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Welcome to the 2007 National Network of Statewide Afterschool Networks Meeting Teams from C.S. Mott Foundation-funded statewide afterschool networks are meeting in Newport, Rhode Island, January 29 – February 1, 2007, to share their successes and challenges in furthering afterschool policies and practices. Participants have the opportunity to lead and learn together. All participants come to the table as experts, learners and problem-solvers. Sessions are designed to stimulate new thinking, encourage discussions, provide resources and create a forum for sharing across networks.

About the Workshops, Discussions and Clinics Workshops focus on specific issues, feature network discussants sharing examples of their work and often include guest experts. Discussions offer an opportunity for networks to discuss an issue and explore challenges and opportunities. Clinics provide one-on-one opportunities for networks to raise specific issues and discuss possible solutions and useful resources with Afterschool Technical Assistance Collaborative (ATAC) members and guest experts.

About the Session Leaders Sessions have been developed by networks and ATAC. Each session is led by a facilitator, either an ATAC or network member. Discussants can be network team members (those registered for the entire meeting) or ATAC members. Guest experts are those invited to the meeting to share their expertise and ideas on a specific idea or issue (bios on these experts are found in the back of the program). All sessions at the meeting are built around the three goals of the Mott Foundation-funded statewide afterschool networks:

1 Goal ONE: Create a sustainable structure of statewide, regional and local partnerships, particularly school-community partnerships, focused on supporting policy development at all levels

2 Goal TWO: Support the development and growth of statewide policies that will secure the resources that are needed to sustain new and existing afterschool programs

3 Goal THREE: Support statewide systems to ensure programs are of high quality C cross-Goal: Some sessions address all of the goal areas and are marked with a C for cross-goal session

Some workshops, discussions and clinics are repeated twice; some feature different network discussants. This design provides more participants with the opportunity to discuss a particular topic while at the same time hearing perspectives from different networks.

Team Time and ATAC Consultations Teams are encouraged to use team time to engage in reflection, sharing and action planning. A map with available rooms will be at the registration desk. ATAC members and invited guest experts will be available to work with network teams in 45-60 minute blocks. Teams should have pre-registered for these meetings. See the registration desk for network time and room assignments.

Hot Topic Discussions On Wednesday and Thursday mornings, participants will have an opportunity to discuss “hot topics” that may not have been explored during this meeting or go deeper into conversations begun during existing sessions. Please suggest hot topics by Tuesday or Wednesday evening on the boards near the registration desk. A room, facilitator and time will be assigned when hot topics have been identified. Thank you for your active participation at the National Network Meeting 2007. Please check in at the registration desk if there’s anything we can do to make your experience more meaningful. Enjoy! 









Monday ALL DAY All events will take place at the Newport Marriott in Newport, Rhode Island, except afterschool site visits.

Registration at the Newport Marriott 12:00 – 7:00 pm Registration Desk – Third Floor

Participants are invited to enjoy the facilities throughout the afternoon.

Informal Buffet Dinner 6:00 – 7:00 pm Atrium

Opening Kick-Off 7:00 – 8:30 pm Salon

Welcome and Speed Networking Ready! Set! Network! The National Network of Statewide Afterschool Networks will kick-off the 2007 annual meeting with a lively and engaging opportunity to meet and greet, including the opportunity to hear about some successes and challenges in the past year and hopes for coming years. Facilitators: An-Me Chung and Eugene Hillsman, C.S. Mott Foundation

Team Time and ATAC Consultations 4:00 – 6:00 pm Throughout the Newport Marriott Conference Center. See the registration desk for network room assignments.











Tuesday morning Breakfast

Registration

7:30 – 8:30 am East Foyer

8:00 – 12:00 pm Registration Desk – Third Floor

Opening Plenary 8:30 – 9:15 am Salon

youth in providence: A whole new day Speaker: David N. Cicilline, Mayor, Providence, Rhode Island The Honorable David N. Cicilline took the oath of office as the 36th mayor of Providence on January 6, 2003. His message – clearing out decades of corruption, breaking the link between money and government and restoring sound fiscal and ethical leadership to government – resonated citywide. In his first three years of office, Mayor Cicilline’s goal of reforming municipal government and making it open, honest and predictable, while offering programs and services the residents need most and want, has helped make Providence one of America’s most livable cities. It is earning national awards and acclaim for its dynamic nature and for its integrity. Beyond eliminating practices of the past, Mayor Cicilline has launched a system of afterschool programs, capturing $6 million in private support to create PASA – the Providence After School Alliance. His vision for a robust afterschool system to rival those of wealthy suburban communities is a burgeoning reality. Neighborhood parks are alive with arts programming throughout the summer. The Providence schools are showing steady improvement across the board as a result of fundamental reform, with a comprehensive plan in place called Realizing the Dream to accelerate student achievement. Two independent studies showed the system transforming into one of the most financially efficient urban districts in New England. Mayor Cicilline is also an active board member of the Afterschool Alliance. Cicilline received his law degree from Georgetown School of Law and his bachelor’s degree in political science from Brown University.

Break 9:15 – 9:30 am






Tuesday morning 9:30 – 12:15 pm

9:30 – 10:45 am

Workshops, Discussions & Clinics

Workshops, Discussions & Clinics

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1 Using Communications to Affect Change:

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1 Engaging Mayors, Legislators and Governors:

How to Build Public Will at Every Level

Passing and Supporting Policies and Budgets

Workshop; Double Session (Two hours and 45 minutes) | Newport

Workshop; Topic Repeats | Weatherly

Support from city and state policymakers is crucial in advancing a network’s agenda. Learn about the information policymakers need in order to support afterschool initiatives and the ways they can champion specific budget initiatives. This session focuses on the similarities and differences in engaging state and local decision-makers. Participants will hear representatives from mayoral, gubernatorial and legislative offices share their stories of engagement and learn some “do’s and don’ts” for working with elected officials and their staff.

What is public will? Where there is a will, politicians will find a way. Getting the public and key stakeholders behind your efforts is key to affecting change which requires strategic communications. This workshop will cover elements of a public will campaign, lessons learned from polling, researching and planning a public education/public will campaign and message mapping. The second half of the workshop will draw from elements in the first part and include an exercise for the group on developing comprehensive communications plans in support of policy goals of the network. This hands-on group exercise will look at timelines, integrated strategies and campaign building models.

Facilitators: Daniel Princiotta, National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Bela Shah, National League of Cities Institute for Youth, Education, and Families and Jennifer Stedron, National Conference of State Legislatures Discussants: Representative Chris Barstow, Maine House of Representatives, Tammy Papa, Lighthouse Program, Connecticut and Nancy Sturm, West Virginia Governor’s Office

Facilitators: Janelle Cousino, FowlerHoffman, LLC, consultant to the Afterschool Alliance and Ursula Helminski, Afterschool Alliance Discussant: Kisha Bird, Pennsylvania Statewide Afterschool Network/Youth Development Network

1 Engaging Education Stakeholders Workshop | Columbia

To successfully deepen support for extended learning opportunities and grow a statewide infrastructure to support the development and expansion of such programs, statewide afterschool networks need to effectively engage a diverse group of stakeholders within their respective states. One key group of stakeholders includes education leaders: state education agencies, chief state school officers, teachers, principals, district superintendents and teachers’ unions. The buy-in and support for extended learning opportunities from this group is not only important, but essential in those instances where public education dollars fund programs and/or programs are based in schools. Most importantly, engaging education stakeholders is a critical strategy for better serving participants in extended learning

ATAC Consultations 9:30 – 10:45 am Throughout the Newport Marriott Conference Center. See the registration desk for network room assignments.






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programs. In this session, participants will learn about successful efforts undertaken by the Washington and Wisconsin statewide afterschool networks to engage education leaders. Participants will hear about specific strategies that worked in these states and have the opportunity to ask questions and brainstorm additional strategies for engaging education stakeholders.

Workshop | Freedom

Although high school reform and the afterschool field’s role in that reform are critical topics today, there are few innovative high school afterschool models to point to in the context of the discussion. The goal of this session is to share a sampling of models of innovative high school afterschool programs in Rhode Island. The programs will present the challenges and successes they encounter with their programs, including connection to schools, recruitment and retention of youth participants, and integrating youth employment with engaging afterschool programs.

Discussants: Steve Fernan, Wisconsin Afterschool Network and Mari Offenbecher, Washington Afterschool Network

1 Building Connections: School, Community

Facilitator: Sarah Cahill, Rhode Island Afterschool Plus Alliance

and Afterschool Through Service Learning

Guest Experts: Chace Baptista, Young Voices, Mayor David Cicilline, Providence, Rhode Island, Karen Feldman, Young Voices, David Gonzalez, AS220 Broad Street Studio, Lydia MacManus, 21st Century Community Learning Center at Feinstein High School, Jennifer Merchan, Young Voices, Michelle Novello, RiverzEdge Arts Project, K.C. Perry, Feinstein High School, Heather Shea, 21st Century Community Learning Center at Feinstein High School and Ronke Whesu, Young Voices

Workshop | Middletown

Service learning can be an effective strategy to support afterschool programs. Service learning creates intentional connections with the school day, creates dialogue with communities and provides activities that engage children and youth. In this workshop, participants will learn about a tool to create conversations which will support higher quality afterschool programs and discuss service learning as a strategy to build connections between school, afterschool and community partners.

3 Evaluating Your Network Using Your NetWorkPlan

Facilitator: Beth Unverzagt, Oregon After School for Kids

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3 Innovative High School Afterschool Models

Facilitators: Ayeola Fortune, Council of Chief State School Officers and Terry Peterson, University of South Carolina Educational Foundation

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Workshop | Jamestown

How will you know your network has been successful? Drawing from the NetWorkPlans, this session will provide an overview of the range of outcomes and performance measures that networks can use to track their progress. Discussants will share their current evaluation plans and participants will work on developing performance measures to track their own progress.

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2 Funding Strategies That Work Workshop | Enterprise

This session will explore how to create more flexibility in current funding and new dedicated revenue streams to produce more dollars for afterschool. Specific strategies include blending and braiding funds, ballot initiatives, children’s trust funds, and income tax check-offs. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss their efforts in undertaking these financing strategies and/or determine which strategies might work best in their state.

Facilitator: Priscilla Little, Harvard Family Research Project Discussants: Clarence Hogue, New Mexico Forum for Youth in Community and Harry Kujath, Missouri Afterschool Network

Facilitators: Sharon Deich and Kate Sandel, The Finance Project Guest Experts: Christine Arouth, Sullivan School Family Center, Rhode Island and Myra Webster, Children Opportunity Zone, Rhode Island Discussant: Hillary Salmons, Providence After School Alliance






Tuesday morning 9:30 – 10:45 am

11:00 – 12:15 pm

Workshops, Discussions & Clinics

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C Network 101

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1 Engaging Mayors, Legislators and Governors: Passing and Supporting Policies and Budgets

Workshop; Topic Repeats | Portsmouth

Workshop; Topic Repeats | Weatherly

What are the essential first steps in rolling out a statewide afterschool network? Participants will have the opportunity to discuss the building blocks that contribute to both the early and long-standing successes of a network, and will identify the challenges associated with building an effective structure to impact policy and practice. This session is appropriate for new networks and new members of established networks. Discussants: Deborah Elder, Kansas Enrichment Network and Gwynn Hughes, Massachusetts Afterschool Partnership

Support from city and state policymakers is crucial in advancing a network’s agenda. Learn about the information policymakers need in order to support afterschool initiatives and the ways they can champion specific budget initiatives. This session focuses on the similarities and differences in engaging state and local decision-makers. Participants will hear representatives from mayoral, gubernatorial and legislative offices share their stories of engagement and learn some “do’s and don’ts” for working with elected officials and their staff.

