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architecture portfolio

COLLEEN CREIGHTON Original Photo Copyright Georgia Institute of Technology


Colleen Creighton

Résumé EDUCATION University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY Master of Architecture, May 2014 (expected) Honors: Arthur A. Schomburg Fellowship Current GPA: 3.54/4.00

4151 Heather Drive Williamsville, NY 14221 colleen.e.creighton@gmail.com

Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA Bachelor of Science in Architecture, May 2011 Honors: High Honors Dean’s List Faculty Honors Frances Wood Wilson Grant John C. Schafer Scholarship J&E Strickland Scholarship AIA Convention Installation Design: Team Member: Paper Wall (Published on suckerPUNCH) Zentis/RWTH Aachen University/Georgia Tech Restaurant Competition: Honorable Mention Global Alliance of Technological Universities - Tower of Babylon Competition: Second Place GPA: 3.50/4.00 ACTIVITIES Member of University at Buffalo’s 2015 Solar Decathlon Submission Team Architecture Graduate School Association (ArchGSA) - Secretary Participated in Exploring the American South with the University at Buffalo - Interviewed for The Spectrum Studied abroad in Barcelona, Spain Lectured on Exhibiting Constructions Paper Wall to School of Architecture Introduced basics of Architecture to Centennial Elementary School WORK EXPERIENCE University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY Graduate Assistant, August 2013 - present Teaching Assistant, August 2012 – May 2013 Kelkenberg Homes, Inc., Clarence, NY Project Coordinator, August 2011 – Present

SKILLS Autodesk AutoCad; Autodesk Revit; Rhinoceros 5.0; Adobe Creative Suite; Microsoft Office, Model Making, Sketching, Photography, Hand Drafting


Solar Decathlon Proposal

From Zig Zag House to University at Buffalo’s GRoW House

Northeast Plaza Shopping Center Retrofit An Urban Design Project in Atlanta

Georgia Tech Learning Center

A Classroom Building on Freshman Hill

Competitions and Installations

Bavarian Fast Food Restaurant, Tower of Babel, and Paper Wall

Sketches and Photography

Documenting Architectural Excursions


Solar Decathlon Proposal Zig Zag House

Design Team: C. Creighton, E. Schelleng Instructor: Bradley Wales Year: Fall 2013

The Zig-Zag house develops a relationship with its surroundings and landscape through a solid/transparent-parti. Operating as a sanctuary for the urban farmer and gardener, the house pulls the private and service spaces into its thick core wall and opens the floor space up in the public areas. This follows the formal organization of the space, further opening the southern façade to accept the outdoor space. Fully operable sliding doors open the southern side of the building into the landscape, creating a transition of indoor to outdoor. In conjunction to the “bonus” greenhouse, the house blends the outdoor landscape into the living space. This effect lets the resident-gardener pull the vegetation inside and push the livable space outside. The private space of the building, embedded into the north wall acts as a base component for the house to expand and receive its external surroundings. Through the light and transparent enclosure, the space adapts to the performance of the resident-farmer and environment.


CLOSED

PRIVATE

INTERMEDIARY OPEN

PUBLIC


Solar Decathlon Proposal Zig Zag House

Design Team: C. Creighton, E. Schelleng Instructor: Bradley Wales Year: Fall 2013

Monocrystalline Array

Shading Overhang/ South Glazing, Visitors

North Ventillation

Project Info Boards

Landscape Planters

Water Storage Tanks

Thermal Mass Floor


12’ - 6”


Solar Decathlon Proposal University at Buffalo’s GRoW House

Design Team: C. Creighton, P. Foti, W. Fung, T. Gargiulo, N. Karl, J. Li, S. Lim, C. Lin, S. Parks, A. Phelps, E. Schelleng, R. VanCuren Instructor: Bradley Wales Year: Fall 2013

Overall Design Goal & Program: Create a spacious-feeling 1,000sf max, better-than-net-zero house, for an urban farmer/gardener couple living in Buffalo. The design must also perform well in the Solar Decathlon Competition in Irvine, California in October 2015. The house should provide excellent opportunities for indoor-outdoor living, gardening, entertaining (movie nights, dinners), and be passively heated and cooled. Specific Design Goals 1. Passive Design 2. Creating easily modulated, distinct heating and cooling zones with small square footages. 3. Reconfiguring domestic spatial hierarchies 4. Modularity 5. Design specificity to client needs and regional site conditions 6. Activation of landscape, particularly for food production 7. Water Catchment and Reuse 8. Re-use of Materials TBD 9. Innovation of PV Design


