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contents Volume 21 Number 8

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Features 28 A Good Time for a Good Cause Central Carolina Community Foundation’s Food and Wine Festival By Robin Cowie Nalepa 32 Columbia Metropolitan’s Top Cake Contest

28

Departments Local Seen 18

The Food Boutique

Food insecurity births food bank option By Deena C. Bouknight 42

Hometown History 24

Memorable Fare

A look at Columbia’s legendary restaurants By Rodger Stroup

18 36

Home Style 36

Expanding Viewpoints

Blending a designer’s vision with a client’s dream By Margaret Gregory 42

The Gathering Place Ford and George Bailey’s un-kitchen By Katie McElveen

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contents Volume 21 Number 8 48

Spring Brunch Nine recipes for a delicious mid-morning meal By Susan Fuller Slack, C.C.P. Best doctors

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Best Doctors in the Midlands

Palmetto business 84

Get Some Culinary Class

The Midlands is home to numerous cooking schools By Susan Fuller Slack, C.C.P. 48

Good eats

64

Food Festival Guide 98 Restaurant Guide

96

advertising sections 72 90

84

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Best Doctors Profiles Getting Down to Business

in every issue 10 From the Editor 12 City Scoop 62 New to the Neighborhood

89 Spread the Word 103 Just Married 104 Picture This

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FROM THE EDITOR

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s a child, the extent of my diet consisted of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, SpaghettiOs or plain hamburgers with ketchup. And that’s all. Needless to say, my limited tastes sometimes created quite a challenge for those feeding me. Rather than trying to appeal to my inflexible palate when I visited, my grandparents knew that most of their favorite uptown restaurants offered delicious hamburgers that would suit my fancy. One of their preferred spots was The Fountain Room in the basement of the Tapp’s building on Main Street. As soon as we were led to our table, a warm basket of their famous corn sticks was served, which Kirby, my brother, and I devoured before Granddaddy even had time to hang up his hat. We certainly weren’t trying to be rude; they were just irresistible! The Capitol Restaurant was another spot where I knew my hamburger would be prepared just the way I liked it every single time. I remember having to be very patient, though, because it seemed that my grandparents knew every person in the restaurant and they had to stop and talk to each of them before we could place our orders. We also visited the Elite Epicurean for dinner on occasion. My grandmother was the ultimate cook, but she also appreciated time away from the kitchen. At the Elite – where we knew the wait staff and the owners – it was like having dinner with family without having to clean up. But then, that was a different era, and native Columbians remember it fondly. In this issue of the magazine, writer Rodger Stroup researched some of Columbia’s oldest restaurants for his article, “Memorable Fare.” Learn about the first restaurants to open their doors in the Capital City, but beware: it’s a walk down memory lane that may leave you longing for an unobtainable signature dish from days past. Once your taste buds are warmed up, keep on reading, because this issue has wonderful recipes for brunch, award-winning cakes and signature dishes from some of Columbia’s present-day restaurants. You may want to file your copy of the magazine with your cookbooks. For some of us, time in the kitchen is more about cleaning up spills and trying to save the dinner we’ve just burned. No need to worry because writer Susan Slack introduces us to several cooking schools around town that are appropriate for the skill levels and interests of almost anyone. Surely, learning to cook in the company of friends lends itself to a greater ratio of success. And don’t miss the return of our Restaurant Guide! In this issue, we provide a listing of restaurants in all areas of town, as well as a compilation of annual food festivals – so mark your calendars and don’t miss the baklava at the Greek Festival or the crawfish at the Rosewood Crawfish Festival. I am happy to report that since childhood, my tastes have vastly improved. Unfortunately, my cooking skills have not. Lucky for me, and all Columbia residents, this city is brimming with fantastic restaurants, food festivals and a host of chefs ready to lend a helping hand. Enjoy the food issue and join us as we celebrate Columbia’s culinary offerings.

Publisher

Henry Clay e d i to r

Emily Tinch A SSO C I ATE EDITOR e d i to r i a l A rt D i r e c to r

Robyn Culbertson a d v e rt i s i n g A rt D i r e c to r

Dennis Craighead Design SENIOR A DVERTISING E X E C UTIVE

Shawn Coward A DVERTISING s a l e s

Emily Clay, Margaret Clay production manager

Nancy Lambert INTERN s

Meg Evans, Ravenel Godbold, Allyson Seitzer contributing writers

Deena Bouknight, Meredith Good, Margaret Gregory, Katie McElveen, Robin Nalepa, Susan Slack, Rodger Stroup P h o to g r ap h y

Jeff Amberg, Jennifer Covington, Robert Clark, Bob Lancaster Columbia Metropolitan is published 10 times a year by Clay Publishing, Inc., 3700 Forest Drive, Suite 106, Columbia, S.C. 29204. Copyright© Columbia Metropolitan 2011. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Advertising rates available upon request. The publishers are not responsible for the comments of authors or for unsolicited manuscripts. Subscription price $19.97 a year, $29.97 for two years in the United States. Postmaster send address changes to: Columbia Metropolitan, P.O. Box 6666, Columbia, South Carolina 29260. (803)787-6501.

Sincerely,

Emily Tinch Editor

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About the cover: Hampton Street Vineyard’s Jumbo Lump Crab Cake Photography by Jeff Amberg

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city scoop

20th Annual Artista Vista Ushers in Spring By Ravenel Godbold

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Street near Lady, Park Street near Pendleton and Lady Street near Wayne. The Vista is Columbia’s main art district, and it has continued to keep the art scene alive through the past couple of decades. The creative energy of the Vista has been the driving force in the success of restaurants, shopping and nightlife today.

photography courtesy of ARTISTA VISTA

rtista Vista returns for its 20th anniversary April 28 to 30. Galleries and local artists welcome visitors with complimentary wine, hors d’oeurves and insight into the artwork they have on display. Nationally recognized artists, along with local and upand-coming artists, will be featured in this year’s event. A special addition will be the unveiling of Susan Lenz’s art quilt, “Find a Mate,” composed of socks that were donated by attendees of Vista Lights last fall. Lenz’s quilt is intended to be a community art project, focused on educating the public about art quilts. Free parking will be available in the Vista parking decks on Lincoln

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photography courtesy of www.palmettohalfmarathon.com

2nd Annual Palmetto Half Marathon By Ravenel Godbold

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his month, North Trenholm Baptist Church will host the second annual Palmetto Half Marathon. Events begin Friday, April 15 at 4 p.m. and end Saturday, April 16 after the running of the 13.1-mile road race. Festivities will take place at the Village at Sandhill, which is located at the intersection of Clemson and Two Notch roads. On Friday, a race expo will be held from 4 until 8 p.m. A youth half marathon, which runs along the final mile of the marathon course, begins at 6:30 p.m. and a 1-mile road race begins at 7 p.m. On Saturday, the half marathon begins at 7 a.m., a 5k walk/run begins at 7:15 a.m. and the Kids Fun Run, a

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1/2-mile run for ages 10 and under, begins at 9 a.m. All proceeds will be donated to Friends of Juvenile Justice and D.I.V.A. Inc. Friends of Juvenile Justice is a non-profit group that works to stop the rise of gangs, teen crime, drugs and violence through prevention and rehabilitation. D.I.V.A., an acronym for Dedicated Individually to Valiantly Assist, provides intervention and education for girls and young women between the ages of 9 and 25 who are affected by domestic violence, sexual assault and child abuse.

The number of runners is limited to 2,500, so register early at www.palmettohalfmarathon.com. For information, contact Anna Schrall at palmettohalfmarathon@hotmail.com or (803) 206-3123.

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city scoop

City Center Partnership presents the 2011 Urban Tour By Ravenel Godbold and Meg Evans

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at, drink and explore Columbia’s Main Street on Thursday, April 7 as City Center Partnership presents the 4th annual Urban Tour. The self-guided tour of Main Street from Gervais to Laurel will be held from 5:30 to 10 p.m. and features food and drink samples, live entertainment, prizes and carriage rides. Businesses along the tour will keep their doors open late. The event also includes a look at downtown living in Columbia and information about the historical buildings located on Main Street. To end the night, a concert will take place in the 1200 block of Main Street between Gervais and Lady streets. City Center Partnership, Inc. manages the Business Improvement District in the 36-block area bound by Elmwood, Assembly, Gervais and Marion streets in downtown Columbia. This is South Carolina’s only Business Improvement District and is funded by property owners located within the district’s boundaries. For more information visit www.citycentercolumbia.sc or call (803) 233-0620.

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city scoop

Columbia Museum of Art 2011 Gala: Grit & Glamour

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ock and roll meets black tie at the Columbia Museum of Art’s 2011 Gala. “Grit & Glamour: Rock & Roll in Focus” is a celebration of Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History, 1955 to the Present, Columbia Museum of Art’s newest exhibition featuring more than 175 works by over 100 photographers. The black tie fundraiser, held Saturday, April 16 from 7 p.m. to midnight, will feature food by The Southern Way, entertainment from The Swingin’ Richards, a piano bar, a DJ spinning records, lounge singers and several surprise performances. Proceeds from the gala go towards the museum, and an online auction will coincide with the gala for attendees and members of the museum. Early bidding

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begins Tuesday, March 1 and bidding closes April 17 at 6 p.m. The gala, planned by a 60 member volunteer committee, is sponsored by Pout!, Dr. and Mrs. Ronald C. Rogers, VanJean Womenswear, Shawn Allen and Carolyn Holtschlag Allen, AT&T, BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina, Cassidy Painting, Doctors Care and Joyce and Bob Hampton. Tickets are $150 per person in advance or $175 at the door and can be purchased at columbiamuseum.org/

photography courtesy of Columbia Museum of Art

By Ravenel Godbold

gala or by calling Meagan Warren at (803) 343- 2210. The attire is “black tie with attitude” and complimentary valet parking will be provided.

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local seen

Nathan and Meredith Good (right), owners of The Food Boutique, help a client shop at their food pantry.

The Food Boutique

Food insecurity gives birth to food bank alternative By Deena C. Bouknight Photography by Jeff Amberg

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athan and Meredith Good are well educated and hard working. They own a house in Shandon and have two children, ages six and four. Meredith acquired a nursing degree while Nathan, with a sociology degree, worked

for a while as a case manager in a home for abused children and also began managing rental properties. When the opportunity for Nathan to test his entrepreneurial spirit presented itself, the couple opened a coffee shop together downtown that was,

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for a while, successful. However, when the economy took a nosedive a few years ago, so did their coffee shop. The Goods suddenly found themselves transitioning from a comfortable lifestyle into survival mode. Debts from the struggling business began to mount. The little money they did have coming in from odd jobs and rental properties covered basic necessities, but Meredith was finding it difficult to eke enough out of their shrinking dollars to purchase adequate groceries to feed the family. For the first time in their lives, this family of servers and givers had to become takers in order to survive. Periodically, Nathan would visit a food bank to supplement weekly groceries. “We walked through some hard times for about a year and a half,” says Meredith. “It was a complete attack on our pride. We were not used to asking for help; we were used to helping others. Many of our friends did not know, for a while, that we were having difficulties. It’s just not something you want to talk about. I remember participating in a dinner gathering with friends where you bring a dish. I had gotten some decent looking asparagus at a local food bank. When my friend asked where I got the asparagus, I hesitated and said, ‘It was given to me.’ I didn’t want to tell her it was from the food bank. Later on, when she was having a crisis, I realized that we really don’t know what’s going on with people. Everyone has some kind of issue to deal with.” Increasingly throughout America, families have become food insecure. According to Feeding America’s Hunger Report 2010, the organization is providing food to 37 million Americans – an increase of 46 percent just since 2008. The report states: “More than one-third of client households report having to choose between food and other basic necessities, such as rent, utilities and medical care.” College students, as well, are finding that a scholarship or college fund may have gotten them to a college, but they are unable to feed themselves once they get there. The first step that the Goods made to minimize their grocery bill was to learn how to coupon. A friend paid for Meredith to attend a Southern Savers seminar, which teaches families how to save money on groceries and personal care products. This helped, but it did not solve their problems.

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Visiting a food bank also helped. However, the Goods soon learned that at most food banks, because the organization is meeting such a great demand, clients must take what they get and do the best they can with meal preparation. “We were used to eating so healthy,” says Meredith. “I’m not discounting, at all, what the food banks do. They provide an invaluable service, and we are very appreciative of that. For our family, we just wanted some healthy choices. We didn’t want there to be any waste, and I just didn’t feel good about feeding my family high salt, high sugar or highly processed foods. We were already distraught about our situation, so eating unhealthily only made us feel worse.”

Healthy Alternative

Walking around her neighborhood one day, a light bulb went off in Meredith’s mind. What if there was a food bank that offered mostly healthy foods and gave clients a chance to choose their food supply? she thought. What if this same food bank provided coupons and education regarding grocery shopping frugality? “I birthed this idea with my husband, and then we talked it over with some people at our church, Radius in Lexington,” says Meredith. “People began donating money, food and products. I learned when I began couponing that people often stock up on supplies when they can be purchased for practically nothing on sale and with a coupon. For example, if a family has eight tubes of toothpaste and they figure they might only need four for the year, they have another four to donate.” Thanks to donations, The Food Boutique is housed in a 500-square-foot storage unit on Garners Ferry in The Shoppes at Woodhill, near Target and next to Hampton Hill Athletic Club and Tonic Day Spa. Local graphic designer Lauren Landers came up with a retro, upbeat logo and the motto: “Shop where everything is FREE, and learn how to get through this tough time.” The shelves are stocked with such items as Healthy Choice soups and whole grain pastas. There are cans of vegetables and boxes of whole grain cereals. For families with small children, there are diapers, wipes and baby foods. Clients can also choose cleaning products (a luxury, says Meredith, when times are tight) as well as toilet paper, paper towels, first aid items and toiletries. 20 C o lu m b i a M e t ro p o l i ta n

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Healthy, easy recipes hang on a clipboard and donated coupons are always available. “Everything is donated,” says Meredith. “People might see a case of something that’s affordable and buy it for us, or they might get too much of something because they have a coupon for it and donate it to the Food Boutique. What we really need is rice,

Meredith and Nathan Good envision the Food Boutique as a comforting place where clients are nurtured not just with food, but spiritually as well. beans, canned vegetables, flour, sugar, salt, healthy pastas, soups, baby items, etc.” Most donations are by individuals; however, a Massachusetts-based company, Food Should Taste Good, Inc., donated a large amount of food, while Meredith says she is seeking to partner with local businesses and donors. Beginning last September, Tot Trade became a partner. To become a Food Boutique client, Meredith says the only qualification is perceived need. A volunteer will conduct a short interview and fill out some general paperwork. One of the questions on the questionnaire is this: “Do you have other needs or prayer requests?” Meredith points out that she would like for the Food Boutique to be a comforting place where clients will know they are being nurtured not just with food, but spiritually as well. During the client’s first visit, she says, “We just want them to be blessed.” The second and future visits require sweat equity. Sweat equity involves bringing in items or coupons they may not use, helping check expiration dates on products, stocking and organizing shelves, or volunteering to help other clients shop. Meredith says, “We just don’t want to encourage an entitlement mentality. They need to be involved. They’re being helped and they can spend a short amount of time helping others.” After eight weeks of using The Food w w w. c o l u m b i a m e t ro . c o m

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Boutique, clients receive training in how to shop via “Extreme Couponing Method.” Because so many clients who are visiting the Food Boutique are not used to taking free food, they are hesitant, observes Meredith. As a result, she came up with a form – with assistance from a nutritionist friend – that offers suggestions for the amount a family should take based on their size. For example, a family of four shopping for a week or so might need 12 items in the bread, grains, cereals, pasta category and 18 cans of soup. “With my nursing training, I am aware that we need to cater to clients who might have specific health issues, such as hypertension,” she says. The goal for Food Boutique is to eventually have locations in all the surrounding areas of Columbia: Lexington, Irmo and the Northeast. “We envision a small, friendly grocery store setting so that clients can feel more ‘normal’ while they’re shopping,” explains Meredith. She is also working on achieving 501(c)(3) status for the Food Boutique. There is no time limit to how long clients can use the Food Boutique. “Our goal is to empower families to be independent again and not reliant on a food pantry.” Meredith says that although her family is still digging out of their economic woes, the future looks brighter daily. “We can now afford to shop at a grocery store for healthy foods again, but I am more cautious and careful and use coupons when I shop. We’re on a tight budget, but it certainly feels wonderful when you can come through it. We’ve been so blessed and God has been so good to us. We just want to give others hope, and we’re hoping that the Food Boutique does that. It’s about just putting one foot in front of the other.”

How to Help

Anyone who wants to volunteer time to help people shop at the Food Boutique, or to donate items, produce (especially during the summer months), or make financial donations, visit www.healthyfoodboutique. com or contact Meredith at fbcolumbia@ gmail.com. Drop-off locations for donations include Hampton Hill Athletic Club/Tonic Day Spa in the Shoppes at Woodhill, Daffa-Deals Children’s Store, Frame of Mind, The Funzone and FFS Model and Talent Agency in Southeast Columbia.

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hometown history

Memorable Fare A look at Columbia’s legendary restaurants By Rodger Stroup

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ll too often newspaper headlines herald the closing of another restaurant that was a favorite of many local citizens. In January 2011, Columbians followed the story of the closing of S & S Cafeteria in Richland Mall. The restaurant originally was located on Hampton Street, then moved to Gervais Street in the downtown area before finally settling in Richland Mall in 1975. The S & S is just the most recent in a long list of restaurants that are now just memories. Since its designation as the capital of South Carolina in the late eighteenth century, hundreds of restaurants have come and gone in Columbia. In addition to providing Columbians and visitors with places to eat, many of these restaurants became popular gathering places for social, fraternal and political organizations. The first eating establishment on record in Columbia was the Richardson Street Tavern located close to the State House and operated by Revolutionary War veteran Timothy Rives. A 1792 advertisement proclaimed the tavern was “for the PRIVATE accommodation of Gentlemen.” Throughout the nineteenth century Columbia was dotted with taverns, hotels, boarding houses and eating establishments but extant records provide us with their names and locations but little about their operations. Several restaurants that opened in the early years of the 20th century survived into the 21st century. However, none of these are still open. The most recent early 20th century restaurant to close was Jaco’s Tavern located at the corner of Rosewood Drive and Bluff Road. Jaco’s originally opened in 1912 and was a favorite of truck drivers and workers from the local textile mills. Another restaurant that opened in

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This circa 1945 postcard depicts the Market Restaurant on the northwest corner of Assembly and Gervais. Courtesy of Dave and Marty Sennema. A Yellow Pages ad from 1973 says it all. Courtesy of Richland County Public Library.

1905 and survived until 2002 was the Capitol Restaurant located in the Brennan Building at 1210 Main Street. Only a short walk from the State House, the Capitol Café, as it was known in its later years, was a popular gathering place for politicians, writers, students and the homeless. Many political deals were consummated while legislators enjoyed the food and beverages. Columbia writer William Price Fox hosted world-renowned authors Kurt Vonnegut, Thomas Wolfe and Joseph Heller at the Capitol Café. From 1912 until it closed in 1968 the dining room in the Jefferson Hotel was not only a popular eating place for Columbians and visitors, but was also the location of many formal banquets

featuring famous visitors including Billy Graham. Several restaurants that opened between the two World Wars were popular with Columbians until they closed during the past several years. Originally started as a lunch counter in 1929, the Market Restaurant on the corner of Assembly and Gervais evolved into one of Columbia’s premier

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The Capitol Restaurant closed its doors in 2002 after serving Columbia’s downtown for nearly a century. Photo courtesy of Rodger Stroup.

A 1950s postcard depicts the location of Drake’s Restaurant at the southwest corner of Forest Drive and N. Millwood Avenue. Courtesy of Dave and Marty Sennema. The menu from Drake’s is circa 1945. Courtesy Richland County Public Library.

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The dining room at the Jefferson Hotel, circa 1915. Photography courtesy of Dave and Marty Sennema.

restaurants. The Market’s location across from the State House insured it was frequented by state’s movers and shakers until it closed in 1983. Opened in 1932 the Elite Epicurean on the corner of Main and Laurel was across the street from the Columbia City Hall and the Federal Courthouse. The Elite was a favorite meeting place for Columbia’s political leaders until it closed in 1997. The Fountain Room in Tapp’s Department Store on Main Street opened in 1940 and was popular with both the business lunch crowd as well as shoppers until the restaurant closed in 1995. Cogburn’s Restaurant at 1317 Sumter Street opened in 1941 and was famous for its steak sandwich and fries. Cogburn’s was a favorite of politicians, lobbyists and USC faculty and students until 1979 when it moved to Sunset Boulevard in West Columbia, where it operated until 1999. The Seaboard Diner opened in 1944 to provide a quick meal for thousands of soldiers catching trains at the

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Seaboard Air Line Depot on Gervais Street. When Amtrak began operating passenger service at the depot in 1972 the diner continued to operate adjacent to the Amtrak Station. In 1991 Amtrak moved to its current location at College and Pulaski. In 1993 the depot was purchased and renovated as the Blue Marlin Restaurant and the diner was demolished. A discussion of Columbia restaurants would not be complete without mentioning barbeque establishments. Over the years many barbeque places have come and gone, but there are two older eateries still operating. In 1955 Maurice Bessinger opened Piggie Park on the Charleston Highway. Since then Piggie Park has added several new locations throughout the Midlands. Opened in 1963 on Rosewood Drive the Little Bar-B-Que Hut moved to Alpine Road in 1978 and changed its name to Little Pigs Barbeque. Trying to determine the oldest operating restaurant in Columbia is tricky. Villa Tronco at 1213 Blanding Street opened in 1940 when the Tronco family, after operating a fruit stand since the early 1930s, decided to open an Italian restaurant to cater to the northern soldiers of Italian descent stationed at Ft. Jackson. The fourth generation of the family still welcomes customers to Columbia’s first Italian restaurant located in a renovated 1858 fire station. On the other hand Drake’s Duck-In at 1544 Main Street can trace its beginning to the family’s first restaurant opened in 1907 on Elmwood Avenue to deliver sandwiches to the city’s textile mills. Subsequently the family operated restaurants on Main Street and Taylor Street. Ac c o r d i n g t o t h e Co l u m b i a Convention and Visitors Bureau, “Eating in the South is a way of life, and Columbia does it well. From Southern comfort foods to new bistro specialties, Columbia offers over 450 dining options.” Even though some of Columbia’s most historic spots may have closed, the future looks bright for our culinary capital city.