C 21st CCLC Quality Resources and Other

Facilitators: Bela Shah, National League of Cities Institute for Youth, Education, and Families and Jennifer Stedron, National Conference of State Legislatures

Facilitator: Michelle Ganow Jones, The Finance Project

Information for Programs and Networks

Discussants: Representative Betty Boukus, Connecticut House of Representatives, Mayor David Cicilline, Providence, Rhode Island and Nancy Sturm, West Virginia Governor’s Office

Workshop | Courageous

Several national efforts funded by the U.S. Department of Education and focused on improving the quality of afterschool programming for the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) are useful resources for afterschool programs and networks. Participants will learn about researchbased high quality core academic content material developed by the National Partnership for Quality Afterschool Learning. In addition, participants will have an opportunity to understand how 21st CCLC data collected nationally through the Profile and Performance Information Collection System (PPICS) can be used to impact your state’s quality and improvement efforts.

1 SEAs and Networks Discussion; SEA REPRESENTATIVES ONLY | Freedom

State education agencies (SEAs) are critical stakeholders in statewide afterschool networks as they administer the 21st CCLC program and other state and/or federal extended learning opportunities. In this discussion session, representatives from SEAs will discuss challenges and successes related to SEA participation in the statewide afterschool networks. Facilitator: Ayeola Fortune, Council of Chief State School Officers

Facilitator: Carol McElvain, Learning Point Associates Guest Expert: Catherine Jordan, National Partnership for Quality Afterschool Learning, Southwest Educational Development Laboratory

Break 10:45 – 11:00 am

ATAC Consultations 11:00 – 12:15 pm Throughout the Newport Marriott Conference Center. See the registration desk for network room assignments.






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activities and discuss how the ideas of complementary learning can enrich the discussion of how to build statewide support for afterschool by looking at a broader definition of skills and learning for children in the 21st Century.

2 Introduction to Sustainability Planning for Networks

Workshop | Courageous

The Finance Project will share a framework and process for planning for the sustainability of your statewide network. Participants will gain a clear understanding of what it takes to plan for and conduct a planning process in their state. This is an introductory session geared towards first time meeting participants.

Facilitator: Carol McElvain, Learning Point Associates Guest Expert: Priscilla Little, Harvard Family Research Project

3 Arts in Afterschool Workshop | Middletown

Facilitators: Michelle Ganow Jones and Kate Sandel, The Finance Project

Arts in afterschool can play an important role in developing high quality afterschool experiences that help build students skills and abilities. Participants in this session will hear how two statewide afterschool networks strengthen afterschool programs through the use of the arts and cultural resources, and the role of the network.

Discussants: Zelda Quiller Waymer, South Carolina Afterschool Alliance and Mim Wilkey, Kansas Enrichment Network

2 TANF and Afterschool Workshop | Enterprise

Facilitator: Terry Peterson, University of South Carolina Educational Foundation

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) funds support afterschool programs serving poor families. This session will describe how two states are taking advantage of TANF funding and how the networks have been instrumental in making this happen. The session will give participants a chance to discuss strategies for learning about TANF in their state and developing a plan and process for exploring opportunities to access this funding.

Discussants: Ken May, South Carolina Arts Commission and Rachel Scott, Iowa Afterschool Alliance

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NetWorkPlan Effectively

discussion | Portsmouth

Your NetWorkPlan should work for you, not collect dust on a shelf. To be successful, NetWorkPlans must be dynamic in the face of policy environments that are volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous. In order to translate theories of change into realities on the ground, networks must devise ways to balance day-to-day activities with strategic plans and determine how the two should inform one another. Participants in this clinic will discuss NetWorkPlan development, uses and challenges and will brainstorm efficient methods to support the evolution of their NetWorkPlans. This session will be valuable for network coordinators and others involved in supporting the progression of NetWorkPlans over time. If possible, bring a copy of your NetWorkPlan for reference.

Discussants: Malaika Mitchell, Georgia Department of Human Resources, Liz Nusken, Ohio Child Care Resource and Referral Association and Jill Riemer, Georgia Afterschool Investment Council

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Facilitator: Sharon Deich, The Finance Project

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3 Promising Practices: Integrating

Academics and Youth Development into Complementary Learning Workshop | Columbia

This workshop will outline the research supporting a broader view of out-of-school time activities that provide children and youth with access to a greater complement of opportunities for success in academics, career opportunities or job training. Participants will learn about examples of those programs and

Facilitator: Daniel Princiotta, National Governors Association Center for Best Practices Discussants: Sarah Cahill, Rhode Island Afterschool Plus Alliance and Cecilia Ugarte, Massachusetts Afterschool Partnership




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Tuesday Afternoon Role-Alike Networking Lunch

Site Visits to Afterschool Programs in the Newport and Providence Areas

12:15 – 1:30 pm East Foyer and Narragansett Suites

Participants will have an opportunity to network with peers with similar roles in the network. The following rooms have been assigned by organization type. Please select the group you most identify with. Advocacy Organizations

1:30 – 6:00 pm

Participants must pre-register for site visits. Please confirm your participation, sign up or cancel your reservation at the registration desk.

Freedom

Marked buses will be parked in front of the hotel lobby. Please meet in the lobby at 1:30 for Providence/Cranston-based programs and at 2:15 for Newport-based programs.

Afterschool Program Providers Courageous

Child Care Advocates

Participants traveling to Providence can return immediately following the visit or stay for dinner and return on the shuttle at 8:00pm.

Weatherly

Cooperative Extension Affiliates Salon III/IV

Individual Programs in Providence

Education Policy Organizations Salon III/IV

AS220

Funders/ Foundations

AS220 is a non-profit community arts center whose mission is to provide a forum and home for the arts and the creative population of Rhode Island.

Enterprise

Governor’s Offices, State Legislatures and State Boards of Education Newport

New Urban Arts

Intermediaries

Salon III/IV

New Urban Arts is an arts studio for high school students and emerging artists that aims to build a vital community that empowers young people to develop a creative practice they can sustain throughout their lives.

Statewide Afterschool Network Staff

Youth in Action

Salon I

Youth In Action (YIA) is a non-profit youth development organization that encourages high school youth to gain the skills, resiliency and determination to be successful adults.

Middletown

Local Elected or Appointed Officials

School District Staff Salon III/IV

National Afterschool Association Affiliates Salon III/IV

State Agencies (other than education) Salon III/IV

State Education Agencies Salon II

Universities and Other Higher Education Institutions Columbia

Team Time and ATAC Consultations 1:30 – 6:00 pm Throughout the Newport Marriott Conference Center. See the registration desk for network room assignments.

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Tuesday Afternoon Community MusicWorks Through the permanent residency of the Providence String Quartet, Community MusicWorks builds long-term learning and mentoring relationships between children and professional musicians.

Young Actors Studio,Trinity Repertory The afterschool enrichment programs at Trinity Repertory Company are grounded upon three skills sets important to any student interested in the arts: basic acting, playwriting and movement.

Multi-Activity Programs in Providence Providence After School Alliance (PASA) AfterZone Site AfterZone is a campus of programs offering a variety of arts, recreation and experiential learning opportunities for middle school youth in Providence.

Feinstein High School 21st Century Community Learning Center The 21st Century Community Learning Center at Feinstein High School offers a comprehensive program based on the academic needs of Feinstein students and the results of student and teacher surveys.

Individual Program in Newport Newport Art Museum The Newport Art Museum provides community arts enrichment programs for children and young adults throughout Rhode Island.

Multi-Activity Programs in Newport Newport Sullivan School Family Center Sullivan has been offering 21st Century Community Learning Center Programs since February 1999. Specific activities on Tuesdays include: K-Crafts, Academic Center and Lights Camera Action.

Newport Community School, Thompson Middle School The Newport Community School works daily to provide academic support and enhancement through its A.M. Academy and Academic Center, with tutorial components built into the school’s curriculum offering additional enrichment activities and programs.

Newport Boys and Girls Club The club is a full-service afterschool program and facility that serves children and youth between the ages of five and 18.

Multi-Activity Program in Cranston Cranston 21st Community Learning Center, Bain Middle School Bain + 2 is a 21st Century Community Learning Center that operates much like a college, as students choose the days and activities that best fit their needs, and offers a wide variety of classes to all students in the Bain community.

Dinner On Your Own 6:00 pm

See concierge for assistance with local restaurants.

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wednesday morning Breakfast

9:30 – 12:15 pm

7:30 – 8:30 am

Workshops, Discussions & Clinics

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Cohort III Innovations Breakfast Weatherly

Team members from Colorado, Georgia, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana and Pennsylvania are invited to learn about and discuss the upcoming opportunity to apply for Innovations Grants from the C.S. Mott Foundation. Facilitators: Sharon Deich, The Finance Project and Ayeola Fortune, Council of Chief State School Officers

ATAC Consultations 8:30 – 9:15 am Throughout the Newport Marriott Conference Center. See the registration desk for network room assignments.

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1 Partnerships 101/201 Workshop and Clinic; Double Session (Two hours and 45 minutes) | Weatherly

Part workshop, part clinic, this double-block session focuses on how to generate coalitions, keep them growing and deal with sticky partnership issues. Participants will review the basic principles of coalitions, consider effective outreach strategies and hear examples of best practices. Participants will also strategize about how to address real-life partnership predicaments and come out smiling. This session is appropriate for newer networks. Facilitators: Janelle Cousino, FowlerHoffman, LLC, consultant to the Afterschool Alliance, Sharon Deich, The Finance Project and Daniel Princiotta, National Governors Association Center for Best Practices Discussants: Rachel Scott, Iowa Afterschool Alliance and Beth Unverzagt, OregonASK

Break 9:15 – 9:30 am

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1 Maximizing Your Own Network Media Coverage: Consultations

Clinic; 30 Minute Sessions; Requires Pre-Registration | Portsmouth

This one-on-one 30 minute consulting session will allow participants to “go deep” with media experts to address their network’s specific media challenge. Learn techniques to effectively engage media and practice skills with the experts. Submit challenges or questions beforehand so that the team can best respond to issues and bring appropriate materials and tools. Note: Limited slots available. This session is intended for the individual(s) in your network who are most directly engaged with the media. See registration desk for assignments. Facilitators: Matt Freeman and Lisa Lederer, PR Solutions, Inc.

ATAC Consultations 9:30 – 10:45 am Throughout the Newport Marriott Conference Center. See the registration desk for network room assignments.

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wednesday morning 9:30 – 12:15 pm

9:30 – 10:45 am

Workshops, Discussions & Clinics

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C Coordinator Leadership 101

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1 Rural Afterschool Programs

Workshop; Double Session (Two hours and 45 minutes) | Newport

discussion | Courageous

Rural afterschool programs face unique challenges, including high transportation costs and fewer economic and community resources upon which to draw. This session will engage participating networks in a brief review of challenges and focus on sharing ideas and brainstorming strategies that networks can consider to improve supports for rural afterschool programs.

