Michal Ostrowski, Rewieda Othman, Abimbola Oyewole, Yetunde Omotola Oyenuga, Samantha H. Padovano, Po Yun Pan, Angel M. Paradis, David Park, Gregory D. Pashayan, Endri Pasholli, Christopher Pasiecznik, Michael Pasqualone, Saurabh K. Passi, Manisha P. Patel, Kristina Chea Pavia, Ranil Ajantha Perera, Leanna N. Petrone, Daria Petrova, Daniel Pfeiffer, Rose M. Picarello, Michalina Pichnarczyk, Fitzgerald Pierre-Jean, Jason E. Pinero, Patrick L. Pizzarelli, Jr., Marissa Ponterella, Gazmire Popovic, Richard F. Prignoli, Kristen Proscia, Mudassir Qaisar, Anthony Quinto, Diana F. Ramirez, Brianne M. Reardon, Chris L. Reuben, Diana Revich, Fernando A. Reyes, Melinda M. Rhodes, Jason Paul Ribeiro, Amanda J. Richardson, Eric V. Rios-Doria, Syed Zafar Basit Rizvi, Nicole Rizzo, Anthony C. Rizzuti, Brian M. Roberts, Kaemian K. Robinson, Roberto A. Roca, Mayte R. Rojas, Shannel Roman, Roger B. Romero, Kaven Roos, Clarissa Rosario, Andrey Rudnik, John Samuels, Elise Santiago, Dupinder Sarao, Patrick F. Savage, Joseph Scala, William A. Scheer, Michael B. Schiffer, Janine I. Schiller, Andrew E. Schlissel, Stephen G. Schoepfer, Marilyn D. Schulz, Kathryn E. Seluga, Hassan Shah, Mariam M. Shalabi, Alice Bendu Shaw, Junaid A. Sheikh, Irida Shqerra-Kavaja, Stanislav Shraybman, William P. Siciliano, Dimitrios Sidiropoulos, Courtney M. Signore, Robert Simeone, Ramona Singh, Amanda R. Siuzdak, Zachary H. Slavutsky, Anna Smirnov, Susan D. Sommers, Christina Sorrentino, April Soto, Kristin E. Renninger Spain, Simon Spektor, Vera Spektor, Christopher L. Spinelli, Michael P. Spoto, Bartlomiej H. Stadnicki, Kinga Boguslawa Stala, Dylan T. Stone, Matthew E. Storm, Marisa A. Streppone, Inna Sukher, John V. Sullivan, Bopha P. Sun, Urooj Fatima Syed, Vanessa Szajnberg, Sabina E. Szetela.Aneta Szkutnik, Patrick D. Taaffe, James Tam, Leopold S. Tatchou-Fonyen, Samy K. Tawadrous, Jeanine Taylor, Jason S. Tenenbaum, Anthony R. Tirone, Abymol Thomas T.M., Michael V. Tong, Mark Elgene Toralballa, Janeth R. Toro, Louise A. Torres, Stephanie Torres, Paul Tran, Lauren Trapasso, Sarah R. Troncone, Siu Lun Ben Tsui, Anastasia Tsveitel, Uzoaku N. Ugoji, Darren J. Uscianowski, Cesar R. Valer, Jonathan K. Vaynberg, Elena V. Vazquez, Priscilla E. Vazquez, Gianbattista Verna, Christopher Verteramo, Cassandra A. Vesce, Joseph M. Viera, Amanda L. Vigo, Yury Viknevich, Johanna E. Villalona, Shahjad Virani, Charles V. Vitale, Steven M. Volpe, John J. Wade, Cen Wang, Daniel M. Watson, Gittel Tova Weiss, Rufan Weng, Jacqueline N. White, Danielle Wilde, Donna A. Williams, Brittney Windle, Wing Yan Wong, Joanna Lynn Wu, Li Qing Wu, Michael W. Yan, Qiquang Yang, Frances Yee, Derek R. Yim, Roman Yurchenko, Mohamed Zahriah, Marica Gricel Zambrano, Yelena Zeldina, C.J. Zhang, Lining Zhang, Lizhang Zhou, LongFei Zhu, Emanuel M. Zoumboulis. MASTER OF ARTS Anne F. Castro, Richard J. Krysztoforski, Andrew D. Palladino. Peter N. Astras, Rosy George, Daniel A. Greenberg, Kevin S. Mamakas, Jessica L. Manger, Garth W. Priebe, William K. Safte, Jillian Vitale. Catherine N. Carson, Caroline S. Dworkin, Adam M. Greenberg, Kelley McOlvin, Craig A. Mitchell, John J. Tedesco. Genadi Arveladze, Sven Dietrich, Dominic N. Fiduccia, Saimir Kraja, Rose A. Sieniawski. MASTER OF SCIENCE Elizabeth Aviles, Danielle M. Bacigalupo, Christopher M. Basso, Michele G. Belpedio, Joseph R. Del Re, Christina M. DeMartino, Natasha R. DeMartino, Christina Diaz, Christopher M. DiGregorio, Rhiannon EbnitSmith, John P. Esposito, Michelle M. Esposito, Edward Fontana, Laura E. Galante, Sinan Hepcakar, Leonard M. Hession, Jr., Stephanie Igneri, Jason M. Ilkowitz, Lisa N. Johnson, Lauren Kaan, Sabrina M. Kaufman, Alexis Kirschbaum, Michelle C. May, Jennifer M. McNeil, Alenandra G. Mercil, Lorne Odell, Emily Jie Pan, Tetyana Perkhalyuk, Allmira Perovic, Danielle S. Puca, Parrish J. Santi, Janine M. Sheirer, Christina P. Silva, Elizabeth M. Slevin, Christina N. Snyder, Paul G. Wiley, Hugh Withers, Jr., Christopher Zilinski. Eunice H. Woo. Karen A. Costello, Linda M. McKenna, Carmen Mercado, Shyla Roshin. Smitha A. Abraham, Lucille Cunsolo, Ousha Bajelan Farrokhi, Sarah Luecke Flaherty, Alexander Perelman. Monique Datnova, Bedrana Duka, Aleksandar Krsmanovic, Eddie Kayiu Ng, John W. Sequin, William A. Serrao, David Soliman, Yu-Hwa Tao. Janine N. Acosta, Christine L. Amodeo, Nicole Antonucci, Suzanne A. Baeringer, Dina Baio, Laurie B. Bleeker, Carolyn R. Bradley, Stephanie C. Brescia, Danielle Broadbent, Darlene H. Burroughs, Stephanie Campisi, Medina Capric, Carleen E. Church, Maria Costa, Christina J. DeNicola, LorriAnn DePhillips, Mariann Devico-Davis, Basma Douban, Maureen T. Dunleavy, Emily Ellison, Nawal Elsibay, Heather M. Ewald, Elizabeth M. Fanizza, Ann M. Ferrera, Erica L. Galletta, Carrie D. Gerecitano, Razia Ghafari, Kimberly A. Giovinazzo, Mariangela Graffagnino, Paul G. Graniero, Jaclyn F. Grann, Susanne E. Grigoli, Catherine Guarnieri, Tara A. Gurrieri, Cheryl A. Gwizdaloski, Amy Hankin, Junior A. Iglesia, Jennifer L. Just, Rebecca Kantrowitz, Caryn F. Kelly, Melanie A. Krause, Maria Lagoudis, Erin Liebowitz, Melissa A. Markinson, Caroline Marquina-Nunez, Renee McHale, Jessica A. Moser, Alia Nazir, Jennifer R. Olsen, Victoria Patanio, Jeanine