GROW Planting Maintenance Harvesting Composting Soil Testing

WASH

FILTER

Planting Maintenance Harvesting Composting Soil Testing

Laundry Sorting Shoe Storage Sink Floor Drain

PROCESS Preparation Cooking Canning Pickling

STORE Storage Temperature -Controlled

DIMENSIONS Length: 47’ Width: 13’ Height: 11’6”

WASH

FILTER

PROCESS

STORE

BATHE

DIMENSIONS Length: 18’ Width: 11’ Height: 11’6”

GROW

Square Footages Conditioned Space: 755 sq. ft. Unconditioned Space: 694 sq. ft. Total: 1449 sq. ft.

RELAX

Thermal Box

GROW

GROW

Unconditioned Greenhouse

Thermal Box


Solar Decathlon Proposal University at Buffalo’s GRoW House

Design Team: C. Creighton, P. Foti, W. Fung, T. Gargiulo, N. Karl, J. Li, S. Lim, C. Lin, S. Parks, A. Phelps, E. Schelleng, R. VanCuren Instructor: Bradley Wales Year: Fall 2013


Northeast Plaza Shopping Center Retrofit An Urban Design Project in Atlanta

Design Team: C. Creighton, E. West, S. Rios Instructor: Ellen Dunham-Jones Year: Fall 2010

Currently, the Northeast Plaza Shopping Center is set to the side of Atlanta’s Buford Highway. The mile long stretch in between crosswalks encourages jaywalking which leads to accidents. Buford Highway holds the title for having the highest pedestrian death rate in the state of Georgia. The proposal is to split the highway creating a couplet. This allows for two one way streets with multiple crosswalks, forcing drivers to yield to crossing pedestrians. It also introduces a town center, ideally bringing the surrounding sprawling neighborhoods together. A “rambla” connects this town center to the nearby creek and green space which will be regraded to accomodate users. Before | Transient

Existing high-speed street condition with extents of strip mall core buildings. Proposal: slow traffic by putting town center core buildings in middle of Buford Highway and creating a couplet consisting of two, one-way streets

After | Permanent

Before | Restricted

Existing buildings face highway and restrict access or views to the creek. The main pedestrian circulation is concentric, bordering the core buildings Proposal: Break up buildings along the creek, allowing for access and views

After | Accessible


Couplet Park: Based on the Parks of San Juan, Puerto Rico Seeks to provide a unique setting connecting urbanism to nature. Creates a desirable environment for those using mass transportation. A

B

Before | Detached Abandoned

Residential

Retail

Parking

Retail dissociates itself from the residential neighborhoods it is intended to support and chooses to orient itself along the highway to serve commuters. Proposal: Introduce a civic core that establishes a town center oriented for the people.

After | Dynamic Residential

Ravine Park Church

Soccer Field

Retail

Town Green Town Square Mixed Use Library

Community Pavilion Clinic Parkway

Before | Maximize Surface Area

After | Minimize Surface Area

Existing parking is excessive and underused. Proposal: Change to on-street parking and two parking decks which can be underground. This optimizes area that can become green space.


Georgia Tech Learning Center A Classroom Building on Freshman Hill Design Team: C. Creighton, C. DeRiso Instructor: Judy Gordon Year: Spring 2010

The Georgia Tech Learning Center positions itself along freshman hill in the heart of the university’s campus. The building’s design addresses the steep slope of the site while adding a peculiar twist to the campus architecture. In this design, there is a play on contrasts and the idea that opposites, when paired next to each other, emphasize one another’s existence. The curving facade, glass materiality, ramps, and series of jut outs are a strong contrast to the core of the building which consists of more solid materials, structural grid system, and ordered program. The void between the two spaces helps emphasize this contrast.