There are many complex skills involved in leading and developing effective networks. This session will focus on leadership skills and challenges, as well as interpersonal and group dynamics specific to the network model. It will address issues that include: an overview of leadership skills for network leaders; understanding network operations; building and maintaining network members’ interest; and leading outside your comfort zone. This session will also be a unique opportunity to participate in engaging dialogues to foster learning from fellow participants. The format of the session will incorporate interactive participation and customized case studies.

Facilitators: Michelle Ganow Jones and Kate Sandel, The Finance Project

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2 State Funding for Afterschool: Developing a Proposal

Note: This session is for those who did not attend the workshop held at the Fall 2006 Coordinators meeting.

workshop | Enterprise

Participants will have an opportunity to understand the practical processes, partners, parameters and pitfalls of recent state budget proposals on afterschool programs from two state networks. This session will help networks develop their own state budget proposals.

Facilitator: Joyce Dudley, Dudley Hamilton Associates, Inc.

Facilitator: Terry Peterson, University of South Carolina Educational Foundation Discussants: Charity Ellison, Wisconsin Council on Children and Families, Steve Fernan, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction and Gwynn Hughes, Massachusetts Afterschool Partnership

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3 Building the Foundation: How Local Program Evaluation Efforts Can Help Build Statewide Networks

Workshop; Topic Repeats | Columbia

This session will discuss how local program evaluations can help build the efforts of the statewide network. Participants will learn what the key data pieces and outcomes are in their local program evaluations that can help focus future data collection efforts and help build additional partnerships, support and sustainability. Participants will also have an opportunity to talk about their own local efforts and look for specific ways they can contribute to the statewide work.

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C At Your Fingertips: Resources on Afterschool Workshop; Topic Repeats | Boardroom

In this hands-on session, participants will learn about the afterschool resources available specifically for statewide afterschool networks. The session will demonstrate the newly restructured web site featuring the fifth edition of “Resources on Afterschool” with more than 400 resources to help networks meet their goals. Participants will discuss and share resources most helpful in their work. Facilitators: Jennifer Dahnke and Terri Ferinde Dunham, Collaborative Communications Group

Facilitator: Carol McElvain, Learning Point Associates Guest Expert: Priscilla Little, Harvard Family Research Project

Hot Topic Discussions 9:30 – 10:45 am

3 The Elephant in the Room: Next Steps on Access and Equity for Networks discussion | Freedom

This session brings several years of preliminary work and discussion on the issues of access and equity and the role of afterschool and the network to a level where participants can now think critically about how they might affect positive change within their networks and states. After a short review of our past work on access and equity and a summary of previous state discussions, participants will engage in conversation about how they might work intentionally within their networks to embed these issues vertically within the participants’ own work and horizontally across the work of the network in quality, funding, partnership and collaboration.

Jamestown

Participants are invited to suggest topics for discussion (please submit your suggestions at the registration desk). Facilitators will help consider issues that were unexplored during the meeting or delve deeper on conversations begun earlier.

Break 10:45 – 11:00 am

Facilitators: Ayeola Fortune, Council of Chief State School Officers and Eugene Hillsman, C.S. Mott Foundation

ATAC Consultations 11:00 – 12:15 pm Throughout the Newport Marriott Conference Center. See the registration desk for network room assignments.

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wednesday morning 11:00 – 12:15 pm

frame a conversation about linkages between afterschool and summer. Participants in this session will also discuss possible barriers and challenges in making connections at the state network level.

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Facilitator: Eugene Hillsman, C.S. Mott Foundation

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Guest Expert: Ron Fairchild, Center for Summer Learning, Johns Hopkins University

2 Squeezing Blood out of a State Turnip: Opening the School Financing Window for Afterschool Workshop | Freedom

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State school finance restructuring is complicated and time consuming, but with the right opportunity afterschool can become embedded in funding formulas to help support statewide education goals. Learn from two state networks involved in discussions to integrate funding for afterschool into state educational finance formulas and systems.

Early Childhood Systems

Workshop | Courageous

There are many similarities between the expansion of afterschool programming in the last decade and the growth of early care and education in previous decades. This session looks at the experience of building the early childhood care system and what afterschool networks and partners can learn from their efforts. This session will highlight lessons centered around building infrastructure, building an evidence base and building support among parents and policymakers.

Discussants: Gail Daughtry, North Carolina Center for Afterschool Programs and Janet Frieling, School’s Out Washington

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Facilitators: Terry Peterson, University of South Carolina Educational Foundation and Jennifer Stedron, National Conference of State Legislatures

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Facilitator: Kate Sandel, The Finance Project Guest Experts: Elizabeth Brown, Director of Government Relations, Connecticut Commission on Children and Dionne Dobbins-Harper, The Finance Project

3 Building the Foundation: How Local Program Evaluation Efforts Can Help Build Statewide Networks

clinic; Topic Repeats | Columbia

This session will discuss how local program evaluations can help build the efforts of the statewide network. Network representatives will learn what the key data pieces and outcomes are in their local program evaluations that can help focus future data collection efforts and help build additional partnerships, support and sustainability. Network representatives will also have an opportunity to talk about their own local efforts and look for specific ways they can contribute to the statewide work. Facilitator: Carol McElvain, Learning Point Associates Guest Expert: Priscilla Little, Harvard Family Research Project

3 Summer Learning and Afterschool: Exploring Connections

workshop; Topic Repeats | Enterprise

C Community Dialogues: A Strategy to Promote Afterschool

Workshop | Middletown

State networks are leading the way in aligning professional development standards and systems for providers working with school-age children. Minnesota is working with organizations across the state to build awareness and buy-in for its professional development efforts. These professional development efforts aim to increase the use of effective practices by afterschool providers and increase the number of afterschool practitioners who are qualified and demonstrate effective practices. Learn more about how Minnesota designed their Community Dialogues to address specific network goals and used them to promote the general purpose of the network. Facilitator: Janelle Cousino, FowlerHoffman, LLC, consultant to the Afterschool Alliance

This session will provide participants with the opportunity to hear about the state of summer learning. An introductory presentation by Ron Fairchild from the Center for Summer Learning at Johns Hopkins University will help to facilitate and

Discussant: Dale Blyth, Center for 4H and Community Youth Development, University of Minnesota Extension Service and Laura LaCroix Dalluhn, Youth Community Connections

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wednesday afternoon

Plenary Lunch 12:15 – 1:30 pm Salon

pathways and partnerships: afterschool programs building lifelong success Speaker: Peter McWalters, Commissioner of Elementary and Secondary Education, Providence, Rhode Island Peter McWalters has served as the Rhode Island commissioner of elementary and secondary education since 1992. His priorities have been to establish an education system that is responsible for student results from the classroom to the State House. He has supported the development of high student performance standards, assessments that measure what students know and can do, school improvement procedures that inform school and district decision-makers and curriculum, and professional development that improves classroom practices. He has advocated for increased access to quality early childhood education, interagency collaboration in support of families of children in school and the development of an education finance system that recognizes state responsibilities to meet individual student needs while being fair to taxpayers. The commissioner serves in the governor’s cabinet, as well as on numerous boards and professional organizations, including the Rhode Island Children’s Cabinet and the Human Resources Investment Council. He is co-chair of the National Task Force on the Arts in Education and is a past president of the Council of Chief State School Officers. Prior to becoming Rhode Island’s commissioner, McWalters served over twenty years in a variety of educational leadership and teaching positions, including superintendent of schools in the City School District of Rochester, NY. He also served in the Peace Corps in the Philippines. McWalters received both a master’s of public administration and a certificate of advanced graduate study in school administration from the State University of New York at Brockport as well as a bachelor’s of arts in history and philosophy from Boston College.

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wednesday afternoon 1:30 – 4:15 pm Workshops, Discussions & Clinics

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SESSIONS

1 On-Camera Media Training

Workshop; Double Session (Two hours and 45 minutes) | Newport

Do you dream of TV coverage but cringe at the thought of going on camera? In private 20 minute sessions, network spokespeople will be coached by public relation pros who work with the Afterschool Alliance on polishing their message, refining on-camera poise and practicing message discipline.

This session provides an overview of the 16 skill sets that drive leadership effectiveness for network coordinators. This application-based session focuses on providing participants with the broker skills and producer skills necessary to influence their stakeholders and achieve peak performance. The session will focus on some of the following topics: brokering skills and challenges, understanding and using power strategically; and producer skills and challenges, motivating self and others. This session will be an opportunity to assess your strengths and opportunities, share best practices with colleagues and deal with real-time challenges. Participants will leave with a framework for identifying their skills, strengths and areas for improvement, as well as knowledge and materials to support their future efforts.

This session is limited to one or two team members per session; only one session per state. See registration desk for assignments. Facilitators: Matt Freeman and Lisa Lederer, PR Solutions, Inc.

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C Coordinator Leadership 202

Clinic; 20 Minute Sessions; Requires Pre-Registration | Portsmouth

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3 Quality 101 Workshop; Double Session (Two hours and 45 minutes) | Weatherly

Note: This session is for those who attended the Fall 2006 Coordinators Meeting or the morning Coordinator Leadership 101 session.

Participants will have the opportunity to learn about development and content of quality assessment tools, hear about the latest research on program quality, and consider how that knowledge aligns (or doesn’t) with the state standards and assessment tools. Discussants will share their overarching philosophical approaches to measuring and fostering program quality, and how this impacts the development and continual refinement of quality assessment tools. In addition participants will engage in a dialogue on the role of networks in fostering program quality.

Facilitator: Joyce Dudley, Dudley Hamilton Associates, Inc.

Facilitators: Ayeola Fortune, Council of Chief State School Officers and Carol McElvain, Learning Point Associates Guest Expert: Priscilla Little, Harvard Family Research Project Discussants: Sarah Cahill, Rhode Island Afterschool Plus Alliance, Gail Daughtry, North Carolina Center for Afterschool Programs, Donna Traynham, Center for State and Federal Programs, Massachusetts Department of Education and Mim Wilkey, Kansas Enrichment Network

ATAC Consultations 1:30 – 2:45 pm Throughout the Newport Marriott Conference Center. See the registration desk for network room assignments.

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wednesday afternoon 1:30 – 2:45 pm Workshops, Discussions & Clinics

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1 Navigating Political Change: Building Champions Across the Aisles

1 State of the Afterschool State: Developing a Statewide Afterschool Report Workshop | Jamestown

Workshop; Topic Repeats | Freedom

As evidenced by the fall 2006 elections, change is inevitable in both state and local leadership and in the national balance of power. In the short-term, how do you negotiate leadership transitions in order to engage new policymakers? In the longterm, how do you keep from aligning too closely with the party in power, build bipartisan support and keep your agenda progressing through future political transitions? This session will summarize the national election results and provide insight from both the policymaker and network perspective on how to successfully navigate political change and deepen relationships on both sides of the aisle. This is an introductory and intermediate level session useful for any stakeholders involved in outreach and policy.