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Marie Patinella, Phil Richford, Jennifer Rivera, Brett Rothman, Jaclyn N. Ruggiero, Richard J. Sanchez, Jr., Vivian Shenoda, Marla A. Silverman, Kelli D. Slomko, Mallory Soletti, Maureen Soos, Kaitlin A. Sparnroft, Joanna Spatharakis, Catherine Avery St. Jean, Lydia Vanette-Sciusco, Maggi Watt. Kalpeshkumar Mangubhai Chaudhary, Rex Joyel Doctor, Gilbert Salim Jadallah, Sapan Dipakkumar More, Tejaskumar Dineshbhai Patel, Yamini Jayantibhai Patel, Hanna Boutros Shahin, Steven Vaccaro, Steven Ray Vega. Jennifer L. Fox, Hung Nguyen. Souleymane Diallo, Philip C.e Lee, Vineet Punia, Francoise F. Sidime, Ekaterina Zavyalova. Pamela A. Bauer, Jaime M. Benedet, Gabriella Birshtein, Meghan A. Brandt, Meghan L. Burke, Marie M. Cornicelli, JoAanne Cosenza, Jamie A. Damora, Ira M. Diamond, Kathryn E. Dobson, Megan Donohue, Kari Fessler, Dana Gioia, Thomas Grossman, Meghan Hopkins, Amy LaRocca, Drita Lazoja, Han Kin Lei, Kathryn R. Lobasso, Sepideh Marhyan, Danielle A. Prologo, Lauren Romano, Kimberly M. Rutherford, Danielle M. Scianna, Shannon Krista Siler, Cheryl Smit, Lauren J. Stone, Kathleen A. Sullivan, Andrea M. K. Tsiamanes, Renee Virga, Colette E. Vitacco, Katy Eileen Vorbeck, Pelin Yetiskul, Heather Yohananov, Briana Colette Zasa. SIXTH-YEAR PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE Donna Colgan-Arena, Beatrice Forlizzi, Emma Kontzamanis, Ancy C. Palakunnel.

AUGUST, 2010 ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE Ornella J. A. Omanda Ambourouet, Princy Deepthika Goonewardene, Shaquana L. Johnson, Victor J. Morvillo, Kenisha R. Murray, Matthew Pinkston, Jessica Marie Strazzera, Boris Yevseyev. ASSOCIATE IN ARTS Janine M. Buckley, Frank J. Cambria III, Peter Candrilli, Anna Chmielewska, Louis T. Cintron, Caitlin Condon, Christina Girgenti, Annie-Lynn Gray, Jennifer P. Hallihan, Danielle E. Jurkiewicz, Rose Berline Laguerre, Lataisha Temeka McCall, Donna L. Moran, Imani Randall, Can Cheng Wen. ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE Yanique Jodieann Lingo, Alexander Azubuike Nwanekah, Monana Shimova. BACHELOR OF ARTS Catherine Aloisio, Rosaline Andino, Laura E. Arato, Teuta Avdiu, Lonnie M. Baron, Lindsay P. Batchelor, Sasika I. Bathgalawalawve, Alvin Baugh, Damaris Bianchi, Chrisovalantou Bois, Noreen K. Brigante, Stanislav Burdman, Anthony J. Catania, Linda A. Cappiello, Colin Cheung, Kathy S. Correia, Shpresa Cukovic, Shannon Damico, Janeury De Leon, Walaa Elbanna, Samer Fayad, Karissa M. Ferraiolo, Ezra A. Friedman, Jamie A. Gallo, Joseph Gori, Kaitlyn N. Grant, Leyna Gregorio, Crystal A. Holminski, Jessica E. Hughes, Lindita Ismaili, Renee M. Jordan-Ross, Jessica Jorge-Duran, Rachel J. Josaphat, Marie Andree Joseph, Bojana Jovanovic, Jeffrey L. Khamis, Artur Lalik, Glen Levy, Sara Lim, Yanique Jodieann Lingo, Laurie M. Lucido, Matthew Lynch, Tamara O. Mason, Tara J. Meiners, Denise A. Melendez, Valeriya Mikhaylecnko, Evalis Molina, Phillip A. Nau, Gleb Nepomnyashchy, Joann Nunziata, Chioma E. Nwaohuocha, Kaosara Omobola Oladele, Olayinka Ajoke Olutosin, Mayra A. Orellana, Pranvera Melody Papraniku, Vanessa M. Perez, Kimberly J. Philip, Joseph Pristera III, Daniel E. Rivera, Catherine A. Roca, Ciara Y. Rosario, Shirley Roy, Richard J. Satriano, Tamika Sealy, Charles Tagle, Elias M. Taweel, Nelida Lexine Tolentino, Robert T. Ventriglia, Sameh Maher Wahba, Paloma Wasserstein, Rena A. Wilkerson, Jennifer Wong, Rebecca Yi, Sahar Zafar, Sara Zavala. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE Antoine Abdel-Malek, Lovie M. D. Amolo, Brian Bekkerman, Jonathan A. Birriel, Georges Bouobda-Tsemo, Sean M. Broderick, Megan V. Caldwell, Brittany F. Carnevale, Thiago Carvalho, Lai Wa Chan, Daisy Chang, Di Meng Chen, Wayne Chu, Gabrielle Cofone, Christiana R. Colon, Christine M. Coppola, Lauren C. Cybulska, Christopher M. Fama, Taicha I. Faublas, Kate E. Finley, Romany Gaied, Luz M. Gamboa-FernandoNisha S. Gilbert, Lisa Gino, Marcin Glowczynski, Momolu M. Gray, Jr., Igor Gugnishev, Nikita Gupta, Jang Heo, Darya Irinina, Angela Kamel, Rajendran Kanagaratnam, Michail Kapilkov, Ziv Karmi, Devorah R. Katz, Jennifer Khanna, Diana Kosov, Tillie Kwok, Azar Latif, Karen Shuci Lei, Michael Levitan, Jenny Liang, Luz C. Lucero, Lorraine S. MacLeod, Christopher Maropakis, Daniel J. Marsillo, Mohamed Abdulrahaman Massaquoi, Laura L. Medina, Edward P. Migliorisi, Elisa Mohamed, Mohsen Mohsen, Ardian Mollabeciri, Jennifer L. Murphy, Kenneth A. Murphy, Jr., Thaer Saleh Musallam, Ryan H. Nemoyten, Antoinette A. Noah, Alexander Azubuike Nwanekah, Abimbola O. Oyewole, Olabisi O. Olubunmi, Olufunmike Eunice Oyewole, Andrea Pabon, Geethanjali Mahesika Padmaperuma, Saurabh Kumar Passi, Ganga Perera, Christine Plude, Aaron A. Ramirez, Diana F. Ramirez, Mariela L. Reyes, Kristine A. Salgado, Leopold Sedar, Munib R. Sheikh, Vladimir Page 135 of 155


