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hood river maker’s market colin jensen thesis - gast/spr.12


My own relationship with the town of Hood River, OR began at birth. I was born at the Hood River Hospital in 1985 to Wes and Sabine Jensen. My father was at the time an employee of Luhr Jensen & Sons, a company owned by his father and started by his grandfather, my great-grandfather, Luhr Jensen Sr. Luhr Jensen & Sons produced fishing tackle, primarily for the Northwest’s recreational salmon-fishing industry. The Northwest was at the time rich with family businesses in the fishing industry, which speckled the area from Washington to Southern Oregon, wherever the salmon and steelhead were plentiful. Luhr Jensen & Sons was, at the time I was born, a stalwart of the Hood River economy and on the way to becoming its largest employer. All of the company’s numerous products were conceived and produced by the hardworking people of Hood River.

Luhr Jensen Sr

introduction

In the 1990’s, the family fishing companies in the Northwest began to be acquired by larger, often foreign, companies. In the early 2000’s, while I was in business school studying to earn my business degree in order to get involved with the family business, Luhr Jensen sold its interests to the Finnish fishing giant Rapala, which quickly moved the production of all goods to its facilities in China. The town of Hood River, as well as myself, was dealt a great blow. Today, I sometimes lament my missed opportunity to carry on the heritage of Luhr Jensen & Sons. Little is left of the company, aside from a museum to its history, and its memory amongst the towns folk, many of whom were employed at one time or another at the plant. Thankfully, the products are still produced under the Luhr Jensen name and are still a staple of the salmon fishing industry up and down the West Coast. Hood River has changed over the years, and evolved into a tourism driven economy. Recreation and proximity to resort-style living has influenced the economy and led to skyrocketing property values. Visiting Hood River, it is easy to forget that it is a town born of hard work and sacrifice - a true embodiment of the entrepreneurship and industry that defines the Northwest. This project is dedicated to that legacy, as well as that of my great grandfather.


The Maker’s Market project is for a public indoor/outdoor market to serve the City of Hood River as a venue for commerce, public gathering, and arts and leisure. Sited on a series of lots on 2nd and 1st Avenues in Hood River’s Historic downtown, the project will become a hearth for the city, where people can gather to buy and exchange goods and services, or simply ‘be’ in a public venue while enjoying the sense of place bestowed by the historic context and natural influences of the Columbia Gorge. The architecture will be one of outdoor plazas, covered pedestrian “retail alleys”, and open and visible craft spaces where the skill and trades of the vendors will be highlighted as a “living workspace” for the public.

project statement

In an effort to honor the history of the town and usher in a connection with its forward-looking present day, the vendors selected for the project will be a host of Northwest-based entrepreneurs, pursuing crafts both old and new. Some of the vendors will be in early stages of product introduction, and will use the market as a vessel to incubate their business to a brick and mortar level. Others will be established and permanent names, whose craft and innovation have stood the test of time and helped define character of the Pacifc Northwest. The Hood River Farmer’s market, currently housed on a weekly basis at the Hood River Times’ parking lot, will occupy the public space on Saturdays, with a limited daily presence in some of the vendor areas. The public will benefit in this way from an aggregated set of businesses offering relevant goods on a daily basis, rather than a weekly market with a decidedly tourist-focus. Vendors will benefit by pooling resources and services in a co-working model, while their proximity to one another will amplify their business and become an economic boon for the city. In these ways, the project seeks to unify the populace by paying homage to the hardworking cultural milieu at its core, simultaneously providing a resource and service to locals and tourists alike. The construction and building loans for the project will be financed by a private real estate investment trust comprised of several prominent Northwest investors and developers. Operationally, the Market will form itself as a non-profit entity funded primarily by the vendor rents, event revenues, and 501c(3) donations from the public. The City of Hood River will subsidize the project from a tax standpoint in order to foster its creation of a functioning public space for the citizens of Hood River, and a private land endowment has generously provided the permanent site for the project.


Hood River, OR Population: 7,167 (2010) Founded: 1895

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Nestled in the Columbia Gorge 65 miles east of Portland, Hood River has a rich history in the Pacific Northwest as a supplier of much of the state’s fruit and produce from its bountiful orchards along the Hood River Valley. Founded in 1895, Hood River had an early and vibrant rail connection to Portland and east to The Dalles and Pendleton. This railroad facilitated the exchange of goods and commerce along the Gorge Corridor, and was a major driver of the economy in Hood River, as produce was packed and prepared in warehouses along the waterfront (still visible in the picture above) and loaded onto waiting trains for delivery to distribution centers in Portland’s “Produce Row.” Today, Hood River has retained much of its agricultural roots in spite of a growing tourist influence, driven by the rise of action sports such as windsurfing, kiteboarding, mountain biking and skiing. The city center is an eclectic mix of tourist focused businesses, a growing “hi-tech” presence, and a historic old-town.


demographics

Caucasian Other Hispanic

8000 7000

Aerial of Hood River showing downtown and marina, and surrounding agricultural land

Fruit orchards historically and currently comprise the dominant industry in the town

population

6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2007 2010

Having gained a world-class reputation for various action sports, particularly windsurfing, Hood River now has a thriving tourism industry


Downtown Hood River Approx 16 “Portland” city blocks Between 1st and 8th Streets & State & Industrial Streets

Oak Street forms the primary east-west axis of the Hood River downtown, as well as its commercial core. A gridded plat of 200’x200’ blocks, the downtown has steep grades down to the river. Most blocks have a full story of grade change over the course of their 200’ run (as can be seen in the image of the Hood River Hotel at right). Bounding the downtown to the North is the I-84 freeway and Union Pacific Rail Line, both of which enforce an imposing separation from the town’s marina and waterfront, which in recent decades has been designed as an industrial park. To the south, the residential character of the bounding neighborhoods permeates as far as State street, where it meets the downtown edge. The character of most of the buildings is historic load-bearing masonry. Many of the newer buildings that have filled in the downtown over the years have mimicked this style using masonry veneer, leaving a fairly uniform and distinctly “old-town” feel to the area.


Downtown Hood River points of interest

Oak Street looking west, circa 1920. The “Mt Hood Hotel� in the mid-ground is the historic Hood River Hotel today

A contemporary view of the Hood River Hotel, 1st & Oak


“Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.” - Jane Jacobs Hood River, like many towns throughout the United States, suffers from a lack of true public space. This is evidenced by the clear absence of a town square, plaza, or many other of the classic forms public space takes. The townspeople of Hood River share a Northwesterner’s love for their local eating and drinking establishments - on any given day or night this is where the people can be found aggregating - particularly in one of the local microbreweries that the town has become known for. But this form of gathering, while social in nature and comprised of many of the characteristics of public space, must not be mistaken for the true thing. Restaurants, breweries, and cafes, whether indoor or out are not wholly inclusive of the entire populace, and therefore cannot be considered truly public.

public space

theory and discussion

When factoring in the issue of tourism, the problem is compounded. As a town with a distinctly tourist-driven economy, it becomes challenging to create a place that feels just as much at home to the residents as it does to the visitors. In the efforts to create a distinctive place, many towns reach too far and wind up creating a “tourist trap” that defeats the purpose of the public space in the first place. If a place feels artificial or contrived, devoid of time or place, it loses that intangible feeling that makes great public spaces great. In the quest for good public space in Hood River, great care will have to be taken to be sensitive to the roots of the town and avoid blindly catering to the tourist economy, thereby ignoring the townspeople as consequence. In studying historic towns such as Hood River, a question often arises. Is “Main Street” a public place? It goes without saying that if prompted to list the public spaces of Hood River, it would certainly be at the forefront of the discussion, but is it possessed of the qualities that a public space needs? In experiencing Hood River’s “Main Street” (Oak), I would assert that while it is a character defining aspect of the town and it’s history, the street is not a truly public space. This has become evident through conversation and observation of residents of the town, including my own relatives, who have an attitude towards the place that ranges from blithe indifference to outright avoidance. This sentiment stems largely from the tourist nature of the street, but also due to the pertinence (or lack thereof) of it’s offerings.


