Page 1

Virtual Environments

Colleen Chen 356888

Semeter 2/2010 Group #13 1 Â


Page 5.  6.  7.  

Page 3.  4.   Page  8.  9.  10.  11.  12.   Page  13.  14.  15.  16.  17.    

BRIEF.

Page 18.  19.  20.  

Your conceptual  proposals  should  consider  human  body  as  the  site   for  your  design  ac5ons.  Events  occurring  in  rela5onship  to  the  human  

body can  than  serve  as  form-­‐genera*ng  processes.  Iden5fy  several   such  processes  and  propose  how  they  can  be  materialised  as   structures  .Possible  processes  can  include  events  where:  1.  Geometry  of   the  human  body  becomes  modified  or  extended.  2.  Actual  or   poten5al  movements  of  the  body  become  visible  as  spa5al  structures.  3.   An  external  element  interacts  with  the  human  body.  

2


1.1

PRECEDENCE. My aim  is  to  find  inspira5on/precedents  to  

1.10

serve as  form-­‐genera*ng  process  to  the   1.2  

1.8

project. My  ini5al  explora5on  came  from   contemporary  representa5ons  of  the  

human body  because  the  term  was  

1.6

1.11

1.5 men5oned  most    frequently  in  the  design   brief.    The  video  installa5on  by  Daniel  Crooks  

1.3

(Fig. 1.1)  struck  me  in  par5cular  for  its   1.4   I  was  oPen  drawn  to  works,  which  distorted  the  

effec5ve capturing  of  the  transience  of  taichi   through  5me-­‐lapse  video.    

human body  in  order  to  communicate  

1.7

1.9

But as  the  brief  only  encourages  the  considera5on  of  the  human   body  as  a  site  for  our  work,  I  decided  to  incorporate  some  other  

par5cular ideals  about  the  quali5es  or  movements  of  

artworks that  have  interested  me  in  the  past.  I  really  like  how  

the subject.  Contemporary  sculptures  (Fig.  1.2,  1.3,  

pain5ngs by  Rene  Magri6e  (Fig.  1.6)  and  miscellaneous  works  

1.4) were  helpful  in  demonstra5ng  the  material  and  

by Christopher  Niemann  (Fig.  1.10,  1.11)  demonstrate  the  effect  

formal possibili5es  of  representa5on,      

of text  upon  an  image.  I  also  find  the  playful  work  by  Piero   Manzoni    (Fig.  1.7),  Noma  Bar  (1.8)  and  Anish  Kapoor  (Fig.  1.9)To   be  effec5ve  in  subvert  our  usual  expecta5ons  and  challenging   how  we  see/  interact  with  our  environment  

3


APer looking  at  different  works,  I  decided  to  se[le  on  the  

COMMUNICATION

theme of    

because I  appreciated  how  varying  methods  of  conveying   a  message  can  alter  our  percep5ons  so  dras5cally.  I  also   2.1  

thought this  theme  could  be  quite  expansive.  

2.6

2.7

2.8

In the  natural  world,  communica5on  is  a  prime     mobilising  force.  The  visual  quality  of  such  mass  movement   (Fig.  2.2,  2.3,  2.4,  2.5)  is  compelling.     Artworks  using  themes  of  such  mass  movements  oPen  expose     the  follies  of  group  mentality.  Cai  Guo  Qiang’s  installa5on  (Fig.  2.6)  and   Christopher  Niemann’s  playful  graphics  (Fig.  2.9)  demonstrate  how  perilous   passive  communica5on  can  be.        

2.2 So  then,    

the goal  for  my  project     2.3  

2.5

would be  to     convey  the  quali5es    

2.9

of communica5on  that  will  hopefully       inform  us  of  the  need  for  constant  cri5cal  thinking   and  engagement  in  our     2.4  

everyday living.  

4


Ini5ally, I  focused  on  direct  symbols  –

IDEA #1.  

ENGENDER.