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feature Hampton Street Vineyard’s Jumbo Lump Crab Cakes with a Ginger Mandarin Orange Brandy Glaze

A Good Time for a Good Cause

Central Carolina Community Foundation’s Food & Wine Festival By Robin Cowie Nalepa / Photography by Jeff Amberg

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t’s a combination that just makes sense. The 17th Annual Central Carolina Food and Wine Festival pairs good times with a good cause, serving up luscious wines from around the world with elegant menus from the area’s top restaurants and caterers. The festival features intimate wine dinners and private wine tastings sprinkled throughout the winter months, culminating with a gala on April 1. In addition to tempting the palate, the festival also benefits Central Carolina Community Foundation and its mission of awarding grants to nonprofit organizations in the Midlands. Since its inception in 1995, the festival has raised close to $735,000.

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While Hampton Street Vineyards, Mill Pond Steakhouse, MoMo’s Bistro and The Vista Room at the Blue Marlin already have hosted successful festival dinners, it’s not too late to enjoy two more elegant evenings showcasing wine and food. On March 31, you get to be the judge at the VIP Wine Tasting: A Battle of the Pinots. You’ll enjoy an opportunity to sample and judge a blind tasting of South Carolina distributors’ best pinots at 6:30 p.m. at Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough, 1320 Main Street, 17th Floor. Tickets are $150. And on April 1, join more than 600 wine lovers as you sip and savor a vast array of global vintage wines and fine

foods offered by Midlands chefs and caterers. The gala event is at 7 p.m. at The Medallion Center, 7309 Garners Ferry Road. Tickets are $75 in advance, $100 at the door. We asked the owners and chefs of the restaurants that hosted tasting dinners – Hampton Street Vineyards, Mill Pond Steakhouse, MoMo’s Bistro and The Vista Room at the Blue Marlin – to each share a delicious recipe and their top wine picks. You’ll be able to keep the celebration of food and wine going long after the festival ends. For more information about the Food and Wine Festival or to purchase tickets to any of the events, visit the CCCF website at www.yourfoundation.org.

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Hampton Street Vineyard’s Jumbo Lump Crab Cakes with a Ginger Mandarin Orange Brandy Glaze

MoMo’s Bistro’s White Truffle Cake

William Murphy, Executive Chef and Co-Owner of Hampton Street Vineyard, has cooked for Shahs and showgirls. He was appointed personal chef to Gov. Richard Riley and Gov. Carroll Campbell. With Leigh Talmadge and Paul Pittenger, he started Hampton Street Vineyard in 1995. Bill says he enjoys a cheap rose while prowling around the southwest of France. Bill finds that a Trimbach Gewurztraminer accents the crab cakes beautifully. Crab Cakes 1 pound jumbo lump crab meat 6 tablespoons minced onions, sautéed 3 tablespoons minced garlic, sautéed 5 tablespoons mayonnaise 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard bread crumbs Gently mix all the ingredients, being careful not to break down the lumps of crab meat and adding only enough bread crumbs to hold together the cakes. Patty 4 cakes, gently flour both sides and sauté both sides in clarified butter. Place in a 450-degree oven for 4 to 5 minutes. Glaze 1 small can mandarin oranges 4 tablespoons brandy 3 tablespoons red onion, minced 3 tablespoons red pepper, minced 3 tablespoons pickled ginger 1 Thai chili, minced 1/2 cup chicken stock 1/4 cup cider vinegar 3 tablespoons brown sugar 3 tablespoons cilantro, chopped Saute all ingredients in a noncorrosive pan and reduce by half. Add cilantro and thicken with cornstarch. Serve crab cakes drizzled with glaze.

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MoMo’s Bistro’s White Truffle Cake

MoMo’s Bistro Chef Andrew White is a hometown boy. The Heathwood Hall alum graduated from Le Cordon Bleu culinary schools and has whipped up savory dishes from Yellowstone to Denali, Alaska and from Los Angeles to Garmsich, Germany. Andrew’s wine tastes vary with the season and his mood. He prefers his whites light and crisp and leans toward French sauvignon blancs. When he goes red, he gravitates toward newer blends and prefers the alternative grapes, such as Malbec, for their complexity and adaptability to food. This white chocolate génoise cake with white chocolate mascarpone icing is Andrew’s favorite dessert. He’d pair it with a Rozes White Reserve Porto. Cake 1/3 cup flour

3 eggs 4 teaspoons sugar 1 1/4 ounces white chocolate Melt 1 1/4 ounces white chocolate in a double boiler. Whisk 3 eggs in a tabletop mixer and slowly add in sugar. Once sugar is incorporated, slowly add in flour while still whisking. Fold melted chocolate into batter. Pour into a buttered 9-inch cake pan. Bake for 25 minutes in a 350-degree oven. Allow cake to cool to room temperature. Topping 1/4 cup cream 12 ounces white chocolate 1 cup mascarpone cheese Melt 12 ounces of white chocolate in a double boiler. Whisk 1/4 cup cream and 1 cup mascarpone in mixer until incorporated. Fold melted chocolate into cream and cheese mixture. Pour topping onto cake. Allow to set in refrigerator for 90 minutes. Garnish with fresh fruit and shaved white or dark chocolate.

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Blue Marlin’s Shrimp Creole

Blue Marlin’s Shrimp Creole

Customers flock to The Blue Marlin and the Vista Room at the Blue Marlin for the comfort and flavor of Executive Chef and General Manager Brian Dukes’s Lowcountry fare. So it’s no surprise that Brian has whipped up Blue Marlin’s Carolina cuisine on Capitol Hill and received a prestigious Invitation to Cook at the world-renowned James Beard House in New York City. The graduate of Johnson and Wales worked in New York City and the San Juan Islands before joining his uncle, restaurateur Bill Dukes, in Columbia in 2004. In the world of wine it would be a shame to pick just one, so Brian offers several suggestions: King Estate Pinot Gris, Oregon; Acrobat Pinot Noir, Oregon; Archery Summit Pinot Noir, Oregon; Four Vines Naked Chardonnay, California; Louis Martini Napa Cabernet; Las Rocas Grenacha, Spain; La Posta Malbec, Argentina; and Martin

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Codax Albarino, Spain. Brian shares his grandfather’s recipe for Shrimp Creole. Pair this dish with Archery Summit Pinot Noir, a wellbalanced wine that holds up well to the tomato and spice. Creole Sauce 1/2 pound bacon, large dice 1 yellow onion, large dice 3 stalks celery, large dice 1 green pepper, large dice 1 tablespoon chopped garlic 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 1/2 teaspoon thyme 1/2 teaspoon oregano 3 bay leaves 3 dashes Tabasco sauce 1 1/2 ounces chicken base 1/4 cup tomato paste 6 cups tomato strips Cook bacon in saucepot over medium heat until browned. Add onion, celery, pepper and garlic. Cook vegetables until onion becomes translucent. Add

cayenne pepper, black pepper, thyme, oregano, bay leaves, Tabasco and chicken base. Cook for five minutes or until very fragrant. Add tomato paste and tomato strips and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Remove bay leaves when finished. Shrimp Creole 6 cups Creole sauce 2 tablespoons canola oil 1 1/2 pounds shrimp 1 tablespoon Old Bay seasoning 12 cups Savannah red rice (visit www.columbiametro.com for recipe, or substitute white rice) parsley In a warm sauté pan add oil to coat pan. Add shrimp and season with Old Bay. Cook until shrimp begins to turn pink and then add Creole sauce. Bring sauce to a simmer and check doneness of shrimp. Place 2 cups of rice on each plate and top with 1 cup Shrimp Creole. Garnish plate with parsley.

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Mill Pond Steakhouse’s Boykin Cornmeal & Panko Encrusted Organic Buttermilk Soaked Chicken Livers with Clemson Blue Cheese Coleslaw and Bourbon Glaze

Mill Pond Steakhouse Chef Jaime Hecker is an Irmo native who attended Western Culinary Schools in Oregon. He has cooked at Sunflowers in Colorado, Magnolias in Charleston and the Crescent Grille in Camden. Jaime’s top five wine picks are Torii Mor Pinot Noir; Willamette Valley Pinot Noir, Oregon; Cain Five, Napa Valley; Caymus Cabernet, Napa Valley; Duckhorn Sauvignon Blanc. He suggests

pairing a Stags Leap 2005 Napa Valley Cabernet with this recipe. Chicken Livers 1 pint organic chicken livers 1 cup Boykin Mill cornmeal 1 cup Panko bread crumbs, crushed 1 cup buttermilk 1/8 cup Frank’s Red Hot sauce salt and pepper to taste Dredge livers in cornmeal and Panko mix and deep fry for about 3 to 4 minutes. Set aside. Coleslaw one bag slaw mix 1 cup Clemson blue cheese, crumbled 1 green pepper 1 Vidalia onion 1/2 cup red wine vinegar 1/4 cup sugar

1 cup mayonnaise salt and pepper to taste Puree half the onions and green peppers in a blender. Stir together vinegar and sugar in a bowl. Add mayonnaise, pureed mix and salt and pepper and whisk together. Add a touch of sour cream. Pour over slaw mix. Add blue cheese crumbles and toss. Set aside Glaze 1 cup bourbon 1/2 cup brown sugar 1/3 cup red wine vinegar 1 tablespoon garam masala 1 tablespoon chopped garlic Add all ingredients in a tall pot and cook on medium high heat until thick and syrupy. Top chicken livers with bourbon glaze and serve with coleslaw on the side.

Mill Pond Steakhouse’s Boykin Cornmeal & Panko Encrusted Organic Buttermilk Soaked Chicken Livers with Clemson Blue Cheese Coleslaw and Bourbon Glaze

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feature

Columbia Metropolitan’s

Top Cake Contest

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Photography by Jeff Amberg For the second year in a row, the editors at Columbia Metropolitan magazine were thrilled with the response to our call out for cake recipes. It seems that the Midlands is host to many exceptional bakers! Thank you to everyone who sent in recipes for this year’s contest. After much deliberation, Columbia Metropolitan’s editorial team has narrowed our favorites down to these top five recipes. Luckily for you, our contestants graciously agreed to share their delicious recipes so that you can bake them yourselves. If you are more of an eater than a baker, we will have samples available at the Central Carolina Food and Wine Festival Gala Event (see page 28 for more details). So stop by the Columbia Metropolitan table on April 1 at the Medallion Center between 7 and 8:30 p.m. to taste and vote for your favorite cake. The winner will be announced at 9 p.m. The lucky winner gets a $100 gift certificate to Mr. Friendly’s, a Corian cake plate from Solid Surfaces, a stylish apron from Tiffany’s and a 2 year subscription to Columbia Metropolitan magazine.

Crepe Cake

by Amy Nunamaker Crêpes and pastry cream can be made a day ahead. Crêpes 6 tablespoons butter 3 cups milk 6 eggs 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 7 tablespoons sugar pinch salt vegetable oil Cook the butter in a small pan until lightly golden brown. Set aside. In another small pan, heat the milk until steaming; allow to cool for 10 minutes. In a mixer on medium-low speed, beat together the eggs, flour, sugar and salt. Slowly add the hot milk and browned butter. Pour into a container with a spout, cover and refrigerate over night. To make the crêpes, bring the batter to room temperature. Place a nonstick or seasoned 9-inch crêpe pan over medium heat. Swab the surface with the oil, then add about 1/4 cup batter and swirl to cover the surface. Cook until the bottom just begins to brown, about 1 minute, then carefully lift an edge and flip the crêpe with your fingers. Cook on the other side for 15 to 20 seconds. Flip the crêpe onto a baking sheet lined with parchment. Repeat until all batter is used. You should have at least 20 crêpes. Vanilla Pastry Cream 2 cups milk 1 tablespoon vanilla extract 6 egg yolks 1/2 cup sugar 1/3 cup cornstarch, sifted

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3 1/2 tablespoons butter Bring the milk to a boil. Turn off the heat and stir in the vanilla extract then set aside for 10 minutes. In a medium heavy-bottomed pan, whisk together the egg yolks, sugar and cornstarch. Gradually whisk in the hot milk, then place pan over high heat and bring to a boil, whisking vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes. Press the pastry cream through a fine-meshed sieve into the small bowl. Stir in the butter. When completely cool, cover and refrigerate. To assemble the cake 2 cups heavy cream 1 tablespoon sugar 3 tablespoons Chambord Raspberry liqueur Nutella Chocolate Hazelnut Spread Whip the heavy cream with the tablespoon sugar and the Chambord. Fold it into the pastry cream. Lay 1 crêpe on a cake plate. Using an icing spatula, completely cover with a thin layer of pastry cream (about 1/4 cup). Cover with a crêpe and repeat to make a stack of 20. Cover the top layer with Nutella. Chill for at least 2 hours. Set out for 30 minutes before serving. Slice like a cake.

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Chocolate Kahlua Cake by Carol Richburg

cake 1 box Devils food cake mix 1/2 cup sugar 1/3 cup vegetable oil 3 eggs 3/4 cup water 1/4 cup bourbon 1/2 cup Kahlua 3/4 cup black coffee, double strength 2 teaspoons cocoa Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix all ingredients and beat 4 minutes. Bake in a greased Bundt pan for 50 minutes.

Icing 1 stick butter 1 cup sugar 1/2 to 1 cup evaporated milk 1 1/2 cup chocolate chips Heat butter, sugar and milk. Boil for 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Remove from heat, stir in chocolate chips. Pour immediately over cake.

Jan’s Family Pleasing Apple Cake by Jan Albriton

3 Red Delicious apples, peeled and diced into 1/2-inch cubes 1/2 cup sugar 1/4 cup cinnamon 1/2 cup golden raisins 1/2 cup chopped pecans 1 box of Betty Crocker’s Cinnamon Swirl flavored Decadent Supreme Cake Mix Jar of Smucker’s caramel flavored ice cream topping Toss the first 5 ingredients together in a large bowl. Cover and set aside. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Prepare cake mix as directed on package. Spray Bundt pan with Baker’s Joy. Pour half of

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cake mixture into pan. Pour apple mixture on top of batter. Pour remaining cake mixture on top of apple mixture. Cook according to directions on box or until done. Allow cake to cool enough to safely remove from pan. Drizzle caramel topping on top of cake while still warm.

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Wine Cake

by Sheila Holdford 1 package yellow cake mix 1 package instant vanilla pudding mix 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg 3/4 cup vegetable oil 3/4 cup cream sherry 4 eggs powdered sugar, for topping Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place all ingredients, except powdered sugar, in a bowl and beat on medium/medium-high speed for 5 minutes. Pour into a greased and floured Bundt pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes. Cool in the pan

for 20 minutes. Remove from the pan and cool completely. Sprinkle with powdered sugar.

Peanut Butter Pound Cake by Jenny Lewis

cake 1/2 cup Crisco 2 sticks unsalted butter, softened 3 cups sugar 5 large eggs 3 cups plus 5 tablespoons sifted all-purpose flour (you must sift the flour 3 times) 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 cup whole milk 1 cup peanut butter 3 teaspoons vanilla extract Cream Crisco and butter together until smooth. Add sugar till mixed well. Then add eggs one at a time until each one is mixed well. Add peanut butter and baking powder. Add extract to milk and set aside. Alternate adding flour and milk until well mixed. Pour batter into a greased and floured pan. Place pan in

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a pre-heated 300 degree oven and bake for 95 minutes. Icing 1 cup confectioner’s sugar 1/4 cup peanut butter 1 teaspoon vanilla extract milk Place peanut butter in microwave and melt. Add powder sugar, vanilla extract and enough milk to melted peanut butter to make it able to pour over cake. Drizzle over cake.

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home style

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Pete and Teddy Hornsby’s living room features sea foam green walls and a wrap-around sofa of leather and woven fabric. Matching accent chairs and an oyster shell lamp add to the feel of the lake, while a stacked stone fireplace provides contrast between the wet bar and entertainment center.

Blending a designer’s vision with a client’s dream By Margaret Gregory / Photography by Robert Clark w w w. c o l u m b i a m e t ro . c o m

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This page: The railing in the foyer is painted Caviar black, contrasting against the off-white shade of the balusters. A patterned Berber carpet on the stairs provides a quiet walk up to the landing. Opposite: The kitchen features warm stained cabinetry surrounding a center island finished in a crème paint and glaze. The granite for the countertops is the perfect complement, with swirls of gold, gray and black.

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hen Teddy and Pete Hornsby started down renovation road on their lakeside home in Hallmark Shores, they were thinking a simple remodel and updated décor were all they needed. Then they met Linda Burnside of LGB Interiors, and all that changed. “I had been working with someone for a while, and we just couldn’t seem to bring everything together the way I wanted,” says Pete. “She suggested that we talk with Linda, and when she came in, it was a whirlwind of ideas. It wasn’t what I was expecting at all.” The Hornsbys built their home just over 25 years ago and had done one

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remodel to convert a screened porch into a living area. After spending several years growing their business – they own seven Subway stores in Lexington, West Columbia and Columbia – it was time to tackle the next remodeling project. “We had built some stores and decided we could put something else on our plate,” says Teddy. This renovation would take them to new level – one they weren’t sure they wanted to tackle in the beginning. Linda’s first recommendation was to take down a main wall that separated the formal living area from the rest of the house. “I think they thought I was crazy!” Linda laughs. “After I met with them

and reviewed the existing furnishings, it dawned on me that the whole first floor needed a change. My first thought was to open up the kitchen to the living room, and while we’re at it, let’s knock out the wall from the dining room to the kitchen.” “We didn’t think we wanted to knock walls down again,” says Teddy. But Linda saw something that they hadn’t, and she had to convince them she was right. “She talked about the flow of the house,” recalls Pete, “and she said we’d have a better view of the lake. Everything we originally said we weren’t going to do, we ended up doing. She said ‘trust me’, so we did.”

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As it turns out, Linda was right. Teddy and Pete now have a view of the lake from every vantage point in the main area of the house. “It definitely opened another view that we had but never used,” says Teddy. “Once that wall came down, the space opened up, and it was amazing!” That renovation then led to what Teddy refers to as the “domino effect.” “We couldn’t make all these changes in this area and not do the bathroom,” he says. “And then it was the foyer,” adds Pete. The entire project moved along quickly. The construction portion of the renovation took around four months and was completed in December 2010. “It didn’t take long to do it, once we decided to move ahead,” Teddy says. “It just took a while to decide what we were going to do.” The Hornsbys accompanied Linda to High Point to select many of their new furnishings. “I like to take clients to market with me,” Linda says. “It allows them the opportunity to see the spectrum of price points and quality.” Pete readily admits that she can’t describe what her style is. “We’d been working to pull a look together for so long that I’d gotten away from even defining a style,” she notes. “We just wanted a home that was comfortable and livable, that we could enjoy and that our friends could enjoy as well.” The completed renovation has brought to the house an aura of calm, with natural hues that reflect the colors of the lake that Pete and Teddy love so much. The living room features sea foam green walls and a wrap-around sofa of leather and woven fabric. Matching accent chairs and an oyster shell lamp add to the feel of the lake, while the breakfast table is flanked by alternating wooden and wicker chairs. A stacked stone fireplace provides contrast between the wet bar and entertainment center. In fact, it’s the wet bar and entertainment center that became major points of discussion for the Hornsbys and Linda. “I came in one day to find them painted what I call ‘battleship gray,’” says Pete. “There’s no way I would have gone into a paint store and said, ‘This is what I want,’” adds Teddy. This was an instance where Teddy and Pete truly had to put their faith in Linda’s

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(L to R) Heather, Pete and Teddy Hornsby

recommendation. “After the glaze was added, it was obviously a great choice,” Pete says. Moving a wall meant a complete makeover for the kitchen as well, including relocating the refrigerator, cooktop and sink. The u-shaped kitchen now features warm stained cabinetry surrounding a center island finished in a crème paint and glaze. Leather panels with furniture rivets accent the bar area. The granite for the countertops is one area where Pete held firm. After traveling to several shops and searching through slab after slab, Pete found what would turn out to be the perfect fit – Golden Crystal. The swirls of gold, gray and black serve as the perfect complement to the cabinetry. To u p d a t e t h e f o y e r , L i n d a proposed painting the railing Caviar black, leaving the balusters a shade of off-white. A patterned Berber carpet on the stairs provides a quiet walk up to the landing where guests can pause to admire themselves in the large driftwood-framed mirror. Another wall came down to combine the guest bath and powder room into one large bathroom. Removing the wall opened the space and allowed for the addition of a large walk-in tile and stone shower. Though they originally questioned what the end result would look like, Pete and Teddy couldn’t be happier. “We were looking for some younger eyes to give us fresh ideas,” says Teddy, “someone who could go with the trends that we could enjoy but also that the next person who lives here could enjoy.” “Linda had the vision to see it all come together,” adds Pete, “and there’s nothing that we wish we would have done differently.”

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home style

The Gathering Place Ford and George Bailey’s un-kitchen

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Instead of thinking in terms of kitchen, Ford Boyd Bailey pulled in pieces that would work in any part of her house.