If townspeople feel this way - and my sense is that many do - then how could the place be considered public? All this is not to say that Oak Street does not possess a sense of place. Walking down Oak street, you can’t help but feel the essence of the town - it’s age, context in the Gorge, topography, culture and spirit are all evident. It simply has lost the sense of inclusivity that it used to possess in the early days of the town, when it was a true main street. Gone now are the drugstores, diners, blacksmiths and cobblers, and in their place are now high end mountain bike shops, ritzy boutiques, and wine bars. The goal of this project is to address the inclusivity that is lacking in Hood River. This project seeks to bring a space to Hood River with enough life and vitality that it lends itself to simply watching and being - where a person, whether they are local or not, can simply spend an afternoon meandering in a public market or sit and drink in the scenery of the Columbia Gorge. As a venue for public discourse, entertainment and learning, the project will draw together the town in ways that true public spaces do.

Covenant Garden Market London ca 1825 A truly public scene

In classic societies, particulary agrarian ones like that of Hood River, the act of “going to market”, either to sell one’s wares or to purchase daily necessities, was one of the most universal facts of daily life. At the marketplace, one could find all manner of vendors selling their wares, along with people carving out a living performing, or providing some service such as shoe shining or knife sharpening. There is no stratification of class in the market - it is an amalgamation of rich and poor, all ethnicities and religions. It is for this reason that the great markets of history, and today, are some of the most quintessentially public places that exist.


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2 site

3 4 1 Waterfront Park

greater hood river existing public space & gathering places

The largely industrial Port area that lies to the north of downtown Hood River is home to the newly visioned Waterfront Park, created in 2009 after a land gift to the city from the Port of Hood River in 2005. The park has been heralded as highly successful, albeit mainly with young children. Because of it’s accessibility issues and disparate nature, the park is difficult to consider a truly public place, as it has become home almost exclusively to families with children, and windsurfers. The amenities featured in the park, including a “kid-sized” rock wall and an obstacle course featuring boulders and logs, are distinctly child-focused, and although successful at reinforcing the city’s outdoorsy and health-minded identity, do less for making the park a universal resource to the city.


2 Full Sail Brewery / Double Mountain Brewery Full Sail, an iconic Hood River brand since they restored the Diamond Fruit Cannery into a brewery in 1987, and newcomer Double Mountain Brewery, are both mainstays of the Hood River social scene. At these breweries, locals and tourists alike can come in, dry off from a day on the river, and enjoy a beer with friends while celebrating the slower pace of life in Hood River. These venues both favor the tourist set, because of their downtown locations near the waterfront, and upscale pricing, and cannot be considered truly public destinations as they are, at the end of the day, private businesses. Nevertheless, they are a reminder of the importance of the brewery in the culture of the Northwest, and in particular, Hood River.

3 Hood River County Library/Georgiana Smith Park Situated near the heart of Hood River, the County Library and accompanying park were built in 1913 and lie on the National Register of Historic Places. Renovated in 2002 by Fletcher Farr Ayotte, the library is a beautiful and historical addition to the downtown scene. Georgiana Smith Park, which is the name for the library grounds, is a pristine and gently sloping lawn which addresses Oak Street. Adjacent from small boutiques that begin to form the commercial fabric of the Downtown area, the lawn becomes a gathering place on Spring and summer days, helped largely by its proximity to Mike’s Ice Cream Shop, a family favorite in the town. Though this place is quintessentially public and possesses a strong sense of place, it does not offer the broad range of opportunities that more successful public spaces would.

4 Saturday Farmer’s Market Hood River has a weekly Saturday Market in the parking lot of the Hood River Times Newspaper. Recently celebrating it’s 20th Anniversary, the market is a celebration of the spirit of the town’s craftspeople, and a cry for a more appropriate location befitting its wealth of vendors and products. This is more of a “locals scene” as the products sold are mostly fresh produce, or food products made with local ingredients. Unlike some Saturday Markets, this market leans more towards daily necessities rather than tourist trinkets. With a little more infastructure and a better location, this market could be an anchor for the town, and a truly public place.


Annex

Main Site Annex

Railyard Overlook Site Approx 35,000 SF Between 2 & Industrial, Cascade & Oak

The Railyard Overlook site is aptly named for its proximity to the historic rail line connecting Portland and Hood River. The primary building on-site is a wood framed building with masonry veneer, and is not a historically contributing element in the downtown area. The building and land belongs to my family, and the remainder of the site is primarily dedicated to parking. The site backs up to the historic Hood River Hotel, which is on the register of historic places and a landmark for the town. To the north, the 2nd St overpass branches to the industrial marina, and views of the Columbia and Washington shoreline lie beyond. During windy days, the Gorge is full of windsurfers and kiteboarders directly in front of the site, a hallmark of Hood River. A subtle grade change from south to north, and irregularly shaped adjoining lots are the primary challenges of the site, but will create intriguing options for the scheme design.


Greater Downtown Hood River (showing primary roadways)

View of from I-84 Exit (primary entrance to downtown)

View from Oak Street of site and Columbia Gorge


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Site Photographs 11/11/12 Site Visit

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The street frontage currently occupied by Pietro’s Pizza is some of the most desirable in the project, and host to the largest foot and vehicular traffic.

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This photograph taken from the adjacent corner shows the sweeping views of the Gorge that the site has potential to take advantage of.

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This diagonal view of the site shows the sloping grade of the site, and the interior of the site that could host the future plaza and public space components of the program.

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Across Industrial St lies the “Annex” portion of the site, which could be aptly sized and positioned for a brewery and public house.

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The looming Hood River Hotel to the south of the site will be a key contextual factor to contend with, but also contributes a strong sense of “place” to the project.


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BONNEVILLE DRIVE Within City Limits: City of Hood River Planning Department 301 Oak Street Hood River, OR 97031

Outside City Limits: County of Hood River Planning Department 601 State Street Hood River, OR 97031

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1 inch equals 0.25 miles DISCLAIMER: This map product was prepared by Hood River County and is for informational purposes only. It may not have been prepared for, or be suitable for legal, engineering, or surveying purposes. Users of this information should review or consult the primary data and information sources to ascertain the usability of the information.