Through a  series  of  brain-­‐storming,  I  iden5fied  some  

looking to  telegraph  lines  and  sound  

quali5es  to  include  into  my  design.  If  the  func5on  of  

waves to  find  forms  for  shaping  my  

communica5on is  to  persuade,  then  the  act  of  

headpiece. Imita5ng  the  undula5ng  waves  

communica5ng can  serve  to  both  inform  and  

of sound  signals,  I  made  models  very  

misinform.

quickly. However,  the  end  product  was  not   very  sa5sfying  as  I  did  not  feel  that  this  

The dual  quality  of  communica5on  paves  way  for  

approach embraced  my  original  idea  of  

many possibili5es  in  material  representa5on.  To  

exploring the  interes5ng  characters  of  

illustrate the  dichotomy  of  truth  and  falsehood,  one  

communica5on, which  had  originally  

may include  material  quali5es  of  lightness  and  

fascinated me.      

darkness, or  transparency  and  opacity.  

5


IDEA #2.  

I decided  to  use  the  snake  as  an  analogy  for  the  

theme of  communica5on.  This  is  inspired  by  the   fact  that  the  snake  as  possessing  completely   opposite  associa5ons  in  different  cultures.  Whilst  

wisdom in  the  

being the  embodiment  of  

Minoan trad5on,  the  snake  is  more  commonly   associated  with  the  no5on  of  

deceit in  the  

3.1

The most  interes5ng  precedent  I   have  observed  is  the  portrait  of   Queen  Elizabeth  I  (Fig.  3.1),  where  

3.4

it was  revealed  that  there  is  a   small  serpent  beneath  the  layer  of   rose  (in  which  she  was  originally   holding).  It  has  been  commonly   agreed  by  art  historians  that  the   3.3  

Chris5an canon.    

modifica5ons made  to  the  

Just as  our  intent  qualifies  the  informa5on  in  

pain5ng were  done  

which we  communicate,  our  cultural  bias  

in response  to    

qualifies the  way  in  which  we  perceive  the  same  

the Elizabethan    

ways in  which  Caravaggio  (Fig.  3.2),  Rondanini    

object in  ques5on.      

sensibili5es and    

(Fig. 3.3),  Rubens  (Fig.  3.4)  and  Bernini  (Fig.  3.5)    

fear for  misinterpre-­‐   ta5on  upon  reconsidera5on.  

3.5

Mythological Gormons  provide  precedent  for  the  body/ head  being  used  as  a  site  for  slithering  snakes.  The    

3.2

have painted/sculpted  Medusa,  provide  a  wealth  of   material  to  inform  further  developments  of  my  idea.          

6


CLAY MODELLING.   The  slithering  movement  and  linear  form  of  snakes   provided  many  possibili5es  to  my  design.  However,  my   ini5al  clay  model  either  did  not  resemble  real  snakes  at  all.   This  was  due  to  a  lack  of  actual  observa5on  on  how  snakes  

This method  proved  much  more  effec5ve  

would usually  conduct  themselves.    

and efficient.  The  only  modifica5on  I’d   made  aPer  construc5ng  the  clay  models  in  

I decided  to  look  at  videos  to  see  how  snakes  behaved  in  

the image  of  the  video,  was  to  make  their  

the state  of  ba[le.  I  thought  that  having  two  snakes  would  

bodies a  li[le  more  volumetric  in  order  to  

emphasis the  duality  embodied  in  the  subject.  To  my  

facilitate digital  modelling.  

findings, snakes  tended  to  bite  each  other  near  the  head,   constric5ng  their  opponents  un5l  one  party  fell  dead.  

7


DIGITISE. POINT CLOUD.   Point  cloud  method  was  thought  to  deliver  a  

It was  hoped  that  once  points  were  plo[ed  

However the  process  proved  not  only  lengthy,  

more accurate  digital  image  because  my  clay  

on all  six  surfaces,  that  the  individual  

but was  also  unsuccessful.  The  inaccuracies  in  

model had  many  curved  edges.  Care  was  taken  

surfaces could  become  folded  into  a  cube  

orthographic photos  resulted  in  a  mismatch  in  

to number  each  dot  on  the  physical  model  

to begin  the  process  of  loca5ng  individual  

most of  the  dots  and  compromised  the  quality  

before the  points  were  traced  out  on  Rhinoceres.     points  in  three-­‐dimensional  space  

of the  en5re  process.    

