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Ten
Tips
and
Tricks
for
Purchasing
a
Violin
 


When
buying
a
violin
it
is
crucial
to
know
what
to
look
for
in
an
instrument.


This
blog
will
provide
ten
tips
and
tricks
for
picking
out
a
great
violin
no
matter
 your
level
of
playing.
 Preparing
Yourself
 


Before
you
even
try
a
violin,
make
sure
that
you
bring
two
people
with
you


(no
more
and
no
less)
to
get
a
couple
second
opinions.
It
is
crucial
if
at
least
one
of
 the
people
that
you
bring
is
a
musician,
preferably
a
string
player.
When
walking
 into
a
store
make
sure
you
have
a
set
budget
and
have
calculated
the
tax
costs
as
 well,
since
taxes
can
add
a
few
hundred
dollars
to
your
budget.
Secondly,
try
as
 many
violins
within
your
budget,
however,
it
is
crucial
to
never
look
at
the
price
so
 that
the
price
tag
does
not
sway
your
opinion.
Furthermore,
it
is
extremely
 important
to
use
your
own
bow
because
you
want
to
concentrate
on
the
instrument
 itself,
not
a
strange
bow
you
are
using,
therefore,
as
much
familiarity
with
other
 things,
such
as
a
bow
is
important.

 Checking
the
Technicalities
 


Before
playing
a
violin
that
you
are
interested
in
purchasing,
make
sure
to


check
that
the
bridge
does
not
sit
too
high
so
that
the
strings
are
floating
too
high
 above
the
fingerboard,
but
also,
make
sure
that
the
bridge
is
not
sitting
too
low
so
 that
the
strings
are
hugging
the
fingerboard.
Furthermore,
if
the
strings
feel
too
 close
together
when
playing,
make
sure
to
check
to
see
if
the
bridge
is
curved
as
it
 should
be.
If
you
have
doubts
about
the
bridge,
it
never
hurts
to
ask
the
store
to
 change
out
the
bridge
on
the
violin,
for
the
bridge
is
not
a
permanent
attribute
of
the



violin.
Furthermore,
make
sure
that
the
pegs
on
the
violin
move
easily,
but
do
not
 slip;
again,
this
is
something
that
the
store
can
change
or
fix.

 The
Choosing
Process
 


When
trying
to
find
the
right
violin
for
you,
the
best
approach
is
to
start


playing
all
the
violins
in
the
selection.
If
one
violin
just
does
not
feel
right
or
has
too
 shallow
of
a
tone,
immediately
discard
it
from
the
selection.
Furthermore,
when
 choosing
a
violin
there
are
many
attributes
that
are
important
to
look
for,
such
as:
 large
projection
and
sound,
clear
and
even
tone
(make
sure
that
the
tone
and
 projection
from
the
g‐string
to
the
e‐string
are
balanced),
no
rattling
noises,
and,
 most
importantly,
that
the
violin
feels
good
under
the
fingers.
Furthermore,
when
 playing
the
violin
it
is
important
to
make
sure
that
the
g‐string,
the
lowest
string,
 has
power
and
does
not
sound
scratchy
and
that
the
e‐string,
the
highest
string,
 does
not
sound
scratchy,
but
clear
and
smooth.
If
you
pay
close
attention
to
these
 attributes
it
will
be
easy
to
discard
many
violins.

 
 The
Second
Opinions
 


After
you
have
discarded
many
of
the
violins
and
are
down
to
three
to
five


violins,
it
is
time
to
consider
the
opinion
of
others.
The
most
effective
way
to
 accomplish
this
is
to
have
your
friends
or
family
stand
outside
of
the
room
or
turn
 their
back
so
they
cannot
see
the
instrument
you
are
playing.
Furthermore,
make
 sure
you
play
music
that
you
already
know,
so
that
mistakes
are
not
the
main
focus
 of
listening.
By
doing
this,
people
will
be
able
to
give
an
honest,
non‐biased,
opinion
 of
which
violin
sounds
better.
Furthermore,
if
you
have
another
violinist
accompany



you,
ask
them
to
play
the
violins
for
you
in
the
same
manner,
so
that
you
can
hear
 the
difference,
yourself.
The
last
tip
to
consider
is
the
violin’s
flexibility
in
musical
 styles.
For
instance,
many
violins
have
beautiful
soft
or
deep
tones,
however,
you
 must
consider
if
they
work
for
every
musical
style,
such
as,
baroque
versus
 romantic,
etc.
The
most
ideal
violin
has
power,
brightness,
yet
can
sound
smooth.
By
 following
this
process,
you
should
be
able
to
select
which
violin
you
like
the
most.

 Meet
the
Author
 My
name
is
Colette
Campo
and
I
have
been
a
musician
for
thirteen
years.
I
 started
playing
the
violin
when
I
was
in
fourth
grade
and
have
been
taking
private
 lessons
since.
I
have
played
in
various
orchestras,
youth
symphonies,
and
 community
symphonies.
Furthermore,
I
have
performed
professionally
with
groups
 such
as
the
Gary
Bonner
Singers
and
the
Corona
Symphony.

 As
a
musician
and
violinist
for
over
a
decade,
I
have
massive
experience
in
 the
care
and
knowledge
of
the
anatomy
of
violins.
For
example,
I
have
been
taught
 and
trained
in
the
process
of
choosing
an
instrument,
cleaning
an
instrument,
 choosing
a
bow
and
have
a
lot
of
knowledge,
experience,
and
training
in
the
care
and
 understanding
of
the
violin.

 As
a
musician,
I
understand
the
importance
of
having
a
good
instrument
and
 the
need
to
understand
the
proper
care
technique
and
anatomy
of
ones
instrument,
 therefore,
this
blog
is
available
to
anyone
who
may
have
questions
or
anyone
who
is
 need
of
guidance
on
any
instrument
care
or
selection.
I
am
more
than
experienced
 in
these
areas
and
am
happy
to
share
my
experience
and
knowledge
to
others!
 


Buzz Piece  

that
the
strings
are
hugging
the
fingerboard.
Furthermore,
if
the
strings
feel
too
 
 When
buying
a
violin
it
is
crucial
to
know
what
to
loo...

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