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City and Site Zoning

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The maps above and at right show the distribution of zoning throughout the city of Hood River. The darkly contrasted area in the map above denotes the Hood River City limits. The Railyard Overlook site, like much of the surrounding downtown context, is zoned C-2 General Commercial. The following are some of the conditions/restrictions of said zoning code in Hood River - the remaining conditions are located in the Appendix of this report. 1. Frontage - 50’ minimum frontage on a dedicated public street 2. Setbacks - zero front, 3 foot side and rear up to two stories, 1’ additional for each story beyond. 3. Height Limit - 35’ residential, 45’ commercial 4. Parking - Never less than (2) off street parking spaces.


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DISCLAIMER: This map product was prepared by Hood River County and is for informational purposes only. It may not have been prepared for, or be suitable for legal, engineering, or surveying purposes. Users of this information should review or consult the primary data and information sources to ascertain the usability of the information.

Outside City Limits: County of Hood River Planning Department 601 State Street Hood River, OR 97031

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hood river maker's market program Site Area Analysis Site area

~35,000

QUANTITATIVE ELEMENTS

Main Site Program

Space

nasf

occ

asf

count

sub-total

25

75

1,875

1

1,875

5,000 300 1,000 400

1 1 1 1

5,000 300 1,000 400

2,000

1

2,000 10,575

Public/Outdoor Space Amphitheater/Movie Screening Farmers Market Plaza Water Space Wood Space Rock Space Bioswales & Street Improvements Subtotal

QUANTITATIVE ELEMENTS

Main Building Program

Space

nasf

occ

asf

count

sub-total

35

10

350 300

25 1

8,750 300

750

1

750

3,000 1,200 2,500

2 5 1

6,000 6,000 2,500

850

4

3,400

105 500

4 1

420 500 28,620

Daily Indoor Marketplace Vendor Stalls Info Stand Demonstration Kitchen Maker's Workshop Spaces Anchor Spaces "Pop-up" Spaces Materials Storage Residential Urban Lifestyle Studios Support Public Restrooms Bike Lockup

50

50

35 10

3 50

nasf

occ

35

30

Subtotal

Annex Program

Space Brewery & Public House Indoor Seating Kitchen and Production Outdoor Seating Educational/Multi-Use Small - Medium Classrooms Large Public Rooms Office Director's Office Staff/Volunteer Offices Staff Break/Multi-Use Support Public Restrooms Staff Storage Staff Restroom & Shower

QUANTITATIVE ELEMENTS asf count

sub-total

1,050

1

1,050

1,200

1

3,000

35

30

1,050

1

1,050

25 50

16 16

400 800

2 2

800 1,600

150 120 35

1 1 8

150 120 280

1 3 1

150 360 280

35 10 80

3 50 4

105 500 320

2 1 1

210 500 320 9,320

Subtotal

Service/Mechanical Program

Total area (Assuming 80% net/gross)

Poche Elevators/Stair Mechanical/Elec

inc below inc below inc below 11,650


QUALITATIVE ELEMENTS daylighting strategy

connected spaces

indoor/outdoor

gorge views?

street frontage?

ground floor/upper

n/a - outdoor

Farmer's Market Plaza Ampitheater, "Elemental Spaces" Farmer's Market Plaza Farmer's Market Plaza Farmer's Market Plaza

outdoor

indirect

ground floor or roof deck

outdoor outdoor outdoor outdoor

direct direct none none/indirect

Farmer's Market Plaza

outdoor

none

Industrial? Cascade/2nd/Indus trial None None None Cascade/2nd/Indus trial

n/a n/a n/a n/a

-

outdoor outdoor outdoor outdoor

n/a - outdoor

ground ground ground ground

floor floor or roof deck floor floor

ground floor

QUALITATIVE ELEMENTS

daylighting strategy

connected spaces

indoor/outdoor

gorge views?

street frontage?

ground floor/upper

ample - storefront and rollup doors some diffuse - clerestory + storefront

Farmer's Market Plaza, Maker's Workshop Vendor Stalls

indoor indoor

indirect none

partial - Cascade none

ground floor + mezzanines ground floor entrance

Vendor Stalls

indoor

indirect or none

partial-2nd

ground floor

ample - curtainwall ample - curtainwall minimal - none

Farmer's Market Plaza Farmer's Market Plaza Maker's Workshop

indoor indoor indoor

direct direct none

2nd/Cascade Cascade none

ground floor + 2nd floor ground floor + 2nd floor ground floor/below grade

ample - curtain wall

none

indoor

sweeping

2nd/Cascade

top floor (3-4)

minimal minimal

Farmer's Market Plaza Farmer's Market Plaza

indoor outdoor - covered

none none

none Industrial

various ground floor/below grade

daylighting strategy

connected spaces

QUALITATIVE ELEMENTS indoor/outdoor gorge views?

street frontage?

ground floor/upper

ample - rollup doors

outdoor seating/plaza

indoor

indirect

ground floor + mezzanine

diffuse - clerestory

indoor

none

n/a - outdoor

indoor seating indoor seating/Farmer's Market Plaza

Industrial Industrial - for delivery

outdoor - covered

indirect

Industrial

groundfloor & roof decks

ample - storefront ample - storefront

Farmer's Market Plaza Farmer's Market Plaza

indoor indoor

none none

2nd/Cascade 2nd/Cascade

ground floor + mezzanine ground floor + mezzanine

ample - punched ample - punched ample - punched

Staff/Volunteer Offices Staff areas Staff areas

indoor indoor indoor

indirect indirect indirect

none none none

upper floors (2-3) upper floors (2-3) upper floors (2-3)

minimal minimal minimal

Farmer's Market Plaza Staff Areas Staff Areas

indoor indoor indoor

none none none

none none none

various upper floors (2-3) upper floors (2-3)

n/a some - curtainwall none

all multi-story spaces Maker's Workshop

n/a both indoor

n/a indirect none

n/a none none

all various below grade/rooftop

ground floor/below grade


1 Ampitheater/Movie Screening This program element calls for the creation of an outdoor movie theater and event space for the community. The people of Hood River have had a long tradition of 8750 outdoor “drive in” movies. There is something romantic and casual about watching a movie on a late summer evening 750 in the orchards - this space will bring that notion into the urban context. The space will do a great deal in fostering the “living room for the6000 city” goal of this project, and will have considerable transparency with other major outdoor900spaces and plazas.