8


3D SCAN.   A[empts  were  made  at  digi5sing  the  model   using  a  3D  scanner.  This  was  unsuccessful   because  the  undula5ng  surfaces  of  the  model   was  not  able  to  be  captured  by  the  machine.    

FREE-­‐HAND. Other  a[empts  were  also  made  by  drawing   the  model  free-­‐hand  in  Rhinoceros.  Although   the  end  product  bore  some  resemblance  to   the  physical  model,  free-­‐hand  drawing  did  not   serve  to  exercise  the  aim  of  this  module  in   accurately  transferring  a  physical  model  into   digital  space.  

9


Edges were  op5mised  to  reduce  curved   surfaces  as  it  was  understood  that  the   curved  surfaces  would  complicate  the   triangulated  cladding  process.  Triangle  

CONTOURS.

surfaces were  then  added  to  join   adjacent  parallel  contours.  

Contouring method  was  employed   with  minor  adjustments.  Instead  of   tracing  the  contour  around  the   physical  body  of  the  model,  then   taking  orthogonal  photographs  of  it   before  tracing  it  out  on  SketchUp,   individual  contour  sec5ons  were  cut   off  before  the  physical  model  was   photographed.  This  way,   overlapping  sec5ons  otherwise  hard   to  view,  could  be  included  into  the   digital  drawing.  

10


OPTIMISE. Triangle  faces  were  reduced  and   adjustments  were  made  at  the  base   of  the  model  to  be[er  suit  the   contour  of  the  head.  This  was  not   very  helpful  as  it  oPen  led  to  the   distor5on  of  the  original  form  with   only  incremental  reduc5ons  in  the   Looking  at  

amount of  triangulated  surfaces.     At  this  point,  I  realised  that  the  form  

4.1

certain  architectural     precedents  featuring  triangulated    

of my  model  would  mean  that  it  

surfacing, for  instance  Federa5on  Square    

would be  incredibly  difficult/ complicated  to  clad  properly.  Thus  it  

(Fig. 4.1)  and  Helios  House  (Fig.  4.2),  it  is  observable    

remains to  be  determined  whether  

that most  would  not  contain  such  acute  undula5ng  

the design  of  the  model  needs  to  be   revised.    

4.2

surfaces as  the  requirements  for  more  triangulated   parts  would  come  at  a  high  cost  to  the  client.    

11


the model  despite  concerns  for  its   feasability  (the  model  contained   over  3000  surfaces  according  to   SketchUp).  Taking  away  surfaces   which  may  be  in  hidden  layers,   therefore  unnecessary,  a  posi5ve   es5mate  would  s5ll  leave  around   1000+  surfaces  to  unfold  and   construct.  

The  model  was  subdivided   into  strips  not  dissimilar  to   the  arrangement  of  the   original  contours.    

FABRICATION TRIAL  #1.  

An a[empt  was  made  at  unfolding  

Taking a  small  sample  of  the   front  of  the  mode,  the  first   trial  achieved  reasonable   success.  The  parts  joined  up.   However  the  excess  of  acute   triangles  made  the  overal   model  appear  messy.    

12


5.1

FABRICATE. TESSELLATION.

The main  advantage  of  tessella5on  lies  in  its  

5.2

provision of  structural  strength.  The  5ghtly   fi[ed  shapes,  once  fi[ed  together,  becomes   fairly  immutable.  This  explains  its  wide  usage     in  architecture  and  mural  over  all  ages.   5.3   Yet  despite  its  visual  effec5veness,  this  method   may  not  be  most  suitable  for  my  model.  It  was   decided  to  redraw  my  model  to  explore  the   alterna5ve  method  of  crea5ng  cross-­‐sec5ol  ribs  

CROSS-­‐SECTION.

An a[rac5on  to  the  employment  of  sec5oned  ribs   is  the  ability  to  easily  construct  three-­‐dimensional   objects  with  two-­‐dimensional  component.  This   method  is  also  structurally  sound  and  has  been   employed  in  many  successful  architectural   prac5ces  (Fig.  5.1,  5.2,  5.3)  

13


FABRICATION TRIAL  #2.  