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By Katie McElveen Photography by Robert Clark

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nterior designer Ford Boyd Bailey’s kitchen is more than a site to prepare food and eat meals. It’s the house’s nerve center; a gathering place for friends and family. Her design choices help set the tone: there’s a fireplace along one wall, original artwork, striking light fixtures and a palette of clean, neutral colors that allows the cabinets and counters to fade into the background. “I realize that since the room is a kitchen it needs to have appliances and the like, but I do my best to hide them,” Ford laughs. “The biggest compliment I ever got was from someone who asked me how to get to the kitchen when he was standing in the middle of it! Granted, a big flower arrangement was hiding the stove from his view, but it made me feel great!” Te n y ea r s a g o, w h e n For d designed the room, she filled it with Old World touches like creamy travertine on the counters, a constellation of pottery plates on the wall above the fireplace, dark wood furnishings and leaded glass windows set into the cupboard doors. A year or so ago, though, Ford decided that although the original concept was still working, her kitchen was in need of an update. “The initial kitchen design was influenced by Italy,” she notes. “I still love so much about it, but I felt that it needed a few modern touches. When I started the project, I thought I would simply update the room. Now, ironically, it feels cozier than it did before.” Although the kitchen underwent a complete transformation, there was very little construction and nearly all of the changes were cosmetic. “It’s really more of an update than a renovation. We

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Ford Boyd Bailey

replaced the sink, the faucets and the countertops, but we didn’t move any walls,” notes Ford. “Even small changes can have a big impact.” The trick, says Ford, is to decide where you want the room to go, and move it there with a cohesive collection of colors, textures and surfaces that won’t fight with what you’re going to keep. Since Ford was looking to set a more modern tone, she replaced the knobs on her drawers and cupboards with sleek stainless steel barrel pulls and installed mirrors in the cupboard doors. Around a simple, slightly rustic table, white linen slipcovers hide the dark wood of the chairs and highlight their squared-off shape. “Accessories can make a huge difference in the tone of a room,” notes Ford. “New hardware is the easiest and least expensive way to change the look of your kitchen, and paint runs a close second.” Next, she replaced the creamy travertine on the countertops with honed marble, using slightly different colors for the counters

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and the island. Mosaics made from shiny marble tiles used as a backsplash, around the countertops, behind the stove and above the kitchen window add a smattering of subdued texture. “Marble can fit in almost any décor, but before you choose it, know that keeping it pristine is pretty much impossible. I love the life that marble takes on, but it’s not for everyone.” Ford would not suggest changing countertops if eventually the cabinets would need to be replaced. Instead, she recommends saving your money and

A lt h oug h F o r d Bailey’s kitchen underwent a total t r a n s fo r m at i o n , n e a r ly a l l o f t h e changes were cosmetic. “It’s r e a l ly m o r e o f a n u p dat e t h a n a r e n o vat i o n , ” s h e notes . “E ven small changes can have a big impact .” taking those steps all at the same time. Installing new countertops does give you more options when updating your sink and faucets, since you don’t have to worry about utilizing — or hiding — existing plumbing holes. Ford chose a modern chrome faucet and replaced the old double sink with a large single that makes it easier to clean large pots. Now comes the fun part: adding personality. According to Ford, instead

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of thinking in terms of “kitchen,” pull in pieces that would work in any part of the house. The oil painting that hangs above her kitchen fireplace, for instance, would look fabulous in any room in the house; here, it gives the room a bold pop of color. She upped the wow factor by replacing two of her kitchen chairs with a bench covered in a swath of gorgeous white leather. And the massive Italian breakfront that fills the wall in the eating area would be perfectly at home in a dining room. Ford also believes that instead of trying to hide the quirks in your room, you should take advantage of them. For her own kitchen, Ford had a set of old wood

“Accessories

can make a huge d i ff e r e nc e i n t h e to n e o f a room ,” notes F ord B ailey . “N ew hardware is the easiest and least expensive way to c h a ng e t h e l o o k o f you r k i tc h e n , a n d pa i nt run s a close second.” and iron doors reworked to fit in a doorway of an odd height. “Those funky characteristics of your home are what make it unique,” she says. “They can turn into wonderful features.” Ford also underscores the importance of light fixtures. “The first thing you need to do is get rid of that giant fluorescent ceiling fixture and replace it with chandeliers and sconces,” she notes. “You can never have too many. Task lighting under the counters will give you the light you need to work. Add dimmers to control the brightness. We keep the lights very low at night and eat by candlelight — even on weeknights!” Although Ford didn’t change out the two wrought-iron chandeliers that hang over the kitchen table, she did replace the fixture over the sink, choosing a clean-lined piece that echoes the architectural lines of the room. A pair of iron sconces flanks the painting above the fireplace. “With the lights dimmed and candles burning, it becomes a whole different room at night,” says Ford. “It’s an amazing transformation.” To continue working toward her mission of having an un-kitchen kitchen, Ford was willing to give up one thing that might be tough for some people: ice and water on the doors of her refrigerator. “Without those dispensers, it just disappears into the walls,” she says, smiling. “The microwave is next. I can’t wait. Once all my children have moved out, it will be gone!”

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home style

Southern Brunch Biscuits, Orange Yogurt and Berry Parfait, Egg-cellent Cheese Strata

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SNinepring B runch recipes for a delicious mid-morning meal By Susan Fuller Slack, C.C.P. / Photography by Jeff Amberg

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he word brunch originated as student slang in 19th century England. In 1896, a London food critic wrote in Punch magazine that “the excellent portmanteau word introduced last year, by Mr. Guy Berliner” described a new kind of meal replacing breakfast and lunch. Brunch soon came into fashion as a leisurely, indulgent mid-morning meal for the wealthy and noble classes. In early 20th century America, “formal breakfasts” and “ladies breakfast parties” gradually evolved into brunch. After 1914, it became a Mother’s Day tradition when Congress sanctioned the national holiday. The first advertised restaurant brunch was in Chicago in 1930, celebrating Easter. By mid-century, American hostesses had elevated the brunch to an art form, serving a variety of dishes representing breakfast and lunch — and yes, even culinary indulgences like dessert. Any day of the week is a good time for brunch but weekends are ideal, giving family and friends time to linger

Egg-cellent Cheese Strata Stuffed French Toast & Maple-Cinnamon Blueberry Syrup Peaches & Cream Breakfast Porridge Apricot Almond Danish Southern Brunch Biscuits Orange Yogurt & Berry Parfaits Mango & Passion Fruit Smoothies Carolina Breakfast Shrimp Maple Pecan Bacon

and catch up on the latest news. It’s the perfect time to choose dishes you might not prepare on a busy weekday, especially if they can be made in advance and don’t mind waiting. If you are expecting a crowd, consider a casual buffet that allows diners to serve themselves. Offer guests a variety of beverages including your very best coffee from freshly ground beans. Don’t forget the decaf. Champagne and many other lightly sparkling wines and specialty drinks are popular at celebratory brunches and can accent brunch foods like eggs and cheese. Fresh-squeezed orange or grapefruit juice is a good choice for those who wish to avoid alcohol. Don’t forget appropriate beverages for the kids: slushy citrus drinks, fruit punch or sparkling apple juice. Here are a few favorite brunch recipes that, for the most part, can be prepared ahead, allowing you the opportunity to relax and enjoy the party along with your guests.

Egg-cellent Cheese Strata An old saying among chefs is that there are as many ways to cook an egg as there are pleats on a chef ’s toque (the distinguished white hat – some have up to 100.) There must be as many ways to cook eggs for a brunch! A rich egg custard is the base for this savory breakfast casserole. It can be assembled hours in advance of baking. For the bread cubes, pick a hearty country-style loaf or one of my favorite choices – Asiago Cheese bread from Panera Bread’s bakery. For the best flavor, use a blend of shredded cheeses like sharp Cheddar, Gruyère, Swiss or sharp Provolone. Serve the strata with a green salad featuring peppery arugula, orange slice, black olives and a balsamic vinegar dressing. 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 1/2 9-ounce package fresh, prewashed

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small spinach leaves 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 small onion, in small dice 1/2 red bell pepper, in small dice 1/2 pound spicy or plain bulk Italian sausage 5 cups 3/4-inch bread cubes, cut from 1-inch thick slices 1 1/4 cups shredded cheese 1 cup whole milk 1 cup half and half 6 large eggs 3 or 4 shredded fresh basil leaves 1 teaspoon salt and black pepper, to taste 1/4 cup fresh-grated Asiago cheese or Parmesan Heat butter in a large skillet. When hot, add spinach and stir until completely wilted. Remove to a strainer in a bowl and cool; squeeze out all the liquid. Wipe skillet and add 2 tablespoons olive oil. Sauté onion and bell pepper over medium heat until

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translucent, stirring often. Add sausage and stir until meat is crumbly. Lightly butter an 8-inch square baking dish. Layer half the sausage mixture in the pan, then half the bread cubes and shredded cheese. Scatter half the spinach over the top. Continue layering with remaining sausage mixture, bread, shredded cheese and spinach. Whisk together milk, half and half, eggs, basil and seasoning, then pour over layered ingredients in pan. Cover dish with plastic wrap and refrigerate 2 hours or overnight. Remove dish from refrigerator and let stand on the counter 20 minutes while preheating oven to 325 degrees. Remove plastic wrap and sprinkle dish with Asiago cheese. Bake casserole uncovered 60 minutes or until the top puffs and the center tests done when a small knife is inserted. Cool 10 to 15 minutes then cut into squares and serve warm. Refrigerate leftovers; reheat in the microwave. Makes 6 servings. Variations • Substitute 4 ounces diced Canadianstyle bacon, s autéed pancetta or crumbled, cooked bacon for the Italian sausage. Meat can be omitted. • Substitute for fresh spinach half of a 10-ounce package frozen, chopped spinach, thawed, briefly sautéed and drained to remove excess liquid. • Omit spinach and substitute fresh steamed asparagus tips, cooked artichoke hearts or sliced mushrooms, sautéed and drained to remove excess liquid.

S tuffe d F re nch T oast & M aple Cinnamon Blueberry Syrup This delicious pan-fried French toast is a little crispy on the outside, crunchy on the inside, a bit custardy and not too sweet. It is best freshly cooked, but you can save time by soaking the stuffed bread in the egg mixture overnight then cooking it shortly before serving. If you prefer a less-sweet syrup topping, substitute a warm fruit compote. Combine 2 1/2 pints of mixed berries, 3 tablespoons tangy orange juice, zest of 1 orange, 1/4 cup brown sugar (or

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Splenda® Brown Sugar) and a pat of butter. Simmer on low heat 8 to 10 minutes until berries release their juices. Stuffed French Toast 1 8-ounce package cream cheese, softened 1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar, or to taste 1/2 cup lightly toasted slivered almonds, coarsely chopped grated zest of 1 lemon 1 teaspoon pure almond extract salt, as needed 4 large eggs 1 cup half and half or milk 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg 1 loaf of challah or other egg bread, cut in 12 to 14 slices, 3/4-inch thick unsalted butter and vegetable oil for frying fresh blueberries, for garnish confectioners’ sugar In a small bowl, stir together cream cheese, sugar, almonds, lemon zest, almond extract and a pinch of salt. Whisk together eggs, half and half, vanilla, nutmeg and another pinch of salt; pour into a shallow pan. On half the bread slices, spread one side with 1 to 2 tablespoons of the cheese mixture. Top with remaining slices of bread. Dip each “sandwich” on both sides in the egg custard 10 to 15 seconds; place on a baking sheet. In a large frying pan over medium heat or a griddle, heat a small amount of butter and vegetable oil. Cook French toast in batches, about 2 minutes for each side. Keep warm in a low oven until ready to serve. Large slices can be cut in half; arrange on a platter or serve on individual plates. Dust with powdered sugar; garnish with berries. Serve with warm Maple-Cinnamon Blueberry Syrup. Makes 6 or 7 portions. Maple-Cinnamon Blueberry Syrup 2 cups quality, pure maple syrup 2 1/2 to 3 cups fresh blueberries or 1 12-ounce bag frozen blueberries, preferably organic 1/2 cinnamon stick 1 to 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, or to taste In a medium saucepan, combine

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syrup, berries and cinnamon; simmer over low heat 5 to 6 minutes or until berries burst. Stir in lemon juice. Discard cinnamon. Serve warm. Refrigerate leftover syrup; warm to serve. Variations Spiced Blueberry Syrup: Simmer 2 12-ounce jars Smuckers Blueberry Syrup with 3 cups fresh blueberries or one 12-ounce bag frozen berries and 1 whole cinnamon stick. Stir in 2 tablespoons lemon juice; discard cinnamon stick. To make Strawberry Syrup, follow the recipe using fresh strawberries and strawberry syrup; omit cinnamon. Serve over Stuffed French toast garnished with fresh strawberries. A deliciously excessive variation is Stuffed French Toast topped with sliced Carolina peaches, a drizzle of pure maple syrup, and a scoop of Ben & Jerry’s Cinnamon Bun (caramel) Ice Cream.

P e a c h e s & C r e a m B r e a k fa st Porridge A welcome change from cold cereal, Cream of Wheat’s texture is similar to grits, but it’s actually farina made with ground wheat instead of corn. One serving supplies nearly half of the daily value of iron and can provide up to 70 percent calcium when served with milk. Add a glass of orange juice; Vitamin C helps enhance the amount of iron the body can absorb. The recipe can be increased, as necessary. 1 1/2 cups water, plus more if needed 1/2 cup maple syrup, honey or molasses 2 tablespoons currants or chopped raisins 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg or cinnamon pinch salt 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 1/2 cup Original 2 1/2 Minute Cream of Wheat 2 tablespoons wheat germ, if desired fresh peeled, sliced peaches or frozen thawed, sliced peaches 3 tablespoons lightly toasted chopped pecans cream, half and half or milk, as desired

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In a small saucepan, bring water, syrup, raisins, nutmeg and salt to a boil. In a medium-size saucepan, melt 1 tablespoon of the butter over medium-high heat. Add farina and wheat germ; stir 1 to 2 minutes or until lightly toasted. Reduce heat to medium-low. Off the heat, gradually pour hot liquid into the grain, stirring continually with a long wooden spoon to avoid hot steam. Place back on the burner, stir and cook 3 minutes or until thickened. Porridge can be kept warm on the lowest heat until served; stir often, thinning with a little water or milk, if necessary. Spoon portions into serving bowls; top with 1 teaspoon butter, several peach slices, 1 tablespoon pecans and cream, as desired. Makes 3 servings. Recipe adapted from Cooking with Grains by Susan Fuller Slack (H P Books).

Apricot Almond Danish Keep the puff pastry sheets cold when you use them. Make clean cuts on the pastry so the edges will puff. 1 17.3-ounce box puff pastry sheets, thawed 1 12.5-ounce can Solo Almond Cake & Pastry Filling 1 15-ounce can lite, unpeeled apricots, packed in juice, well-drained 1/2 cup melted apricot preserves 1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar 1 to 2 tablespoons cream or milk or reserved apricot juice 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Remove one pastry sheet from the refrigerator at a time. Roll out gently on a lightly floured surface to remove creases and enlarge slightly. Cut lengthwise into 3 even strips. Cut widthwise two times to form 9 squares. Spread a heaping teaspoon almond filling over the center of each square then top with an apricot half, cut side down. (Refrigerate remaining filling for another baking use.) Brush apricots with

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jam. To finish each pastry, gently pull two corners of each pastry square up to the center and pinch together. Place shaped pastries on a large baking sheet lined with parchment paper or coated lightly with vegetable spray. Bake 12 to 15 minutes until pastry is puffed, crispy and golden brown. Remove from oven. Combine confectioners’ sugar, cream and vanilla then drizzle over each pastry. Serve warm or at room temperature. Pastries can be reheated before serving. Makes 18 small pastries.

Southern Brunch Biscuits Serve these decadent cheese biscuits hot with eggs and sugar-cured country-style ham or crispy bacon. They’re delicious spread with butter and bitter orange marmalade, honey or berry preserves. To make ahead, cool freshly baked biscuits, wrap tightly and freeze. Reheat in the microwave or wrap in foil and heat in a low oven. 3 cups Gold Medal® self-rising flour 1/4 cup granulated sugar 1 to 2 teaspoons grated orange zest 4 ounces (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut in pieces 2 ounces cold cream cheese, in pieces 2/3 cup shredded extra-sharp Cheddar cheese 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 cups whole buttermilk, or as needed Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Grease large baking sheet with butter or cooking spray. In large bowl, whisk together flour, sugar and orange zest. Cut in butter and cream cheese until mixture becomes coarse crumbles. Add 1 1/2 cups buttermilk and gently stir with a fork until mixture starts to come together. Add remaining buttermilk, as needed, to form a soft, moist dough. Turn out on a surface lightly floured with plain flour. Fold dough 2 or 3 times with a pastry scraper. Don’t overwork dough or biscuits will be tough. Pat the dough out 1 inch thick. Cut biscuits with a 3-inch biscuit cutter; place on prepared baking sheet about 1/4 inch apart. Brush tops with melted butter. Bake 15 to 18 minutes until tops are golden brown. Serve warm. Makes about 16 biscuits. Tip: Dough is moist and slightly sticky. If necessary, dust cutter lightly with plain flour. Use a larger cutter for bigger biscuits, which are good for stuffing with ham.

Orange Yogurt & Berry Parfaits If you don’t have parfait glasses, be creative and use white wine glasses, glass coffee cups or pretty glass dessert bowls. Or why not layer the yogurt, granola and fruit in a large glass trifle bowl and invite people to help themselves? Tangy, strained Greek yogurt is thicker — a little like sour cream but without all the calories. If your brand of yogurt

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“B runch … puts you in a good temper , it makes you satisfied with yourself and your fellow beings, it sweeps away the worries and cobwebs of the week.” Guy Beringer, 1895

is watery, thicken the texture and concentrate the flavor by draining it in the refrigerator several hours in a strainer lined with a coffee filter. 1 quart (4 cups) plain Greek or other yogurt 1/4 cup frozen orange juice concentrate, thawed 3 tablespoons honey, or to taste 1 vanilla bean, halved lengthwise, or 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract fresh mixed berries, as desired (blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, strawberries) strips of orange rind and fresh mint sprigs Maple Walnut Granola, as needed (recipe below) Raspberry Sauce, (recipe below) Two days ahead, prepare granola; prepare and refrigerate raspberry sauce. One day ahead, combine yogurt, orange concentrate and honey in a large bowl. With a small knife, slit open vanilla bean and scrape some seeds into the yogurt; stir in the pod. Cover tightly and refrigerate overnight. Remove vanilla bean before serving. For each serving, spoon 1 to 2 tablespoons granola into each dish then 1/3 cup yogurt. Top with a spoonful of raspberry sauce and some berries. Continue layering ingredients to the top of the dish, ending with raspberry sauce, berries and a sprinkle of granola. Garnish with orange strips and mint sprigs. Serve at once or refrigerate up to 2 hours until serving time. Makes 6 servings. Raspberry Sauce It’s optional but adds a special touch. Drizzle over pancakes with maple syrup to enhance the flavor; decorate with fresh raspberries. 1 tablespoon cornstarch 1 10-ounce box frozen raspberries in syrup, thawed 2 to 3 teaspoons fresh lemon juice to taste In a small saucepan, stir cornstarch into raspberries until well dissolved. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture comes to a full boil; cook for 1 minute. When slightly thickened, remove from heat and stir in lemon juice. Pour into a fine strainer over a bowl and press out seeds. Put strained sauce in a jar and refrigerate until needed.

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Maple-Walnut Granola Stir into yogurt, warm oatmeal or cold cereal for extra flavor and crunch. 1/4 cup coconut would be a tasty addition. 2 cups old-fashioned oats 1/2 cup chopped pecan or walnut pieces 1/4 cup whole wheat flour or white flour 1/4 cup nonfat dry milk powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 3/4 cup pure maple syrup 2 tablespoons safflower or canola oil 1 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract 1 cup dried fruits of choice, in small pieces (apricots, cherries, cranberries, blueberries, plums, golden raisins) Grease a large baking sheet. Heat oven to 300 degrees. In a large bowl, mix oats, nuts, flour, dry milk and salt. In a small bowl, combine maple syrup, oil and vanilla; pour into the oat mixture and coat well. Spread mixture over a large baking sheet. Bake 20 minutes, stirring one or two times. If necessary, rotate pan for even cooking. Cook 10 minutes more, or until nuts and oats become fragrant. Remove from the oven and immediately stir in dried fruits. Cool and store in an airtight container up to one week. Makes about 4 cups. Recipe can be doubled.

Mango & Passion Fruit Smoothies Tangy and refreshing, smoothies are a great way to start the day. Freeze the cut-up fresh fruits to give the smoothies a thicker consistency and to keep them cold. Store-bought frozen fruit works well, too. Passion fruits are delicious — their scent and flavor are like nectar. They are not easy to find and their yield is small so substitute commercial juice or nectar. If passion fruits are available, cut several in half then scrape out the juice and edible seeds to include in your smoothies. Passion fruit sorbet offers the essence of the fruit flavor. A decadent idea for breakfast - but worth every sip! 1/2 cup frozen Welch’s Passion Fruit Flavored Fruit Juice Cocktail 1/2 cup plain Greek yogurt or other plain yogurt 1 medium ripe banana, peeled, partially frozen 1/2 cup tart fresh orange juice 1 cup fresh mango or pineapple cubes, frozen 1/2 heaping cup ice cubes 1 14-ounce carton Häagen-Dazs® Passion Fruit or Mango Sorbet mint sprigs for garnish Put all the ingredients except mint and sorbet into a blender; process until smooth. Pour into chilled white wine glasses. Put a small scoop of sorbet into the top of

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each glass; garnish with a mint sprig. Serve at once. Makes 3 to 4 servings. Recipe can be doubled. Smoothies can be made and frozen in a container a day or two ahead. Thaw partially, stir until slushy and serve. Makes 4 servings. Variation: Add 1 cup of the sorbet to the blender with the other ingredients; blend until smooth.

Carolina Breakfast Shrimp The Charleston breakfast dish, shrimps and hominy, has been popular for decades and is now a culinary icon. In its simplest form, it has long been a favorite among coastal fishermen and their families. Hominy grits are a staple food that practically every long-time South Carolinian knows how to make. Make sure your grits are cooked and waiting before you start preparing the shrimp. 1 pound large raw shrimp, preferably fresh, wild American 2 slices quality bacon, such as Applewood smoked bacon 1 tablespoon butter 1 small sweet onion, finely chopped 1/2 medium red bell pepper, in small dice 1 garlic clove, minced 2 small green onions, thinly sliced 1 cup shrimp stock or chicken broth, more if needed 1 to 2 tablespoons lemon juice, to taste salt and black pepper, to taste dash Tabasco, to taste Clean shrimp. In a large skillet cook bacon until crisp; set aside. Add butter to the bacon fat in the skillet over medium heat-high; cook onion, red bell pepper and garlic 3 to 4 minutes or until tender. Add shrimp; stir about 2 minutes then mix in green onions. Stir in 1 cup broth, lemon juice, salt, pepper and Tabasco. Cook 2 to 3 minutes more until shrimp is done. Taste and adjust seasonings, if necessary. If a thicker sauce is desired, mix about 2 teaspoons cornstarch into 3 tablespoons chicken broth or water and stir into shrimp mixture. Cook 1 minute or until thickened slightly. Serve shrimp mixture over hot grits; garnish with crumbled bacon. Makes 4 to 5 servings.

Maple Pecan Bacon Sweet, salty and delicious! Bacon may be the most popular breakfast and brunch meat. Bacon-mania has created a new genre of foods like bacon-flavored chocolate and bacon ice cream. Preparing bacon for brunch couldn’t be easier. If you don’t have a rack, form ridges in an extra long piece of heavy-duty foil to catch the bacon fat. Additional flavorings can include a pinch of cracked black pepper or cayenne pepper, Dijon mustard or light brown sugar.