1875

5000

5000 SF

300 1875

1000

400

2 Farmer’s Market Plaza 8750 850 850 750 This is850 the largest in the program and is designed to handle the in850outdoor space 2500 flux of vendors during Saturday Farmer’s Market. It is outdoor, uncovered space 6000the putting up of tents and pavillions for the vendors. It has a that can facilitate 900 8750 would facilitate musical perfordirect transparency with the Ampitheater, which mances during the market hours. This is “spill-out” space from the permanent 750 vendor area,850 which is indoors and covered. 850

5000 1875 5000

5000 SF

300

1000

400

5000 850

6000

3 Water Space

5000 300

1000

850

5000 SF

2500

400

I consider the formative elements of the Gorge to be water, trees and mountains. 850 850 The water space of the project will8750 evoke the power of the water, in a symbolic space such as850 a reflecting pool. The space will be offset from one of the primary 5000 850 750 outdoor spaces as a place of introspection and quiet. 2500

1875

5000

6000

4 Wood Space

5000 SF

1875 300

1000

400

5000 5000 1000

spatial narratives

900

The green space is about 8750 the life giving force of the trees in the Northwest. Many a livelihood was850made on the forest, from the orchards to the Doug Fir logging 850 tracts around the city. The750 rendering and process of the wood will be evoked, as 850 850 well as the lifecycle - growth, death, and rebirth. 2500 6000

5000 SF

300

900

5 Rock Space

400

900

850 The 5000

850

final 850element in the trio of forces acting on the Gorge, is represented in a textural and monolithic sculpture gracing the open space(s) of the project. 850

2500


750 6000 6 Brewery/Public House 900

5000

5000 SF

300

1000

400

One of the project’s anchor tenants, Double Mountain Brewery, will provide a great service 850 to the Market in the form of a public house and “open brewery” on 850 the site. There will be a full breakfast/lunch/dinner menu in addition to micro850 850 on-site. The “open brewery” will boast daily “brewer’s tours” where brews made 2500 childrens 8750 and adults can learn and observe the process behind the beer. Open mic events, book readings, concerts, and televised sporting events will be some of the 750 types of activities found here.

5000

1875

5000

6000 5000 SF

300

1000

400

5000

850

850

850

850

7 900 Urban Lifestyle Studios Part of the mission of the market is to create an intimate and urban style of living into the downtown area. As such, four studios will be part of the project to bring density to Hood River’s small downtown and help subsidize the market’s operational costs. These highly desirable units will have unobscured Gorge views and 2500 enjoy the vibrant lifestyle created by the market. Small floorplans and highly sustainable amenities will reinforce the goal of the market as an engine for sustainability and reducing the footprint of urban life.

8 Daily Indoor Marketplace 8750 750 5000

6000 5000 SF

000

900

400 850

850

850

850

8750 5000

2500 750

000

6000 5000 SF

400 850

850

900

The heart of the project, the daily market place is a covered, heated, indoor yearround market for bringing “made and crafted” goods to market. In contrast to the production spaces of the market, most of the goods sold in this section are food-related. Some of the vendors are listed in the following pages. These are typically short-to-midterm tenants who either lack a brick and mortar presence in town or are trying to increase the reach of their product. Spatially, this part of the program will be able to “open up” to the outdoor Farmer’s Market Plaza on pleasant days.

9 Demonstration Kitchen As an amenity for patrons to the market, a full service demonstration kitchen will be included in the Daily Marketplace, to connect patrons with the food and process behind it. The space will be rentable during market hours for cooking classes taught by market vendors or the greater community.


10 Maker’s Workshop Anchors

1875

5000

6000 5000 SF

300

1000

400

5000

850

850

850

850

Spatially, these workshop spaces are about describing and illustrating the process behind the product. They are about celebrating the effort and care that goes into every pair of boots, or every beautiful line in the design of a new bicycle. As anchor tenants, these companies will be champions for craft - and that message 2500 will be heard loud and clear by other tenants and the public alike.

1875

118750Maker’s Workshop Pop-Ups

5000

6000 5000 SF

300

1000

400

5000

000

8750

6000

850

850 750 8750

850

850 750

5000 SF

000400 400

000

000

Two anchor tenants have been chosen to represent the Maker’s portion of the program. These companies, Danner Boots and Faraday Bikes, have been chosen as emmissaries of a level of craft, detail, and beauty that defines Northwest made goods. 8750 The profiles of both companies are included in the following pages. A juxtaposition of an age old trade with an innovative and techno-centric twist on a 750 one is indicative of the dichotomy that defines companies in Hood River classic - to fit in here you either seem to be rugged and classic or on the cutting edge of the future, and that is what these tenants are about. 900

900

6000 5000 SF

850

850

850 850

850 850

850

850

900

The750 large, open Maker’s workshop will house between 4 and 5 other companies in less developed stages of their business cycle. Pooling resources and elevating their craft in the presence of the public and their peers will help push the 900 envelope of their business and grow them to a more mature level, at which point they can move on and make way for the newest makers to follow.

12 Office Spaces 2500

A small staff and a director will comprise the team behind the Maker’s Market. They will handle the logistics of the market, including vendor coordination, accounts receivable, and event scheduling.

13 Educational/Multi-Use 2500 2500

Underlying every effort of the Maker’s Market is the continuation of generations of makers and doers. This mission is carried out in multi-use spaces provided in the program, where classes, lectures, and demonstrations can be held. The market staff will have a monthly program facilitating some of this, while the remainder can be infilled by local organizations.


KEY BREW = BREWERY EDU = MULTIPURPOSE CLASSROOM GRN = GREEN SPACE MKT = MARKETPLACE PED = PEDESTRIAN GREEN STREET PLZ = PLAZA OFF = OFFICE/SUPPORT WA = WATER SPACE WH = WAREHOUSE (MAKER’S SPACE)

GR

WA EDU

PED GRN PLZ

MKT WH BREW PED

spatial transparency

n

relative scale


Water Staged in the backdrop of the Columbia River Gorge, this project will understandably have a profound sustainable focus on the treatment, preservation, and usage of water. The primary strategies by which this project will seek to minimize its adverse impact on the local ecosystem will be: Bioswales - Stormwater runoff will be collected and diverted to perimeter bioswales. These deep organic filters will take graywater runoff from the project’s ample roof systems, and percolate them through organic filters before they reach the aquifers of the Columbia Gorge Watershed. These small “water gardens” will beautify the site and downtown area while providing a very functional purpose within the project. Pervious Paving - With plentiful on-site hardscaping, the project will seek to reduce the amount of runoff during rain events by employing a minimum of 75% pervious paving in all hardscaped areas. Using proprietary concrete products that are pourous in nature, the open spaces on the site will absorb water in all but the most severe rain events, allowing graywater to percolate harmlessly (and more slowly) into the ground rather than runoff into the Columbia or Hood Rivers. Graywater Treatment & Re-Use - Some of the graywater from the operations of the project will be harnessed and treated for re-use. As an example, the large amounts of water used in the brewing process at Double Mountain Brewery will be captured and treated for re-use in the public toilets and nonpotable water needs of the project.

Solar

sustainability goals & strategy

Free of the coastal cloud cover that impacts Portland and other cities close to the Pacific Ocean, Hood River enjoys more sun-days than many other towns in Oregon. Appropriately, solar capture strategies will be employed in the project, pending site shadow analysis and ROI calculations. The north side of the site may be apt for positioning of photovoltaic arrays, as it is free of the Oak Street building shadows, as would a built structure over Cascade or Industrial streets (see Sant Antoni Market precedent).


Wind Wind Power - Studies done in response to building integrated wind turbines have indicated that optimum locations for wind collection as a power sourcing strategy may not be as high as previously thought, making the possibility for application on a low-rise project such as this one possible Wind power applications will be studied thoroughly to determine their viability for this project. Wind Shelter - Schematic design is the first step in optimizing a building for sustainable performance. While wind can be a boon in the Gorge, it can also be a nuisance. Because of the outdoor nature of much of the program in this project, great care will be taken to analyze prevailing wind patterns and structure the building masses in such a way that the wind does not become disruptive to the project.