Shikhman, Boris Shulman, Jacklyn E. Smith, Kristie A. Sorrentino, John V. Sullivan, Matthew J. Tafone, Senghor Tatchou-Fonyen, George Venetsanakos, Rostislav Volotskiy, Toby Weiss, Christopher Wesley, Philip A. White, Li Qing Wu, Yanling Xu. MASTER OF ARTS Linda Barbato, Barbara Brancaccio, Daniel S. Kane, Rose A. Sieniawski, Gerald H. Weder. MASTER OF SCIENCE Timothy J. Audet, Christina Bilotti. Anna Ghazaz, Leslie J. Meiners, Sonia Sarah Ninan. Anthony M. Rodriguez. CSI RECIPIENTS OF CUNY DOCTORAL DEGREES Louis Alfieri, Timothy Bambrick, Paul Bruening, Carla Buonviaggio, Leah Cohen, Ramone DeLosReyes, Bethany Dresely, Sara R. Guariglia, Nora Hamdan, Brandy Moore, Ha Thi Thu Phan, Udani Silva, Ben Silverbush, Sultana Soter, Mohammad Talafha, Melissa Terrusa, Steve Tserlin, Rumiya Tsymbalyuk, Boris Vorik, Shengli Wu, Ning Zhao, Ellen Zikeli. Š 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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Mother, daughter graduate today at CSI By Tevah Platt May 27, 2010, 9:24AM STAPLETON STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Mom and daughter, Leslie and Tara Meiners of Stapleton, will graduate together today, with degrees in education from the College of Staten Island (CSI). Thirty-two years apart in age, mother and daughter were surprised to realize they were filing for graduation at the same time — Leslie, with a master’s in childhood education, and Tara, with a bachelor’s degree in science, letters and society — the suggested major for students going on become certified teachers. Leslie Meiners teaches pre-school at the Foresight School in New Springville. She earned her bachelor’s degree while raising her family, taking classes part-time between 1983 and 2003, when she completed her degree in early childhood education. Her daughter took the four-year fast track. “My mom was like my personal advisor because she went through everything I did,” said Tara. Both say they had a fantastic experience at CSI. Staten Island Advance/Bill Lyons Leslie Meiners holds the graduation photo of her and her daughter, Tara. The two graduate today from the College of Staten Island.

While working on her degree, with minors in French and psychology, Tara helped found the Peace Club on campus, and swam for four years, earning 67 medals, setting seven records and ending her tenure as captain of the team in her senior year. Leslie said she built excellent relationships with professors at CSI who were willing to help any student who showed commitment.

She wrote her master’s degree thesis on pre-school education, arguing that the federal dollars that go to pre -school programs should fund parents to stay at home with their children until kindergarten. The Meiners are thrilled to be graduating together. “I’m more excited for my mom than for myself because it’s so deserved, after all this time, raising a family and going to school, and finally getting that degree,” said Tara. Financially and otherwise, the dad in the family, Curt Meiners, supported his wife and two kids (son Jesse earned his associate’s degree five years ago) through their years at CSI. Tara will be leaving in October to teach English in Tours, France. Following commencement, the family will celebrate today at the Elm Park Inn. ---

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PressReleasePoint U.S. Chamber's Quaadman Promoted to Vice President of Center for Capital Markets Competitiveness Posted May 28th, 2010 by US Chamber of C...

CONTACTS: Eric Wohlschlegel (202) 463-5682 / 888-249-NEWS

May 28, 2010

WASHINGTON, D.C. The U.S.

Chamber of Commerce today announced that Thomas P. Quaadman has been promoted to vice president of the Chamber's Center for Capital Markets Competitiveness (CCMC). "With two decades of legal experience and a background in securities and commercial law, Tom has developed a strong record of supporting pro-growth and pro-jobs policies," said Tom Donohue, Chamber President and CEO. "As we make our way through the economic recovery, he will continue to play a key role in advancing one of the Chamber's top priority issues

modernizing our financial regulatory system to promote economic growth and job

creation in America."

Since 2008, Quaadman has been executive director for Financial

Reporting and Investor Opportunity at the CCMC. In this role, he has fought for fair and transparent accounting standards, a predictable and smooth transition toward a global financial reporting system, accountability for special interests' abuse of the proxy system, and communicating the benefits of efficient American capital markets for Main Street.