One role of a network is to provide information about the state of afterschool. This may include mapping program availability, assessing local research, tracking state funding streams and defining afterschool services. A published report provides an opportunity to definitively state a collective vision for afterschool in a state. Developing a report can serve multiple purposes, including building the network itself and engaging partners. This session will describe the work of two networks in developing statewide reports and provide practical process tools. The discussion will focus on the opportunities and challenges in creating a statewide afterschool report. Facilitator: Terri Ferinde Dunham, Collaborative Communications Group

Facilitators: Audrey Hutchinson, National League of Cities Institute for Youth, Education, and Families, Daniel Princiotta, National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Jennifer Stedron, National Conference of State Legislatures

discussants: Jill Riemer and rachel wellborn, Georgia Afterschool Investment Council

Discussants: Rosie Buzzas, The Flagship Program, Montana, Paul Kelly, Arkansas Advocates For Children and Families and Janet Wolf, Youth & Family Programs/Salt Lake City Corporation

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2 Financing 101 Workshop; Topic Repeats | Courageous

Finding funding to expand and sustain quality programs is a challenge common to all statewide networks. This session will provide an overview of basic strategies and approaches that can be used to meet financing challenges. It will include information on strategies as well as the major sources of funding available for financing afterschool programs and networks. This is an introductory workshop. Facilitators: Sharon Deich and Kate Sandel, The Finance Project

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wednesday afternoon 1:30 – 2:45 pm Workshops, Discussions & Clinics

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3 Summer Learning and Afterschool:

2 Finding and Accessing Windows of Opportunity

Exploring Connections

Workshop; Topic Repeats | Columbia

Afterschool has a legitimate role to play in many emerging state and national initiatives (e.g., high school redesign, preventing childhood obesity). In turn, linking afterschool to these initiatives can help strengthen the availability and quality of your state’s afterschool programs. Explore ways to identify issues that relate to afterschool, potential funding sources and approaches for networks to take advantage of windows of opportunity. This interactive session will include time for participants to brainstorm about windows of opportunity and share network experiences connecting to resources and initiatives. This is an intermediate level session most appropriate for network coordinators and other stakeholders interested in beginning or already involved in sustainability initiatives. Facilitators: Ilene Berman, National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Michelle Ganow Jones, The Finance Project and Terry Peterson, University of South Carolina Educational Foundation

Workshop; Topic Repeats | Enterprise

This session will provide participants with the opportunity to hear about the state of summer learning. An introductory presentation by Ron Fairchild from the Center for Summer Learning at Johns Hopkins University will help to facilitate and frame a conversation about linkages between afterschool and summer. Participants in this session will also discuss possible barriers and challenges in making connections at the state network level. Facilitator: Eugene Hillsman, C.S. Mott Foundation Guest Expert: Ron Fairchild, Center for Summer Learning, Johns Hopkins University

3 Technical Assistance and the Networks Workshop | Middletown

Participants will consider the diverse role of the statewide afterschool networks in ensuring that programs receive highquality technical assistance (TA) support as part of the larger strategy of fostering program quality. State networks vary significantly in their approaches to technical assistance; some directly provide technical assistance while others serve as conduits for information on TA opportunities. This session will highlight the broad spectrum of network efforts to ensure that program TA needs are being met.

Guest Expert: Steve Fowler, FowlerHoffman, LLC Discussant: Michelle Doucette Cunningham, Connecticut After School Network

Facilitator: Carol McElvain, Learning Point Associates Discussants: Cynthia Billings, PlusTime New Hampshire and Zelda Quiller Waymer, South Carolina Afterschool Alliance

Break 2:45 – 3:00 pm

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wednesday afternoon 3:00 – 4:15 pm Workshops, Discussions & Clinics

G o al o n e

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SESSIONS

1 Navigating Political Change: Building Champions Across the Aisles

Workshop; Topic Repeats | Freedom

As evidenced by the fall 2006 elections, change is inevitable in both state and local leadership, and in the national balance of power. In the short-term, how do you negotiate leadership transitions in order to engage new policymakers? In the longterm, how do you keep from aligning too closely with the party in power, build bipartisan support and keep your agenda progressing through future political transitions? This session will summarize the national election results and provide insight from both the policymaker and network perspective on how to successfully navigate political change and deepen relationships on both sides of the aisle. This is an introductory and intermediate level session useful for any stakeholders involved in outreach and policy. Facilitators: Audrey Hutchinson, National League of Cities Institute for Youth, Education, and Families, Daniel Princiotta, National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Jennifer Stedron, National Conference of State Legislatures Discussants: Paul Kelly, Arkansas Advocates For Children and Families, Angela Monson, Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center and Daniel Santos, Oregon Office of the Governor

1 Marketing and Messaging Your Network Workshop | Middletown

How do you talk about your network? In what ways do you convey what you are and what you do? In this session, participants will review network materials, examining themes and messages. Participants will consider the ideas and words that resonate in the field. Facilitators: Terri Ferinde Dunham, Collaborative Communications Group and Ursula Helminski, Afterschool Alliance

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2 Financing 101 Workshop; Topic Repeats | Courageous

Finding funding to expand and sustain quality programs is a challenge common to all statewide networks. This session will provide an overview of basic strategies and approaches that can be used to meet financing challenges. It will include information on strategies as well as the major sources of funding available for financing afterschool programs and networks. This is an introductory level workshop. Facilitators: Sharon Deich and Kate Sandel, The Finance Project

2 Finding and Accessing Windows of Opportunity Workshop; Topic Repeats | Columbia

Afterschool has a legitimate role to play in many emerging state and national initiatives (e.g., high school redesign, preventing childhood obesity). In turn, linking afterschool to these initiatives can help strengthen the availability and quality of your state’s afterschool programs. Explore ways to identify issues that relate to afterschool, potential funding sources and approaches for networks to take advantage of windows of opportunity. This interactive session will include time for participants to brainstorm about windows of opportunity and share network experiences connecting to resources and initiatives. This is an intermediate level session most appropriate for network coordinators and other stakeholders interested in beginning or already involved in sustainability initiatives. Facilitators: Ilene Berman, National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Michelle Ganow Jones, The Finance Project and Terry Peterson, University of South Carolina Educational Foundation Guest Expert: Steve Fowler, FowlerHoffman, LLC Discussant: Katie Fitzgerald, Oklahoma Afterschool Network

ATAC Consultations 3:00 – 4:15 pm Throughout the Newport Marriott Conference Center. See the registration desk for network room assignments.

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wednesday afternoon and Evening 3:00 – 4:15 pm Workshops, Discussions & Clinics

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C Tips and Tools for Mott Grantees

Team Time and Casual Dinner

Workshop | Boardroom

5:00 – 7:00 pm

The C.S. Mott Foundation supports and provides resources to help grantees succeed in and leverage their work. Participants will have an opportunity to learn more about Mott’s grantmaking process, Mott’s Grantee Toolbox and resources available to the National Network of Statewide Afterschool Networks. This session is designed for new networks and coordinators seeking an overview of assistance and grantee requirements.

Salon

Cross-Network Discussions: Creating Large-Scale, Sustainable Policy Movements by Engaging Key Decision-Makers 7:00 – 8:00 pm

Facilitator: Eugene Hillsman, C.S. Mott Foundation

Salon

As the networks are increasingly successful in their work building grassroots support, creating strong coalitions and even securing new funding, networks are positioning themselves to think more broadly about what it will take to create a largescale, sustainable policy for high quality statewide afterschool initiatives. Led by a number of statewide afterschool networks, this informal after-dinner discussion will provide an opportunity for participants to reflect on the policy and funding successes across the country, and linkages to other education and children’s policy agendas.

Break 4:15 – 5:00 pm

ATAC Consultations 7:00 – 9:00 pm Throughout the Newport Marriott Conference Center. See the registration desk for network room assignments.

Dessert and Networking 7:00 – 9:00 pm Atrium

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Thursday morning Breakfast 7:30 – 8:30 am East Foyer

Supporting Student Success Breakfast Weatherly

The request for proposals (RFP) for Supporting Student Success: The Promise of ELOs is now available (released January 29, 2007). Networks are invited to meet and learn about this upcoming grant opportunity - a joint initiative of the Council of Chief State School Officers, the National Conference of State Legislatures and the National Governors Association, through the support of the C.S. Mott Foundation. Facilitators: Ayeola Fortune, Council of Chief State School Officers, Daniel Princiotta, National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Jennifer Stedron, National Conference of State Legislatures

Plenary 8:30 – 9:15 am Salon

A New Day for Learning The nation’s steady progress as an economy and as a society will end “unless we profoundly change our thinking and policies about when, where and how children learn and develop” contends “A New Day for Learning,” a new report from the Time, Learning, and Afterschool Task Force funded by the C.S. Mott Foundation. Based on extensive research and emerging policies and practices, the Task Force envisions a system rich with multiple ways to learn and develop, anchored to high standards and aligned to educational resources throughout a community. Paul Koehler, a member of the task force will discuss the highlights of the report, and the critical role of afterschool in rethinking time and learning. Speaker: Paul Koehler, Director, WestEd Policy Center

Paul Koehler is the director of the WestEd Policy Center. In that position, he is responsible for providing information and services to the policymakers in the WestEd region including: Arizona, California, Nevada and Utah. In this position since 2000, he is responsible for providing information and services to the policymakers in the four-state region. He works directly with state superintendents, state department of education staffs, Governors, Legislators and education leaders in these states. He also serves as the director of the Southwest Regional Comprehensive Center (SWCC), which works with leadership and staff of the state departments of education in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah. In addition, Dr. Koehler is senior policy advisor on education to Arizona Governor, Janet Napolitano. Duties of this position are to provide consultation, assistance, advice and research to the Governor on matters relevant to improving the effectiveness of Arizona’s K-12 public education system. He is a member of the Time, Learning, and Afterschool Task Force funded by the C.S. Mott Foundation. Prior to joining WestEd, Koehler served as District Superintendent for a large suburban school district in metropolitan Phoenix, a role that earned him recognition as the Arizona Superintendent of the Year in 1999. Earlier, as the Arizona Department of Education’s Associate Superintendent, he led the Education Services Division, including all curriculum, testing and federal programs. In addition, he served as both the federal and state legislative liaison for the Arizona Department of Education. Koehler received a doctorate degree in elementary education and curriculum development from Arizona State University, a master’s in elementary education and a bachelor’s in business management.

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Thursday morning 9:30 – 12:15 pm

9:30 – 10:45 am

Workshops, Discussions & Clinics

Workshops, Discussions & Clinics

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SESSIONS

1 City-State Partnerships: Working Together

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1 Engaging Business Stakeholders

to Bolster Work Locally and Statewide

Workshop | Enterprise

Workshop; Double Session (Two hours and 45 minutes) | Freedom

This session will emphasize advice and lessons learned on engaging business partners as supporters of the network statewide and local level. Network examples of business engagement will be presented.

How can cities leverage their power, leadership and resources to advance the policies of the network? Many cities are investing significantly in local afterschool programs, and mayors and council members are becoming champions for afterschool. Some cities are thinking broadly to create citywide systems for afterschool including work on quality, mapping and financing. How can these efforts and investments help to advance the state networks’ agendas? What can a network learn from local efforts already in place? Learn about the unique voice and influence that cities can contribute and how engaging local elected officials across your state can strengthen the reach of a network.

Facilitator: Janelle Cousino, FowlerHoffman, LLC, consultant to the Afterschool Alliance Discussants: Marisa Albanese, National Grid Company and Jennifer Becker Mouhcine, Illinois After-school Partnership

1 Using Afterschool Public Service Announcements Workshop; Topic Repeats | Middletown

For more than 60 years, the Ad Council has been creating public service announcements (PSAs) and media campaigns addressing society’s biggest concerns. In this session presenters will cover how PSAs can help advance your organization and cause, review award-winning afterschool PSAs and campaign results, share radio and print ads available to networks for use, and provide lessons learned on how to get PSAs placed in quality media. Participants will leave with the print and radio PSAs to tag with their name and place locally.