Materiality Building materials will be selected to reflect the character and history of the town, while maintaining a modern response and a delicate impact on the environment. Zero VOC paint, locally harvested lumber, and recycled fiber insulation will be some of the strategies implemented in the construction of the project.

Usage Patterns Low-Usage Appliances & Fixtures - All water-using appliances in the project will conform to the highest standards of conservation, or will employ automatic shutoff mechanisms to reduce usage. LED light sources, or high efficiency fluorescents will be used in all lighting applications. Fixtures will include timers, motion sensors, and automatic shutoffs to reduce electrical usage. Utility Monitoring- A tenant utility monitoring screen will be accessible in a common area of the project. This concept, employed in Portland’s EcoFlats development on N Williams street, has been shown to encourage positive usage patterns and discourage wastefulness.


anchor tenant - craft danner


Danner, a maker of hand crafted boots and accessories, has been selected as an anchor tenant for the project. Their line of footwear epitomizes the dedication to craft and quality, in a product targeted to hardworking men and women of the Northwest. Founded in 1932, by relatives of the Jensen’s, Danner’s rise to success closely paralleled that of Luhr Jensen and Sons, with roots in the Great Depression and a close following of die-hard supporters throughout the Northwest. A major breakthrough came for Danner when they were selected for an exclusive contract to provide boots for the United States Special Forces branches of the military, a contract they still hold today. The comfort and durability of their boots, for decades a hallmark of the company, had finally earned them international respect. Danner now enjoys a resurgence of success, with their fashionable Stumptown line, and is well poised for their next venture - the “Gorge” line - a line of boots and apparel hand-made in their Hood River Maker’s Market flagship, and constructed for the rigorous demands of the hardworking people of the Columbia Gorge.


anchor tenant - food & bev. double mountain brewery


Beer entrenched itself in the culture of the Northwest firmly in 1862 when Henry Weinhard started his brewing empire in NW Portland, and the rest was history. Now Portland proudly boasts itself as Beer Capital of the USA, and is home to the largest concentration of craft breweries in the United States. Nearby Hood River has a lively craft brewing scene of its own, and arguably the most current rising star is Double Mountain Brewery. Currently located two blocks from the Railyard Overlook site, and across the street from the larger and nationally known Full Sail Brewery, Double Mountain has outgrown its current location in a former automotive garage purchased from Dave Jensen in the 1990’s, and is looking for a flagship location that will anchor their presence in Hood River while they focus on growing their business and bringing their distinctive and bold brews to new markets around the Northwest. The Hood River Maker’s Market is proud to host Double Mountain as their featured destination for food and drink.


anchor tenant - innovation faraday bikes


A hit at the 2011 Oregon Manifest design competition and chosen as the People’s Choice Winner, the Faraday Porteur bike is a success story of entrepreneurial vision, design, and high-tech innovation. The brainchild of Portland native and IDEO designer Adam Vollmer, the Faraday bike is an electric assist utility bike that evokes classic styling and reinvents the very notion of bicycle commuting. Designed to be suitable for even the rigorous hills of San Francisco (not unlike the steep grades found in Hood River, OR), the bike provides the user hours of electric assist to make commuting up and down hills a breeze. Integrating advanced technology including high powered lithium batteries, integral LED headlights, and an iOS/bluetooth connection that provides users up to date information on route and power info, the bike is exactly the type of high design and innovation that has found its home in the Gorge. Faraday has recently decided to relocate its operations back to the Northwest from San Francisco, and the Hood River Maker’s Market will be an ideal design/fabrication labratory and small retail outlet for its bicycles.


Turtle Island Foods, Inc Creators of the Tofurky line of meatless substitute foods, Turtle Island has recently moved its headquarters to Hood River in what was a major influx of jobs and industry for the town. As part of their community outreach and increasing interest in the vegetarian health movement, Turtle Island will maintain a full time presence at the marketplace to hand out product samples, coupons, and promotions.

Juanita’s Fine Foods, Inc One of the first three Mexican families to move to Hood River in 1937, the Juanita’s company was born from a lack of authentic hispanic foods (especially tortillas) in the Hood River Valley, an area that was becoming home to many Mexican workers in the orchards. By 1977 the Juanita’s brand was formed and has since become a major name in the valley and a supplier for many Northwest restaurants. Juanita’s will serve and sell its goods in the Maker’s Market the original way - face to face in a local setting.

Draper Girls Country Farm

other notable food vendors

A mainstay of the Portland Farmer’s market scene, Draper Girls is known regionally for their highest quality orchard products and ciders. Without a proper venue to bringing their goods to market on a regular basis in Hood River, the Draper Girls Country Farm has relied on a weekly presence in the PSU and Hillsboro Farmers markets. No longer - with the creation of the Hood River Maker’s Market, Draper Girls will be the ambassador for Hood River produce in a local venue.


Boy’s Fort With roots as a holiday pop-up shop in Downtown Portland’s Galleria, a warm reception of Boy’s Fort and their highly curated collection of made goods and “gentleman chic” has created a following and led to a permanent home in NE Portland for the company. With plans to still “pop-up” in Portland and dazzle design-hungry shoppers with their ability to transform raw spaces into a wonderland of goods, Boy’s Fort will be a welcome short - mid term tenant in the Maker’s Workshop space of the Market.

Bloke Botanical designer Justin Waddell parlayed a career in interior design in Montana into Portland-based Bloke, a design and lifestyle shop that creates inspired natural arrangements for any space. With a client list that reads as a who’s-who of Portland’s creative elite, Bloke’s work is as inspiring to watch be made as it is to have in your home. The success garnered by Bloke has led to plans for expansion, and with a workshop that is an eyecatching amalgamation of all things living, as well as found and reclaimed objects, it would be a welcome addition to the Maker’s Workshop.

Hammer + Hand Furniture

other notable makers

Hammer and Hand is a well known Portland and Seattle based design firm focusing on innovative and intricately crafted design-built spaces. The force behind a number of Portland’s most notable residences, restaurants, and interiors, they are known for their dedication to the finest details. Many of their works feature custom furniture pieces - with the addition of the Hammer + Hand Furniture studio in the Maker’s Market, they can bring their custom pieces to a higher level of design and introduce them to the retail market.