Prior

to joining the Chamber, Quaadman was chief of staff to Congressman Vito Fossella where he worked to pass the Investors Capital Markets Fee Relief Act. This act reduced SEC transaction fees, representing a savings of billions of dollars for investors.

Quaadman

graduated cum laude from New York Law School and is a graduate of the College of Staten Island. He is a member of the New York and Connecticut state bars. Quaadman and his wife, and their two children reside in Alexandria, Virginia.

Since its inception three years

ago, the CCMC has led a bipartisan effort to modernize and strengthen the outmoded regulatory systems that have governed our capital markets. The CCMC is committed to working aggressively with the administration, Congress, and global leaders to implement reforms to strengthen the economy, restore investor confidence, and ensure wellfunctioning capital markets.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is the world's largest

business federation representing the interests of more than 3 million businesses of all sizes, sectors, and regions, as well as state and local chambers and industry associations.

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College graduates on parade By Staten Island Advance May 30, 2010, 5:31AM By LINDSAY MACKLIN and JILLIAN TARATUNIO Randi E. Fisch Randi E. Fisch, daughter of Linda and Leo Fisch of Great Kills, graduated magna cum laude from the University of Miami with a bachelor of science degree in electronic media and psychology and a minor in business management. Ms. Fisch was a member of her school's honors societies, Alpha Lambda Delta and Alpha Epsilon Rho. She also was on the dean's list and was a member of the Provost's Honor Roll and President's Honor Roll. While attending Miami, Ms. Fisch was the executive producer of her school's late-night comedy television program, "Off the Wire." During the summer of 2009, Ms. Fisch interned for "The Late Show with David Letterman." She aspires to pursue a career in television production. Holly Bonner Holly Bonner of West Brighton graduated from Columbia University with a master's degree in social work. While attending Columbia, Ms. Bonner held internships at Camelot Counseling Center in Port Richmond and the Legal Aid Society Juvenile Rights Division in St. George. An alumnus of The Audrey Cohen School for Human Services and Education in the Metropolitan College of New York, Ms. Bonner graduated with a bachelor's degree in human services in 2002 and was awarded the presidential scholarship for academic achievement. In 2008, she received her first master's degree in public administration from the Metropolitan College of New York, where she was a member of Pi Alpha Alpha, the national honor society for public administrators. She was on the dean's list throughout her undergraduate and graduate years. Ms. Bonner is a breast cancer survivor and has helped raise almost $12,000 for breast cancer research with the help of students and staff from Concord High School and the Camelot Counseling Center, Port Richmond. She is married to Joseph Bonner. During her coursework, Ms. Bonner took part in community service activities with Concord High School, including a yearly Thanksgiving food drive for local military families and the school's annual fund-raisers. Every year, Ms. Bonner funds a scholarship given to a graduating senior from Concord High School in memory of her grandfather, Charles Richard Benford, who was her greatest inspiration in her academic pursuits. Anthony P. Avona Anthony P. Avona, the son of Fran and Anthony Avona of Oakwood, graduated from Baruch College's Zicklin School of Business with a bachelor of business administration degree in finance. Avona was a member of the school's baseball team, which won the 2009 CUNY Athletic Conference championship.

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Kristina Niesi Kristina Niesi, the daughter of Ellen Hoydal of Annadale, graduated from the College of Staten Island with a bachelor's degree in English, concentrating in linguistics, with a minor in psychology. She plans to attend graduate school for education and to join Teachers Educating Students of Other Languages (TESOL) in order to pursue a career as an English as a Second Language (ESL) teacher. Emily Quadrino Emily Quadrino, daughter of Sue and Emil Quadrino of Arden Heights, graduated from Villanova University with a bachelor of science degree in marketing and a bachelor of arts degree in Italian. Ms. Quadrino was on the dean's list and was an active member of Delta Gamma sorority, was vice president of the marketing society, assistant to the chairman of the Special Olympics Pennsylvania Committee and orientation counselor to the incoming members of the Class of 2013. These roles earned her a student leadership award. While attending Villanova, Ms. Quadrino volunteered in orphanages in Honduras during her sophomore year and studied abroad in London in the fall of her senior year. Ms. Quadrino has accepted a position as an intern for a prestigious program with Estee Lauder's global marketing division in Manhattan. Michael Bivona Michael Bivona, the son of Anne Marie and Michael Bivona of Annadale, graduated from Quinnipiac University with a bachelor of arts degree in psychology and a minor in law studies. While attending Quinnipiac, Bivona was a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity and on the dean's list. In the fall, Bivona will attend Quinnipiac Law School. Allison Duffy Allison Duffy of Westerleigh graduated summa cum laude from Marist College, Poughkeepsie, N.Y., with a bachelor's degree in communications, a dual concentration in journalism and sports communication, and a minor in political science. Ms. Duffy, daughter of Irene and Dennis Duffy, was an intern at the Staten Island Advance in 2008. She was a member of the Dean's Circle, dean's list, and honors program for four years. She was a member of Alpha Chi, a national college honors society, and Lambda Pi Eta, a communications honors society. Ms. Duffy was awarded the 2010 School of Communication and the Arts Intern of the Year Award, and the 2010 Baccalaureate Award for Excellence in Communication. She accepted a position with Major League Baseball's Properties Office of the Commissioner in photos and the publishing department as the project assistant editor. Justin R. Grant Justin R. Grant of West Brighton graduated summa cum laude from SUNY-Purchase with a bachelor's degree in literature. He completed his undergraduate education in three years. His research interests include 18th century American literature, critical pedagogy and theory. Grant, the son of Roger and Claudia Grant, will be pursuing his master's degree in English at the University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla., on a full tuition scholarship and a teaching assistantship. He has been given the option to continue his education to pursue his doctorate.