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1 pound thick-sliced or medium-sliced quality bacon (16 to 20 slices) 1/3 cup quality maple syrup, or as needed 1/2 cup finely minced pecans, if desired Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Place a rack on heavyduty (half-sheet) baking sheet lined with foil. Or, cover baking sheet with foil or a large Silpat pan liner. Arrange bacon on the rack; cook 15 minutes or until 3/4 done*. Brush bacon slices lightly with maple syrup; sprinkle with pecans. Cook 4 or 5 minutes until crisp and browned. Watch carefully to prevent burning. Drain on paper towels; serve warm. If necessary, cook on 2 baking sheets; rotate pans while cooking. Makes 6 to 8 servings. *Partially cooked bacon can be drained and refrigerated a day ahead. The following morning, place on a baking sheet, glaze lightly with syrup, sprinkle with nuts, if used, and bake in a 375 degree oven about 5 minutes. Suggestions French Toast: Use 1/2 to 1 inch-thick bread slices. Choose egg breads like braided challah, brioche, croissants, Sally Lunn, Hawaiian sweet bread or fruit filled panettone. Try thick Texas toast, sourdough and cinnamon raisin breads. Extra dry, crusty French, Italian or Cuban bread slices can be cut on the diagonal then soaked in the egg mixture overnight. Publix carries many varieties, including challah and Cuban bread. Cream of Wheat cereal (farina) can be used to give French Toast a crispy coating. Dip bread in the egg and milk mixture, then coat both sides with dry cereal; sauté in butter or bake in the oven. Brush Canadian bacon or ham slices with a mixture of Dijon mustard sweetened with some maple syrup. Broil on both sides until sizzling hot. Wine-based brunch drinks can include champagne framboise (with fresh strained raspberries), Kir (white wine and crème de Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. cassis), Kir Royal (champagne and crème de cassis), Spritzer (white wine, club soda, twist Also, visit our website to subscribe to our newsletter of lemon) and the Bellini (pureed white for everything you need to know about peaches or peach nectar and Prosecco). where to go, what to do and how to save money. Fruit ideas for brunch include a colorful fruit platter, a beautiful bowl of fresh berries, skewers of strawberries, pineapple wedges and melon cubes, grilled fresh apricot or peach halves, papaya slices with lime wedges, thick slices of quality dried fruits sprinkled with light brown sugar and caramelized, or fresh figs and dates with Greek yogurt and pine nuts.

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New to the neighborhood?

New Home Communities indicates a natural gas community

1. Allan’s Mill Price Range of New Homes: $100s - $160s School District: Richland 2 Palmetto Homes & Land Realty, LLC Mark Wright, (803) 404-1983 www.candcbuilders.com Directions: Take Percival Rd. to Smallwood. Turn left on Old Percival Rd. Allan’s Mill is on the right. 2. Chelsea Park Price Range of New Homes: $179,900 $204,900 School District: Lexington Richland 5 Rymarc Homes (803) 732-0118 www.rymarc.com Directions: Take I-26 West to exit 97 for Hwy 176/Peak. Take an immediate right on Julius Richardson. Proceed .7 miles to end. Turn right at West Shadygrove. The Chelsea Park entrance is .2 miles on left. Turn left into Chelsea Park on Heathwood. Turn right on Newton Rd., and the new phase is straight ahead. 3. Concord Park Price Range of New Homes: $160s School District: Lexington 2 C and C Builders of Columbia Tina Horne, (803) 736-5008 www.candcbuilders.com Directions: Take I-77 to exit 2 for 12th St. Extension. Turn left on Taylor Rd. behind Busbee Middle School. 4. Heath Pond Price Range of New Homes: $140s - $250s School District: Kershaw Palmetto Homes & Land Realty, LLC Diane Nevitt, (803) 414-3945; Dan Long, (803) 917-0947 www.DianeNevitt.com Directions: Take I-20 East to exit 87 for White Pond/Elgin. Turn left onto White Pond Rd., then left onto Larry Jeffers Rd. Heath Pond is ahead on the right. 5. The Homestead Subdivision Price Range of New Homes: $130s - $200s School District: Richland 2 EXIT Real Estate Solutions Richard Carr, (803) 421-9630 www.ExitColumbiaSC.com Directions: Take I-77 North to Farrow Rd. North. Turn right onto Hardscrabble, then right onto North Brickyard. Homestead Subdivision is on the left. 6. Jacobs Creek Price Range of New Homes: $124,900 $224,900

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School District: Richland 2 Great Southern Homes RMS – Realty & Marketing Services Robert Penny, (803) 360-9165 www.gshomes.gs Directions: Take I-20 East to exit 82 for Spears Creek Church Rd. Turn left onto Spears Creek Church Rd. Continue for three miles and cross Two Notch Rd. Jacob’s Creek will be approximately 1/2 mile ahead on the right. Follow signs to the new model home. 7. Lake Frances Price Range of New Homes: $169,900 $194,900 School District: Lexington 1 Rymarc Homes (803) 315-6409 www.rymarc.com Directions: Take I-20 to exit 55 for Hwy 6 East. Turn right at Hwy 6 East/S. Lake Dr., and continue for 3.6 miles. Turn left at Platt Springs Rd., and continue for 3.5 miles. Take a sharp right at Ramblin Rd., and go .5 mile. Turn right into Lake Frances on Lake Frances Way. 8. Lexington Villas Price Range of New Homes: $184,900 $273,900 School District: Lexington 1 Epcon Communities Jennah Wells, (803) 520-4381 www.LexingtonVillas.com Directions: Take I-20 West to exit 61 for Hwy 378/Sunset Blvd. Turn right, and go four miles toward Lake Murray. Turn right onto Whiteford Way. Lexington Villas will be ahead on the left. 9. The Lofts at Printers Square Price Range of New Homes: $749,000 $1,550,000 School District: Richland 1 Coldwell Banker United, Realtors® Danny & Karen Hood, (803) 227-3220 or (803) 227-3221 www.LoftsAtPrintersSquare.com Directions: In the Vista, the Lofts at Printers Square are at the corner of Lady and Pulaski streets. 10. LongCreek Plantation Price Range of New Homes: $250,000 $650,000 School District: Richland 2 Plantation Properties (803) 754-2071 www.longcreekplantation.com Directions: Take I-77 North to the Killian Rd.

exit, and turn right. Follow the signs to LongCreek Plantation. 11. Peach Grove Villas Price Range of New Homes: $184,900 $273,900 School District: Richland 2 Epcon Communities Levi Weisser, (803) 223-9545 www.PeachGroveVillas.com Directions: Take I-20 East to exit 80. Turn left onto Clemson Rd. Go 1.5 miles (towards the Village at Sandhill), and turn right onto Earth Rd. Peach Grove Villas is located on the right just before the entrance to Woodcreek Farms. 12. Pine Forest Price Range of New Homes: $120s - $180s School District: Kershaw Palmetto Homes & Land Realty, LLC Diane Nevitt, (803) 414-3945 www.candcbuilders.com Directions: Take I-20 East to the Elgin exit. Turn left onto White Pond Rd. Continue to the traffic light in Elgin, crossing Main St./Hwy 1. Cross railroad tracks, and bear right onto Smyrna Rd. Pine Forest is on the left about a mile ahead. 13. Quail Creek Price Range of New Homes: $100s - $150s School District: Kershaw Palmetto Homes & Land Realty, LLC Diane Nevitt, (803) 414-3945 www.candcbuilders.com Directions: Take I-20 East to the Elgin exit. Turn left onto White Pond Rd. Continue to the traffic light in Elgin, crossing Main St./Hwy 1. Cross railroad tracks, and bear right onto Smyrna Rd. Turn right onto Wildwood Ln., and then left onto Cook Rd. then left into Quail Creek community. 14. Rabon’s Farm Price Range of New Homes: $79,900 $159,900 School District: Richland 2 Great Southern Homes RMS – Realty & Marketing Services Lauren Sawyer, (803) 360-4327; Sandy Cleaves, (803) 622-9065 www.gshomes.gs Directions: Take I-77 North to Two Notch Rd. exit. Turn right onto Two Notch, then left onto Rabon Rd. Turn right onto Flora Dr. Rabon’s Farm is .5 mile ahead on the right. Take second entrance, and model home is on the left. 15. Rutledge Place Price Range of New Homes: $125,000 $225,000

School District: Kershaw Palmetto Homes & Land Realty, LLC Barbara Jordan, (803) 243-0524; Steve King, (803) 600-9414 www.barbarajordan.homesandland.com Directions: Take I-20 East to exit 98. Turn left onto Hwy 521 North. Continue 5.7 miles through Camden. Rutledge Place is ahead on the left on Edinburgh Castle Rd. 16. Saluda River Club Price Range of New Homes: Townhomes from the $200s; Craftsman Homes from the $300s; Executive Homes from the $500s; Village District Homesites from the $60s; River District Homesites from $113,900 School District: Lexington 1 Saluda River Club Edmund H. Monteith, Jr., (803) 358-3969 www.saludariverclub.com Directions: Take I-20 West to exit 61 for Hwy

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378. Turn right, and take an immediate right onto Corley Mill Rd. The entrance to Saluda River Club is located 1.9 miles down Corley Mill Rd. on the right. 17. South Brook Price Range of New Homes: $134,900 $152,900 School District: Lexington 1 Rymarc Homes (803) 315-6409 www.rymarc.com Directions: Take I-20 West to exit 51. Turn left, and South Brook is on the left. 18. Spring Knoll Price Range of New Homes: $120s - $150s School District: Lexington 1 Thomas Shumpert, (803) 518-2588 www.candcbuilders.com Directions: Take I-20 West to Hwy 6. Turn left

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toward Red Bank/Pelion. Go about 4 miles, and turn right onto Platt Springs Rd. Take the first road to the left, which is Brevard Rd.

Directions: Take I-77 North to exit 24. Turn left onto Wilson Blvd. Stonington will be one mile on the right.

19. Stoney Creek Price Range of New Homes: $220s - $280s School District: Lexington 1 ReMax Real Estate Consultants Thomas Shumpert, (803) 518-2588 www.candcbuilders.com Directions: Take Hwy 378 through Lexington, and turn right onto Wise Ferry Rd. Stoney Creek is ahead on the left.

21. The Thomaston Subdivision Price Range of New Homes: $160s - $200s School District: Richland 2 EXIT Real Estate Solutions Richard Carr, (803) 421-9630 www.ExitColumbiaSC.com Directions: Take I-77 North to exit 22. Turn right onto Killian Rd., then left onto Longreen Pkwy. Thomaston Subdivision is on the left.

20. Stonington Price Range of New Homes: $169,900 $199,900 School District: Richland 2 Rymarc Homes (803) 732-0118 www.rymarc.com

22. Wellesley Price Range of New Homes: $170,900 $194,900 School District: Lexington 1 Rymarc Homes (803) 808-1201

www.rymarc.com Directions: Take I-20 West to exit 61 for US 378/Lexington. Merge right on US 378, and turn left at the first light onto Ginny Ln. Continue to community ahead on the right. 23. Westcott Ridge Price Range of New Homes: $220s to $400,000 School District: Lexington/Richland 5 (Chapin) Russell & Jeffcoat Realtors, Inc. Brenda Berry, (803) 781-6552 www.westcottridge.com Directions: Take I-26 West to exit 97 for Hwy 176/ Peak. Turn right onto Broad River Rd. Continue 1 mile, and Westcott Ridge is on the left.

This listing is provided by the Home Builders Association of Greater Columbia.

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Best doctors

Best Doctors in the Midlands Columbia Metropolitan magazine is proud to present the Midlands doctors named to the 2011 Best Doctors in America list. This list is provided to us exclusively from Best Doctors, Inc., a 21-year-old company founded by doctors affiliated with Harvard Medical School. Once a year, Best Doctors, Inc., contacts physicians in the Columbia area who have been included on previous Best Doctors lists and asks, “If you or a loved one needed a doctor in your specialty, to whom would you refer them?” Those doctors who withstand the company’s vetting process are then added to the list. No one pays Columbia Metropolitan or Best Doctors, Inc. to be included. Following the list, you’ll find our special advertising section, where some of the doctors named to the list have provided more information about themselves and their practices. We hope you’ll find all of this information to be invaluable when searching for doctors and practices to fill your medical needs.

Allergy and Immunology Lisa Slatton Hutto Palmetto Allergy and Asthma Nine Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 430 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 765-9435 Lawrence Stanley Weiner Carolina Allergy and Asthma Consultants One Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 200 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 765-9233

anesthesiology Vincent J. Degenhart Critical Health System 1410 Blanding Street, Suite One Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 254-2394 Paul David Eckenbrecht Palmetto Health Richland

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Department of Anesthesiology Five Richland Medical Park Drive Columbia, SC 29202 Phone: (803) 434-6151 Satish M. Prabhu Critical Health System 1410 Blanding Street, Suite One Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 254-2394

cardiovascular disease H. Wade Collins III Columbia Heart Clinic Eight Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 300 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 256-6511 Amy Rawl Epps Columbia Cardiology 131 Sunset Court West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 744-4910

Barry J. Feldman Lexington Heart Clinic 120 West Hospital Drive West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 739-6500 Jennifer Feldman Lexington Heart Clinic 120 West Hospital Drive West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 739-6500 C. W. Hendricks Columbia Heart Clinic Eight Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 300 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 256-6511 William Joseph Hollins Columbia Heart Clinic Eight Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 300 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 256-6511

Christie Benet Hopkins University Specialty Clinics Department of Internal Medicine Two Medical Park Drive, Suite 506 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 540-1000 Benjamin Richard Jones Columbia Heart Clinic Eight Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 300 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 256-6511 Robert Allison Schulze, Jr. Columbia Heart Clinic Eight Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 300 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 256-6511

critical care medicine Raymond Bynoe University Specialty Clinics

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Department of Surgery Two Medical Park Drive, Suite 300 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 256-2657

Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 540-1000

Family Medicine Dermatology Jim C. Chow Columbia Skin Clinic Three Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 500 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 779-7316 Pierre G. Jaffe One Medical Park Drive, Suite 240 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 256-6648 Lee T. Jordan The Dermatology Group 1709 Barnwell Street Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 254-3376

endocrinology and metabolism James R. Brennan Laurel Endocrine and Thyroid Specialists 1740 Saint Julian Place Columbia, SC 29204 Phone: (803) 256-3534 Tu Lin University of South Carolina University Specialty Clinics Division of Endocrinology Two Medical Park Drive, Suite 502

Tisha Boston Senior Primary Care Practice at Palmetto Health Richland 3010 Farrow Road, Suite 300 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-1210 Robert Callis Lexington Family Practice Irmo 7037 St. Andrews Road Columbia, SC 29212 Phone: (803) 732-0963 Brian Cline Lexington Family Practice 76 Polo Road Columbia, SC 29223 Phone: (803) 699-7259 William Crigler Saluda Pointe Family Medicine 3630 Sunset Boulevard West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 239-1600 Gerald Fishman Irmo Medical Park Harbison Medical Associates 7033 St. Andrews Road, Suite 205 Columbia, SC 29212 Phone: (803) 749-1155 Rodney Fitzgibbon II Northeast Family Practice

3000 Northeast Medical Park, Suite 209 Columbia, SC 29223 Phone: (803) 736-6262 Robert Erik Hartvigsen 115 Blarney Drive Columbia, SC 29223 Phone: (803) 736-0731 Rutkamar Jani Spring Valley Family Practice 229 Longtown Road Columbia, SC 29229 Phone: (803) 419-4949 Scott Lamar Palmetto Health Richland Department of Family Medicine 3209 Colonial Drive

Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-6113 Margaret Matthews Senior Primary Care Practice at Palmetto Health Richland 3010 Farrow Road, Suite 300 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-1210 Tan J. Platt Palmetto Health Richland Department of Family Medicine 3209 Colonial Drive Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-6113 Sarah Schumacher Senior Primary Care

These lists are excerpted from The Best Doctors in America® 2011-2012 database, which includes over 45,000 doctors in more than 40 medical specialties. The Best Doctors in America® database is compiled and maintained by Best Doctors, Inc. For more information, visit www.bestdoctors.com, or contact Best Doctors by telephone at 800-675-1199 or by e-mail at research@bestdoctors.com. Please note that lists of doctors are not available on the Best Doctors web site. Best Doctors, Inc., has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list, but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause. Copyright 2011, Best Doctors, Inc. Used under license, all rights reserved. This list, or any parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without written permission from Best Doctors, Inc. No commercial use of the information in this list may be made without the permission of Best Doctors, Inc. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of the information in this list without permission. “Best Doctors”, “The Best Doctors in America” and the Best Doctors star-in-cross logo are registered trademarks of Best Doctors, Inc. in the U.S. and other countries, and are used under license.

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Department of Internal Medicine Two Medical Park Drive, Suite 501 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 540-1000

190 Parkridge Drive, Suite G100 Columbia, SC 29212 Phone: (803) 434-4700

Geriatric Medicine G. Paul Eleazer Senior Primary Care Practice at Palmetto Health Richland 3010 Farrow Road, Suite 300 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-1210

Geriatric Medicine/Hospice and Palliative Medicine Charles D. Petit Senior Primary Care Practice at Palmetto Health Richland Carolina Medical Plaza 3010 Farrow Road Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-1210

Hand Surgery

Victor Hirth Senior Primary Care Practice at Palmetto Health Richland 3010 Farrow Road, Suite 300 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-1210

Michael R. Ugino Midlands Orthopaedics 1910 Blanding Street Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 256-4107

William (Bill) C. Logan Senior Primary Care Practice at Palmetto Health Richland 3010 Farrow Road, Suite 300 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-1210

Infectious Disease

Margaret Matthews Senior Primary Care Practice at Palmetto Health Richland 3010 Farrow Road, Suite 300 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-1210

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Victor Hirth Senior Primary Care Practice at Palmetto Health Richland 3010 Farrow Road, Suite 300 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-1210

George (Tripp) Jones South Carolina Oncology Associates 166 Stoneridge Drive Columbia, SC 29210 Phone: (803) 461-3000

Ruben Luther Mayer Columbia Medical Group 4540 Trenholm Road Columbia, SC 29206 Phone: (803) 790-4700

Steven Allan Madden Lexington Oncology Associates 2728 Sunset Boulevard, Suite 402 West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 794-7511

Caroline Powell University of South Carolina University Specialty Clinics Department of Internal Medicine Two Medical Park Drive, Suite 501 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 540-1000

Leland Joseph McElveen South Carolina Oncology Associates 166 Stoneridge Drive Columbia, SC 29210 Phone: (803) 461-3000

M. Shawn Stinson University of South Carolina University Specialty Clinics Department of Internal Medicine Two Medical Park Drive, Suite 501 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 540-1000 Matthew Wisdom Senior Primary Care Practice at Palmetto Health Richland 3010 Farrow Road, Suite 300 Columbia, SC 29209 Phone: (803) 434-1210

Charles S. Bryan Providence Hospital Department of Infectious Disease 2435 Forest Drive Columbia, SC 29204 Phone: (803) 256-5300

Medical Oncology and Hematology

Internal Medicine

Phillip Eugene Baldwin South Carolina Oncology Associates 166 Stoneridge Drive Columbia, SC 29210 Phone: (803) 461-3000

Shawn Chillag University of South Carolina University Specialty Clinics

William Manion Butler South Carolina Oncology Associates 166 Stoneridge Drive Columbia, SC 29210 Phone: (803) 461-3000

William Harry Babcock South Carolina Oncology Associates 166 Stoneridge Drive Columbia, SC 29210 Phone: (803) 461-3000

Robert Ernest Smith, Jr. South Carolina Oncology Associates 166 Stoneridge Drive Columbia, SC 29210 Phone: (803) 461-3000

Neurological Surgery Scott B. Boyd Columbia Neurosurgical Associates 132 Sunset Court West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 794-3700 Burke H. Dial University of South Carolina University Specialty Clinics Department of Neurosurgery Three Medical Park Drive, Suite 310 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-8323 James R. Howe University of South Carolina University Specialty Clinics Department of Neurosurgery Three Medical Park Drive, Suite 310 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-8323

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Neurology James (John) E. Carnes South Carolina Neurological Clinic 1333 Taylor Street, Suite 1C Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 254-6391 Te-Long Hwang University of South Carolina University Specialty Clinics Department of Neurology Eight Medical Park Drive, Suite 420 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 545-6050

Obstetrics and Gynecology Judith Thompson Burgis University of South Carolina School of Medicine Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Two Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 208 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 779-4928 Myles Davis Columbia Women’s Healthcare 1301 Taylor Street, Suite 6J Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 254-3230 Sharon I. Eden Women Physicians Associates Nine Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 620 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 779-6776 Lilly S. Filler Women Physicians Associates Nine Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 620 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 779-6776 Anthony Gregg University of South Carolina School of Medicine Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Two Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 208

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Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 779-4928 Mark Salley South Carolina ObGyn 1333 Taylor Street, Suite 2D Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 254-1300 Charles Frederick Shipley III Women’s Health and Diagnostic Center Lexington Medical Park One 2728 Sunset Boulevard, Suite 106 West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 936-7420 Sidney Terrell Smith South Carolina Oncology Associates 166 Stoneridge Drive Columbia, SC 29210 Phone: (803) 461-3000 George W. Watt Medical Park ObGyn Lexington Medical Park One 2728 Sunset Boulevard, Suite 103 West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 936-7430 Gail F. Whitman-Elia Advanced Fertility and Reproductive Endocrinology Institute 2728 Sunset Boulevard, Suite 305 West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 939-1515

Columbia, SC 29223 Phone: (803) 736-7200

Orthopaedic Surgery Kim John Chillag Moore Orthopaedic Clinic 14 Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 200 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 227-8000 Michael C. Tucker Premier Orthopaedic Specialists Three Medical Park Drive, Suite 330 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-6958

Pathology William R. Armstrong Pathology Associates of Lexington 2720 Sunset Boulevard West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 791-2410 John B. Carter Pathology Associates of Lexington 2720 Sunset Boulevard West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 791-2410 Beverly W. Daniel Pathology Associates of Lexington 2720 Sunset Boulevard West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 791-2410

Otolaryngology Alan Howard Brill Midland Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic Three Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 130 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 744-7770 William C. Giles CENTA Medical Group Nine Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 510 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 256-2483

Kitt McMaster Pathology Associates of Lexington 2720 Sunset Boulevard West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 791-2410 Ervin B. Shaw Pathology Associates of Lexington 2720 Sunset Boulevard West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 791-2410

Ophthalmology William Cain, Jr. Columbia Eye Clinic 1920 Pickens Street Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 779-3070 James B. Dickson Eye Consultants 1410 Blanding Street, Suite 200 Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 799-9919 Jeffrey G. Gross Carolina Retina Center 7620 Trenholm Road Extension