Facilitators: Audrey Hutchinson and Bela Shah, National League of Cities Institute for Youth, Education, and Families Discussants: Shanni Call, Utah Afterschool Network, Michelle Doucette Cunningham, Connecticut After School Network, Shirley Farnsworth, Denver Public Schools, Lynn Heemstra, Office of Children, Youth and Families, Michigan, Jennifer Jones, Colorado Afterschool Network and Mary Sutton, Michigan Department of Education

Facilitator: Penny Schildkraut, Ad Council

1 On-Camera Media Training Clinic; 20 Minute Sessions; Requires Pre-Registration | jamestown

1 Mapping Afterschool Workshop | Portsmouth

Do you dream of TV coverage but cringe at the thought of going on camera? In private 20 minute sessions, network spokespeople will be coached by public relation pros who work with the Afterschool Alliance on polishing their message, refining on-camera poise and practicing message discipline.

As part of a quality initiative, for the past year, North Carolina has coordinated a project that gives afterschool participants a chance to participate in high quality afterschool experiences that strengthen their science, technology, mathematics, literacy and leadership skills. The hands-on project involves students in GIS community mapping and advocacy. This session will explore the project and discuss some of the opportunities and challenges of involving youth in mapping afterschool.

This session is limited to one or two team members per session; only one session per state. See registration desk for assignments. Facilitators: Matt Freeman and Lisa Lederer, PR Solutions, Inc

Facilitator: Gail Daughtry, North Carolina Center for Afterschool Programs

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Thursday morning

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2 Data for Policy and Practice

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Facilitators: Ursula Helminski, Afterschool Alliance and Michelle Ganow Jones, The Finace Project

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3 Addressing Transportation Challenges and Solutions

Workshop; Topic Repeats | Newport

Data is critical for making the case for increased resources for afterschool. But understanding WHY, WHEN and HOW to use data is almost as important as having the right data to share. This session will share some key insights and lessons learned on how afterschool networks can use key data to convince policymakers of the need for increased resources for afterschool programs. It will also take a look at specific tools and methods to help develop resource estimates in your state. In order to make the case for increased resources, networks need to be able to answer the following questions: What is currently being spent on afterschool in our state? How many programs/slots do we have and how many do we need? How much does afterschool cost? This session will provide tools for networks to use to develop answers to these questions highlighting both a “quick and dirty” approach as well as a more thorough analysis.

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Discussion | Courageous

Transportation plays a vital role in connecting children to afterschool programs. Communities often struggle to create reliable, comprehensive transportation systems supported by stable funding sources. This session will provide an overview of how to assess community transportation needs, investigate potential funding sources and develop strategies for financing transportation. Session participants will discuss strategies they have considered or implemented to improve transportation in their states and brainstorm new approaches. Facilitators: Kate Sandel, The Finance Project and Jennifer Stedron, National Conference of State Legislatures

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C Going Global: Expanding Learning Time for the Global Economy

Discussant: Dale Blyth, Center for 4H and Community Youth Development, University of Minnesota Extension Service

Workshop; Topic Repeats | Weatherly

Global competitiveness. Growing diversity. Skilled workforce. Graduation rates. Achievement gap. More time for learning. Are these topics of policy conversation in your state? This workshop will explore these concerns, suggesting how they can be tied to the expansion of afterschool, including the opportunity for statewide networks to build upon policy discussions in these areas. Facilitator: Carol McElvain, Learning Point Associates Guest Expert: Steve Fowler, FowlerHoffman, LLC Discussants: Eugene Hillsman, C.S. Mott Foundation and Terry Peterson, University of South Carolina Educational Foundation

ATAC Consultations 9:30 – 10:45 am Throughout the Newport Marriott Conference Center. See the registration desk for network room assignments.

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Thursday morning 9:30 – 10:45 am

11:00 – 12:15 pm

Workshops, Discussions & Clinics

Workshops, Discussions & Clinics

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C High School Reform and the Role of

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1 Using Afterschool Public Service Announcements

Expanded Learning Opportunities

Workshop; Topic Repeats | Middletown

Workshop; Topic Repeats | Columbia

For more than 60 years, the Ad Council has been creating public service announcements (PSAs) and media campaigns addressing society’s biggest concerns. In this session presenters will cover how PSAs can help advance your organization and cause, review award-winning afterschool PSAs and campaign results, share radio and print ads available to networks for use, and provide lessons learned on how to get PSAs placed in quality media. Participants will leave with the print and radio PSAs to tag with their name and place locally.

Confronted with dismal graduation rates, shoddy student achievement and mounting investments in remediation at the college level, states are working furiously to reform high schools across the country. This session will present an overview of gubernatorial and state efforts to reform high school, coupled with a discussion of the role of afterschool and summer learning in transforming the American high school. Session participants will hear examples of successful state programs and will discuss the role of statewide afterschool networks in making expanded learning opportunities an integral and effective part of high school reform.

Facilitator: Penny Schildkraut, Ad Council

Facilitators: Ilene Berman and Daniel Princiotta, National Governors Association Center for Best Practices

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2 Data for Policy and Practice Hot Topic Discussions

Workshop; Topic Repeats | Newport

Data is critical for making the case for increased resources for afterschool. But understanding WHY, WHEN and HOW to use data is almost as important as having the right data to share. This session will share some key insights and lessons learned on how afterschool networks can use key data to convince policymakers of the need for increased resources for afterschool programs. It will also take a look at specific tools and methods to help develop resource estimates in your state. In order to make the case for increased resources, networks need to be able to answer the following questions: What is currently being spent on afterschool in our state? How many programs/slots do we have and how many do we need? How much does afterschool cost? This session will provide tools for networks to use to develop answers to these questions highlighting both a “quick and dirty” approach as well as a more thorough analysis.

9:30 – 10:45 am Salon I

Participants are invited to suggest topics for discussion (please submit your suggestions at the registration desk). Facilitators will help consider issues that were unexplored during the meeting or delve deeper on conversations begun earlier.

Break 10:45 – 11:00 am

Facilitators: Ursula Helminski, Afterschool Alliance and Michelle Ganow Jones, The Finace Project Discussant: Caroline Kueneman, Office of Work and Family Life, Utah Department of Workforce Services

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Thursday morning

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2 Determining the Costs of Afterschool

Programs: Planning and Policy Implications Workshop | Courageous

State networks are leading the way in determining the costs of running afterschool programs in their state. There are no agreed upon costs for running quality afterschool programs, however, this information would assist both program providers and policy makers. Program providers could use the data in program development and policy makers could use the data for determining funding levels across the state. Learn more about how states are collecting data, how the data will be used to assist programs with planning and the policy implications of this data. Facilitator: Laura LaCroix Dalluhn, Youth Community Connections Discussants: Deborah Chase, Maine Afterschool Network, Sharon Deich, The Finance Project and Paul Snyder, Minnesota Youth Community Learning Initiative

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3 Creating Standards,Training and Leadership Credentials for Afterschool Professionals workshop | portsmouth

This workshop is designed to provide information on the combined efforts of groups in Kansas and Missouri to define the core competencies for youth development professionals to provide quality services for youth and their families. Participants will share in a discussion of the process and outcomes of these efforts, and explore a framework to discuss core competencies for afterschool professionals.

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C At Your Fingertips: Resources on Afterschool Workshop; Topic Repeats | Boardroom

In this hands-on session, participants will learn about the afterschool resources available specifically for statewide afterschool networks. The session will demonstrate the newly restructured web site featuring the fifth edition of “Resources on Afterschool” with more than 400 resources to help networks meet their goals. Participants will discuss and share resources most helpful in their work. Facilitators: Jennifer Dahnke and Terri Ferinde Dunham, Collaborative Communications Group

C Going Global: Expanding Learning Time for the Global Economy

Workshop; Topic Repeats | Weatherly

Global competitiveness. Growing diversity. Skilled workforce. Graduation rates. Achievement gap. More time for learning. Are these topics of policy conversation in your state? This workshop will explore these concerns, suggesting how they can be tied to the expansion of afterschool, including the opportunity for statewide networks to build upon policy discussions in these areas. Facilitator: Carol McElvain, Learning Point Associates Guest Expert: Steve Fowler, FowlerHoffman, LLC Discussants: Eugene Hillsman, C.S. Mott Foundation and Terry Peterson, University of South Carolina Educational Foundation

Facilitators: LeAnne Cantun, Missouri Afterschool Network and Deb Elder, Kansas Enrichment Network

ATAC Consultations 11:00 – 12:15 pm Throughout the Newport Marriott Conference Center. See the registration desk for network room assignments.

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Thursday morning & Afternoon 11:00 – 12:15 pm Workshops, Discussions & Clinics

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C Building Internal Capacity to Support

Hot Topic Discussions

ELOs and Reinvent the Learning Day

11:00 – 12:15 pm

Discussion; SEA REPRESENTATIVES ONLY | Enterprise

Salon I

The report “A New Day For Learning” presents both an opportunity and challenge for SEAs: the opportunity is the promise of added time and learning for students based on restructuring the current school day; the challenge is how to add this to the already crowded reform agenda facing understaffed and overburdened state education agencies who will likely be called upon to lead the reform of the school day in their states. The session will also look at the issues of “capacity” of the SEAs as they implement existing ELO initiatives and embrace and move ahead with the ambitious and much needed reforms described in the report. The session will brainstorm ways in which some SEAs have started to restructure and reorganize themselves internally as means of improving communication, coordination, and implementation of ELOs.

Participants are invited to suggest topics for discussion (please submit your suggestions at the registration desk). Facilitators will help consider issues that were unexplored during the meeting or delve deeper on conversations begun earlier.

Networking Lunch 12:15 – 1:30 pm Atrium

The meeting concludes with an informal networking lunch to connect and reflect on learnings from the week.

Facilitator: Ayeola Fortune, Council of Chief State School Officers Guest Expert: Paul Koehler, WestEd Policy Center

Mansion Tours (optional) 1:30 pm

C High School Reform and the Role of

Meet in the hotel lobby at 1:30 pm.

Expanded Learning Opportunities

Workshop; Topic Repeats | Columbia

Confronted with dismal graduation rates, shoddy student achievement and mounting investments in remediation at the college level, states are working furiously to reform high schools across the country. This session will present an overview of gubernatorial and state efforts to reform high school, coupled with a discussion of the role of afterschool and summer learning in transforming the American high school. Session participants will hear examples of successful state programs and will discuss the role of statewide afterschool networks in making expanded learning opportunities an integral and effective part of high school reform. Facilitators: Ilene Berman and Daniel Princiotta, National Governors Association Center for Best Practices

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Leading and Learning Together: The 2007 Meeting of the National Network of St a t e w i d e A f t e r s c h o o l N e t w o r k s Thanks to all the statewide afterschool networks for your everyday commitment and perseverance in furthering statewide afterschool policies. The successes and challenges you share with candor and great enthusiam are critical to the success of providing high quality afterschool experiences for more children and growing the national network. The statewide afterschool networks and the national meeting would not be possible without the commitment, expertise, knowledge and partnerships among the organizations and individuals who are the Afterschool Technical Assistance Collaborative. Thanks to: • Ilene Berman, National Governors Association Center for Best Practices • Janelle Cousino, FowlerHoffman, LLC, consultant to the Afterschool Alliance • Sharon Deich, The Finance Project • Ayeola Fortune, Council of Chief State School Officers • Ursula Helminski, Afterschool Alliance • Audrey Hutchinson, National League of Cities Institute for Youth, Education, and Families • Michelle Ganow Jones, consultant to The Finance Project • Morakot Masokas, Council of Chief State School Officers • Carol McElvain, Learning Point Associates • Terry Peterson, University of South Carolina Educational Foundation • Daniel Princiotta, National Governors Association Center for Best Practices • Kate Sandel, The Finance Project • Bela Shah, National League of Cities Institute for Youth, Education, and Families • Jennifer Stedron, National Conference of State Legislatures The team at Collaborative Communications Group pulled all of the pieces together to foster a learning community. Thank you to Terri Ferinde Dunham, Jennifer Dahnke, Becky Gibbons, Susanna Kemp, Jackie Darden and Gabi Mahn. Meeting materials were designed by Bill Glover, The Design Partnership, LLC. This meeting would not have been possible without the support of the C.S. Mott Foundation and the invaluable and ongoing guidance from program staff An-Me Chung and Eugene Hillsman.