SO. Revised  model  was  unfolded   and  labelled  on  SketchUp   before  cut  by  a  cardcu[er.   Decision  was  made  to  discard   the  use  of  the  ivory  card  in   favour  of  the  1mm  cardboard   for  en5re  model  as  the  ivory   card  was  simply  too  weak  to   hold  the  model.      

The fabrica5on  process   made  me  aware  of   par5cular  tooles  –   sharper  blade  –  to  use,   par5cular  labeling  that   would  advance  my   design,  extra  cuts  to   make,  and  alterna5ve   assembly  processes.  

14


after.

Some structural  changes  were  made,   especially  to  rejoin  the  right-­‐most  sec5on   (from  front  view)  which  was  en5rely  detached   from  the  previous  model.  

FABRICATION TRIAL  #3.  

before.

Minor details  were    added  but     they  proved  to  detract  from  the  model     by  being  unnecessary  embellishments.  

15


Cross-­‐sec5on ribs  were  discarded  and  a  new  model   was  drawn  in  an  a[empt  to  follow  the  trajectory  of  

FABRICATION TRIAL  #4.  

again. the two  snakes.  The  idea  seemed  appealing  at  first   but  the  construc5on  process  soon  revealed  that   without  the  cross-­‐sec5on  ribs,  it  was  near  impossible   for  the  parallel  sec5ons  to  stay  in  place.  The  structure   of  the  model  as  a  whole  was  much  weaker  and  this   could  be  felt  just  by  holding  the  model  in  one’s  hand.   Due  to  the  inaccuracies  of  the  sec5on,  many  parts   also  did  not  join.          

16


My final  submission   resembled  model  fabrica5on   #2  mostly  because  the  later   altera5ons  #3  and  #4    not   only  did  not  completely  

FINAL FABRICATION     It  was  a    happy  coincidence  that  the  slim  frames  of  individual    

contours  should  capture  light  and  establish  such    strong  contrast  to     the    surrounding  darkness.  The  ability  for  the  frames    to  cast  a  shadow  upon  the     adjacent  opaque  surfaces,  meant  that  I  could    almost  create    a  ‘shadow  skin’  to     make  up  for  the  cladding  that  was  never  achieved.  

resolve exis5ng  fabrica5on   issues,  but  added  more   problems  to  the     model’s  structure.      

17


REFLECTION. As a  design  precendent,  I  found  the   Webb  Bridge  by  Denton  Corker  Marshall  

6.1

6.2

6.3

6.4

(Fig. 6.1,  6.2,  6.3,  6.4)  to  be  extremely   effec5ve  in  achieving  what  I  had   originally  set  out  to  create.  As  the  Webb   Bridge  was  based  on  an  indigenous   fishing  basket,  the  curvilinear  form  and   woven  texture  of  the  bridge  meant  that   there  were  many  similari5es  in  the   construc5on  outcome  between  my   design,  based  on  two  ba[ling  snakes,   and  snaking  form  of  the  bridge.  I  felt  that   the  method  in  which  the  bridge  was   ribbed  made  it  more  structurally  sound   and  its  translucency  throughout  made   the  model  much  more  consistent            

Many of  my  design  precedents   displayed  proper5es  of   amorphousness,  mul5plicity  and   dual  meaning  and  I  felt  that   model  was  successful  in  conveying   some  of  my  ini5al  explora5ons.  

18


The most  challenging  part  of  Module  1,  Engender,   was  to  develop  our  design  concept  through   constant  experimenta5on  as  well  as  research.  In   the  process  of  making  prototypes,  I  found  that   even  if  a  concept  was  ra5onally  sound,  its  viability   as  an  idea  for  a  headpiece  would  rest  largely  on   how  successful  the  model  prototypes  would  be.   This  is  because  ul5mately  the  headpiece  must   communicate  to  its  audience  and  not  rely  on   added  explana5on  to  jus5fy  its  design.  