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Pediatric Allergy and Immunology

Pediatric Pulmonology

Lawrence Stanley Weiner Carolina Allergy and Asthma Consultants One Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 200 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 765-9233

Daniel C. Brown University Pediatrics Pulmonology Nine Medical Park Drive, Suite 505 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-2505

Pediatric Specialist/ Abused Children

Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology Janice Lynne Bacon University of South Carolina School of Medicine Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Two Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 208 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 779-4928 Judith Thompson Burgis University of South Carolina School of Medicine Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Two Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 208 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 779-4928

Pediatric Anesthesiology Mary E. Dalton Palmetto Health Richland Department of Anesthesiology Five Richland Medical Park Drive Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-6151 Larry J. Frazier Palmetto Health Richland Department of Anesthesiology Five Richland Medical Park Drive Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-6151 Christopher A. Yeakel Palmetto Health Richland Department of Anesthesiology Five Richland Medical Park Drive Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-6151

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Susan Breeland Ryan-Luberoff Assessment and Resource Center Wilson Building 1800 Colonial Drive Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 898-1470 Pediatric Cardiology

Pediatric Hematology-Oncology

Claudius Osborne Shuler III University Specialty Clinics Division of Pediatric Cardiology Nine Medical Park Drive, Suite 110 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-7940

Kevin Paul McRedmond Palmetto Health Richland Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders Seven Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 7215 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-3533

Matthew Wienecke University Specialty Clinics Division of Pediatric Cardiology Nine Medical Park Drive, Suite 110 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-7940

Pediatric Critical Care Greta S. Harper Palmetto Health Richland Department of Pediatric Critical Care Nine Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 530 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-4603 Robert D. Hubbird Palmetto Health Richland Department of Pediatric Critical Care Nine Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 110 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-4603

Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery Fred Piehl Midlands Orthopaedics 1910 Blanding Street Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 256-4107

Pediatric Otolaryngology Frederick Tatum Garner Carolina Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Associates 2016 Sumter Street Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 744-2700 William C. Giles CENTA Medical Group Nine Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 510 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 256-2483

Pediatric Specialist/Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Patrick T. Butterfield Carolina Psychiatric Services 160 Medical Circle, First Floor West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 796-6811 Clyde H. Flanagan, Jr. University of South Carolina School of Medicine Department of Neuropsychiatry and Behavioral Science 3555 Harden Street Extension, Suite 141 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-4248 Craig Stuck University of South Carolina School of Medicine Department of Neuropsychiatry and Behavioral Science 15 Medical Park Drive, Suite 141 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-4000

Pediatric Specialist/NeonatalPerinatal Medicine Victor Iskersky Palmetto Health Richland Department of Neonatology Five Richland Medical Park Drive

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Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-6392

Pediatric Specialist/Pediatric Clinical Genetics Kate Clarkson 1911 Thurmond Mall Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 799-5390

Pediatric Urology Jeffrey T. Ehreth Palmetto Children’s Urology Nine Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 420 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-2833

Pediatrics/General Teresa N. Baggett Palmetto Pediatrics 74 Polo Road Columbia, SC 29223 Phone: (803) 788-4886 Susan Montgomery Claytor Medical Park Pediatrics 120 Highland Center Drive, Suite 100 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 788-0577

Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 779-4001 Kay Lillard Moore Palmetto Pediatric & Adolescent Clinic 16 Woodcross Drive Columbia, SC 29212 Phone: (803) 732-0140 John A. Rider Carolina Pediatrics and Adolescent Care 7033 St. Andrews Road, Suite 103 Columbia, SC 29212 Phone: (803) 376-2838

Pediatrics/Hospital Medicine James Rast Stallworth University of South Carolina School of Medicine Division of General Pediatrics 14 Medical Park Drive, Suite 400 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-7945

Plastic Surgery Peter Carleton Haines The Center for Plastic Surgery 7033 St. Andrews Road, Suite 204 Columbia, SC 29212 Phone: (803) 732-5788

Psychiatry Deborah Marie Greenhouse Palmetto Pediatrics 3250 Harden Street Extension, Suite 100

James G. Bouknight Baptist Hospital

Division of Geriatric Psychiatry 1330 Taylor Marion Road Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 434-4813 Patrick T. Butterfield Carolina Psychiatric Services 160 Medical Circle, First Floor West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 796-6811 Clyde H. Flanagan, Jr. University of South Carolina School of Medicine Department of Neuropsychiatry and Behavioral Science 3555 Harden Street Extension, Suite 141 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-4248 Richard Frierson University of South Carolina School of Medicine Department of Neuropsychiatry and Behavioral Science 15 Medical Park, Suite 301 3555 Harden Street Extension Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-2808 Lynn Hunter Hackett William Jennings Bryan Dorn VA Medical Center Psychiatry Service (116) 6439 Garners Ferry Road Columbia, SC 29209 Phone: (803) 776-4000 Angela Dauby Harper Comprehensive Behavioral Care 1620 Lady Street, Suite B Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 451-7600 Edward McDonnell Kendall Columbia Area Mental Health 2015 Marion Street Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 898-0123

Paul Switzer III C.M. Tucker, Jr. Nursing Care Center 2200 Harden Street Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 737-5302 Joshua T. Thornhill IV University of South Carolina School of Medicine Department of Neuropsychiatry and Behavioral Science 3555 Harden Street Extension, Suite 141 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 434-4300 T. Hilda White 1415 Richland Street Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 730-8003

Pulmonary Medicine Richard Keith Bogan Palmetto Baptist Medical CenterColumbia SleepMed of South Carolina 1333 Taylor Street, Suite 6B Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 251-3093 Joseph Daniel Love Carolina Pulmonary and Critical Care 1333 Taylor Street, Suite 4G Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 296-3273

Radiation Oncology Raleigh James Boulware Palmetto Health Richland South Carolina Oncology Associates Seven Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 104 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 461-3452

Radiology Deborah D. Leverette 3612 Landmark Drive, Suite B Columbia, SC 29204 Phone: (803) 782-9280

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Layne Richard Clemenz Lexington Medical Center Department of Radiology 2720 Sunset Boulevard

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West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 791-2460 Tommy E. Cupples Women’s Care at Image Care 710 Rabon Road Columbia, SC 29223 Phone: (803) 462-3680 Clarence S. Davis III Lexington Medical Center Department of Radiology 2720 Sunset Boulevard West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 791-2460 Mark A. Lovern Palmetto Baptist Medical CenterColumbia Department of Radiology Marion Street at Taylor Street Columbia, SC 29220 Phone: (803) 296-5060

C. Alden Sweatman Surgical Associates of South Carolina 1850 Laurel Street Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 256-3400 Lynn M. Tucker Lexington Surgical Associates Medical Park One, Suite 104 2728 Sunset Boulevard West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 791-2722

Surgical Oncology Richard M. Bell University Specialty Clinics Department of Surgery Two Medical Park, Suite 306 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 256-2657

Urology Rheumatology Kathleen Patricia Flint Columbia Arthritis Center 1711 St. Julian Place Columbia, SC 29204 Phone: (803) 779-0911

Sleep Medicine Richard Keith Bogan Palmetto Baptist Medical CenterColumbia SleepMed of South Carolina 1333 Taylor Street, Suite 6B Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 251-3093

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John O. Fairey Columbia Urological Associates 1301 Taylor Street, Suite 1A Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 254-4591 Philip W. Kinder Columbia Urological Associates 1301 Taylor Street, Suite 1A Columbia, SC 29201 Phone: (803) 254-4591 Bruce H. Truesdale Lexington Urological Associates 139 Summer Place Drive West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 796-9968

Surgery

Vascular Surgery

Raymond Bynoe University Specialty Clinics Department of Surgery Two Medical Park Drive, Suite 300 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 256-2657

Robert R. M. Gifford University Specialty Clinics Department of Surgery Two Medical Park, Suite 306 Columbia, SC 29203 Phone: (803) 256-2657

Charles W. Harmon Lexington Surgical Associates 723 South Lake Drive Lexington, SC 29072 Phone: (803) 359-4133

William M. Moore, Jr. Southern Surgical Group 146 North Hospital Drive, Suite 310 West Columbia, SC 29169 Phone: (803) 796-8901 a p r i l 2011


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Advertising section: Best doctors

(L to R) Frederick C. Piehl, MD and Michael R. Ugino, MD

Orthopaedics

Midlands Orthopaedics, P.A. 1910 Blanding Street Columbia, SC 29201 • (803) 256-4107 With combined experience totaling 46 years, doctors Mike Ugino and Fred Piehl have spent their entire professional careers caring for patients in the Midlands. Dr. Ugino joined Midlands Orthopaedics in 1983 after completing a Fellowship in Hand and Microvascular Surgery at Duke University. Dr. Piehl began his practice in 1992 following his Fellowship in Pediatric Orthopaedics at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Their specialized training, years of expertise and commitment to excellent patient care have made these physicians leaders in their orthopaedic sub-specialties. Both men have witnessed tremendous advancements in orthopaedic medicine since they first began practicing in Columbia. 72 C o lu m b i a M e t ro p o l i ta n

Dr. Ugino notes that improved internal fixations of upper extremity fractures enable a much more rapid return of function to the hand than was possible in the 1980s. In other words, the plates, pins and screws that are now available to repair fractures greatly enhance the healing process. Additionally, the advent of functional cast bracing following surgery allows motion of the joints above and below the fracture, which prevents stiffness in the joint that could limit full extension and promotes early healing. Removable splints, braces and immobilizers have largely replaced the need for cast changes and afford improved comfort and convenience to the patient without sacrificing clinical outcomes. While technological advancements continue to change orthopaedic medicine in positive ways, the personal connection Dr. Ugino establishes with his patients has been a constant throughout his career. He finds it particularly rewarding to now treat the children and grandchildren of those patients he first met decades ago.

Dr. Piehl’s pediatric focus encompasses a broad range of orthopaedic care, from routine youth sports injuries to scoliosis to the musculoskeletal care of severely disabled children. He echoes Dr. Ugino’s observation that improved technology has revolutionized orthopaedic care over the past decade. He particularly notes that the treatment of scoliosis has dramatically improved since he began his practice. Resources are now available that provide better surgical correction outcomes in less time. Additionally, successful treatment options now exist for very young children with scoliosis. Without hesitation, Dr. Piehl cites his patients as the most enjoyable part of his practice. He values the opportunity to treat many children into adulthood and watch their quality of life improve with each course of treatment. Doctors Ugino and Piehl certainly project the vision of all Midlands Orthopaedics physicians: Advanced Options. Caring Specialists.

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Advertising section: Best doctors Orthopaedics

Midlands Orthopaedics, P.A. Robert M. Peele, Jr., MD Specialties: Sports Medicine, Shoulder and Knee Certification: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery

Michael R. Ugino, MD Specialty: Upper Extremity Certification: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery

Michael S. Green, MD Specialty: Upper Extremity Certifications: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery, Additional Certification Hand and Upper Extremity by American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery

M. David Redmond, MD Specialty: Physical Medicine and Electrodiagnosis Certifications: American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, American Board of Electrodiagnostic Medicine

Robert M. DaSilva, MD Specialties: Sports Medicine, Shoulder and Knee Certification: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery

Frederick C. Piehl, MD Specialty: Pediatric Orthopaedics Certification: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery

Thomas P. Gross, MD Specialty: Hip and Knee Replacement Certification: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery

James A. O’Leary, MD Specialty: Sports Medicine, Shoulder and Knee Certification: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery, with added qualifications in Sports Medicine

Coleman D. Fowble, MD Specialty: Traumatology Certification: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery

William C. James, III, MD Specialty: Foot and Ankle Certification: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery

Robert D. Santrock, MD Specialty: Foot and Ankle Certification: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery, American Academy of Wound Management

Thomas D. Armsey, MD Specialty: Non-Operative Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine Certification: Family Practice, Certificate of Advanced Qualifications in Primary Care Sports Medicine

Ivan E. LaMotta, MD Specialty: Adult Spine Certification: Board Eligible, American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery

Bernard G. Kirol, MD Specialty: Sports Medicine, Shoulder and Knee Certification: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery

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As Midlands Orthopaedics celebrates 30 years of orthopaedic excellence, we are both humbled and encouraged to reflect on our growth from a solo practice founded in 1981 by Dr. Richard Davis to a full scale orthopaedic center staffed by 14 fellowshiptrained physicians. From the outset, Dr. Davis envisioned a practice equipped to provide patients with comprehensive musculoskeletal care by physicians with the highest level of training and expertise. As a result, each of our physicians has completed a Fellowship in his unique orthopaedic sub-specialty. This highly specialized training that occurs after residency equips physicians to provide the most advanced diagnostic tools and treatment options. While all of our physicians are prepared to address general orthopaedic needs, we are proud to offer patients sub-specialty expertise to diagnose and treat their muscle, bone or joint pain from neck to toe. Advanced imaging via our MRI, digital x-ray and bone density scanner enhances our ability to efficiently and accurately diagnose orthopaedic injuries or disease within our office. Because these high quality images are quickly available to our physicians, treatment can proceed without the delay of awaiting results from outside facilities. Perhaps the most exciting development in our recent history was the opening of our Ambulatory Surgery Center (ASC) in 2006. Advances in regional anesthesia allow increasingly complex surgery to be performed on an outpatient basis. Patients benefit financially as the total cost of procedures performed in an ASC is typically less than in a hospital setting. Abundant surface parking and a comfortable waiting room reduce the stress of navigating a large healthcare campus. Because our ASC is primarily dedicated to orthopaedic procedures, patients benefit from the extensive expertise of a tight-knit, highlytrained team specializing in orthopaedic care. Infection risk is also reduced when orthopaedic surgeries are performed in a specialty ASC simply because these patients have less exposure to others with contagious diseases that is inherent in a general hospital setting. As we prepare for the future, our physicians and staff remain committed to providing advanced options in diagnosis, treatment and service. We have recently introduced a web portal allowing patients to communicate with our staff electronically and securely on any topic. The portal provides detailed billing information, a variety of educational materials, the ability to request appointments and make on-line payments. In the near future, patients will also have access to wi-fi in all of our waiting areas. We look forward to serving you for the next 30 years! C o lu m b i a M e t ro p o l i ta n 73


Advertising section: Best doctors

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Advertising section: Best doctors

Back Row (L to R): Neurosurgery- Scott B. Boyd, MD; William M. Rambo, Jr., MD; Brett C. Gunter, MD; Randall G. Drye, MD; Front Row (L to R): Neurosurgery- Karl A. Lozanne, MD; Thomas J. Holbrook, Jr., MD; Pain Medicine- Eva J. Rawl, MD; Steven B. Storick, MD

Neurological Surgery

Columbia Neurosurgical Associates, P.A. 720 Rabon Road, Columbia, SC 29203 132 Sunset Court, West Columbia, SC 29169 (803) 462-0423 or (803) 794-3700 www.columbianeurosurgical.com Founded in 1953, Columbia Neurosurgical Associates has established a tradition of excellence for over 50 years. As one of the largest neurosurgical practices in South Carolina, the physicians and surgeons of Columbia Neurosurgical Associates provide diagnostic and therapeutic care with an emphasis on emerging technology based on traditional principles. The group consists of six neurosurgeons and two pain management physicians who have decades of experience and perform thousands of procedures each year. Their goal is to make all reasonable attempts to treat patients with the numerous available conservative treatment options prior to surgery. However, when surgery is needed Columbia Neurosurgical Associates surgeons offer a full range of adult neurosurgical options with a focus on minimally invasive surgeries which result in less pain, faster recovery, and overall better long-term outcome. Procedures range from

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artificial disc replacement to endoscopic brain tumor surgery. Areas of expertise include minimally invasive spine surgery, many of which are performed as outpatient procedures. Vertebral fractures, pituitary tumors, gamma knife radio-surgery, and stereotactic computer-assisted surgeries are also commonly performed. Many spinal and neurosurgical conditions can be treated without surgery and the group’s pain management program is an integral part of this non-operative treatment. Its two board certified pain medicine specialists are widely respected and have been successful in relieving pain for many patients who can return to comfortable, productive lives. The group strives to provide timely and convenient patient care and has two locations in the Northeast and West Columbia. Cranial and spinal imaging services are available when needed using a high strength 1.5T MRI unit located at its Northeast location MRI Center. Also, physical therapy services are offered on-site at both locations. Columbia Neurosurgical Associates surgeons are affiliated with Lexington Medical Center, Palmetto Health Baptist Medical Center and both Providence Hospital campuses. All of this combines to provide patients with the widest range of neurosurgical and spinal care options available in central South Carolina.

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Advertising section: Best doctors

(L to R) Vince Vismara, MD, Guillermo Pineda, MD, Jennifer Feldman, MD, Barry Feldman, MD, Kevin Baugh, MD, Kyle Hewett, MD

Cardiovascular Disease

Lexington Heart Clinic 120 West Hospital Drive West Columbia, SC 29169 (803) 739-6500 • www.lexheart.com Lexington Heart Clinic is the Midlands’ leading center for prevention, diagnosis, treatment and interventional care for diseases of the heart and blood vessels. Our doctors, nurse practitioners, physician assistant and staff are dedicated to providing quality cardiovascular care in a warm, comfortable and caring environment. Our comprehensive approach to patient care takes into consideration each patient’s lifestyle, risk factors and entire medical history when formulating a personalized treatment plan. We also put a strong emphasis on prevention and education, helping our patients ward off 76 C o lu m b i a M e t ro p o l i ta n

heart disease and other related health problems. We are proudly affiliated with Lexington Medical Center and Palmetto Health Richland Heart Hospital. Our hospital services include consultation, invasive and noninvasive diagnostic testing and interventions. Our physicians are expertly trained in pacemaker implantation, electrophysiology testing, coronary and peripheral angioplasty and stenting, as well as atrial septal defect closures. Lexington Heart offers a full spectrum of services in our West Columbia office, including nuclear stress testing, echocardiograms, peripheral vascular studies, pacemaker and defibrillator checks and programming, Coumadin monitoring and more. Our Nuclear and Echocardiography laboratories have been nationally accredited since 2006. Lexington Heart always strives to improve outcomes for our patient community. We

actively participate in several research studies. In addition, our practice boldly implemented a new electronic medical record system last year. Now Lexington Heart voluntarily participates in the American Academy of Cardiology clinical registry to compare our patient outcomes to cardiology practices nationally. Your health is our passion. Our six cardiologists have over 77 years of cardiac experience, and our two nurse practitioners and physician assistant have 33 years experience providing cardiology service. Our office staff are dedicated to serving our patient community with timely and prompt service. For more information about Lexington Heart, please refer to our website, www.lexheart.com. We believe if you put your HEART in our hands ... your health will speak for itself! a p r i l 2011


Advertising section: Best doctors Ophthalmology

Carolina Retina Center 7620 Trenholm Road Extension Columbia, SC 29223 • (803) 736-7200 625 W. Wesmark Boulevard Sumter, SC 29150 • (803) 905-7700 7033 St. Andrews Road, Suite 301 Columbia, SC 29212 • (803) 407-7676 122 South 4th Street Hartsville, SC 29550 • (803) 736-7200 www.carolinaretinacenter.com

Michael A. Magee, MD, Jeffrey G. Gross, MD and Barron C. Fishburne, MD

Carolina Retina Center was founded in 1992 by Jeffrey G. Gross, MD, and has been providing excellent and compassionate care to patients throughout Central South Carolina for over 18 years. With the addition of Barron C. Fishburne, MD, and Michael A. Magee, MD, the practice has expanded to three board certified vitreoretinal specialists and four offices, including Northeast Columbia, Sumter, Irmo and Hartsville. The doctors are dedicated to continued clinical research activities in diabetic retinopathy, retinal vascular occlusions and macular degeneration, and patients with these diseases are afforded the latest interventions to treat blinding diseases. The doctors have co-authored and presented results of these studies at major national specialty meetings. All offices are easily accessible with ample parking and comforting surroundings, and they are equally equipped with the advanced diagnostic instruments required to provide superior care locally to all patients.

Allergy and Immunology

Palmetto Allergy & Asthma Nine Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 430 Columbia, SC 29203 • (803) 765-9435 Dr. Lisa Hutto (Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Allergy and Immunology) and the staff of Palmetto Allergy & Asthma are committed to being the regional leader for quality allergy and asthma care. Since its inception in 1990, the practice of Dr. Lisa Hutto has grown to become one of the largest single physician allergy practices in the Southeast. Our goal is to provide care to our patients in the

most efficient, caring and cost-effective manner. Our cost effective treatment with excellent outcomes has been noted by referring doctors, patients and major insurance companies. Our practice prides itself on putting the patient’s needs first and delivering the best quality care in a comfortable, nurturing environment. We look forward to seeing you in our office and improving your quality of life! Lisa S. Hutto, MD

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Advertising section: Best doctors Urology

Columbia Urological Associates 1301 Taylor Street, Suite 1A Columbia, SC 29201 • (803) 254-4591 John C. Rawl, M.D. Philip W. Kinder, M.D. John O. Fairey, M.D. John E. Wofford, M.D.

John G. Beasley, Jr., M.D. Terence N. Chapman, M.D. Kelly E. Maloney, M.D.

The doctors at Columbia Urological Associates have served the greater Columbia area for more than 60 years, combining experience, skill and compassion to provide the highest quality urological care available. The physicians provide a full range of medical and surgical services for all conditions of the genitourinary tract. These include diagnosis and treatment of kidney stones, male and female incontinence and erectile dysfunction as well as prostate, bladder, kidney and testicular cancer. Treatment options include same-day lithotripsy for kidney stones and the latest minimally invasive surgical procedures such as da Vinci robotic surgery, laparoscopic surgery, Greenlight laser surgery for enlarged prostate, no-scalpel vasectomy, urethral slings for incontinence as well as traditional open surgery. All of the physicians at Columbia Urological Associates are certified by the American Board of Urology, including the two newest partners, Dr. Terence Chapman and Dr. Kelly Maloney, who bring additional academic and fellowship experience to the team. Dr. Chapman completed a fellowship in urologic oncology and minimally invasive surgery and has performed over 500 da Vinci robotic procedures. Dr. Maloney previously served as Associate Residency Director and Assistant Professor of Surgery at Duke University and is currently the only female urologist in private practice in the Columbia area. Columbia Urological Associates has three offices in the Midlands. The main office is conveniently located in downtown Columbia, with satellite offices in Camden and Newberry. John O. Fairey, MD

Radiology

Women’s Care @ Image Care 710 Rabon Road • Columbia, SC 29203 • (803) 462-3680 www.imagecarellc.com Dr. Tommy Cupples received his fellowship training in Mammography from the Susan G. Komen Breast Center in Peoria, Illinois. He is certified by the American Board of Radiology and joined the ImageCare Radiology Group in 1995. The Group opened a private Women’s Imaging Center at their Northeast Facility in June of 2006 where Dr. Cupples specializes

in breast imaging and interventional procedures. All mammograms are performed on state of the art digital equipment. The Women’s Center offers routine annual screening mammograms, consultations, diagnostic mammograms, ultrasounds, interventional biopsy procedures, and breast MRI examinations.