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He hopes to work in academia on the university level. Jaime Bree Zuckerberg Jaime Bree Zuckerberg of Arden Heights graduated summa cum laude from the State University of New York (SUNY) at Albany, with a bachelor's degree in journalism and a minor in English. Ms. Zuckerberg, daughter of Paul and Randi Zuckerberg, was on the dean's list. She was a member of Sigma Tau Delta International Honors Society in English. She will be pursuing her master's degree this fall. Brian Goetz Brian Goetz of Willowbrook graduated from St. Francis College, Brooklyn, with a bachelor's degree in childhood education and a concentration in social studies. Goetz, the son of Carl and Kathy Goetz, was on the dean's list for three years. He was a member of Kappa Delta Pi International Education Honor Society and Phi Alpha Theta International History Honor Society. He was the vice president of the school's Education Society from 2007-2008, and was president in 2009. He was awarded the Franciscan Spirit Award for his service to the college and community, and the Certificate of Recognition for his work with the Education Society and his other achievements. He plans to pursue a master's degree in literacy, and to work in the education field. Ednita Lorenzo Ednita Lorenzo of Port Richmond graduated from the College of Staten Island with a bachelor's degree in communications and journalism, and a minor in music. Ms. Lorenzo, the daughter of Mayra Hernandez and Sofronio Lorenzo, was the president of the Athletics Committee, captain of the Dolphins' women's soccer team, assistant coach of the CSI men's soccer team, and captain and assistant coach of Los Yankees, a women's indoor league team. She received the Scholar Athlete of the Year Award. She was a teaching assistant at Port Richmond High School's Raider ACTION, a community service group. Ms. Lorenzo was the sports editor of The Banner, a CSI student publication. She hopes to pursue a career in sports journalism. Nawal Elsibay Nawal Elsibay of Annadale graduated from the College of Staten Island with a master's degree in childhood education. She earned her associate's degree and bachelor's degree in English writing from CSI. Ms. Elsibay, daughter of Kathleen and Magdy Elsibay, was a teaching scholar at PS 14. She will return to the College of Staten Island in the fall to obtain a certification in special education. She aspires to be a full-time classroom teacher in an elementary school. Melissa DeMartino Melissa DeMartino of Bay Terrace graduated summa cum laude from the College of Staten Island with a bachelor's degree in mathematics with a concentration in adolescent education. Ms. DeMartino, daughter of Aldo and Carol DeMartino, was on the dean's list from 2006 to 2010. She graduated with honors in mathematics, received the Mathematics Departmental Award, the Phi Kappa Beta

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Award and the CSI Auxiliary Services Scholarship. She was the speaker at the honor's convocation. She currently tutors mathematics and coaches the Holy Child varsity cheerleading team. In the fall, she will pursue her master's degree in mathematics and adolescent education at the College of Staten Island. She aspires to be a high school mathematics teacher. Joseph A. Villanti Joseph A. Villanti of Tottenville graduated from the Peter J. Tobin College of Business in St. John's University, with a bachelor's degree in finance. Villanti is the son of John S. Villanti and Jane Villanti. He hopes to pursue a career in finance. Valentina Diglio Valentina Diglio of Tottenville graduated from Franklin & Marshall College, Lancaster, Pa., with a bachelor's degree in psychology. Ms. Diglio, daughter of Frank and Maryann Diglio, volunteered for The Tommy Foundation, an organization devoted to helping families impacted by autism. She also wrote for her school newspaper, The College Reporter. She will attend the Institute for Psychological Sciences, Arlington, Va., to pursue a doctorate degree. Elizabeth A. Tilelli Elizabeth A. Tilelli of Richmond graduated cum laude from the College of Staten Island with a bachelor's degree in cinema studies. Ms. Tilelli is the daughter of Joseph and Barbara Tilelli. She hopes to pursue a career in the film production field, writing screenplays. twitter.com/siadvance -- facebook.com/statenislandadvance Š 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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New Jersey

Bayshore Community Hospital Foundation Board of Trustees Welcomes Three New Members Story Number is : 050110164 PROVIDED

Bayshore Community Hospital The Bayshore Community Hospital Foundation Board of Trustees approved three new board members: Louis Czubachowski, Holmdel; Barbara Ganz, Middletown; and Martin Pfleger, Esq., Holmdel. “I am very excited and pleased to welcome our new board members, who are all well respected members of the community, into the Bayshore family as they have so graciously agreed to serve on the Foundation Board of Trustees,” states Raimonda Clark, president and CEO of Bayshore Community Health Services.

Louis Czubachowski holds a strong record of accomplishments in the implementation of critical business systems with development and operations in the financial services industry. Czubachowski is a former senior managing director at Bear Stearns & Co., where he led the firm’s IT practice in providing technology solutions for its broker/dealer, investment advisor and fixed-income Page 143 of 155


clients. “I am thrilled and feel privileged to be a member of the Bayshore Community Hospital Foundation Board,” says Czubachowski. “I eagerly welcome the opportunity to work with the hospital and Foundation members to fulfill the Bayshore mission and serve its community.”

Czubachowski earned a bachelor of science degree in economics from CUNY – College of Staten Island, NY. He is a decorated U.S. Army Vietnam veteran and participates in numerous organizations, including the Chief Information Officers Forum, St. Andrew’s Men’s Group and St. Catharine’s Caring Ministry. “It is an honor to welcome a trustee with such an extensive professional background in information technology with a financial focus, one that can only benefit the Foundation’s mission,” comments Wendell Smith, Esq., chairperson of the Bayshore Community Hospital Foundation. Czubachowski and his wife, Rose Ann, reside in Holmdel and have four children.

Barbara Ganz is a longtime supporter of Bayshore Community Hospital, preserving the memory of her late husband, Michael J. Ganz, former chairperson of the Bayshore Community Hospital Foundation and member of other Bayshore boards. Ganz advanced her husband’s legacy with the naming of the Michael J. Ganz Infusion Suite at the hospital, providing patients with outstanding cancer treatment close to home. Ganz is a schoolteacher at New Monmouth Elementary School, Middletown. She received her undergraduate degree from Slippery Rock University and her master’s from Fairleigh Dickinson University. She is a member of the National Education Association and the New Jersey Education Association and has received the Governor’s Teacher Recognition Award. Ganz is also a member of the Bayshore Foundation Annual Charity Ball Committee. She volunteers at the Calico Cat Thrift Shoppe, which raises money for multiple local charities through the Community Outreach Organization. Page 144 of 155