Georgia Tech Learning Center A Classroom Building on Freshman Hill -25’ up

up

Shop

+15’

Gallery

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Ramblin Wreck

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Shop

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PERSONAL STUDY SPACE dn up

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STUDIO 1 0’

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+7’

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OFFICE SPACE

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+56’

+37’

PERSONAL STUDY SPACE dn

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STUDIO 2

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Competitions

Landesflagge - A Bavarian Fast Food Restaurant Zentis/RWTH Aachen University/Georgia Tech Restaurant Competition Honorable Mention

Design Team: C. Creighton, C. DeRiso, C. Meister Instructor: Daniel Baerlacken Year: Spring 2011

An Oktoberfest tent atmosphere waved in chevrons of white and blue allude to the region of the restaurant’s original concept, Bavaria. The design celebrates Bavarian food, Oktoberfest culture, and German innovation fashioned with the sex appeal of the United States. The driving initiative behind this design was the experience of the customer. The main dining area fosters a communal festive atmosphere while the structure above emphasizes the importance of the kitchen, the bar, and the garden all visible from the main eating area. Landesflagge’s aesthetic is heavily influenced by the Flag of Bavaria. The colors of the flag and chevron patterns are visible through the restaurant. These characteristics function as a branding technique forcing customers to associate the wonderful tastes and festive experiences with Bavaria. From the tables to the bathrooms, the Architectural Section plan is skewed to keep customers aware of the setting and cause them to interact with design.

Symmetrically Spaced Ribbons

Bavarian Gabled Roof

Traditional Oktoberfest Tent

Tent Transformation

Assigning Programs

Roof Transformation

Establishing Hierarchies

Roof Profile

Exterior Expression


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Competitions and Installations

Tower of Babel | Castle in the Sky Global Alliance of Technological Universities - Tower of Babylon Competition Second Place

Design Team: C. Creighton, A. Ali, Z. Brown, C. DeRiso, D. Duncan, B. King, C. Martin, C. Meister, E. Morris, A. Soldier, B. Utting Instructor: Daniel Baerlacken Year: Spring 2011

The purpose of this installation was to communicate the failures of different levels of consumption. Rising from the ground were several connected towers composed of plastic bottles. Each tower was built by vertically stacked compression rings composed of bottles horizontally attached together. The bottles were employed stereometrically, serving as building modules that could be compacted vertically to ascend several stories. The number of bottles used in each tower represented the total number of plastic bottles thrown away rather than recycled on Georgia Tech campus in a single day. These constructions had a physically sublime and overwhelming presence, accumulating into a visual metric of waste. Hanging from above these towers was a cloud of hangers, representing a major retail store's yearly usage. They were arranged in 12-part cuboid modules that placed each component in tension and hung from cords from the ceiling of the installation site. They served as a tectonic counterpoint to the stacked bottles, an ephemeral and floating inversion of the tower below. As much as the bottles represented an obvious product of the recycling process, the hangers symbolized the magnitude of parallel yet hidden consumption patterns. Both structures, towering above with a juxtaposed heaviness and lightness represented the physical index of our material existence.

Photo Copyright Georgia Institute of Technology


Installation Paper Wall

Design Team: C. Creighton, C. Borders, R. Dickey, C. Jimenez, D. Lohrey, J. Fischer, K. Johnson, L. McPhail, A. Froemelt, J. LeFrancois, T. Wheelock Instructor: Jennifer Bonner Year: Fall 2009

]Conceived and fabricated specifically for an AIA convention, this exhibition put into action our concerns for the digital and physical possibilities of design, the collaborative spirit that infuses the creative process, recognition of our shared environmental responsibility, and the role of architecture as an embodiment of intelligence and cultural value. In a collaborative effort of design and making, the exhibition team interrogated what might constitute a responsible contribution to the convention’s ephemeral display of architecture and production. Rescuing 50,000 sheets of paper from the campus recycling bins at Georgia Tech – a fraction of the hundreds of thousands of document pages printed there each month – a singular unit of construction was derived, a simple rolled sheet. Its structural logic was investigated; the procedural logic of its production and assembly was tested; its visual coherence was evaluated. The thickened, porous paper wall that results is embedded with historical data that visualizes student enrollment at Georgia Tech’s College of Architecture during its first 100 years.


Sketches and Photography

Documenting Architectural Excursions


Sketches and Photography

Documenting Architectural Excursions


Sketches and Photography

Documenting Architectural Excursions


architecture portfolio

COLLEEN CREIGHTON Original Photo Copyright Georgia Institute of Technology

Colleen Creighton Portfolio  
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