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Advertising section: Best doctors Ophthalmology

Eye Consultants 1410 Blanding Street, Suite 200 • Columbia, SC 29201 • (803) 799-9919 Dr. James Dickson has been selected as Best Doctor for seven consecutive years. He completed his residency and fellowship at the world renowned Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia. His research and seminal dissertation on “Laser Applications In Surgery” was awarded the 1987 1st prize in not only US competition but also worldwide competition. This research was pivotal in the FDA clearance of modern Laser Surgical Applications. Dr. Dickson has been a board certified member of the prestigious American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery since 1987.

He is one of only three ophthalmologists in the state invited to test ophthalmologists for American Board Certification, which he has done for the past 20 years. Dr. Dickson is known as “the Doctor’s Doctor” and frequently teaches fellow surgeons on advanced eye surgery procedures. Dr. Dickson co-founded the first true Medi-Spa in Columbia and he also serves as medical director for a large southeastern laser company. Dr. Dickson specializes in cosmetic eyelid procedures, Botox, Cataract and Lasik surgery. He also does general ophthalmologic care.

James B. Dickson, MD, FACS

Otolaryngology and Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

Midland Ear, Nose & Throat Clinic

Alan H. Brill, MD

Three Richland Medical Park Drive, Suite 130 Columbia, SC 29203 • (803) 744-7770 • www.palmettomd.com Dr. Alan H. Brill, MD, is a well known achieved by means of treatment and otolaryngologist in Columbia, S.C., surgical correction of facial trauma, providing care for adults and children cancer, congenital diseases and acquired for more than 30 years. He is a board diseases. His office is outfitted to provide noncertified ENT surgeon and facial plastic surgeon specializing in surgical and surgical facial enhancements such as non-surgical treatments of the head and Botox®, facial fillers and laser treatments. neck region. He also offers extensive An array of skin care and anti-aging experience in the treatment of nasal and products such as the well known Obagi® skin care system are available. Whether sinus disease. His reputation as a head and neck the treatment is medical or cosmetic, our surgeon has been well documented goal is to provide each patient with quality by the number of positive outcomes care in a timely fashion.

Allergy and Immunology

Carolina Allergy & Asthma Consultants Three convenient locations: Downtown Columbia, (803) 929-0290 • Harbison/Irmo, (803) 407-0701 • Northeast Columbia, (803) 788-8603 www.CarolinaAllergyandAsthma.com At Carolina Allergy and Asthma Consultants, our goal is to provide you with the finest allergy, asthma and immunology care available in a friendly, efficient and economical manner. Our four American Specialty Board Certified Allergists are dedicated to providing comprehensive diagnosis and treatment of allergic conditions and diseases: asthma and frequent cough, hay fever, sinus infections, w w w. c o l u m b i a m e t ro . c o m

eye allergies, reactions to food, insect stings and drugs, skin allergies including eczema and hives as well as immune system problems that might cause frequent infections. We care for adults and children of all ages. Our doctors and dedicated professional staff are available to answer all of your questions. Please visit our website to learn more about us.

(L to R) Michael J. Bykowsky, M.D., Ph.D, David Perrick, M.D., Lawrence S. Weiner, M.D. and Robert A. Vande Stouwe, M.D., Ph.D. C o lu m b i a M e t ro p o l i ta n 79


Advertising section: Best doctors Family Medicine

Lexington Family Practice Irmo 7037 St. Andrews Road • Columbia, SC 29212 • (803) 732-0963 Dr. Robert Callis is a physician at Lexington Family Practice Irmo, in the Lexington Medical Center network of care. Dr. Callis says he enjoys family practice because it gives him the opportunity to make a difference in patients’ lives and see generations of family members, even having the opportunity to follow some families for 30 years. In addition, he is certified in Geriatrics and has a special interest in that area of medicine. Dr. Callis grew up in Tennessee. He received

an undergraduate degree from the University of Tennessee at Martin and a medical degree from the University of Tennessee Center for the Health Sciences. He completed a residency in family practice at the Medical University of South Carolina. Dr. Callis began working with Lexington Family Practice in 1979. In addition to his work there, he’s a deacon at First Baptist Church in Columbia and teaches medical students and residents at the USC School of Medicine.

Robert Callis, MD

Family Medicine

Lexington Family Practice Northeast 76 Polo Road Columbia, SC 29223 (803) 699-7255 Dr. Brian Cline works at Lexington Family Practice Northeast, a physician practice that is part of Lexington Medical Center. He is board certified in family medicine. Dr. Cline received his undergraduate degree from the Citadel. He received his medical

degree from the University of South Carolina School of Medicine and completed an internship and residency at Richland Memorial Hospital in Columbia. Dr. Cline has worked with Lexington Family Practice since 1998. He and his wife have two children.

Brian Cline, MD

Family Medicine

Harbison Medical Associates 7033 St. Andrews Road, Suite 205 Columbia, SC 29212 • (803) 749-1155 Dr. Gerald Fishman works at Harbison Medical Associates, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice. He is board certified in emergency medicine. Dr. Fishman received an undergraduate degree at Washington University in St. Louis and a medical degree from the Medical College of Georgia. He completed an internship at the University of

South Carolina and a residency in Emergency Medicine at Palmetto Health Richland. Dr. Fishman is a cofounder of Doctor’s Care. He has also worked as a physician for Columbia High School athletes and the State Athletic Commission for Professional Wrestling and other athletic events. Dr. Fishman was born and raised in Atlanta. Gerald Fishman, MD

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Advertising section: Best doctors Family Medicine

Spring Valley Family Practice 229 Longtown Road • Columbia, SC 29209 • (803) 419-4949 Dr. Rutkumar Jani is a physician with Spring Valley Family Practice in Northeast Columbia. He is board certified in family practice. Dr. Jani treats a broad spectrum of patients and has expertise in many areas of medicine. Dr. Jani was born in India. He received an undergraduate degree in pre-med at M.D. Science College in India. He received his

doctoral degree at M.P. Shah Medical College in India. Dr. Jani completed a rotating internship in pediatrics, family medicine and obstetrics and gynecology. In addition, he completed a family practice residency at the University of South Carolina Department of Family Practice. He has worked at Spring Valley Family Practice since 2002.

Rutkumar Jani, MD

Medical Oncology & Hematology

Lexington Oncology Associates 2728 Sunset Boulevard, Suite 402 West Columbia, SC 29169 • (803) 794-7511 Dr. Steven Madden is an oncologist with Lexington Oncology Associates, a physician practice at Lexington Medical Center. He is a recognized leader in the treatment of cancer, earning honors including Midlands Physician of the Year in 2003. Dr. Madden received his undergraduate and medical degrees at the University of South Florida. He completed a residency in Internal Medicine and Fellowship in Oncology at Brooke Army Medical Center in

Texas. During his career, Dr. Madden has served as the Chief of Oncology at Eisenhower Army Medical Center in Augusta and as faculty member at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine. Dr. Madden is a certified member of the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American Board of Medical Oncology. Additionally, he is a member of the Lexington Medical Association and South Carolina Medical Association.

Steven Madden, MD

Obstetrics & Gynecology

Women’s Health & Diagnostic Center

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Lexington Medical Park 1, Suite 106 • 2728 Sunset Boulevard West Columbia, SC 29169 • (803) 936-7420 Dr. Charles Shipley is an obstetrician Ultrasonography, Associate Professor and gynecologist with Women’s Health and Director of Compliance at the and Diagnostic Center, a physician University of South Carolina School of practice at Lexington Medical Center. Medicine. He has also worked as the Dr. Shipley received an undergraduate Director of Ultrasonography/Maternaldegree in chemistry from the College Fetal Medicine at Richland Memorial of Charleston and a medical degree Hospital in Columbia. He is board certified from the Medical University of South in obstetrics and gynecology, and he is Carolina. He completed an internship also a member of the American College of and residency in OB/Gyn at Richland Obstetricians and Gynecologists. He has Memorial Hospital. Dr. Shipley’s won numerous awards, written dozens of work experience includes Assistant publications in medical journals and given Professor, Director of Gynecology and clinical presentations around the country. C o lu m b i a M e t ro p o l i ta n 81


Advertising section: Best doctors Obstetrics & Gynecology

Medical Park OB/GYN Lexington Medical Park 1, Suite 103 • 2728 Sunset Boulevard West Columbia, SC 29169 • (803) 936-7430 Dr. George W. Watt is an obstetrician and gynecologist with Medical Park OB/GYN at Lexington Medical Center. His professional interests include general gynecology, ultrasound and high risk obstetrics. Since 2007, Dr. Watt’s professional peers have recognized him as one of The Best Doctors in America. Board certified in obstetrics and gynecology, he is also a veteran of the United States Army. Dr. Watt has an undergraduate degree from Texas Tech University and a medical degree from the University of Texas.

He completed an internship and residency in obstetrics and gynecology at William Beaumont Army Medical Center in Texas. Dr. Watt served at Moncrief Army Hospital at Fort Jackson in Columbia from 1976-1977 as a Major in the US Army Medical Corps. He also served as chief of staff at Palmetto Health Richland in 1990. During his career, Dr. Watt has also been a professor at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine. He is a fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

George W. Watt, MD

Pathology

Pathology Associates of Lexington, PA

(back) William R. Armstrong, MD, John Carter, MD, Kitt McMaster, III, MD (front) Beverly Williams Daniel, MD, Ervin Shaw, MD

2720 Sunset Boulevard • West Columbia, SC 29169 • (803) 791-2401 The doctors with Pathology Associates of Pathology and Clinical Pathology at MUSC. During Lexington, PA at Lexington Medical Center are her career at Lexington Medical Center, Dr. Daniel board certified pathologists. has also served as Chief of Pathology. Dr. Willilam R. Armstrong, a US Army Veteran, Dr. Kitt McMaster, III, has a medical degree earned a medical degree from the University of from the Medical University of South Carolina. He Michigan Medical School and completed an internship completed a residency in Anatomic Pathology at at the University of Pennsylvania and residency at the the Medical University of South Carolina, serving University of Michigan Medical Center. as chief resident in pathology. He participated in Dr. John Carter attended medical school at a fellowship at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer the University of South Dakota and University of Center in New York City, along with a residency at Minnesota. He did post graduate work at the Mayo the UNC School of Medicine. Graduate School of Medicine. He has served as Dr. Ervin Shaw earned a medical degree at the a Clinical Professor of Pathology & Laboratory Medical University of South Carolina, where he also Medicine at the USC School of Medicine. completed an internship and residency in pathology, Dr. Beverly Williams Daniel received her ultimately becoming chief resident. He has worked medical degree from MUSC. She completed a at Lexington Medical Center since 1975. He is fellowship in Cytology and residencies in Anatomic currently the Chief of Pathology.

Radiology

Lexington Radiology Associates 2720 Sunset Boulevard • Radiology Department West Columbia, SC 29169 • (803) 791-2460 Dr. Clarence S. Davis and Dr. Layne R. Clemenz are radiologists with Lexington Radiology Associates and have been affiliated with Lexington Medical Center for more than 20 years. Dr. Davis earned his medical degree from the Medical University of South Carolina in 1981 and completed his residency there in 1986. He has held many positions at Lexington Medical Center, including past chief of the medical staff. Dr. Clemenz attended 82 C o lu m b i a M e t ro p o l i ta n

the University of South Carolina and received his Diagnostic Radiology training at the Medical University of South Carolina, where he graduated first in his medical school class. At Lexington Medical Center, Dr. Clemenz is vice chief of the medical staff and is slated to be the next chief of staff. Both Dr. Clemenz and Dr. Davis are members of the South Carolina Radiology Society and certified by the American College of Radiology.

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Advertising section: Best doctors General Surgery

Lexington Surgical Associates 723 South Lake Drive • Lexington, SC 29072 • (803) 359-4133

Charles Harmon, MD, FACS

In 1976, Dr. Charles Harmon opened a solo surgery practice, Lexington Surgical Associates, locating his new practice in his grandparents’ former home in Lexington, S.C. Today, the home is one of three locations of Lexington Surgical Associates. Dr. Harmon specializes in General Surgery with a special interest in breast cancer, thyroid, parathyroid surgery and other endocrine operations. At Lexington Medical Center, Dr. Harmon has held the positions of Chief of Surgery (1982-

1984) and Chief of Staff (1997-1999). He received his undergraduate degree from Columbia College and his medical degree from the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. His surgical training included a residency at Richland Memorial Hospital in Columbia, with rotations at the Columbia Veterans Administration Hospital, the Charleston Veterans Hospital and the Medical University of S.C. in Charleston. Dr. Harmon is board certified.

General Surgery

Lexington Surgical Associates Lexington Medical Park 1, Suite 104 2728 Sunset Boulevard • West Columbia, SC 29169 (803) 791-2722 Dr. Lynn Moore Tucker joined Lexington Surgical Associates in 2007, after moving from Augusta, Ga., where she was in private practice with University Surgical Associates. Most of her practice includes breast and endocrine surgery. After receiving an undergraduate degree from Clemson University, she earned her medical degree from the Medical University of South Carolina. Dr.

Tucker completed her general surgical residency at the Medical College of Georgia and obtained her Board certification in 1997 and was recertified in 2006. In addition to caring for her patients, she shares her expertise with other practitioners through presentations related to the detection and treatment of early stage breast cancer and care of mastectomy patients. Lynn Moore Tucker, MD, FACS

Vascular Surgery

Southern Surgical Group Lexington Medical Park 2, Suite 310 • 146 North Hospital Drive West Columbia, SC 29169 • (803) 936-8901

William M. Moore, Jr., MD, FACS w w w. c o l u m b i a m e t ro . c o m

Dr. William M. Moore, Jr. has been practicing vascular surgery since 1991 and is one of the founding members of Southern Surgical Group. He was the first fellowship-trained, board certified vascular surgeon in private practice in the Midlands. Always at the forefront of the vascular surgery field, Dr. Moore developed the endovascular surgery program at Lexington Medical Center in 1996, which allows for minimally invasive treatment of patients with complex vascular disease. After receiving his undergraduate

degree in biology and chemistry from the University of South Carolina, he earned his medical degree from the University of South Carolina School of Medicine. He completed his internship and residency in General Surgery at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine. His residency included a year of vascular and cancer research as the Culpepper Fellow. Dr. Moore then went to the Ochsner Clinic and Alton Ochsner Medical Foundation in New Orleans, Louisiana, where he completed a vascular surgery fellowship. C o lu m b i a M e t ro p o l i ta n 83


PALMETTO BUSINESSES

Get Some Culinary Class The Midlands is home to numerous cooking schools

O

ne of the best ways to cook up new culinary skills is to take a class at a local cooking school. Cooking classes provide recipes and ideas to make home meals more exciting and can even kick-start a new career. Classes are inspirational for people who love to socialize, entertain and have fun. Ethnic cooking classes allow you to explore and appreciate other cultures. Nutritionoriented classes are beneficial to everyone, but especially people who have health concerns. Don’t forget that kids love to cook too. What do you want to learn to make – an elegant French meal, a spicy Indian curry, rustic hearth bread or a luscious chocolate torte? Take a cooking class and wake up your taste buds! For even more fun, bring along a few friends. The following list of schools covers the culinary spectrum, whether you are a novice or expert cook. They will help you to interpret and develop your own creative style. Managing a Culinary Career Do you want a career in the culinary arts or hotel/restaurant management? The University of South Carolina’s School of Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management (HRTM) prepares undergraduate and graduate students for managerial careers in the hospitality and tourism industries. The multi-faceted curriculum offers two Bachelor of Science degree programs with courses in general education, quality food production, business, hospitality and tourism management. HRTM operates McCutchen House on USC’s historic Horseshoe. Built in

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1813, the 19th century house is now a fine-dining restaurant open to the public and green-certified by the South Carolina Green Hospitality Alliance. Under the supervision of the director and professional chef instructors, HRTM students design and prepare exquisite multi-course evening dinners for Thursdays at McCutchen. Lunch is served Tuesday through Friday, with the exception of spring break and holidays. Consider yourself an avid home chef? The Chef d’Jour program at USC offers an exciting series of Saturday classes from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Designed for the nonprofessional cook, instruction is available on a range of subjects including French and Scandinavian cuisines and mastering the backyard grill. Wine classes are offered in the evenings. Learn about wines from different regions and pair them with tapasstyle foods. One popular class helps you select 10 great wines for under $10 each. Classes generally run $50 and you must be 21 to attend. For information about South Carolina’s School of Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management visit www. hrsm.sc.edu/hrtm/default.html. McCutchen House is open for spring dining until April 22, 2011. For reservations, call (803) 777-4450. For information and class registration, call (803) 777-8225. Columbia’s Cooking! Good nutrition plays a crucial role in maintaining good health and preventing disease. According to the University of South Carolina’s Cancer Prevention and Control Program, this state has some of

photography by jeff Amberg

By Susan Fuller Slack, C.C.P.

the worst health indicators in the country. Columbia’s Cooking! is a culinary program started by registered dieticians who received numerous requests for recipes developed for research studies related to cancer. The school offers delicious recipes while emphasizing the principles of a healthy diet. The focus on fresh fruits and vegetables encourages an exploration of flavor, color, shape and texture on the plate. Food flavors are enhanced through seasonings like spices and herbs, with less emphasis on sugar, salt and fats. Classes showcase ethnic dishes from India and Greece, family and kid-friendly dishes and theme classes featuring

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Thorir Erlingsson, director of the USC Culinary Institute, works with students at The McCutcheon House.

gourmet cuisine. Demonstration and some hands-on classes are available. Spring classes feature USC’s First Lady Patricia Moore-Pastides teaching Meatless Meals Mediterranean Style, featuring recipes from her new book, Greek Revival – Cooking for Life. While that class is sold out, Patricia also will teach a class on Phyllo, and Devi Raju will teach two classes on Indian food. Classes are $40 and will be held at 915 Green Street in the Discovery 1 building, part of the University’s Innovista research campus. Providence Hospitals will partner with Columbia’s Cooking! to present Healthy w w w. c o l u m b i a m e t ro . c o m

Food in Fast Times, which features recipes for healthy meals that can be ready in 30 to 45 minutes. The school also offers children’s culinary camps in the summer. For information and class registration, contact Katherine Shavo, MS, RD, LD at (803) 576-5636 or shavo@mailbox.sc.edu or Elaine McLane at (803) 576-5666 or mclanep@mailbox.sc.edu. Let’s Cook Culinary Studio Dedicated to the fine arts, Chef John Militello invites top regional chefs to guest-teach at his culinary studio, fulfilling the goal that students should

“learn, taste and experience” cooking with professional chefs. Chef Militello says the dishes his students learn to prepare for home entertaining are based on quality fresh, local, seasonal ingredients that are easily sourced. Two formats are offered: the demonstration class, with three to four items prepared by a professional chef, and the hands-on class, in which students cook with supervised training. April classes feature a high school French cooking class in French with Chef Bertrand Gilli, an art and wine class, tapas class, Italian supper class and a salad and soup class. A handson Friday night couples class is offered C o lu m b i a M e t ro p o l i ta n 85


photography courtesy of francois fisera

Francois Fisera of Fleur de Lys Home Culinary Institute, gives a cooking lesson to his son, Joseph.

Fleur de Lys Home Culinary Institute Award-winning Chef Francois Fisera brings French culinary flair to Columbia as he hosts a variety of classes at the Fleur De Lys Home Culinary Institute. The cooking school doors opened in 1996 and the business quickly became successful, primarily through word of mouth. Francois offers a wide range of additional services from catering to cooking on television. The classic cuisine that is prepared and served at Fleur de Lys is rooted in French culinary application and tradition. Fine ingredients are sourced from all over the world. Inspired by the quality and diversity of the area’s local ingredients, Francois incorporates many of them into the dishes of his classic repertoire. Upcoming classes include tempting offerings like Veal Chops with

Dijonnaise Sauce, Virginia Crabmeat Soufflé, Porterhouse-size Boneless Pork Chop with Cranberries and Port Reduction and Steak Flambé with Bordelaise Sauce. Classes at Fleur de Lys average about 30 people and are primarily demonstration and hands-on classes, and classes are also available for kids. Francois is knowledgeable about fine wines, especially those from the Bordeaux region, and his students can purchase bottles to accompany food tastings at the school or to take home. Small groups of students often join Francois on international culinary forays, enabling them to learn more about the host country’s local wines and traditional cooking styles. Chef Francois is one of only eight Americans to receive the Order du Merite Agricole from the French Minister of Agriculture, and he has received numerous local, statewide, national and international commendations for his work. For information and class listings, contact Chef Fisera at (803) 765-9999 or www.fleur-delys.us. photography courtesy of Young chefs® academy

twice a month. One-on-one classes are available, as well as a “Chef of the Day” event featuring YOU as the star chef in a restaurant setting. The fee includes some advance training, with assistance in creating the menu and with the food prep. Invite the guests, then “show off your talents, and cook like a pro!” Class prices vary, averaging $35 to $45; some are higher depending on the type of event. For information and class listings, visit www.letscookculinary.com, e-mail letscook@earthlink.net or call (803) 348-5874.

school for children, take place in a safe environment where discovery, creativity and fun are encouraged. Kids learn food preparation skills with a generous portion of kitchen safety, etiquette, table-setting skills and menu planning added to every class. A big scoop of laughter is thrown in for good measure. Chef Erinn Rowe, a former student of USC’s School of Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Management, owns the Irmo franchise of the cooking school in partnership with her mother, Dallas Partin. Erinn had hoped to own a business after school, and with her polished culinary skills, this was a perfect fit. The Junior Chefs curriculum is the core of the program, offering a unique culinary experience to kids that help them develop new skills and a life-long love for the culinary arts. The cooking classes improve skills in math, science, reading and social studies. Emphasis is placed on healthy ingredients, and food is made from scratch. Classes are designed for students aged 5 to 6 and 12 to 13. The KinderCooks program accommodates the youngest culinarians, ages 3 to 5 years old. Age-appropriate recipes, themes and activities focus on shapes, numbers, colors and community helpers. The Senior Chefs program accommodates students who have met certain criteria and who wish to assume

Young Chefs® Academy Cooking classes at the Young Chefs® Academy, the first cooking Dallas Partin and Erinn Rowe run The Young Chefs® Academy in Irmo.