In the  development  and  fabrica5on  process  of  Module  2,  the   most  personally  challenging  task  involved  learning  new   soPware  and  understanding  their  advantages  and  limita5ons.   It  took  me  a  li[le  5me  to  pick  up  my  working  speed  as  I   found  that  the  new  design  tools  required  an  altered  way  of   thinking  and  of  planning.    In  this  process,  I  learnt  that  many   of  the  design  techniques  –  tessella5on  and  sec5oning  –  are   not  new,  although  I  was  able  to  appreciate  how  advances  in   technology  have  allowed  for  greater  flexibility  in  exis5ng   techniques  and  new  direc5ons  in  design.    

19


The fabrica5on  process,  Module  3,  demonstrated  how,  as  the  paper     model  can  be  quite  delicate,  the  physical  assembly  does  not  oPen   allow  for  post-­‐digital  amendments.  In  my  model,  if  slots  were  not   made  to  be  1mm  wide  in  the  3D  model,  then  intersec5ng  1mm   cardboards  would  not  fit  together.    From  this  I  understood  the   importance  of  having  a    grasp  for  the  material’s  characteris5cs.      

Another aspects  of  learning  involved  apprecia5ng  the  importance  of   documenta5on.  This  was  carelessly  done  ini5ally  and  as  a  result,  the   first  presenta5ons  suffered.  From  this  error,  I  gained  that  both  the   designer  and  audience  stood  to  gain  from  a  be[er  visual   understanding  of  the  fabrica5on  process.  As  the  weeks  progressed,  I   also  learnt  how  to  make  be[er  quality  screen-­‐grabs  as  well  as   ensuring  that  the  basic  orthogonal  viewpoints  would  be  present  to   contrast  any  adjustments  made  to  my  model.      

Ul5mately, the  model  is  the  product  of  a  design  brief,  which  must   answer  to  the  requirements  of  the  client.  From  the  ini5al  monochrome     un-­‐annotated  and  un-­‐cited  powerpoint  slides,  to  the  colourful,   typographically  interes5ng  and  fully  referenced  presenta5on  in  the   final  stages  of    presenta5on,  many  insights  have  been  obtained  about   the  importance  of  communica5on.        

20


REFERENCE. 1.1 Daniel  Crook.  video  installa5on  ‘Sta*c  No.   12'  (2010)  <h[p://www.dedeceblog.com/wp-­‐ content/uploads/2010/05/New-­‐Zealand-­‐ar5st-­‐ Daniel-­‐Crook’s-­‐video-­‐‘Sta5c-­‐No.-­‐12-­‐tai-­‐chi-­‐ forms’-­‐2009-­‐2010-­‐captures-­‐and-­‐distorts-­‐a-­‐man-­‐ performing-­‐Tai-­‐Chi.-­‐440x368.jpg>  

1.2 Kenneth  Armitage.  Friends  Walking  (1952)  <h[p://www.seriousart.org/archive/ archive_images/gormley_images/armitage.jpg>   1.3  Henry  Moore.  Reclining  Figure  (1951)  <h[p://www.anglonautes.com/ voc_arts_scul_1/voc_arts_scul_1_pic_white.jpg>   1.4  Bend  <www.synap5cs5muli.com>   1.5  Antony  Gormley.  <h[p://1.bp.blogspot.com/_Ia8cg_fsfA4/SsPEEMz_pvI/ AAAAAAAAAt8/uEZT2oxpruM/s400/antony_gormley_feelingmaterialxiv2005.jpg>   1.6  Rene  MagriVe  -­‐  Ceci  nest  pas  une  pipe   1.7  Piero  Manzoni  -­‐  BASE  OF  THE  WORLD   1.8  Noma  Bar  -­‐  Shy  Guy   1.9  Anish  Kapoor  -­‐  Un5tled   1.10  Christopher  Niemann  –  Bio  Diversity  <h[p://graphics8.ny5mes.com/images/ blogs/niemann/posts/2009/11/19fir.jpg>     1.11  Christopher  Niemann  –  My  Way  h[p://graphics8.ny5mes.com/images/blogs/ niemann/posts/2010/03/21mi[en.jpg    