“Bayshore Community Hospital is a wonderful community of very dedicated people,” Ganz shares. “When approached for membership on the Foundation board, I accepted with enthusiasm and look forward to the opportunity to serve.” “Barbara and Mike Ganz were instrumental in the development of Bayshore’s cancer program,” says Smith. “We are pleased that she will continue as a member of the Foundation.” Martin Pfleger is a partner with the law firm of Harter & Pfleger, LLC, Colts Neck. A member of the NJ Bar Association, he is a graduate of both Bucknell University and Seton Hall University School of Law. Pfleger proudly follows the path of his late father, Robert, who was a founding member of the Bayshore Community Hospital Board of Trustees and devoted many years to the mission of providing a state-of-the-art healthcare system to our community. His father’s dedication to Bayshore’s efforts over the years inspired him to similarly contribute, a sentiment echoed by Smith: “I feel certain that Bob would be pleased to see Marty carrying on the family tradition of support for Bayshore Community Hospital.” Pfleger was a member of the Holmdel Township Board of Education from April 2001 to April 2007, serving as president his last two years. He was subsequently appointed by the Township of Holmdel to serve as co-chair of the Holmdel Township Citizen’s Advisory Committee for the Lucent property. He now looks forward to his new role as a member of the Bayshore Community Hospital Foundation. Pfleger and his wife, Ruthann, reside in Holmdel and have three daughters.

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From the sea: A treasure of a story By Diane Lore May 13, 2010, 12:27PM Salvatore Quinto of Graniteville has just published his first children’s book, based on his work on a tug STATEN ISLAND, NY - GRANITEVILLE - One day, when his 10year-old daughter, Alexandra, asked her dad what he did at work, she gave Salvatore Quinto an idea: Write a children’s book that explains what he does for a living. And that’s just what he did. Quinto’s recently-published book, “Tug Boat Tommy,” is an illustrated story about the duties and tasks performed by a tug boat and its crew. “Tommy” is the captain, and along with “deck hand Dan” they explain for pint-size readers what tug boats are and how they help other ships dock safely. Quinto himself is a merchant marine who has worked on oceangoing tug boats since 2007. He is employed by K-Sea Transportation Inc., based in Mariners Harbor, where he works aboard a tug named “The Viking.” It’s 127-feet long and has 5,000 horsepower engines. "Tug Boat Tommy," is an illustrated story about the duties and tasks performed by a tug boat and its crew. "Tommy" is the captain, and along with "deck hand Dan" they explain for pint-size readers what tug boats are and how they help other ships dock safely. The book was written by Salvatore Quinto, of Graniteville. PHOTO COURTESY OF SALVATORE QUINTO

“We transport cargo fuel barges from New York to Louisiana and Texas,” he explained. “I enjoy being at sea. It’s very peaceful. The ocean is a magnificent and mysterious wonder, and while I enjoy her, I also respect her,” he said, during an interview from his Graniteville home, where he was taking down-time between voyages.

Being a merchant marine is a second career for 40-year-old Quinto, who worked for 15 years as a mail carrier with the US Postal Service. Working out of the Manor Road Post Office in Castleton Corners, his route included parts of Graniteville and Bulls Head. “It was a good job, but I wanted to try a different challenge,” Quinto said. So he applied to the US Coast Guard for his merchant marine license and seaman’s clearance, and then signed up with Local 333 of the United Marine Division, the union representing merchant marine seamen. He spends two-to-three weeks at a time at sea, before down time on land, which affords him the opportunity to tackle his writing. “Writing is my first love,” said Quinto, who grew up in New Springville. He holds a bachelor’s degree in liberal arts and creative writing from the College of Staten Island. “I write poetry, too. Originally I wanted to write screenplays, but it gets very involved, and I had to put that on the back burner,” he explained. “I do,

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however, have a few more ideas for children’s books.” A sequel, “Tug Boat Tommy to the Rescue” is in the works. In this adventure, Tommy and his crew get to deliver emergency rescue supplies to hurricane victims. Drawing on his postal experience, Quinto is also working on a book, “My First Letter.” It will teach children how to write a letter, and what happens to a letter when it’s mailed.

Salvatore Quinto, author of 'Tugboat Tommy,' is a merchant marine who has worked on ocean-going tug boats since 2007. He is employed by K-Sea Transportation Inc., based in Mariners Harbor, where he works aboard a tug named 'The Viking.'

He’s also doing author readings and book signings in schools. He’s contacted a number of schools, and is tentatively scheduled to appear at St. Charles School in Oakwood in June. He’s also donated copies of “Tug Boat Tommy” to school libraries. Quinto tends bar part-time at Danny Boys Tavern in Castleton Corners, and is scheduled to do a charity book-signing there in June. (Copies of “Tug Boat Tommy” published by Xlibris, are available for $15.99 and can be ordered online at www.exlibris.com/bookstore, or by calling 888-795-4274, ext. 7876. )

© 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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Bayshore Community Hospital Foundation welcomes new board members

Czubachowski and his wife, Rose Ann, reside in Holmdel and have four children. Barbara Ganz is a longtime supporter of Bayshore Community Hospital, preserving the memory of her late husband, Michael J. Ganz, former chairperson of the Bayshore Community Hospital Foundation and member of other Bayshore boards. Ganz advanced her husband's legacy with the naming of the Michael J. Ganz Infusion Suite at the hospital, providing patients with outstanding cancer treatment close to home.

Laurie Zalepka • Reader Submitted • May 13, 2010

The Bayshore Community Hospital Foundation Board of Trustees approved three new board members: Louis Czubachowski, Holmdel; Barbara Ganz, Middletown; and Martin Pfleger, Esq., Holmdel.

Ganz is a schoolteacher at New Monmouth Elementary School, Middletown. She received her undergraduate degree from Slippery Rock University and her master's from Fairleigh Dickinson University. She is a member of the National Education Association and the New Jersey Education Association and has received the Governor's Teacher Recognition Award.

“I am very excited and pleased to welcome into the Bayshore family our new board members, who are all well respected members of the community, as they have so graciously agreed to serve on the Foundation Board of Trustees,” states Raimonda Clark, president and CEO of Bayshore Community Health Services.

Ganz is also a member of the Bayshore Foundation Annual Charity Ball Committee. She volunteers at the Calico Cat Thrift Shoppe, which raises money for multiple local charities through the Community Outreach Organization.