1 Archiplanet. (2011, April 29). Archiplanet. Retrieved December 3, 2012, from Milwaukee Public Market, Milwaukee, Wisconsin: http://www.archiplanet.org/ wiki/Milwaukee_Public_Market,_Milwaukee,_Wisconsin This website describes the construction of the Milwaukee Public Market, a design precedent for this project, as a public indoor/outdoor market with a culinary focus, in a historic marketplace district in Wisconsin. 2 City of Milwaukee. (2012). Milwaukee Public Market. Retrieved December 3, 2012, from www.milwaukeepublicmarket.org The official website for the Milwaukee Public market, this source was used for diagrams, photographs and vendor descriptions of the Market, as well as a virtual tour. 3 Danner. (2012). Retrieved December 3, 2012, from Danner: www.danner.com The official website of Danner was used to learn about the company’s history, fabrication process, and to source photographs for the vendor description in this report. 4 Double Mountain Brewery. (2012). Retrieved December 3, 2012, from Double Mountain Brewery & Taproom: www.doublemountainbrewery.com The official website of Double Mountain Brewery was used to learn about the company’s history, brewing process, and to source photographs for the vendor description in this report.

works cited

5 Draper Girls. (n.d.). Draper Girls Country Farm. Retrieved December 2012, 2012, from About - The Draper Girls: http://www.drapergirlscountryfarm.com/about. html The official website of Draper Girls Country Farm was used to learn about the company’s history, growing process, and to source photographs for the vendor description in this report. 6 Dundas, Z. (2012, June). The Saturday Market Project. Retrieved December 3, 2012, from ADX: Portland’s Shared Workshop: http://saturdaymarketproject. com/2012/06/adx-portlands-shared-workspace/ A blog analysis of ADX, discussing the membership model, interviews with the ADX team, and theory and analysis about the role of ADX-type business models in a future-oriented economy.


7

Faraday Bikes. (2012). Faraday Bikes. Retrieved December 3, 2012, from www. faradaybikes.com The official website of Faraday Bikes was used to learn about the company’s history, design process, and to source photographs for the vendor description in this report.

8

Ford Building PDX. (2012). Retrieved October 14, 2012, from Ford Building PDX: www.fordbuildingpdx.com This website describes the conceptualization and implementation of a development in Portland known as the Ford Building, an adaptive re-use of a historic masonry industrial building into a diverse creative studio environment for 80+ creative businesses and startups.

9

Gerald, P. (2011, January 18). Neighborhood Notes. Retrieved December 3, 2012, from ADX: Portland’s Collaborative Art, Design Facility Fits New, Artisanal, Skills-Based Economy: http://www.neighborhoodnotes.com/news/2011/01/ adx_portlands_collaborative_art_design_facility_fits_new_artisanal_skillsbased_economy/ A blog analysis of ADX, discussing the membership model, interviews with the ADX team, and theory and analysis about the role of ADX-type business models in a future-oriented economy.

10 Goula, A. (2012, June 19). Archdaily. Retrieved December 5, 2012, from Sant Antoni Sunday Market / Ravetllat Ribas Architects: http://www.archdaily. com/245559/sant-antoni-sunday-market-ravetllat-ribas-architects/ A project overview of an outdoor market pavillion in Barcelona Spain. This site was used to source pictures and information for use as a precedent/site response for a potential way of treating the streets that interact with the site. 11 IDEO. (2012). IDEO. Retrieved December 3, 2012, from Building the Ultimate Utility Bike for Oregon Manifest: http://www.ideo.com/work/faraday-bike/ An article on IDEO’s website describing the conception of the Faraday Bike as a competition entrant for the Oregon Manifest Competition. Used for research supporting the choice of the company as an anchor tenant. 12 Jensen, C. (2012, November 11). November 11 Site Visit. Hood River, OR, USA. I conducted a site visit on November 11 to document the Railyard Overlook site and conduct contextual research.


13 Jensen, C. (2012, October 13). October 13 Site Visit. Hood River, OR, USA. I traveled to Hood River to document the existing downtown and waterfront conditions and perform initial site selection. I initially chose a waterfront marina site but later revised the decision due to contextual forces. 14 Jensen, D. (2012, October 13). “History of Hood River”. (C. Jensen, Interviewer) On my first site visit, I interviewed my grandfather, Dave Jensen, about the history of the downtown area. He is the owner of the building and land I have selected for my project, as well as the current or previous owner of much of the surrounding context. 15 IDEO. (2012). IDEO. Retrieved December 3, 2012, from Building the Ultimate Utility Bike for Oregon Manifest: http://www.ideo.com/work/faraday-bike/ An article on IDEO’s website describing the conception of the Faraday Bike as a competition entrant for the Oregon Manifest Competition. Used for research supporting the choice of the company as an anchor tenant for the Market. 16 Jewell, J. (2008). Moon Travel Guides. Retrieved December 4, 2012, from Hood River: http://www.moon.com/destinations/oregon/columbia-river-gorge/hoodriver A map indicating major points of interest in the Downtown Hood River area was sourced from this website to support the site introduction.

works cited

17 Juanita’s Fine Foods. (2006). Juanita’s Fine Foods. Retrieved December 3, 2012, from Family History: www.juanitasfinefoods/famhist.cfm The official website of Juanita’s Fine Foods was used to learn about the company’s history, production process, and to source photographs for the vendor description in this report. 18 Keith, K. (2012, April 25). Portland’s Beam and Anchor. Retrieved October 14, 2012, from Dwell: http://www.dwell.com/articles/Portlands-Beam--Anchor.html This article features a unique manufacturing/retail environment in NE Portland that serves as one of the precedents for this project. It inspires my idea of a co-working environment where artisans and entrepreneurs make and sell their work in a “community capitalism” inspired model.


19 Lascher, B. (2012, August). Instant Cool (Just Add Tools). Portland Monthly Magazine , p. 36. This article in a local periodical spurred the research into the Portland Made/ADX collaboration which eventually became a precedent for this project. It featured three made-goods products that were brought to market through ADX. 20 Manuelli, S. (2006). Design for Shopping. New York: Abbeville Press. This book features a selection of modern projects that highlight innovative retail design and merchandising strategies, from an architectural standpoint. It will be used as a reference to make design decisions regarding the retail components of the project. 21 PIE PDX. (2012). PIE. Retrieved October 14, 2012, from PIE PDX: www.piepdx. com PIE, or Portland Incubator Experiment, is a Wieden+Kennedy sponsored technology incubator in Portland Oregon. I researched it to see if there could be carryover to a more “blue collar” incubator, which is part of the idea of this project. 22 Port of Hood River. (2007-2012). Port of Hood River. Retrieved October 12, 2012, from Port of Hood River: www.portofhoodriver.com Information about the existing condition, history, and future development goals of the Hood River Marina & Waterfront. 23 Portland Made. (2012). Portland Made Local Goods Collective. Retrieved December 3, 2012, from www.portlandmade.com The official website of Portland Made was used to learn about the project’s history, clients/companies represented, and to source photographs for the ADX precedent in this report. 24 Rahm, R. (2012). Beam and Anchor. Retrieved October 10, 2012, from Beam And Anchor: www.beamandanchor.com The official website of Beam & Anchor was used to learn about the company’s history, collaborative work process, and to source photographs for the precedent analysis in this report.