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Newport Marriott Map

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Biographies of the Guest Experts

Christine Arouth

Elizabeth Brown

Christine Arouth is the director of the Sullivan School Family Center and Child Opportunity Zone (COZ) in Newport, Rhode Island. The Family Center is located on site at a high-risk elementary school with

As director of government relations for the Connecticut Commission on Children, Elizabeth Crichton Brown is responsible for developing and promoting public policies that enhance the welfare of families and children. She has been a leader in winning passage of innovative state policies on school readiness, fatherhood, mental health, welfare to work,

approximately 90% of students living in families with income below the federal poverty threshold. A member of the statewide COZ network, the center provides support and services to families and children in Newport between the ages of birth and grade five. In the ten years that Christine has directed the center, she has successfully leveraged and/or managed over 2 million dollars in federal, state, private and local grant dollars. She has also worked collaboratively with other community partners on preparing and implementing several federal grant programs such as the Safe Schools, Healthy Students Initiative and The Early Reading First Initiative. Christine has a bachelor’s degree in psychology and administration of justice from Salve Regina University.

Elizabeth Boukus Representative Elizabeth “Betty” Boukus is currently serving her sixth term in the General Assembly with the Connecticut House of Representatives. She represents the 22nd District, which includes Plainville, Bristol and New Britain. She is an Assistant Majority leader, Vice Chair of the Public Safety Committee and serves on the Commerce and Veterans Affairs Committees. Betty has served on the Plainville Town Council as both the vice-chair and chairwoman. She has also served as a Director on the Boards of the Wheeler Clinic, Family Services Inc. and the Plainville YMCA. Currently she is a member of the Plainville Women’s Club, Lion’s Club, the Tunxis Community Foundation Advisory Board and a corporator of New Britain General Hospital. Each year Betty participates in the Youth and Government program sponsored by the YMCAs of Connecticut. Betty received her master’s degree in education from the University of Hartford and her bachelor of science in education from Central Connecticut State University.

child care, lead paint poisoning, bullying, after school programs and civic capacity building. Elizabeth brings more than 20 years of legislative and policy experience to her work. She served six years as a State Representative from the 74th District in Waterbury and won numerous awards for her leadership on environmental and civil rights issues. As Vice President of the Connecticut Institute for Municipal Studies for five years, she helped win passage of the nationally recognized Neighborhood Revitalization Zone legislation, which empowered low-income communities to become critical stakeholders in their neighborhoods’ future. In addition, she played a leadership role in forming Connecticut’s After School Network and passing legislation to form the After School Policy Board, which expands after school opportunities for children and youth in Connecticut. Elizabeth serves on the Child Day Care Council, the state TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) Council, the Executive Board of the States’ Fatherhood Council, and several other community boards. She is a co-founder of the statewide nonprofit Good Jobs! United Action, a collaboration of grassroots organizations and churches dedicated to ensuring access to good paying jobs for urban residents. She also serves on the Board of Directors of the Universal Health Care Foundation and Girls’ Clubs Inc. of Waterbury, Connecticut.

Dionne Dobbins-Harper Dionne Dobbins-Harper is a senior program associate with The Finance Project. She provides technical assistance and training in the areas of outof-school time, substance abuse and mental health services, and childhood obesity. Dionne was a 2002-2003 National Head Start Fellow. Prior to working at The Finance Project, she was a research analyst at the American Institutes for Research where she worked in the areas Head Start, adult literacy and family literacy. Dionne holds a doctorate from the University of Miami. She was a postdoctoral fellow and served as project coordinator for the Carolina Family Literacy Studies in Chapel Hill, NC.

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Biographies of the Guest Experts (continued)

Joyce Dudley

strategic direction to the Center’s efforts to expand summer learning opportunities for all youth and to help close the achievement gap between disadvantaged youth and their higher-income peers.

Joyce L. Dudley is president and founder of Dudley Hamilton Associates, Inc. (DHA), a management consulting firm started in 1985 and currently headquartered in midtown Manhattan. Joyce began her path toward creating a professional consulting firm by providing executive coaching, career development and change management services to clients in a

Ron is the author of many publications and speaks regularly on researchbased approaches and models of effective summer learning programs. He appears regularly in the media including recent segments on CNN,

range of sectors. Her mission was to create an organization development and change management firm, the impact of which would exceed the standards of the industry by approaching organizational change in a holistic and integrated fashion. Joyce believed then, as she does now,

NBC Nightly News, and the CBS Early Show. He has a background in the fields of education and youth development serving as the past director of education programs with the national office of Boys & Girls Clubs of America and as an education associate with the Public Education Network

that by assessing the relationship between an organization’s business strategy and its individual and organizational dynamics, a consultant could

in Washington, DC. He is also a former classroom teacher with experience teaching both middle and high school students.

identify customized approaches to lasting and effective change. For this reason, she resisted the niche marketing prevalent in the field, in which consultant firms are experts in narrow, specialized areas, and instead

Steve Fowler

forged a broader path for Dudley Hamilton that has allowed the firm to add value by bringing a strong set of skills to the table. As a result, Dudley

Steve Fowler is a partner in FowlerHoffman where he designs and helps implement public education campaigns. In his work at FowlerHoffman, he has directed public education and outreach campaigns on violence

Hamilton has the capacity to diagnose and advise in the areas of strategy, organizational change, leadership and staff development, workforce diversity, and building internal and external alliances.

prevention, children’s safety and child abuse, long-term care, afterschool and urban redevelopment.

Prior to establishing DHA, Joyce was appointed by Mayor Edward I. Koch and served as Deputy Commissioner of Personnel and Policy Analysis for the City of New York. In that role, she ran the prestigious Top Forty

Matthew Freeman Matthew Freeman is a senior account executive with PR Solutions, a public relations firm that serves national advocacy groups, associations, foundations and think tanks working on progressive issues and public

Program, which brought Commissioners and other key executives to the table to learn and apply innovative strategies in their leadership roles. She also served as director of training and development for District Council 37 of New York (the City’s largest municipal labor union at the time) and has been an adjunct professor of communications and supervision at Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations.

education. Freeman works with a variety of organizations, writing opinion pieces and various media materials, developing media strategy, planning and promoting press conferences and briefings, pitching stories to the media,

She earned her master’s degree in program development from New York University and has completed extensive doctoral-level studies in organization development and counseling psychology. She is also certified

and advising clients on message and delivery. He has worked with colleges and universities through the Ford Foundation’s Campus Diversity Initiative and the Association of American Colleges and Universities to help publicize various diversity-related projects and events. He also works extensively with the Afterschool Alliance and the National Council of

in both the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and LIFO, two communications style indicators, and has completed extensive training in Neuro-Linguistic Programming and Somatic Intelligence.

Juvenile and Family Court Judges. In addition, he has worked with the Call to Renewal, a network of churches and faith-based organizations, to promote a re-examination of poverty and welfare programs in light of the changing face of poverty in America.

Ron Fairchild Ron Fairchild is the executive director of the Center for Summer Learning and a faculty member at the Johns Hopkins School of Education. Under

Before joining PR Solutions, Freeman was Senior Vice President for Research and Program for People For the American Way, serving as a

Ron’s leadership, the Center was established and grew to become the nation’s leading authority on creating opportunities for high-quality summer learning for all young people. He provides leadership and

national media spokesman, overseeing research on a variety of policy issues and on the Religious Right political movement, and serving as a

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Biographies of the Guest Experts (continued)

member of the organization’s senior management team. Before taking charge of research and program development, he was the organization’s deputy director of communications. While at People For the American Way, he authored dozens of opinion articles that appeared in major daily newspapers across the country, and wrote a variety of People For the American Way publications. Immediately prior, he worked on the national staff of the League of Women Voters. While there, he directed a nationwide series of 75 Senate and House campaign debates, did advance work for the 1984 presidential debates, and served on the organization’s public relations staff as a communications specialist. Freeman holds a bachelor of arts degree in American government from the University of Virgini, and received a fellowship from the University’s White Burkett Miller Center for Public Affairs.

Catherine Jordan Catherine Jordan is a program manager with the National Partnership for Quality Afterschool Learning at Southwest Educational Development Laboratory (SEDL) and with SEDL’s Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Task 2: National Leadership for Family and Community Involvement. She currently leads the National Center for Family and Community Connections with Schools, which links people with research-based information and resources they can use to effectively connect schools,

Lisa Lederer Lisa Lederer is the president of PR Solutions, a public relations consulting firm that serves national advocacy groups, associations, foundations and think tanks working on progressive issues and public education. Lederer has extensive experience in media relations. She is an expert at media strategy and speech writing. As president of PR Solutions, Lederer has developed and implemented media outreach plans for numerous efforts, including the Family Violence Prevention Fund’s There’s No Excuse for Domestic Violence public education campaign; the campaign to pass and expand the Family & Medical Leave Act for the National Partnership for Women & Families (formerly the Women’s Legal Defense Fund); the U.S. Department of Labor Women’s Bureau’s Working Women Count campaign; the Vietnam Veterans of America Foundation’s campaign to ban the use of landmines; and the Ford Foundation’s Campus Diversity Initiative. Lederer also manages projects for the Afterschool Alliance, the Leadership to Keep Children Alcohol Free, the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, the Project on Student Debt, and others. Lederer served as senior account executive with Public Affairs Research and Communications from 1985 - 1989. As Press Secretary to the National Organization for Women (NOW) from 1983 - 1985, she developed and maintained national and local press contacts, and wrote

families and communities. Some of her recent SEDL publications include A New Wave of Evidence: The Impact of School, Family, and Community Connections on Student Achievement, Creating Collaborative Action Teams

press releases, speeches, Congressional testimony and brochures. She also trained grass roots activists in press and public relations, advanced and publicized speaking tours by NOW officers and other celebrities, including

– Working Together for Student Success, and Thriving Together: Connecting Rural School Improvement and Community Development.

former First Lady Betty Ford, and produced and edited a videotape history of the Equal Rights Amendment Campaign.

Between 1997 and 2000, Catherine led SEDL’s field-based research and development of home, school and community partnerships, which culminated in the publication of Creating Collaborative Action Teams: Working Together for Student Success. She is a Regional Associate of the National

Lederer has served as researcher to a Congressional caucus and has worked as a Logistics and Advance Coordinator for a major presidential campaign. She also served as Newsletter Editor and Executive Board Member to Common Cause - Illinois.

Center for Community Education (NCCE) in Flint, Michigan, and serves on its National Training Task Force for the 21st Century Community Learning Centers. Prior to joining SEDL, Catherine served as executive director for the McLennan County Youth Collaboration - Communities In Schools, Inc., in Waco, Texas, where she developed the nationally recognized “Lighted

Lederer is a graduate of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism.