Louis Czubachowski holds a strong record of accomplishments in the implementation of critical business systems with development and operations in the financial services industry. Czubachowski is a former senior managing director at Bear Stearns & Co., where he led the firm's IT practice in providing technology solutions for its broker/dealer, investment advisor and fixed-income clients.

“Bayshore Community Hospital is a wonderful community of very dedicated people,” Ganz shares. “When approached for membership on the Foundation board, I accepted with enthusiasm and look forward to the opportunity to serve.”

“I am thrilled and feel privileged to be a member of the Bayshore Community Hospital Foundation Board,” says Czubachowski. “I eagerly welcome the opportunity to work with the hospital and Foundation members to fulfill the Bayshore mission and serve its community.” Czubachowski earned a bachelor of science degree in economics from CUNY College of Staten Island, NY. He is a decorated U.S. Army Vietnam veteran and participates in numerous organizations, including the Chief Information Officers Forum, St. Andrew's Men's Group and St. Catharine's Caring Ministry. “It is an honor to welcome a trustee with such an extensive professional background in information technology with a financial focus, one that can only benefit the Foundation's mission,” comments Wendell Smith, Esq., chairperson of the Bayshore Community Hospital Foundation.

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“Barbara and Mike Ganz were instrumental in the development of Bayshore's cancer program,” says Smith. “We are pleased that she will continue as a member of the Foundation.” Martin Pfleger is a partner with the law firm of Harter & Pfleger, LLC, Colts Neck. A member of the NJ Bar Association, he is a graduate of both Bucknell University and Seton Hall University School of Law. Pfleger proudly follows the path of his late father, Robert, who was a founding member of the Bayshore Community Hospital Board of Trustees and devoted many years to the mission of providing a state-ofthe-art healthcare system to our community. His father's dedication to Bayshore's efforts over the years inspired him to similarly contribute, a sentiment echoed by Smith: “I feel certain that Bob would be pleased to see Marty carrying on the family tradition of support for Bayshore Community Hospital.” Pfleger was a member of the Holmdel Township Board of Education from April 2001 to April 2007, serving as president his last two years. He was subsequently appointed by the Township of Holmdel to serve as co-chair of the Holmdel Township Citizen's Advisory Committee for the Lucent property. He now looks forward to his new role as a member of the Bayshore Community Hospital Foundation. Pfleger and his wife, Ruthann, reside in Holmdel and have three daughters.

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Staten Island victims group struggles to stay afloat By Jamie Lee May 13, 2010, 10:32AM

Courtney Mitchell, left, board member, and Bianca DiMitri, director, have assisted victims of domestic abuse from across Staten Island through their organization, Fearless Females. STATEN ISLAND ADVANCE/JAMIE LEE

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. - SOUTH SHORE - Two years ago this month, Staten Island victims of domestic violence were given a group designed exclusively to help them deal with their trauma. Since then, Fearless Females, run by victims and for victims, has continued to provide support, referrals and friendship for both women and men who have suffered abuse at the hands of their partners. Each week, the members of the discussion forum wrap their arms around people from all walks of life, regardless of race, age, profession or sexual orientation. They hear success stories and breakthroughs, and lend each other shoulders to cry on when there are flashbacks and regression. The going hasn’t been easy for the nonprofit, which for all of its valiant efforts, has met with scorn from some; it has struggled to obtain consistent funding for its programming. “To be completely honest, it’s been very hard to keep this alive and running,” said Bulls Head resident Bianca DiMitri, who founded the organization. “But there are a lot of people that depend on us, and I can’t give up on it.” Fearless Females has continued to serve more than 50 victims currently on the roster thanks, almost exclusively, to the persistence of Ms. DiMitri and active board members, including Courtney Mitchell of Pleasant Plains, Julienne Verdi of Richmond, Dino Selita of Dongan Hills and Frank Morano and Suzanne Charaldsen of Tottenville. Weathering criticism and ridicule from the ignorant was one thing. Page 150 of 155


“I’ve been approached on the street and had grown men get up in my face and tell me to mind my own business and that I’m just desperate for attention,” said Ms. DiMitri. “The last thing I want is fame or anything like that, but if I don’t keep talking about it, nothing will ever change.” And Ms. DiMitri, who admits that re-telling the story of when her ex-boyfriend beat her about the face and head still sickens her, isn’t the only one who has dealt with backlash. “I was working a fund-raiser (for Fearless Females) and some guy came up to me and asked if his girlfriend would win the basket raffle if he punched her in the face,” said Ms. Mitchell, a survivor of abuse herself. “Some people don’t understand how hurtful they can be.” The lack of support from community organizations and organizers, however, has been shocking. “We lost the space at the College of Staten Island’s Bertha Harris Women’s Center when I graduated in June of 2009,” said Ms. DiMitri. “But they didn’t tell me right away, and two weeks before graduation, I was left scrambling to find a place.” Having to shut down the group, even for a few weeks, would shatter the progress of many attendees and keep others from ever coming back, believed the founder. At the 11th hour, John Tabacco, then running for the North Shore City Council seat, offered his campaign office off Bay Street for Fearless Females to use. It was dark, damp and the roof leaked, but there were folding chairs and tables. So the group made do. But when his campaign run neared an end, the group was again homeless. It was a chance meeting with a staffer from the office of state Sen. Diane Savino (D-North Shore/Brooklyn) on a Community Growth Opportunities cruise that helped Ms. DiMitri, who was being honored, to her new home. “A few weeks after the cruise, Diane called me and offered us a safe, secure space on the North Shore, and we’ve been there ever since,” she said. “Thank god.” Funding, however, has been harder to come by. Tabacco and World of Women founder Pat Caltabiano have helped financially in the past, but without constant support, Fearless Females has been scraping by. “I’ve spent thousands of dollars of my own money on this group over the years,” said Ms. DiMitri. “I do it because I love it and this group is important, but I just can’t do all the things that I’d like to do without additional help.” Hopes of creating a national organization out of Fearless Females – one with case workers, therapists, emergency funding and access to safe houses – have become bleaker. Police officers, lawyers, therapists and self-defense experts have donated time and knowledge, but launching programs and sponsoring events isn’t cheap. Ms. DiMitri is currently working on a documentary about the struggles women and men face when coping with domestic violence, but cannot edit the tape, as it will likely cost over a thousand dollars to put together. She is also in the process of compiling a comprehensive step program and tip sheet, one that will be reviewed by experts in the legal, counseling and health care fields, for those suffering from domestic violence about how to escape the situation. But mass producing the informational packets, once finished, seems financially impossible. In the coming months, Fearless Females will attempt to generate some needed support with fund-raising events at North Shore night-spots.