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more responsibility. Ernin and Dallas also teach afterschool classes to kids in 20 local schools. Treat your child to one of their unique birthday party packages or a summer adventure at Camp Can-ICook®. A MasterChef Program is offered in two phases: learning basic skills and techniques and taking on a leadership role while learning new skills. For information and class registration, call (803) 749-0670 or email irmosc@youngchefsacademy.com Midlands Technical College Midlands Tech offers one of the Southeast’s most comprehensive continuing education programs. Courses can be completed in a shorter time than more conventional education formats. College credits are not typically earned or transferred to other institutions. The courses attract students looking for a quick, intense approach to learning. Current culinary classes include an 18-hour certificate program for cake decorating; Luscious, Low-Fat, Lightening-Quick Meals; Secrets of the Caterer; and Fruit and Vegetable Carving. For information, registration and school locations, contact Midlands Tech at ce@midlandstech.edu or (803) 732-0432. Williams Sonoma at Columbiana Centre Each month, the retailer offers classes featuring basic cooking techniques and specific cook’s tools. Other cooking classes cover a wide range of cooking styles and ingredients. Classes cover the latest trends in recipes and ingredients. Complimentary technique classes are occasionally offered to the public. The Williams-Sonoma Cookbook Club is a 3-month program consisting of classes led by in-store culinary professionals based on recipes in the month’s featured cookbook. For more information on classes call (803) 749-4442. Earth Fare Earth Fare – “The Healthy Supermarket” – sells fresh natural foods and works to bring local communities together for events like free healthy organic cooking classes, kids healthy Halloweens and local farmers markets. For information, call (803) 799-0048. w w w. c o l u m b i a m e t ro . c o m

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SPREAD THE WORD

Bonita Strickland

Rodney Van Houser

David Kilgore

Dr. Maria Modesto

Debbie Capko

Nancy Nelson

Carolyn Green

Katelyn Sweeten

Julie Londo

Jeffrey Londo

Carrie Rojek

Stephen Hetherington

Annabelle Moca

Roger Coulson

Melody Coulson

Allison Cowherd

Mason Summers

Brian Gambrell

Douglas Leadbitter

Robert Williams

Kara Sproles Mock

Montague Lafitte

Brent Mackie

Kathy Randall

Bonita Strickland, owner of Classic Clef Studio of Guitar and Art, has created Bonita Added Dimensions Canvas, which will be available at Jerry’s Artarama and ASW Express. Michael Quinn has been named a shareholder with Ellis Lawhorne. Jody A. Bedenbaugh and Alana Odom Williams have been elected partners with Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough. Paul T. Collins has been promoted to Of Counsel. Bernie Hawkins has been appointed vice chair of the Climate Change, Sustainable Development and Ecosystems Committee of the American Bar Association’s Section of Environment, Energy and Resources.

Myra Conder, Debbie Capko, Nancy Nelson, Harvey Blanchard, I I I, Retta Sanders, Carolyn Green, Katelyn Sweeten, Julie Londo and Jeffrey Londo have joined the offices of Coldwell Banker United, Realtors®. Bob Coble of Nexsen Pruet has been elected chair of the Columbia World Affairs Council. Tushar Chikhliker has been named to The State newspaper’s 20 Under 40 list for 2011. Carrie Rojek has joined the YMCA of Columbia as soccer program executive. Stephen Hetherington has joined Scott and Company as staff accountant.

Ben Brantley, SIOR, industrial specialist and principal at CB Richard Ellis|Columbia, has received the REALTOR® of the Year Award from Central Carolina REALTORS® Association.

Karen Hudson Thomas of Ellis Lawhorne has been appointed chair of the Taxation Law Specialization Advisory Board of the Supreme Court of SC’s Commission on Continuing Legal Education and Specialization.

Douglas McKay, Jr., founder of McKay, Cauthen, Settana & Stubley, has been selected as a SC Bar Foundation’s Memory Hold the Door honoree. Brandon P. Jones has joined the firm as an associate. Erin M. Farrell has been selected by the SC Bar Association to serve on the Children’s Law Committee. The firm has been named in U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Law Firms.”

Annabelle Moca of Grubb & Ellis Wilson Kibler has been named the Associate of the Year for the SC Chapter of the Institute of Real Estate Management.

Rodney (Van) Hauser has been named director of facilities management with Providence Hospitals. David Kilgore has been named director of pharmacy services. Dr. Maria Modesto has joined Providence Internal Medicine Northeast.

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area coordinator/corps officer for Columbia’s Salvation Army. Major Melody Coulson has been appointed coordinator for women’s ministries/corps officer. Allison Cowherd has joined The Sisters of Charity Foundation of South Carolina as communications and research associate. Bobby Latham has joined the Columbia facility of Bulow BioTech Prosthetics. Mason Summers has been named a shareholder with Richardson Plowden. Drew Butler has been recognized as an equity shareholder. Brian C. Gambrell, Douglas E. Leadbitter and Robert H. Williams have joined the law offices of Rogers Townsend & Thomas. Kara Sproles Mock, APR, has been named assistant vice president of corporate 
and external communications for Colonial Life & Accident Insurance Company. Montague Laffitte of SCBT has been named city executive for Columbia. Brent Mackie has been named city executive for Lexington.

Christine W. DeGood, PH R, has been promoted to vice president of operations with Recruiting Solutions.

Jacklyn Abigail Donevant of Abacus P lan ni ng G rou p ha s co mp le ted a ll requirements for the CFP® credential.

Brian Comer of Collins & Lacy has been named chair of the firm’s Products Liability Practice Group.

Mickey Bowdon, vice president for Christian School Education at Ben Lippen, has been named interim headmaster of the school for the 2011-2012 school year.

KeenanSuggs Insurance has been named an SCLaunch Resource Partner. Major Roger Coulson has been appointed

Kathy A. Randall has joined M G&C Consulting Services.

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getting down to business with

Dr. Manly Hutchinson, Jr.

The Hutchinson Center for Aesthetic Medicine

Estrogen Replacement Therapy: Is it Safe?

A

re you experiencing hot flashes, decreased libido, or mood swings? This could mean that you are becoming menopausal. Are hormones the answer for you? Some 15 million women were comforted by multiple studies supporting all the benefits of Estrogen and many years of use by happy patients. In 2002, The Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), a collaborative study of 100,000 patients in multiple institutions, changed all of this. It is estimated that 8 million women discontinued their hormone therapy because of concerns about this study. The media blitz was widespread and overwhelming, causing patients and physicians alike to have serious concerns about the safety of estrogen replacement therapy. As a result, the Food and Drug Administration has mandated a “black box warning” on all proprietary hormone product. It states: “Estrogen therapy should be prescribed in the lowest dose and for the shortest period of time consistent with sound clinical judgment and only for the 90 C olu m b ia Metropolitan

relief of vasomotor symptoms.” Nine years have passed since that announcement with many questions being raised as to the validity of the study. Many authorities have challenged this rigid statement. In order to shed some light on current thinking, I will present several questions that many women are asking, proceeding to answer them based on current research. Does estrogen cause breast cancer? WHI had many flaws. Th e i n i t i a l p h a s e of the study was stopped at five years because of the finding that 8 in 10,000 w o me n d e v e lo p e d breast cancer with a combination of Premarin and medroxy progesterone. Estrogen-only users continued another two years. There was no increase in breast cancer in this group. Most breast cancers grow for at least two years before they can become detectable. This incidence of breast cancer is one in eight, whether you take estrogen or not. Some studies have actually shown a lower incidence in mortality in estrogen users. How long can I safely take estrogen? As long as uncomfortable vasomotor symptoms persist. In order to gain the most benefit from estrogen therapy, it must begin at the onset of menopause and be continued for at least 10 years. Starting estrogen therapy well after the onset of menopause is not recommended because of increased cardiovascular risks. The relief of vasomotor symptoms is dramatic. The other benefits are more insidious. Estrogen helps prevent bone loss. It also prevents urogenital atrophy, or shrinkage and dryness of vaginal tissue. One of the most significant benefits is the potential to alter the progress of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease when started at the onset of menopause and taken for at least 10 years. S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E CT I O N

What form of estrogen is best and what about “Bio-identical” or “natural estrogen”? Premarin or conjug ated estrogen was the gold standard for many years. It is taken in pill form, digested and processed in the liver into a usable form: Estradiol. Estradiol is the only natural and metabolically active form of estrogen. It is the same compound that is produced in the ovary. A newer delivery system called transdermal provides direct absorption of estradiol through the skin or vaginal wall into the bloodstream. It comes in the form of a skin patch, cream, spray, injection or pellets. Transdermal estradiol is thought to provide superior support for the cardiovascular system. It is important to note that the hormone progesterone actually inhibits the beneficial effects of estrogen in some respects. Progesterone, in addition to its use in the reproductive years, is necessary in order to protect the endometrium in postmenopausal women who still have a uterus. It can be given in a phasic manner in order to minimize its deleterious effects. Two other touted forms of estrogen, Estrace and Estriol, offer little benefit. Soy and other phytoestrogens as well as herbal drugs do little to relieve hot flashes or serve any other useful purpose. The WH I study clearly showed that once the effects of aging take hold and vessels become atherosclerotic, the beneficial effect from estrogen decreases. The actual risk of developing breast cancer is uncertain. Early detection by virtue of annual mammograms and self-breast exam provide the best protection from advanced breast cancer. Estrogen offers many benefits with minimal risks: relief of vasomotor symptoms, alleviation of menopausal symptoms, improved quality of life, prevention of osteoporosis, delay onset of cardiovascular disease, delay onset of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, reduction in degenerative eye disease, preservation of youthful appearing skin and prevention and treatment of urogenital atrophy. Dr. Hutchinson is the senior partner at Three Rivers Ob/Gyn. He has over 30 years of experience in this field. Special interests include sexual dysfunction, hormone replacement therapy and aesthetic medicine, including laser assisted fat removal. april 2011


getting down to business with

Southlake Village

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outhlake Village offers resort style living with no long term commitment. Whether you are looking for an apartment, garden home or patio home, we have a floor plan to meet every need. At Southlake Village, each resident receives three meals per day, weekly housekeeping services, transportation and all utilities including electricity, water, power, cable television and internet service. Amenities such as the heated swimming pool, walking paths, fitness room and a wide variety of activities allow residents to stay physically active and socially engaged. Each month, Southlake Village offers a variety of on-site activities, such as bridge club, bible study, art classes, bingo and wine tastings, just to name a few. Southlake’s handicapped w w w. c o l u m b i a m e t ro . c o m

accessible bus is on the go for shopping excursions, lunch at local restaurants and many cultural events such as plays, musicals and the ballet. Southlake Village’s award winning chef prepares delicious and healthy meals each day with a wide variety of choices. Meals are served in our beautiful, restaurant-style dining room where you can enjoy time with friends. Residents also have the option to order their meals for delivery or may chose to prepare something for themselves since all of the residences include full kitchens. Studio and one bedroom apartments are available in the main building. One and two bedroom garden homes and two bedroom patio homes are just a short walk away from all of the activity. All residences are equipped with emergency call systems S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E CT I O N

for your peace of mind, and the front desk is staffed 24 hours per day for added security. Each unit also includes a washer and dryer for your convenience. With an on-site beauty shop and nail salon, as well as dry cleaning and pharmacy pick-up and delivery, you will not need to waste time running errands. Relax and enjoy all Southlake Village has to offer. Southlake Village dedicates every day to making sure that you are truly living your life to the fullest. We take care and manage the everyday details and chores while you enjoy doing the things that make you happy. Come visit us today and experience for yourself “retirement living at its finest” at Southlake Village. Call us at 356-1158 to schedule a complimentary lunch and tour. C olu m b ia Metropolitan 91


getting down to business with

Ryan Brewer Enterprises

(L to R) Ryan Brewer, Jerry Schultz, Lane Wofford, Robert Crayton, Woody Inman

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yan Brewer came to South Carolina in 1999 to join Lou Holtz and the Gamecocks to pursue his lifelong dream of playing collegiate football. Little did Ryan know that 12 years later, he would call South Carolina home. Ryan’s successful college football career taught him how to persevere, be a team player and to strive for success. In 2004, Ryan was just back from winning the World Bowl with the Berlin Thunder and fresh out of camp with the Baltimore Ravens. With an athletic mindset, he knew what it would take to

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start and run a business: a good plan, hard work and lots of sweat. Ryan started a small fencing company and ran it out of his house for two years before expanding to his current location of 1446 Pineview Drive, right off of Shop Road. With family ties in the manufacturing of fencing, railings and columns, Ryan knew the business well and had a strong plan in place. He is currently running three crews a day and has 14 employees, including Columbia and Charleston s ales representatives.   Ryan Brewer Enterprises, LLC, offers

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high quality products at reasonable prices, including a wide array of fencing, railings and columns. “Whether it’s a new construction or remodeling, our work will help provide the detail that distinguishes the extraordinary from the ordinary,” Ryan says. “With a complete selection of styles for each product, we are sure to help you find the perfect fit for your home, business or project.” Ryan Brewer Enterprises, LLC, will be sure to pay attention to the details that make the difference.  

april 2011


getting down to business with

Todd Wagstaff, President Comfort Services

Comfort Services We sat down with Todd Wagstaff, President of Comfort Services to learn more about his company and the services it provides.

Who is Comfort Services? Comfort Services has been serving the Midlands of South Carolina since 1976. Since that time, a lot has changed. The one thing that hasn’t changed is our passion for providing quality solutions to our clients! Most of you already know us, as we have served thousands of clients over the years and still provide professional service to over 3,000 current annual maintenance clients. We would be honored to serve you as well!

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Tell us about some new things What can you tell us about you are doing. Solar? Due to new technologies, we have added a wide variety of products and integrated solutions to our offerings for our clients. We now have the technology to diagnose the root causes of common problems in the home such as hot or cold spots, humidity issues and even excessive dust. Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) has become extremely important. In fact, the EPA recently labeled IAQ as one of the top 5 environmental risks to public health. On average the air inside of your home or office can be as much as 100 times more polluted than the air we breathe outside. Providing you with better health and piece of mind through better indoor air quality is a top priority for our team at Comfort Services. S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E CT I O N

Solar Power and Renewable Energy...Is there a hotter topic? We take pride in offering a full range of solar and energy efficiency solutions for both residential and commercial clients. Solar Thermal and Solar PV (Photovoltaic) are becoming very common in this part of the country. We are positioned to help our clients with all of their solar needs throughout the Carolinas. If a reduction of your utility costs or “becoming green” is something that is of interest to you, we can provide you with a cost effective solution.

www.comfortservices.com www.csienergysolutions.com 803.772.4490

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The Columbia City Ballet

Photography by Burnie Flake

getting down to business with

Regina Willoughby and Mark Krieger performing as Cinderella and Prince Charming in Columbia City Ballet’s production of Cinderella.

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he Columbia City Ballet is celebrating 50 years of service to our community. Our founding director, Ann Brodie, had a passion and love for ballet and a vision to present firstrate ballets in Columbia, while providing the very finest training for young dance and ballet students. Ann assembled a support team of community leaders to help her put together the company’s first performances 50 years ago. Twenty-five years later, William Starrett, the second Artistic Director in the company’s history, was handpicked by the CCB founder to be her successor. His vision was to provide the highest caliber professional dance company to the region. It was not only to be a major component for statewide economic development, but also to provide a professional outlet to retain and attract 94 C olu m b ia Metropolitan

extraordinary artistic talent in all aspects of the Columbia City Ballet. The Columbia City Ballet will be celebrating its 50th Anniversary during the weekend of May 5th-8th. The festivities will begin with an art exhibit at the Tapp’s building on Main Street on Thursday, May 5 with an art display by national and local artists in celebration of the human form and dance. A free awards banquet filled with visiting alumni, volunteers, dancers and patrons will be hosted by the Capital City Club on Friday evening, May 6. Saturday May 7 will begin with an open class at 11 a.m. at the Columbia Conservatory of Dance, the company’s home on Main Street. At 12:30 p.m., the CCBII – the junior company of dancers – will present a studio performance followed by refreshments and fellowship. S P E C I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S E CT I O N

The Anniversary Gala will begin at the legendary Township Auditorium starting at 5:30 p.m. with music, a silent auction and dinner catered by Houston’s. A film retrospective and tribute will follow, with the theater filled with past production memorabilia, costumes and stage props. The Gala Performance also will feature a brief awards ceremony, celebrating the tremendous artistic accomplishments of the last 50 years with highlights from the company’s extraordinary repertoire performed by a star-studded cast. Following the performance will be more dancing and dessert with live music. The Gala weekend will come to a close on Sunday, May 7 with a brunch uniting alumni, visiting dancers, volunteers, patrons and board members.

april 2011


getting down to business with

Za’s Brick Oven Pizza

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ince its inception in July 1998, Za’s Brick Oven Pizza has been Shandon’s favorite neighborhood pizza joint. Actually, to call it a “pizza joint” would be a little misleading. That’s because Za’s is not your typical pizza restaurant. Za’s has some of the most interesting pizza combinations around, as well as a wide selection of soups, salads, sandwiches, pastas and more. Combine all of this with an extensive wine list and an upscale yet casual atmosphere, and it’s no wonder they have been so successful over the past almost 13 years.

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With pizza combinations such as grilled lime chicken, caramelized onions, jalapenos, mozzarella cheese and salsa – the Santa Fe Za, if you were wondering – you can see that the pizza chefs at Za’s are not afraid to step outside of tradition. On the other hand, when it comes to cooking that pizza they like to stick to their roots. Za’s cooks all of their pizzas the old-fashioned way, using a real wood-fired brick oven. Maybe this is the secret to Za’s being voted best pizza by Columbia Metropolitan magazine’s readers for 10 straight years.

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Whether you are looking to have a quick meal on your way to an event or want to sit and enjoy a long conversation with old friends, Za’s attentive and friendly staff will accommodate your every need. You can grab a quick sandwich or enjoy a full four course meal in either of Za’s two dining rooms or on the spacious patio. Many stop by just for a cocktail and to see the beautiful tree sculpture over the bar. Za’s is so much more than a pizza joint without losing that friendly “everybody’s a regular” atmosphere.

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FOOD FESTIVAL GUIDE

Hungry for a Festival? Year-round guide to Columbia food festivals January World Beer Festival In a town with a growing population that enjoys a dynamic beer selection, this festival is quickly becoming a mustdo for beer enthusiasts and novices alike. www.alloaboutbeer.com/wbf

February Palladium Society Chili Cook-Off Historically held the last Saturday of February, this festival showcases some of Columbia’s most creative chili recipes, as well as live music and beverages. www.historiccolumbia.org (803) 252-7742

March Taste of Lake Murray The sole fundraiser for the 4th of July fireworks display on Lake Murray, this festival offers a formidable array of food, as well as auctions and live music. www.lakemurraycountry.com (803) 781-5940

April Central Carolina Food and Wine Festival Gala April 1, 2011 The culminating event for the annual festival features more than 200 wines and food from 18 Midlands restaurants, as well as samples of cakes from the finalists in Columbia Metropolitan’s Top Cake Contest. www.yourfoundation.org/newsandevents (803) 254-5601, ext. 327

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International Festival April 1 to 3, 2011 This three-day festival showcases the music, culture, food and performing arts of the various cultures, nationalities, races and language groups represented in South Carolina. www.ifmusa.org/festival/ The Big Nosh, Tree of Life Jewish Cultural Festival April 10, 2011 Come make challah, bite a knish, blow a shofar, dance the hora and much more. This annual event celebrates everything Jewish, including good, entertainment and education. www.bignosh.org (803) 787-2182 Wine Tasting at the Zoo April 15, 2011 Listen to live jazz, sample light bites from local restaurants and gab about grapes with wine experts, all in one of the nation’s most beautiful and inspiring public gardens. www.riverbanks.org (803) 779-8717 The 6th Annual Rosewood Crawfish Festival April 30, 2011 Lovers of all things Creole and Cajun are invited to visit Rosewood Drive and take part in one of the city’s favorite celebrations, featuring 7,000 pounds of fresh Louisiana-grown crawfish. “Laissez les bon temps rouler! Let the good times roll!” www.rosewoodcrawfishfestival.com (803) 261-8947 BBQ Cook-Offs Who would have guessed Columbia had so many BBQ festivals? Starting in April, all around the Midlands, Columbians can get their “pig” on.