25 Robbins, L. (2012, October 28th). Kings of a Small Batch Empire in Brooklyn. New York Times . This article is about the Brooklyn Flea, a pop-up market in NYC that is one of the precedents inspiring my ideas about community capitalism and how to shape the marketplace component of the program. 26 Sardar, Z. (2012, October 13). “Maker’s Mark”. Dwell , pp. 88-92. This short article in Dwell Magazine described a creative incubator experiment where artists were given short-term residency and exclusive retail rights to a space in exchange for a percentage of profits and the rights to integrate their product line into the director’s brand of goods. 27 Various. (2012, October 12). Coworking. Retrieved October 14, 2012, from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coworking A general, high-level overview of the concept of co-working and its origins. Researched for relevance to a “community capitalism” model in the Maker’s Marketplace. 28 Various. (2012). Historic Hood River. Retrieved October 1, 2012, from Historic Hood River: www.historichoodriver.com Various historic imagery collected for use in developing an understanding of the forces, context, and history behind the town of Hood River.

works cited

29 Various. (2012, December 4). Wikipedia. Retrieved December 4, 2012, from Hood River, OR: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hood_River,_Oregon A general overview of the town of Hood River used for demographic information in the regional overview section. 30 Webber, A. (2011, December 11). Kevin Cavanaugh is back with a new idea for food carts. Daily Journal of Commerce. This article is about local developer Kevin Cavanaugh, whom I researched to learn about some of his innovative mixed use development concepts to see if there was relevance for this project. 31 Whitelegg, D. (2002). From Market Stalls to Restaurant Row: The Recent Transformation of Exmouth Market. London Journal, 27 (2) , 94. This article is an analysis and critique of the Exmouth Market in London, touching on the social impacts of the restoration of an historic public market.


appendices

complete zoning requirements c2 general commercial

precedents

Beam & Anchor - Portland OR ADX/Portland Made - Portland OR Milwaukee Public Market - Milwaukee WI Brooklyn Flea - New York, NY Sant Antoni Market - Barcelona, Spain


17.03.050 General Commercial Zone (C-2)

complete zoning requirements c-2 general commercial

A. Permitted Uses. 1. Rooming and boarding houses 2. Home occupations 3. Bed and breakfast 4. Family day care 5. Residential care facility 6. Group residential, if less than 15 persons 7. Transportation facilities pursuant to 17.20.050(A) 8. Accessory dwelling units B. Permitted Uses Subject to Site Plan Review. 1. Commercial uses 2. Industrial uses incidental and essential to an on-site commercial use (Refer to the section below, “K�) 3. Change of use 4. Parking lots of four (4) or more spaces, new or expanded, and or the equivalent of paving equal to four (4) or more parking spaces 5. Multi-family dwellings subject to: a) 11 units/net acre. 6. Group residential, if fifteen (15) or more persons 7. Transportation facilities pursuant to 17.20.050(B) 8. Professional Office and Office Uses. C. Conditional Uses. 1. Residential uses, excluding multi-family, subject to the following: a) shall be reviewed through the Planned Unit Development (PUD) process; b) PUD common open space criterion is not applicable; and c) shall achieve a minimum of 11 units/net acre. 2. Residential uses a minimum of 11 units/acre in conjunction with commercial uses on the same lot or parcel. 3. Hospitals, sanitariums, rest homes, nursing or convalescent home 4. Schools and day care facilities 5 Public parks, playgrounds, and related facilities 6. Utility or pumping substations 7. Churches 8. Commercial Uses on parcels of more than 1.5 acres. 9. Public facilities and uses 10. Hostels


D. Site Development Requirements. 1. Minimum Lot Area: None. 2. Minimum Frontage: a. Fifty (50) feet on a dedicated public street or b. Thirty (30) feet on a public dedicated cul-de-sac. E. Setback Requirements. The minimum setback requirements shall be as follows: 1. Front - not required. 2. Side and rear - not required except in the case where the structure is adjacent to a residential zone, in which case a three (3) foot setback is required for structures up to two (2) stories, and increased one (1) foot for each additional story above two (2) stories. F. Maximum Building Height. 1. Thirty-five (35) feet for residential use. 2. Forty-five (45) feet for commercial use or for mixed commercial and residential use. 3. No commercial structure shall exceed a height of forty-five (45) feet. G. Parking Regulations. 1. One (1) off-street parking space shall be provided on the building site, or adjacent to the site for each employee. In addition, adequate off-street parking shall be provided on or adjacent to the building site to meet the needs of anticipated clientele. 2. In no case shall there be less than two (2) off-street parking spaces. 3. The Central Business District, the Heights Business District and the Waterfront are exempt from this requirement but shall pay a fee in-lieu of parking in accordance with Chapter 17.24. 4. Parking in the Central Business District, Heights Business District and Waterfront may be satisfied by substituting all or some of the parking requirement at adjacent or nearby off-site off-street locations and/or by adjacent or nearby shared parking if the substitute parking reasonably satisfies the parking requirements of this section. If no off-street or off-site parking reasonably satisfies the parking requirements of this section, the fee in-lieu of parking shall be paid in accordance with Chapter 17.24. If less than all required parking is provided, the fee in lieu of parking shall be paid in accordance with Chapter 17.24, except that a credit shall be given for the number of spaces provided. 5. All parking areas and driveways shall be hard surfaced prior to occupancy, under the following circumstances: a. New construction b. Change of use c. New parking area 6. All residential uses shall comply with the off-street parking standards as follows, unless exempt above: a. All individual dwelling units, duplexes, and triplexes shall be provided with two (2) parking spaces for each unit on the building site, one (1) of which may be within the required front yard setback area. b. Multi-family dwellings shall be required to furnish one and one-half (1½) off-street parking spaces per dwelling unit on or adjacent to the building site. c. Required setback areas may be utilized for off-street parking for multi-family dwellings. d. Parking spaces utilizing access from a public dedicated alley may be located within the setback areas.


e. Off-street loading facilities shall be encouraged. Public alleys may be utilized for off-street loading facilities. 7. Bicycle parking as required by 17.20.040. H. Lighting. Artificial lighting shall be subdued and shall not shine, cause glare, or be unnecessarily bright on surrounding properties. Both interior and exterior lighting shall take into consideration the viewshed and shall be dimmed as much as possible after closing without compromising safety and security. Flood lights on poles higher than fifteen (15) feet shall not be permitted. I. Signs. All signs shall be in conformance with the sign regulations in this title. J. Landscaping. All landscaping shall be in conformance with the landscaping standards in this title. K. Manufacturing. Manufacture or assembly of goods is a permitted use, provided such manufacturing or assembly is within or contiguous to a permitted commercial use. The retail sales and the commercial character shall be the prominent use. The goods manufactured and/or assembled shall be sold on a retail basis out of the commercial use which is the storefront for such sale. All uses shall meet the following standards: 1. Any use, or portion thereof, causing noise shall be performed in such a manner as not to create a nuisance or hazard on any adjacent property. 2. Any use, or portion thereof, causing vibration shall be performed in such a manner as not to create a nuisance or hazard on adjacent property. 3. Any operation producing intense heat or glare shall be performed in such a manner as not to create a nuisance or hazard on adjacent property. 4. There shall be no emission of odorous, toxic, noxious matter, or dust in such quantities as to be readily detectable at any point along or outside property lines so as to produce a public nuisance or hazard. 5. If the retail and industrial uses are housed in separate buildings on the site, the industrial building shall be equal to or less in size to the commercial building. 6. In the case of two or more separate buildings, the one closest to the public dedicated street must retain a retail storefront and a pedestrian-friendly character. New construction or major renovations shall achieve this standard through use of the following design elements: a. Major renovations are considered any activity on the exterior of a building that exceeds ten percent (10%) of the structure’s cost or fair market value or $75,000, whichever is more, as determined by the building official. b. The building entrance shall be oriented toward the primary street, whenever physically possible. c. Off-street parking or driveways shall not be placed between the building and the primary street, whenever physically possible. d. The retail storefront shall utilize regularly spaced and similarly shaped windows with window hoods or trim. e. The retail storefront shall have large display windows on the ground floor and shall be framed by bulkheads, piers, and a storefront cornice. f. For properties located within the Downtown Local Historic District, refer to the District’s Design Guidelines. L. Commercial buildings between 25,000 square feet and 50,000 square feet. No new buildings shall exceed a combined contiguous length of three hundred (300) feet; nor shall any one building exceed a footprint of 50,000 square feet. Any building or contiguous group of buildings which exceed these limitations and which were in existence prior to the effective date of this ordinance may expand up to ten percent (10%) in area or length beyond their original area or length. Neither the gross