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On May 30, the group will hold a 30th birthday celebration for Ms. DiMitri at Locale, 1221 Bay St., Rosebank, where a portion of the door charge will go to the organization from 10 p.m. on. On June 5, a large-scale fund-raiser will take place at Pier 76, 76 Bay St., St. George, complete with raffles, a 50/50 and a DJ starting at 10 p.m. And on August 26, there will be an early-evening, fund-raising poker tournament, followed by a 50/50 and band performance at Black Dog Grill, 382 Forest Ave., West Brighton. Anyone interested in volunteering or donating is asked do call 347-857-6257 or e-mail fearlessfemales@gmail.com. “We’re just looking for help, whether it be something small or something big,” said Ms. Mitchell. “Every little bit helps. And this is a cause that, more often that not, gets overlooked. But that doesn’t make it any less worthy.” © 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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2 Islanders ordained today By Lisa Ann Williamson May 15, 2010, 5:29AM STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. -- Archbishop Timothy Dolan will ordain 10 new priests in a Mass at St. Patrick's Cathedral in Manhattan this morning, including two Staten Islanders, Thomas A. Roslak and Daniel Tuite. Father Roslak, 44, will celebrate his first Mass at Holy Rosary R.C. Church in Arrochar tomorrow at 2 p.m. Even before entering seminary, he had a desire toward vocation, according to an article in Catholic New York. But the Brooklyn native, who was brought to the Island as a child, took a detour to work in a family business and then media, earn a liberal arts degree at the College of Staten Island and care for family members before pursuing studies at St. John's University and enrolling in St. John Neumann Residence Hall for a degree in philosophy.

Family Photo

During seminary, Roslak served as a parish catechist and coordinated teen retreats at the seminary and at Archbishop Stepinac High School. Father Tuite, 26, will celebrate his first Mass tomorrow at 3 p.m. at his home parish, Our Lady Queen of Peace R.C. Church in New Dorp.

Father Thomas A. Roslak will celebrate his first mass tomorrow at 2 p.m. at Holy Rosary Church, Arrochar.

As a child, Tuite earned the nickname, "Pope St. Daniel." He worked in the parish rectory before going to college at Stony Brook University to study politics and history with an eye on international relations. While at Stony Brook, Tuite was a campus apostolate. Passing on an offer of acceptance to Seaton Hall University's School of Diplomacy, he entered seminary. Family Photo Father Danile Tuite will celebrate mass tomorrow at 3 p.m. at Our Lady Queen of Peace Church, New Dorp.

Both priests will receive their assignments for service on Monday. They come to ordination having spent several days in silent reflection. twitter.com/siadvance -facebook.com/statenislandadvance

Š 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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From the sea: A treasure of a story By Diane Lore May 20, 2010, 5:22AM GRANITEVILLE STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — ay, when his 10-year-old daughter, Alexandra, asked her dad what he did at work, she gave Salvatore Quinto an idea: Write a children’s book that explains what he does for a living. And that’s just what he did. Quinto’s recently-published book, “Tug Boat Tommy,” is an illustrated story about the duties and tasks performed by a tug boat and its crew. “Tommy” is the captain, and along with “deck hand Dan” they explain for pint-size readers what tug boats are and how they help other ships dock safely.

Photo Courtesy of Salvatore Quintos Salvatore Quinto is a merchant marine who has worked on ocean-going tug boats since 2007. He is employed by K-Sea Transportation Inc., based in Mariners Harbor, where he works aboard a tug named “The Viking.”

Quinto himself is a merchant marine who has worked on oceangoing tug boats since 2007. He is employed by K-Sea Transportation Inc., based in Mariners Harbor, where he works aboard a tug named “The Viking.” It’s 127-feet long and has 5,000 horsepower engines. “We transport cargo fuel barges from New York to Louisiana and Texas,” he explained.

“I enjoy being at sea. It’s very peaceful. The ocean is a magnificent and mysterious wonder, and while I enjoy her, I also respect her,” he said, during an interview from his Graniteville home, where he was taking down-time between voyages. Being a merchant marine is a second career for 40-year-old Quinto, who worked for 15 years as a mail carrier with the US Postal Service. Working out of the Manor Road Post Office in Castleton Corners, his route included parts of Graniteville and Bulls Head. “It was a good job, but I wanted to try a different challenge,” Quinto said. So he applied to the US Coast Guard for his merchant marine license and seaman’s clearance, and then signed up with Local 333 of the United Marine Division, the union representing merchant marine seamen. He spends two-to-three weeks at a time at sea, before down time on land, which affords him the opportunity to tackle his writing. “Writing is my first love,” said Quinto, who grew up in New Springville. He holds a bachelor’s degree in liberal arts and creative writing from the College of Staten Island. “I write poetry, too. Originally I wanted to write screenplays, but it gets very involved, and I had to put that on the back burner,” he explained. “I do, however, have a few more ideas for children’s books.” A sequel, “Tug Boat Tommy to the Rescue” is in the works. In this adventure, Tommy and his crew get to deliver emergency rescue supplies to hurricane victims. Drawing on his postal experience, Quinto is also working on a book, “My First Letter.” It will teach children how to write a letter, and what happens to a letter when it’s mailed. He’s also doing author readings and book signings in schools. He’s contacted a number of schools, and is tentatively scheduled to appear at St. Charles School in Oakwood in June. He’s also donated copies of “Tug Boat Tommy” to school libraries. Quinto tends bar part-time at Danny Boys Tavern in Castleton Corners, and

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is scheduled to do a charity book-signing there in June. (Copies of “Tug Boat Tommy” published by Xlibris, are available for $15.99 and can be ordered online at www.exlibris.com/bookstore, or by calling 888-795-4274, ext. 7876. )

© 2010 SILive.com. All rights reserved.

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May 2010  

CSI in the News - May 2010

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