By Meredith Good For a complete listing of events, visit www.scbarbeque.com/events-calendar

May The Capital City Music and Wing Fling May 14, 2011 In its third year, this event will be held at the historic Robert Mills House in downtown Columbia. This exciting new location promises an element of beauty and South Carolina history, as well as some of Columbia’s best chicken wings and live music. www.myspace.com/capitalcitywingfling davebritt@sc.rr.com

June Ribs and Renaissance Festival June 4, 2011 Created originally as a gathering for North Columbia residents, this festival takes place at the corner of North Main Street and Monticello Road. Along with a Best Ribs in SC Cook-Off, the festival features live music, arts and crafts, a kid’s area and a 5K race. (803) 454-0088

July Gilbert Peach Festival July 4, 2011 This all-day celebration at Gilbert Community Park honors the queen of all fruits, the peach with live entertainment, a Peachy Recipe contest, plenty of food and BBQ and even a fireworks display. www.lexingtoncountypeachfestival.com (803) 892-5207

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2nd Annual Palmetto Tasty Tomato Festival July 17, 2011 Celebrate the incredible taste of South Carolina’s heirloom tomato varieties at the height of tomato season. Local celebrity judges, a homegrown tomato contest, an all-local tomato potluck, live music, cold beverages, amazing food, tomato bobbing and the wildly popular Chuck-the-Commercial-Tomato Skee Ball game return this year at the only urban farm in South Carolina. www.tastytomatofest.org Blythewood Balloons, Blues and BBQ Date TBA The largest balloons, blues and BBQ festival in S.C., this three-day festival has music, food and opportunities for tethered hot-air balloon rides. The Glowing – when balloons are lit internally and appear as huge ornaments in the night sky – is a must-see. www.townofblythewoodsc.gov (803) 467-6280

August Brew at the Zoo August 6, 2011 The perfect remedy to a muggy day in the Midlands – samples of cold, frothy beer. From domestics to imports to specialty micros, guests can choose their brew and meander through the Zoo or hang out in the plaza and listen to live music. www.riverbanks.org (803) 779-8717 Main Street Latin Festival Date TBA The streets downtown Columbia will be filled with the sights and sounds of salsa, merengue, reggaeton, grupero music and folkloric dancers. Of course there is plenty of Latin Food for tasting and enjoying as well. www.mainstreetlatinfestival.com (803) 939-0360

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September Greek Festival September 15 to 18, 2011 In its 25th year, the Greek Festival is a Columbia favorite, featuring live Greek music indoors and outdoors, as well as dancing and delicacies. www.columbiasgreekfestival.com (803) 461-0248 Irmo Okra Strut September 24 to 25, 2011 Beginning with a Dam Run over Lake Murray, this two-day festival offers plenty of amusements and performances, including a street dance, okra-eating contests, okra-fitti art, and of course, plenty of fried okra! www.irmookrastrut.com (803) 781-6122 Viva La Vista September 25, 2011 Covering nearly four city blocks, the event celebrates fall with live music, beverages, gourmet cuisine, exotic beer and wine from the neighborhood’s finest establishments. www.vistacolumbia.com (803) 269-5946

October Fall Heritage Festival and Pickin’ Party October 15, 2011 This festival features four styles of BBQ favorites, bluegrass music, plenty of folk arts and crafts and pumpkin-related activities for the kids. www.southcarolinastatemuseum.org (803) 898-4952 Italian Festival and Bocce Tournament October 22, 2011 Along with a bocce tournament and plenty of entertainment, such as dancing and puppet shows, there is also a plethora of Italian foods and dolci (sweets/desserts), and even an Italian fresh air market. www.osiacolumbiasc.org (803) 600-3720

25th Annual Group Therapy Chili Cook-Off October 22, 2011 Benefiting a number of local charities, this Group Therapy event continues to grow each year. After all, along with BBQ, Columbians love their chili! www.grouptherapybar.com (803) 256-1203 The State Fair October 12 to 23, 2011 Locals are known to wait all year for the State Fair and pay entry just for the food: Fiske Fries, Elephant Ears and Fried Snickers are among a few of the infamous delicacies. www.scstatefair.org

November 16th Annual Oyster Festival Date TBA With live music, a children’s area and historic house museum tours, this autumn celebration of a favorite mollusk happens to be Columbia’s largest oyster festival. www.scoyster.com (803) 252-7742 Gaston Collard Festival November 4 to 5, 2011 With plenty of collard dishes to sample and a variety of entertainment, visitors are certain to find a collard recipe worth sharing with family and friends on New Year’s Day. www.gastonsc.org (803) 796-7725

December West Columbia St. Nicholas Festival December 3, 2011 At this unique offering, the Russian Café sells a delicious sampling of traditional foods, and vendors will have crafts and collectibles for gift shopping. Children can get a peek at the attire and legacy behind St. Nicholas, who will be there for pictures and handing out chocolate coins. www.holyapostles.org/StNicholas (803) 926-8744

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GOOD EATS

Restaurant Guide Downtown & the Vista American Bernie’s $ B,L,D 1311 Bluff Rd., 256-2888 Blue Tapas Bar & Cocktail Lounge $ 721 A Lady St., 251-4447 Finlay’s Restaurant $$ B,L,D 1200 Hampton St. (in the Columbia Marriott), 771-7000 Five Guys Famous Burgers & Fries $ L, D 931 Senate St., 799-0441 www.fiveguys.com Flying Saucer $ L,D 931 Senate St., 933-999 Gervais & Vine $$ D 620-A Gervais St., 799-VINE www.gervine.com Hunter-Gatherer Brewery $$ L,D 900 Main St., 748-0540

http://huntergathererbrewery.com Liberty Taproom & Grill $$ L,D,SBR 828 Gervais St., 461-4677 www.libertytaproom.com Mac’s on Main $ L,D 1710 Main St., 929-0037 www.macsjazznblues.com Ruth’s Chris Steak House $$$ B,L,D 924-A Senate St. (at the Hilton), 212-6666 www.ruthschris.com Asian M. Café $$ L,D 1417 Sumter St., 779-5789 www.miyos.com Miyo’s Fine Shanghai & Szechuan Cuisine $$ L,D 922 S. Main St., 779-MIYO www.miyos.com Coffee/Dessert Immaculate Consumption $ B,L 933 Main St., 799-9053

Nonnah’s $ L,D 930 Gervais St., 779-9599 www.nonnahs.com Deli Cloud Nine Market $ L 916 Gervais St., 256-0043 Cool Beans! Coffee Co. $ B,L,D 1217 College St., 779-4277 No Name Deli $ L 2042 Marion St., 242-0480 Fine Dining Columbo’s $$ B,L,D, SBR 2100 Bush River Rd. (in the Radisson), 744-2200 www.columbos.net Hampton Street Vineyard $$$ L,D 1201 Hampton St., 252-0850 www.hamptonstreetvineyard.com Hennessy’s $$ L,D 1649 Main St., 799-8280 www.hennessyssc.com

KEY $ - $10 or less $$ - $11 to $20 $$$ - $21 and up

B - Breakfast L - Lunch D - Dinner SBR - Sunday Brunch

Motor Supply Co. Bistro $$ L,D,SBR 920 Gervais St., 256-6687 www.motorsupplycobistro.com P.O.S.H. $$ B,L,D 1400 Main St. (at the Sheraton), 988-1400 www.starwoodhotels.com Ristorante Divino $$$ D 803 Gervais St., 799-4550 www.ristorantedivino.com Italian Mellow Mushroom $ L,D 1009 Gervais St., 933-9201 www.mellowmushroom.com Villa Tronco $$ L,D 1213 Blanding St., 256-7677 www.villatronco.com Natural/Health Garden Bistro $ L 923 Gervais St., 933-9085 www.gardenbistrosc.com Zoe’s $ B,L 1320 Main St., 771-0122 www.zoeskitchen.com Seafood Blue Marlin $-$$ L,D 1200 Lincoln St., 799-3838 www.bluemarlincolumbia.com The Oyster Bar $-$$ D 1123 Park St., 799-4484 www.oysterbarcolumbia.com Southern 300 Senate at the Canal $-$$ L 300 Senate St., 748-8909 www.vistaeventsonline.com Lizard’s Thicket $ B,L,D 818 Elmwood Ave., 779-6407 www.lizardsthicket.com Steak Longhorn Steakhouse $-$$ L,D 902-A Gervais St., 254-5100 www.longhornsteakhouse.com Sushi Camon Japanese Restaurant $$$ D 1332 Assembly St., 254-5400 SakiTumi $$ D 807 Gervais St., 931-0700 www.sakitumigrill.com Wings Carolina Wings $ L,D 600 Gervais St., 256-8844 www.carolinawings.com Wild Wing Cafe $ L,D,SBR 729 Lady St., 252-9464 www.wildwingcafe.com

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Five Points & Devine Street

Greek Devine Foods $ L,D 2702 Devine St., 252-0356

American Café Millwood $-$$ B,L,SBR 2911 Millwood Ave., 771-0441 www.cafemillwood.com

Irish Delaney’s $ L,D 741 Saluda Ave., 779-2345

Cellar on Greene $-$$ D 2001-D Greene St., 343-3303 www.cellarongreene.com Goatfeather’s $-$$ D, SBR 2017 Devine St., 256-3325 Harper’s Restaurant $-$$ L,D 700 Harden St., 252-2222 www.harpersgroup.com Mr. Friendly’s $$-$$$ L,D 2001-A Greene St., 254-7828 www.mrfriendlys.com

Italian Garibaldi’s $$$ D 2013 Greene St., 771-8888 www.garibaldicolumbia.com Mexican Cantina 76 $-$$ L,D 2901-A Devine St., 708-6004 www.cantina76.com El Burrito $ L,D 934 Harden St., 765-2188 Eric’s San Jose $ L,D 6118 Garners Ferry Rd., 783-6650 http://ericssanjose.com

Salty Nut $ L,D 2000-A Greene St., 256-4611 www.saltynut.com

Natural/Health Mediterranean Tea Room $ L,D 2601 Devine St., 799-3118

Top of Carolina $$-$$$, L (Fri only), SBR 902 Barnwell St., 777-7919 or 777-0848

Pizza LaBrasca $ L,D 4365 Jackson Blvd., 782-1098 www.labrascas.com

Yesterday’s $$ L,D 2030 Devine St., 799-0196 www.yesterdayssc.com Asian Baan Sawan $$$ D 2135 Devine St., 252-8992 http://baansawan.blogspot.com Egg Roll Chen $ L,D 715 Crowson Rd., 787-6820 www.eggrollchen.com Deli Andy’s Deli $ L,D 2005 Greene St., 799-2639 DiPrato’s $ L,D, SBR 342 Pickens St., 779-0606 www.dipratos.com The Gourmet Shop $ B,L 724 Saluda Ave., 799-3705 www.thegourmetshop.net Groucho’s Deli $ L,D 611 Harden St., 799-5708 www.grouchos.com Fine Dining Conrad’s $$ L,D 2865 Devine St., 708-4494 www.conradsondevine.com Dianne’s on Devine $$$ D 2400 Devine St., 254-3535 www.diannesondevine.com Momo’s $$ D, SBR 2930 Devine St., 252-2700 www.momosondevine.com German Julia’s German Stammtisch $$ L,D 4341 Ft. Jackson Blvd., 738-0630 www.julias.vpweb.com w w w. c o l u m b i a m e t ro . c o m

Village Idiot $ L,D,SBR 2009 Devine St., 252-8646 www.villageidiotpizza.com Za’s Brick Oven Pizza $ L,D 2930 Devine St., 771-7334 www.zasbrickovenpizza.com Southern Lizard’s Thicket $ B,L,D 7938 Garners Ferry Rd., 647-0095 www.lizardsthicket.com Sushi Saky $-$$ D 4963 Jackson Blvd., 787-5307 Sushi Yoshi $ D 2019 Devine St., 931-0555

Northeast American 5 Guys Famous Burgers & Fries $ L,D 460-2 Town Center Place, 788-6200 www.fiveguys.com Solstice Kitchen & Wine Bar $$$ L, D 841-4 Sparkleberry Ln., 788-6966 www.solsticekitchen.com barbecue Smoke Southern Barbecue $ L,D 10324 Wilson Blvd., Blythewood, 600-7965 Deli Groucho’s Deli $ L,D • 111 Sparkleberry Ln., 419-6767 • 730 University Village Dr., 754-4509 www.grouchos.com Tiffany’s Bakery & Eatery $ B,L 8502 E Two Notch Rd., 736-CAKE

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Fine Dining Arizona’s $$$ L,D 150 Forum Dr., 865-1001 Italian Travinia Italian Kitchen $$ L,D 101 Sparkleberry Crossing, 419-9313 www.traviniaitaliankitchen.com Mexican Hola Mexico $ L,D 10014 C Two Notch Rd., 865-7758 www.holamexico.mx San Jose $ L,D • 801 Sparkleberry Ln., 419-8861 • 420 McNulty St. #C, 735-9787 • 808 Highway 1S, 438-2133 www.sanjosemexicanrestaurants.com Seafood Blue Fin $$ L,D,SBR 461-4 Town Center Place, 865-7346 www.bluefinrestaurantandbar.com Southern Lizard’s Thicket $ B,L,D • 7620 Two Notch Rd., 788-3088 • 10170 Two Notch Rd., 419-5662 www.lizardsthicket.com Mint Julep $-$$ D 120 Sparkleberry Crossing, 419-7200 www.mintjuleprestaurant.com Steak Longhorn Steakhouse $-$$ L,D 2760 Decker Blvd., 736-7464 www.longhornsteakhouse.com Steak Carolina $-$$ L (Sat only), D 5 Lake Carolina Way, Ste 170, 661-6424 Wings Carolina Wings $ L,D 2000-18 Clemson Rd., 419-0022 www.carolinawings.com D’s Restaurant $ L,D 111 Sparkleberry Crossing, 462-1895 www.dsrestaurant.com Wild Wing Cafe $ L,D 480-2 Town Center Place, 865-3365 www.wildwingcafe.com

Irmo American Five Guys Famous Burgers & Fries $ L,D 285 Columbia Dr., 407-6443 www.fiveguys.com Sticky Fingers $-$$ L,D 380 Columbiana Dr., 781-7427 www.stickyfingers.com Asian Miyo’s at Columbiana Place $$ L,D 1220 E-2 Bower Pkwy., 781-7788 www.miyos.com Miyabi Kyoto $$ L (Sun only),D Columbiana Centre, Harbison Blvd., 407-0574 Thai Lotus Restaurant $ L,D 612 St. Andrews Rd., 561-0006 100 C o lu m b i a M e t ro p o l i ta n

Deli Groucho’s Deli $ L,D • 800 Lake Murray Blvd., 749-4515 • 2009 Broad River Rd., 750-3188 www.grouchos.com Fondue The Melting Pot $$$ D 1410 Colonial Life Blvd., 731-8500 www.meltingpot.com GREEK Zorba’s $ L, D 6169 St. Andrews Rd, 772-4617 Italian Alodia’s Cucina Italian $-$$ L,D 2736 N. Lake Dr., 781-9814 Indian Delhi Palace $ L,D 1029 Briargate Cir., 750-0866 http://delhipalace.msll.net MEDITERRANEAN Al-Amir $$ L,D 7001 St. Andrews Rd., 732-0522 Mexican El Chico Restaurant $-$$ L,D 1728 Bush River Rd., 772-0770 www.elchico.com San Jose $ L,D • 1000 Marina Rd., 749-9484 • 498 Piney Grove Rd., 750-3611 www.sanjosemexicanrestaurants.com Natural/Health Sun Ming Chinese Restaurant $ L,D 7509 St. Andrews Rd., 732-4488 SEAFOOD Bonefish Grill $$-$$$ D 1260 Bower Pkwy., 407-1599 www.bonefishgrill.com Catch 22 $$ L,D,SBR 1085 D Lake Murray Blvd., 749-4700 www.catch22irmo.com Southern Lizard’s Thicket $ B,L,D • 7569 St. Andrews Road, 732-1225 • 1824 Broad River Rd., 798-6427 www.lizardsthicket.com Steak Longhorn Steakhouse $-$$ L,D 171 Harbison Blvd., 732-2482 www.longhornsteakhouse.com Sushi Inakaya $-$$ (Tues-Thurs) L,D 655-C St. Andrews Rd., 731-2538 Wings Carolina Wings $ L,D 7587 St. Andrews Rd., 781-0084 www.carolinawings.com D’s Restaurant $ L,D 285 Columbiana Dr., 227-0238 www.dsrestaurant.com Wild Wing Cafe $ L,D 1150 Bower Parkway, 749-9464 www.wildwingcafe.com

a p r i l 2011


Lexington

Southern Lizard’s Thicket $ B,L,D • 2240 Airport Blvd., 796-7820 • 501 Knox Abbott Dr., 791-0314 • 2234 Sunset Blvd., 794-0923 www.lizardsthicket.com

Barbecue Hudson’s Smokehouse $ L,D 4952 Sunset Blvd., 356-1070 www.hudsonsbbqsauce.com

Wings Carolina Wings $ L,D 2347-C Augusta Rd., 791-0260 www.carolinawings.com

Wings & Ale $ L,D 125-C Outlet Pointe Blvd., 750-1700 www.scwingsandale.com

Deli Cafe 403 $ L 403 N. Lake Dr., 808-2992 http://cafe403.com Groucho’s Deli $ L,D 117 1/2 East Main St., 356-8800 www.grouchos.com Fine Dining Lexington Arms $$ D 314A West Main St., 359-2700 www.lexingtonarms.net Italian Travinia Italian Kitchen $$ L,D 5074 Sunset Blvd., 957-2422 www.traviniaitaliankitchen.com Mexican Eric’s San Jose $ L,D 604 Columbia Ave., 957-9443 http://ericssanjose.com San Jose $ L,D 4510 Augusta Rd., 957-5171 www.sanjosemexicanrestaurants.com Southern Lizard’s Thicket $ B,L,D 621 West Main St., 951-3555 www.lizardsthicket.com Wings Carolina Wings $ L,D 105 North Pointe Dr., 356-6244 www.carolinawings.com

Cayce & West Columbia Coffee/Dessert Café Strudel $ B,L 118 State St., 794-6634 www.cafestrudel.com Deli House Coffee $ B,L,D 116 State St., 791-5663 Fine Dining Al’s Upstairs $$$ D 300 Meeting St., 794-7404 www.alsupstairsitalian.com Terra $$ D 100 State St., 791-3443 www.terrasc.com Greek Grecian Gardens $$ L,D 2312 Sunset Blvd., 794-7552 www.greciangardenssc.com Nick’s $$ L,D 1082 Sunset Blvd., 794-9240

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D’s Wings $ L,D 920 Axtell Dr., 791-4486 www.dsrestaurant.com

Forest Acres American Five Guys Famous Burgers & Fries $ L,D 4751 Forest Dr., 787-3178 www.fiveguys.com Tombo Grille $$ D 4517 Forest Dr., 782-9665 www.tombogrille.com Asian Miyo’s on Forest $$ L,D 3250 Forest Dr., Suite B, 743-9996 www.miyos.com Sakura $-$$ L,D 20 Forest Lake Shopping Center, 738-9330 http://sakurasc1.com Sato $$ L,D 1999 Beltline Blvd., 782-1064 www.satosteak.com Deli Groucho’s Deli $ L,D 4717 Forest Dr., 790-0801 www.grouchos.com Happy Cafe $ L 4525 Forest Dr., 787-8411 Hooligan’s $ L,D 26 Trenholm Plaza, 782-1293 McAlister’s Deli $ L,D 4710-A Forest Dr., 790-5995 www.mcalistersdeli.com Italian Pasta Fresca $$ D 3405 Forest Dr., 787-1838 www.pasta-fresca.net Rosso $$ D 4840 Forest Dr., 787-3949 www.rossocolumbia.com MEXICAN Casa Linda $ L,D 2009 Beltline Blvd., 738-0420 www.casalindasc.com San Jose $ L,D 4722 Forest Dr., 462-7184 www.sanjosemexicanrestaurants.com Natural/Health Zoës $ L,D 4855 Forest Dr., 782-1212 www.zoeskitchen.com

C o lu m b i a M e t ro p o l i ta n 101


Pizza Village Idiot $ L, D 4515 Forest Dr, 787-5005 www.villageidiotpizza.com Seafood Bonefish Grill $$-$$$ D 4708 Forest Dr., 787-6200 www.bonefishgrill.com Southern Lizard’s Thicket $ B,L,D • 402 Beltline Blvd., 738-0006 • 3147 Forest Dr., 787-8781 www.lizardsthicket.com Wings D’s Restaurant $ L,D 2005 Beltline Blvd., 787-2595 www.dsrestaurant.com

Rosewood American Rockaway Athletic Club $ L, D 2719 Rosewood Dr., 256-1075 Utopia $ D 406 Howard St., 733-2222 Deli The Deli at Rosewood Market $-$$ L,D,SBR 2803 Rosewood Dr., 256-6410 www.rosewoodmarket.com

102 C o lu m b i a M e t ro p o l i ta n

ITALIan Moe’s Grapevine $$ L,D,SBR 4478 Rosewood Dr., 776-8463 http://moesgrapevine.com Pizza Dano’s $ L,D 2800 Rosewood Dr., 254-3266 www.danosdelivers.com Pizza Man $ B,L,D 341 S. Woodrow St., 252-6931

REMBERT Fine Dining Boykins at the Mill Pond $$$ D 84 Boykin Mill Rd., (803) 425-8825 Lilfreds of Rembert $$$ D 8425 Camden Hwy., (803) 432-7063 www.lilfreds.net

Chapin Fine Dining Mark’s $$-$$$ L,D,SBR 2371 Dutch Fork Rd., 781-2807 Seafood Rusty Anchor $$-$$$ D 1925 Johnson Marina Rd., 749-1555 www.rustyanchorrestaurant.com

For an extended listing, visit www.columbiametro.com

a p r i l 2011


Amanda Shenk and Michael Herndon

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Carlo Casulo and Adriel Cornman

Allison Sturdivant and Lyle Lee

c o at e s c r e w e w w w . c l a r k b e r r y. c o m

Katherine Robinson and Richard Hutton

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l. Hoke studio & Gallery

William Scheibel and Morgan Dunlap

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Emily Fisher and Craig Black

brantley freeman/all dressed up photography

Alex Dievendorf and Tommy Nocilo

w w w . c l a r k b e r r y. c o m

David L. Stuckey, Jr. and Erin E. Richardson

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w w w . c l a r k b e r r y. c o m

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brantley freeman/all dressed up photography

Va l e r i e s c h o o l i n g / r i c h a r d b e l l p h o t o g r a p h y

just married

Elizabeth Hipp and Scott Shackouls

Blair Barrier and Britt Bearden

Sarah Martin and Benjamin Gibson

Katie Hutchinson and Benji McCollum

C o lu m b i a M e t ro p o l i ta n 103


picture this

Central Carolina Community Foundation Wine Dinner at The Vista Room Gregory Newell, Victoria Beichel, Scott Adams, Arie Gurevitch, JoAnn Turnquist, Marcia Fair

Anne Kelly, Mike Kelly, Renee Dzek, Edward Creason, Peg Danielson, Bill Danielson, Melanie Bowers, James Bowers Kathleen Antonetti, Marc Antonetti, Katherine Wells, James Flanagan

Kerrie Newell, Stewart Sneed, Tonia Cochran, Nancy Stone-Cullum, Natalie Cappuccio Britt

Anne Brittain, Roy Rosenstein, Hazy Caughman, Linda Caughman, Patti Shelley, Robin Gorman, Michael Gorman, Rick Brittain

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Wings of Love Gala

Keven Cohen, Dorothy, Alicia Barnes

Joni James, Merida Trask

Solomon Jackson, Jr., and family with Ray Tanner

Butler Trice, Maria McGregor

104 C o lu m b i a M e t ro p o l i ta n

Ethan Morse

Rob Teal, Risha Teal, Ray Tanner, Karen Tanner

a p r i l 2011


w w w. c o l u m b i a m e t ro . c o m

C o lu m b i a M e t ro p o l i ta n 105


106 C o lu m b i a M e t ro p o l i ta n

a p r i l 2011

Columbia Metropolitan Magazine April 2011 issue  

Columbia Metropolitan Magazine April 2011 issue

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