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Dr. Mar quardt In Dr. Marquardt were combined the virtues of h is n a­ tive and of his adopt ive country. H e was typically German i n his painstaking thoroughnes , his scorn of superficiality, his pat ient endu rance of a grinding routine, i n the tenacity with which h e held to what he believed to be r ight and the fide 1 ity with which he discharged every known d uty. B ut, though born and bred i n the north of Germany, he had l ittle sympathy with the m il itaristic and imperiali tic ideals of P russia ; and with his bride h e early sought the privileges that America offered. And more keenly than the average native American he a ppreciated and enj oyed the freedom of life and breadth of opportunity w hich this count ry af­ fords. H e was proud to be an American citizen ; and when "America" was cal led for h e could sing i t l u stily straight through to the end and quite put to shame some of us na­ tives who are apt to falter and fall out on the later stanzas. To him ours was the " Sweet land of liberty ; " and he was one of its "noble free." I n politics, religion, a n d a l l o f life h e was an i ndependent, i m patient o f all c ramping d ogmas ; yet q uick to respond to sentiment. Who of us that knew him can forget the l i gh t i n his eyes and the m u ic in h is voice as he recited from his favorite German poet ? N ot only was D r . M a rquardt master of his own native language and literatu re, b ut he had also a quite remarkable command of the E nglish language, and was quick to detect and prone to criticise any sli pshod use of i t by us to whom it i s our m other-tongue. It a fforded h i m distinct satisfac­ tion t o be able to correct his student 's bl unders i n E nglish expression. D r . M a rquardt was a born teacher. He made the c lassroom exercise so a ll-absorbing that the problem of discipline, in the narrow sense of the word, rarely a rose. His happy tempering of sternness and strictness w ith flashes of p ungent wit and h umor saved him from the unhappy experiences that so many foreigners have when they undertake to teach our young barbarians. That same whimsical play of wit made a speech from " Dutchy" an in­ dispensable featu re of Colby N ight . Perhaps few of us realized the sleep­ l ess nights those speeches cost him before and after : before i n pondering what he would say, and after i n mourning over those "best points" that he forgot to bring out. What will Colby N ight be without him ? A n d what will Heaven be to h i m without his bel oved Colby c lassroom and campus-a n d California ? H e loved Colby and wa devotedly loyal to all her i nterests. H e loved his students and was intensely interested in t heir interests and enterprises. H e held i n memory and i n his affection a l l the s o n s and d a u ghters o f C o l b y w h o m h e h a d known i n his thi rty-five years of service, and watched ever with pleasure and with pride their suc­ cesses. And who can estimate his contribution to those successes, or count u p t h ose extra h o u rs that he so freely added to a n all-too-heavy schedule in his eager desire that all, even the slowest and d ullest, hould "make the grade." ·

CLARENCE H . W HITE. Two hitndred five

Profile for Colby College Libraries

Oracle 1927  

Oracle 1927