Schools” project as a part of the Pew Charitable Trust’s Partnership for Civic Change. Catherine holds a masters of arts in teaching degree in public service administration from Tarleton State University and a bachelor’s degree in journalism and history from Baylor University.

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Biographies of the Guest Experts (continued)

Priscilla Little

Tammy Papa

Priscilla Little is associate director of Harvard Family Research Project (HFRP), managing and coordinating current research activities, participating in resource development and outreach to current and prospective funders, writing grants, developing and coordinating relationships with national organizations, providing intellectual support to projects to facilitate

Tammy has been actively involved with afterschool for over 13 years having begun Bridgeport’s Lighthouse Program in January of 1993. Under her tenure as director, the program has experienced tremendous growth in numbers of children served and the quality of programming offered. The program has been nationally recognized by several entities including

cross-project synergy and management of priorities, and coordinating activities to ensure long-term performance and sustainability for HFRP.

the National Community Education Association and is the subject of numerous promising practice studies conducted by the University of Wisconsin and Yale University. In addition to her Lighthouse responsibilities, Tammy is an appointed member to the Connecticut After School

She is also Project Manager for HFRP’s Out-of-School Time (OST) Learning and Development Initiative focused on building the field of

Advisory Committee, co-chairs the Mayor’s Strong Schools Initiative and co-authored the 2005 America’s Promise application. She is an active

out-of-school time through the timely development and dissemination of quality evaluation information and tools. The cornerstone of this work is the development of an online searchable database of out-of-school

member of the Bridgeport’s Collaborative Children’s Advisory Board, the Connecticut After School Network, the Fairfield County After School Network, and the Department of Children and Families Advisory Board, represents the Mayor’s Office on the Early Childhood Task Force, is a

time evaluation profiles. Additionally she serves on the advisory board for the Southwest Educational Development Lab’s National Partnership for Quality Afterschool Learning, as well as other state afterschool boards, and is a national expert on research and evaluation of out-of-school time programs and how they can complement in-school learning and

member of the United Way’s Vision Council, and is currently spearheading the National League of Cities Technical Assistance effort in Bridgeport. Tammy was one of 5 individuals to recently receive the “Children’s Champion Award” from the Connecticut Afterschool Network.

development. Priscilla also contributes to the HFRP’s evaluation team, currently evaluating a universal Pre-K initiative in California. She is wellversed in evaluation methodology and designing evaluations for learning and continuous improvement.

Tammy received her master’s of business administration from Sacred Heart University, her bachelor of arts in political science from the University of Bridgeport and her associates in business from Housatonic

Priscilla’s research interests include the evaluation of programs and policies to promote quality out-of-school time experiences for children; early care

Community College.

and education; family involvement; and program evaluation. Little received her master’s of child study from Tufts University in 1990, where she continued with doctoral studies in the same department through 1992.

Myra Webster Myra Webster is the coordinator of the Children Opportunity Zone

She holds a bachelor’s degree from Smith College.

(COZ)/ Family Center in Warren, Rhode Island. In her position, she oversees home visiting programs, including Parents As Teachers; playgroups and preschool programs; adult education programs; a GED testing center; and four before- and after- school childcare sites for the District. For the

Michelle Novello Michelle Novello is the executive director and founder of the RiverzEdge Arts Project. For ten years, Michelle owned and operated a successful printing and design firm and in 2002 she facilitated a peer-mentoring program at the Rhode Island Training School (RITS), and published,

last 17 years she has worked in various capacities for the Bristol Warren Regional School District. Myra has been working in and around public schools for the past 26 years. As a volunteer, she coordinated parent programs, raised funds and served on the school board in Bedford, New Hampshire.

designed, and printed two anthologies of poetry by RITS residents. During her 25 years of producing, exhibiting, and curating art exhibits, she has developed many strong associations with businesses and organizations throughout Rhode Island.

Myra has a bachelor’s degree in American Studies from the University of South Florida.

Michelle holds a master’s of education degree with a focus on arts in education from Harvard University.

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Biographies of the Afterschool Technical Assistance Collaborative

Ilene Berman

An-Me received her doctorate in sociology from Yale University, a bachelors of science degree from Washington University in St. Louis, and completed a post-doctorate fellowship at Columbia University.

Ilene M. Berman is the program director in the Education Division at the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA) where she provides policy advice, research and technical assistance to governors and their advisors. Ilene currently manages multiple foundation-funded projects focused on helping governors and other state leaders improve

Janelle Cousino Janelle Cousino is vice president of FowlerHoffman LLC and heads the Washington, DC office for the firm. She has been responsible for state and national coalition building and advocacy work on behalf of the Afterschool

their education systems. Her areas of expertise include adolescent literacy, high school redesign, turning around low performing schools and school choice.

Alliance, a client of the firm, for the past several years.

Prior to joining NGA in 2002, Ilene served as director of policy, standards

Janelle has more than 30 years of experience directing civic organizations

and instruction at the Council for Basic Education, leading a team that offered policy guidance, professional development and alignment studies to states and districts advancing their standards-based reform efforts.

and developing strategies for advocacy and change for public policies in the U.S. and internationally. In 2000, she returned to the U.S. from a three-year assignment as resident office director and senior program officer of the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs in Moscow, Russia. Janelle has consulted, directed or chaired many state level

Additionally, she served as the director of research and content for the National Clearinghouse for Comprehensive School Reform. Ilene taught high school English for eight years in Washington, DC. She currently serves on the board of Project Northstar, a tutoring program for homeless youth in DC and as an academic advisor to a charter school planning effort in

advocacy campaigns. She led grassroots legislative campaigns on issues such as insurance, tax reform, health care, banking reform, job protection issues, increased funding for poverty programs, passing handgun control and securing funds for affordable housing. Janelle served as the executive director of the Maryland Trial Lawyers Association and instituted a

Brooklyn, New York. Ilene holds a master of arts degree from St. John’s College in Annapolis, Maryland, and master of science and bachelor of arts degrees from the University of Pennsylvania.

highly successful program for grassroots communications and member involvement for the organization. Janelle had previously led the 105member coalition as director of the Maryland Citizen Action Coalition, a statewide organization with over 75,000 family members and a similar organization in Indiana.

An-Me Chung An-Me Chung is a program officer at the C. S. Mott Foundation. Her grantmaking portfolio, Learning Beyond the Classroom, focuses on expanding school-based/school-linked afterschool opportunities and school-community partnerships. The overall grantmaking goal is to sustain quality afterschool programs that complement the school-day and support developmentally appropriate outcomes, especially for traditionally

Janelle earned a master’s in business administration from Indiana University. She received a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Michigan in political science and speech and communications, as well as a secondary education teaching credential.

underserved children and youth and their families. Jennifer Dahnke

Before joining the Foundation, An-Me collaborated with the U.S. Department of Education and the Mott Foundation on the 21st CCLC Initiative. As an associate director at the National Institute on Out-ofSchool Time (NIOST), Centers for Research on Women, Wellesley College, she directed the Save the Children Out-of-School Time Rural

Jennifer Dahnke is a senior associate at Collaborative Communications Group where she manages network development opportunities and knowledge sharing through outcomes-based convenings, and the creation and dissemination of products and services that further policy and practice in public education. Her work includes supporting the National Network of Statewide Afterschool Networks and the Afterschool Technical Assistance Collaborative (ATAC). She has also created a workshop for the

Initiative where she designed and implemented program improvement and evaluation for Save the Children out-of-school time programs. In addition, she also initiated service as a strategy in out-of-school time in collaboration with the Corporation of National Service. Other past work includes conducting a multi-site evaluation of full-service schools/site-

National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP) designed to engage principals and afterschool program directors in facilitating greater alignment of afterschool program activities and outcomes with school-day learning goals.

based managed school reform models; assessment of a statewide childcare training system; and conducting a statewide survey research project on prevention activities for children and youth. 35


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Jennifer joined Collaborative after years of working with in-school, afterschool and community programs. In Chicago, she worked with United Way in program management for Teaming for Technology and supported

to develop Leading Learning Communities: Standards for What Principals Should Know and Be Able to Do (National Association of Elementary School Principals, 2001), Moving Toward Success: Framework for After School Programs

several initiatives and program funding processes. She has taught English in Ecuador with WorldTeach and has also taught in the afterschool program at the Jackson-Mann Community Center in Boston.

(Mott Foundation, 2005), The Current State of Afterschool in Georgia: Building a Strong Foundation (Georgia Afterschool Investment Council, 2006), and A New Day for Learning (Time, Learning, and Afterschool Task Force, 2007).

Jennifer holds a master’s degree in international education development from Boston University and a bachelor’s degree in international relations from James Madison College at Michigan State University.

Previously, she served for a decade at the U.S. Department of Education as producer of the Satellite Town Meeting, a monthly, live interactive television program featuring school and community leaders. Terri holds a master’s degree in public administration from George Mason University and a bachelor of arts in communications and government from The American University

Sharon Deich Sharon Deich is associate director for outreach and practice development at The Finance Project. She assists in management of the organization and directs the work of two practice groups – Children and Family Services and Economic Success for Families and Communities. Working closely

Ayeola Fortune Ayeola Fortune is director of the Extended Learning Opportunities and

with foundation funders and public agency representatives, Sharon directs a variety of multi-year technical assistance projects in the areas of out-of-

Development Project at the Council of Chief State School Officers. In this capacity, she has researched quality extended learning programs in high-

school time, early learning, and community development. She oversees the development of technical assistance tools and materials and provides direct assistance to a variety of programs and initiatives serving both

poverty, high-performing schools and assisted the Council in its efforts to provide technical assistance to state education agencies as the 21st CCLC program transitioned from federal to a state-based administration.

young children and school-age children. Prior to joining The Finance Project in 1997, Sharon spent 15 years researching and evaluating programs that support low-income

Ayeola recently coordinated a task force of chief state school officers to develop the Policy Statement on Extended Learning Opportunities and she authored the publication, Summer Learning Opportunities in High-Poverty

children and families at the American Institutes for Research and The Urban Institute.

Schools. She supports states in their efforts to build statewide capacity and infrastructure for extended learning programs through her work with the Afterschool Technical Assistance Collaborative. In addition, Ayeola provides support to state education agency staff responsible for administering the supplemental educational services provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act.

She has over 20 years experience in public policy and holds a master’s degree from the University of Michigan’s School of Public Policy.

Terri Ferinde Dunham

Ayeola has presented extensively on extended learning at numerous national conferences and has offered expertise to chief state school officers and their staff on improving achievement outcomes among African American children. Ayeola has been a middle school and secondary school teacher, and has taught and developed curricula at the University

Terri Ferinde Dunham is a partner at Collaborative Communications Group, a communications consulting firm, where she focuses on the nexus of schools and communities and in- and out- of school time learning for children and youth. For the past seven years, she has convened and connected thousands of people, including educators, afterschool experts,

of Pittsburgh.

policymakers, community leaders and others, to improve the quality and to sustain afterschool programs across the country.

Ayeola has a master’s degree in political science from the University of Pittsburgh and a bachelor’s degree in government from Lehigh University.