21


2.1 Asymmetric  chandelier  from  Dutch  Design   Week  2010  <dutch  design  week  2009  h[p-­‐// sta5c.dezeen.com/uploads/2009/10/dzn_Eat-­‐ Drink-­‐Design-­‐04.jpg>   2.3  Locust  swarm  1  <h[p://t1.gsta5c.com/ images? q=tbn:ANd9GcQcxlwoIrX3RquNb0wIvsNdlosGnl7v hmFWK_ychzXiHgy90bw&t=1&usg=__AvdAM-­‐ YUzdzT1jTBNT9ZDRem8dA=>     2.4  Locust  swarm  2  <h[p://www.hemmy.net/ images/interes5ng/swarmtheory01.jpg>   2,5  Fish  swarm  <h[p://t3.gsta5c.com/images? q=tbn:ANd9GcRD_GOyconVwji4nq_eCytWhyJFF5 0aVw-­‐uta8HOBkkRcG1SLI&t=1&usg=__BWTx-­‐  

2.6 Cai  Guo  Qiang.  Inopportune:  Stage  One  (2004)  <h[p://www.hipyoungthing.com/wp-­‐ content/uploads/2006/10/cai-­‐guo-­‐qiang.jpg>   2.7  Antony  Gormley.  Asian  Field  (2003)  <h[p://www.seriousart.org/archive/ archive_images/gormley_images/Asian-­‐Field-­‐detail.jpg>   2.8    Maya  Lin.  <h[p://sfstreetbeauty.com/wp-­‐content/uploads/2009/12/ image_large_975.jpg>      2.9  Christopher  Niemann  –  I  Lego  N.Y.   3.1  Unknown  Ar[st.  Portrait  of  Queen  Elizabeth  I   <h[p-­‐//i.telegraph.co.uk/telegraph/mul5media/ archive/01590/snake_1590433f.jpg>   3.2  Michelangelo  Merisi  da  Caravaggio.  Medusa   <h[p-­‐//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File-­‐ Medusa_by_Carvaggio>   3.3  Gian  Lorenzo  Bernini.  Sculpture  of  Medusa  <h[p-­‐// ewhamd.net/data/file/ehwa_album/ 1993967061_4308cbfe_Medusa-­‐Bernini>   3.4  Peter  Paul  Rubens  Medusa  <h[p-­‐// en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File-­‐Rubens_Medusa>   3.5  Medusa  Rondanini.  Sculpture  by  Medusa  <h[p-­‐// en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File-­‐ Rondanini_Medusa_Glyptothek_Munich_252_n1>  

22


5.1 Reichstag,  <h[p-­‐// www.panoramafactory.com/ mul5row/par5al_h/reichstag.jpg>     5.2  Serpen[ne  Pavillion,  <h[p-­‐// viewoncanadianart.com/wp-­‐ content/uploads/2008/07/ serpen5ne.jpg>   5.3  PallazzeVo  dello  Sport,   <h[p-­‐//webhome.cs.uvic.ca/ 4.1  Federa[on  Square,  <h[p-­‐// ~vanemden/mathart/nervi.jpg>   commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File-­‐Federa5on-­‐square-­‐ 6.1  Webb  Bridge  <h[p-­‐// sandstone-­‐façade>   www.archicentral.com/wp-­‐content/images/ 320-­‐150x150.jpg>   4.2  Helios  House,  <h[p-­‐//www.inqmnd.ca/blog/wp-­‐ content/uploads/2010/07/ 6.2  Webb  Bridge  <h[p-­‐//mw2.google.com/ retail_office_da_helios_house_lg_041.jpg>   mw-­‐panoramio/photos/medium/8747611.jpg>   6.3  Webb  Bridge  <h[p-­‐// www.cultureandrecrea5on.gov.au/ar5cles/ urbanrenewal/images/webb-­‐bridge.jpg>   6.4  Webb  Bridge  <h[p://l.yimg.com/ www.flickr.com/images/spaceball>  

23

Virtual Environments Presentation  

Virtual Environments is a first-year subject of the Bachelor of Environments degree at the University of Melbourne.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you