square footage nor combined contiguous building length, as set forth in this section, shall be changed by a variance. The following standards shall apply to buildings or a group of buildings on one (1) site over 25,000 square feet in size: 1. Buildings shall have an entrance for pedestrians directly from the street to the building interior. This entrance shall be designed to be attractive and functional and shall be open to the public during all business hours. Public sidewalks shall be provided adjacent to a public street along the entire street frontage. 2. Building facades greater than one hundred (100) feet in length shall have offsets, jogs, or other architectural distinctive changes. 3. Any wall which is within thirty (30) feet of the street, plaza, or other public open space shall contain at least twenty percent (20%) of the wall area facing the street in display areas, windows, or doorways. Windows must allow views into working areas or lobbies, pedestrian entrances, or display areas. Blank walls within thirty (30) feet of the street are prohibited. Up to forty percent (40%) of the length of the building perimeter, with the exception of the side facing the street, is exempt from this standard if facing toward loading or service areas. 4. A building shall be setback not more than twenty (20) feet from a public sidewalk unless the area is used for pedestrian activities such as plazas or outside eating areas. If more than one structure is proposed for a site, at least twenty-five percent (25%) of the aggregate building frontage shall be within twenty (20) feet of the sidewalk. 5. Developments shall divide large building masses into heights and sizes that relate to human scale by incorporating changes in building mass or direction, sheltering roofs, a distinct pattern of divisions on surfaces, windows, trees, and small scale lighting. 6. One street tree chosen from the street tree list shall be placed along the perimeter of the parcel fronting the street for each thirty (30) feet of frontage for that portion of the development facing the street. 7. Landscaping shall be designed so that fifty percent (50%) coverage occurs after one year from the date the certificate of occupancy is issued and ninety percent (90%) landscaping coverage occurs after five (5) years from the date the certificate of occupancy is issued. 8. Parking areas shall be shaded on the interior and exterior by deciduous trees, buffered from adjacent non-residential uses, and screened from residential uses. The appearance of a “sea of asphalt� shall be avoided. 9. A ratio of one (1) tree for each seven (7) parking spaces shall be required to create a canopy effect. The trees shall be an appropriate large, canopied shade tree and/or a conifer. 10. Landscaped areas shall be substantially evenly distributed throughout the parking area and parking perimeter.


program precedent beam & anchor, PDX


The brainchild of husband and wife team Jocelyn and Robert Rahm, Beam & Anchor is at the heart of Portland’s “community capitalism” movement. It is a reclaimed industrial space located in Portland’s inner NE Industrial area, home to breweries, manufacturing, and storage warehouses. Inside, a carefully crafted interior houses retail on the ground floor, curated in a “living room” style showroom floor, while upstairs the making of goods occurs in an open-plan work space that has been partitioned to house the needs of craftspersons ranging from seamstresses to boat builders. Common spaces such as a kitchen and lounge space are shared, and frequent events and cocktail parties are thrown to promote the goods and efforts of the artisans in a communal setting.


program precedent ADX/portland made


ADX, which stands for “art+design+PDX” has garnered quite the buzz in the Portland community for its unique take on community capitalism and bringing made goods to market. Conceived as a production space that works on a membership model, allowing members to purchase small work spaces and take advantage of shared equipment, storage, and utilities, the project has since grown to include a broader understanding of what is possible within such a model. Portland Made, an extension of ADX, now focuses on bringing and marketing goods made within the shop, and creating actual economies from the ideas generated at ADX. Says the owner, “[ADX] is a perfect diagram of where I’d hope our economy is headed, which is people having the ability to come together and do their thing but also do it in a much smarter and more efficient way by sharing tools and resources.”


architectural precedent milwaukee public market Kubala Washatko


One of the latest in a wave of public food markets sweeping the nation, the Milwaukee Public Market in Milwaukee Wisconsin was built in 2005 in the city’s historic Third Ward district, bringing a contemporary presence to an area that was for decades a hub of market activity. Like many successful markets, the MPM honors the historic warehousing and merchandising context of its site and revitalizes the buildings and blocks surrounding it. Thwarting the challenging Wisconsin weather as a covered and heated building, the market is focused on maximizing its offerings yearround. It’s aim is to “[foster] a way of life that was never lost in Europe.” Architecturally, the diagram at right demonstrates how the market creates internal retail alleys to create a narrow and meandering shopping experience for pedestrians. The plan maximizes the number of entries from various streets, making the market a point of gravitation for the surrounding district.


social precedent brooklyn flea, NYC


Created by New Yorkers Eric Demby and Jonathan Butler, both of whom renounced successful careers in more “traditional” fields, the Brooklyn Flea is a collection of some of the nations largest public flea markets that occurs in various locations around the Brooklyn bourough of New York City. The market has been lauded for its ability to “provide an alternative to big-box retail that embodies a private sector spirit while yielding generous public benefits,” and was awarded the 2009 Certificate of Merit from the Municipal Art Society. More a logistical exercise than a brick and mortar precedent, the Brooklyn Flea serves as inspiration for the ways that it draws people together on grand public stages (the inside of ornate classical buildings, as well as the sprawling views of the Hudson river waterfront, to name a few) to exchange goods and services. In this way it has become an “exceptional contribution to the life of New York City” as I too envision my project will be for Hood River.


architectural precedent sant antoni market Ravetllat-Ribas


The Sant Antoni Market, by Ravetllat-Ribas Architects, is a permanent outdoor pavillion for a once-weekly (Sunday) market in Barcelona, Spain. Designed as a temporary solution to provide space for the weekly market while it’s intended location was refurbished, the covered street pavillion was a “reversible solution” to the problem of housing the market. It seemed logical to the architects, as the street it covers is already closed on Sundays for the market, so by providing an overhead canopy, the space could be better utilized. During the week the street is open to traffic and the 4.5 meter clearance of the canopy does not interfere with any of the traffic that passes through the urban area, as allowed by code. The roof structure contains the drive mechanisms for retractable panels that allow the structure to open up and “breathe” during non-market days, or close to provide more cover for vendors on Sundays.


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