Terri manages the National Network of Statewide Afterschool Networks funded by the C.S. Mott Foundation. Also, she specializes in engaging diverse stakeholders on committees and task forces to develop bold, paradigm-shifting ideas. She has managed, facilitated and supported groups

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Biographies of the Afterschool Technical Assistance Collaborative (continued)

Becky Gibbons

post-graduate leadership training program in St. Louis, and a summer philanthropy internship through SEO (Sponsors for Educational Opportunity) at the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Becky Gibbons is an associate at Collaborative Communications Group where she coordinates convenings, particularly for the National Network of Statewide Afterschool Networks.

He holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Washington University in St. Louis. During summer internships he also worked for Goldman Sachs, PricewaterhouseCoopers and Prudential Healthcare.

Previously, Becky worked for the Office of Great Workplace Development and the Office of Performance Excellence for the State of Michigan. There, she supported state leaders by assisting with data collection and quality assurance for surveys and maintained tracking systems for the MI 360 process and leadership development training.

Audrey Hutchinson Audrey Hutchinson is the program director of education and after school initiatives at the National League of Cities (NLC) Institute for

As an AmeriCorps VISTA for the Head Start State Collaboration Office, Becky organized the Montana Fatherhood Summit and The Children’s Mental Health Symposium both of which enabled participants to develop

Youth, Education, and Families, a national resource that helps municipal leaders take action on behalf of children, youth, and families in five areas—

community and state action plans to support children and families in Montana. Becky holds a bachelor of science degree in marketing from West

education and afterschool, youth development, early childhood, child safety, and family economic success. The Institute assists leaders by conducting research on key challenges, disseminating promising practices, and building

Virginia University.

networks of local officials working on similar issues. Prior to joining NLC, Audrey held several senior positions at the White House under the Clinton administration and at the U.S. Department

Ursula Helminski

of Education. She has also held positions at the City University of New York, where she focused on strengthening partnerships between colleges,

Ursula Helminski is vice president of external affairs at the Afterschool Alliance. She was part of its founding team of the Alliance and now develops strategy, plans and communications for the organization as

communities and city and state governments, and was special assistant and policy analyst for the president of the New York City Council. She holds master’s degrees in both social work and public health from

well as directing its public awareness initiatives such as the national Lights On! Afterschool event and Afterschool for All: Project 2010, a campaign to demonstrate the breadth and diversity of afterschool

Columbia University.

supporters nationwide. Michelle Ganow Jones

Ursula spent five years at the communications and advocacy firm of FowlerHoffman, where she worked on a variety of social issue campaigns, communications plans and business development. She has also served as

Michelle Ganow Jones is a consultant to The Finance Project. Her experience includes providing technical assistance to the statewide after

editor of a trade journal in Washington, DC, worked in marketing for The Nature Conservancy and taught English in a Moscow public school.

school networks, funded by the C.S. Mott Foundation, and engaging in a variety of research, policy tool development and technical assistance activities that focus on financing and sustaining initiatives that serve children, families and communities.

Ursula has a bachelor’s degree in political science and English from Duke University.

Michelle previously directed the work of the Afterschool Investments Project, a technical assistance contract funded by the Child Care Bureau at

Eugene Hillsman Eugene A. Hillsman is an associate program officer for the Pathways Out of Poverty team at the C.S. Mott Foundation. In his current assignment, he

the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which supports the efforts of Child Care and Development Fund grantees and their partners in providing quality after school opportunities.

is working on the Improving Community Education portfolio.

Michelle received her master’s in public policy from the John F. Kennedy

Before coming to Mott, Eugene worked as a junior associate with Citadel Partners, LLC in St. Louis. Other experience includes participation in

School of Government at Harvard University and her undergraduate degree from Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas.

the Coro Fellows Program in Public Affairs, a nine-month, full-time,

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Biographies of the Afterschool Technical Assistance Collaborative (continued)

Morakot Masokas

Terry Peterson

Morakot Masokas is a program associate for the Extended Learning Opportunities and Development Project at the Council of Chief State School Officers. Her work provides assistance and support to state education agency staff responsible for administering extended learning opportunity initiatives. Previously, Morakot worked as the director of

Terry Peterson currently directs the C.S. Mott Foundation funded Afterschool and Community Learning Network project, that helps policymakers throughout the United States and in several developing countries, like Argentina, Brazil and Mongolia. He is also the senior fellow for policy and partnerships at the University of South Carolina Educational

education for Sylvan Learning Center, Educate, Inc. She also served as a 2002 Teach For America corps member teaching tenth grade social studies in Baltimore, MD. Other experiences include interning at the Coalition for Community Schools and at Colorado General Assembly senate offices.

Foundation and College of Charleston.

Morakot has a master’s degree in teaching secondary social studies from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Colorado.

was the lead staff person for a statewide $2 billion, seven-year education package that the Rand Corporation said was one of most comprehensive and successful in the nation.

Terry is no stranger to large-scale educational change, financing and partnership development. While working in the South Carolina governor’s office, Terry oversaw issues from preschool to medical education. He

He has been an expert witness in more than 10 states to help them develop their school reform and policy agendas. Recently, he testified for seven days as the closing witness in a school finance adequacy trial about the lack of opportunities for children to succeed in the 21st Century in

Carol McElvain Carol McElvain is a senior program associate at Learning Point Associates in Chicago, Illinois. Working to serve Learning Point Associates’ goal to help clients build tools and apply proven practices to create schools where all

eight rural low-income school districts. Terry served as a senior advisor to U.S. Secretary of Education Richard Riley on many initiatives, including the

students can develop their skills and abilities, her recent work has focused on providing afterschool programs with the tools to improve their quality

expansion of the 21st Century Community Learning Centers that resulted in the federal appropriation growing from $1 million serving children in 10 schools to now almost $1 billion annually serving children in almost 9,000

and meet the needs of the participants they serve. She has also worked closely with the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) programs providing assistance, training and support. She is co-project

school-community afterschool programs. He was on the American leadership team to the Summit of the Americas’ meetings in Chile and Brazil, G-7 meeting in Tokyo, APEC meeting in Singapore and OCED accountability meeting in Copenhagen. Terry helped organize and lead the USA-Brazil and USA-Denmark education partnerships and development of International Education Day.

manager of the Analytic Support to the 21st CCLC Program which has developed a system to implement, manage and analyze data collection for state-level programs. Carol is currently is a contributing member of the Afterschool Technical Assistance Collaborative to help states build strong afterschool networks, a member of the advisory committee for SEDL’s National Partnership for

Terry has been a teacher, parent organizer, Peace Corps volunteer and college faculty member. He holds a masters and doctorate from the University of South Carolina, and joint bachelors degree in chemistry and

Quality Afterschool Learning and has been a member of the National 21st Century Community Learning Centers Training Taskforce and the North Central Regional Advisory Committee through the National Center for Community Education. She is the co-author of Beyond the Bell®: A Toolkit for Creating Effective After-School Programs (1st, 2nd and 3rd Editions),

education from the University of Wisconsin.

Daniel Princiotta

the Beyond the Bell Principal’s Guide and the Beyond the Bell Start-Up Guide.

Daniel Princiotta is a senior policy analyst at the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center), providing governors and their advisors with policy advice, research and technical assistance on a variety of education issues. Dan manages the NGA Center’s projects on

Trained as a lawyer, Carol has worked as an advocate for special needs children in the Chicago Public Schools and in educational policy.

expanded learning opportunities (ELOs), including afterschool, summer learning, and extended day programs, as well as its dropout prevention and recovery efforts. In his current role managing the NGA Center’s ELO

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Biographies of the Afterschool Technical Assistance Collaborative (continued)

projects, Dan has supported numerous governors’ summits on ELOs, managed the development of A State Leader’s Video Guide to Afterschool, assisted statewide afterschool networks as a member of the Afterschool Technical Assistance Collaborative, and provided ELO-related technical

Previously at the Institute for Educational Leadership, Bela served as the research associate for the Coalition for Community Schools, a network of more than 150 local, state and national organizations which works to improve education by promoting partnerships between local schools and community-based organizations to provide comprehensive and integrated services within schools. Bela co-wrote the Coalition report, Making the Difference: Research and Practice in Community Schools.

assistance to states via the U.S. Childcare Bureau’s Afterschool Investments Project. Immediately prior to joining NGA, Dan served as a research analyst at the American Institutes for Research. There, he led projects to write research briefs for the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) and to support the development of the America’s Children report for the Federal

Bela worked as a policy associate at the Institute for Education and Government (IEG) at Teachers College, Columbia University where she conducted policy research and analysis on various education topics such

Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. Dan also provided analytic support to NCES survey programs, including the Before- and

as national/state standards, high-stakes testing, vouchers, and teacher quality. She also conducted psychiatric research through clinical drug trials

After-School Programs and Activities Survey and the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study. Dan has authored a variety of publications on topics such as state ELO quality systems (forthcoming), summer learning

for individuals suffering with schizophrenia and manic bipolar disorders at Bellevue Hospital in New York City. Bela holds her master’s degree in sociology and education with a

activities, home-schooling, school choice and high school dropouts. Dan holds a master’s degree in applied economics from the Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Cornell University.

concentration in education policy from Teachers College, Columbia University and her bachelor’s degree in psychology and Spanish from the University of Pennsylvania.

Kate Sandel

Jennifer Stedron

Kate Sandel is a program associate at The Finance Project. Her current project work involves research on building a professional development system for after school providers and developing a fiscal management

Jennifer Stedron is a program manager in the education program at the National Conference of State Legislators (NCSL). She is the program policy specialist in the areas of after extended learning opportunities,

guide for youth development programs.

early childhood education and special education. Jennifer is a member of the Afterschool Technical Assistance Collaborative (ATAC), a group of

Previously, Kate spent several years as an educational researcher with

national organizations that provide technical assistance to state afterschool networks of providers, policymakers, educators and others interested in afterschool programs.

RMC Research, conducting evaluations and providing technical assistance in the fields of early learning, service-learning and 21st CCLC. Additionally, she spent a year in the classroom as a pre-kindergarten teacher, utilizing a literacy-focused thematic curriculum she created.

Just prior to joining NCSL, Jennifer worked as a clinician at Denver Children’s Hospital providing assessment and treatment services to children with learning disabilities, developmental disabilities, brain trauma and mental illness. She has also worked for the Michigan House of Representatives and for Abt Associates, a public policy research organization.

Kate holds a master’s degree in public policy from the Harris School of Public Policy Studies at the University of Chicago, and worked with A+ Illinois on education finance reform in Illinois while in graduate school.

Bela Shah

Jennifer received her doctorate and master’s degree from the University of Denver in child clinical psychology with an emphasis in developmental cognitive neuroscience. She has published journal articles and book chapters on aspects of cognitive development and developmental disabilities.

Bela Shah is a senior program associate for Afterschool Initiatives in the Institute for Youth, Education, and Families at the National League of Cities. Her charge is to highlight the importance of afterschool to municipal officials and work with them to utilize their leadership and bully pulpit to advance a citywide afterschool agenda. She recently launched NLC’s Afterschool Policy Advisors Network (APAN), a national peer learning network to connect senior municipal leaders who focus on afterschool.

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INTERNATIONAL MARITIME SIGNAL FLAGS

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Download information and resources from the 2007 National Network of Statewide Afterschool Networks Meeting at www.statewideafterschoolnetworks.net/network_only/network_convenings.html Download information and resources from the 2007 National Network of Statewide Afterschool Networks Meeting at

2007 National Network Meeting  

Criteria: Create an engaging program book for a national meeting, drawing its theme from the seaside location of Newport, RI.Design Response...

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