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Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area

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How to read this document

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area

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Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Vision Page Realising the dream

This document forms part of an evolutionary process and should be considered as a work in progress. The City of Joburg is currently leading an invaluable public participation process that will provide interested and affected parties the opportunity to contribute to the finalization of the Strategic Area Framework. Therefore certain sections of this report will be noted as “under development” or “work in progress"


Table of Contents 6

Realising the Dream

Diversity

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Corridors of freedom The 6 D’s

40

Study Area

15

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Metropolitan context

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48

Salient Features

32

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Housing Social facilities

Trip attractors

51

Movement

Road Hierarchy Public Transport

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These are the salient features of the area

This is how and why we’ve done this

These are the opportunities and enabling factors

These are the issues of the area

This is what we recommend and what it will look like

This is what it will cost

These are the decision points which we need you to consider

Network and Capacity

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Market Analysis Infrastructure

Summary of Analysis

63

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Issues and Challenges Opportunities

Public transport accessibility levels

Design

Strategic Area Framework

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This is what makes good corridors

Travel mode

NMT Walking Distances

Street Grid Analysis Residential Life Cycle

These are the things we want to achieve

Open Space

Enablers

68

Character Environmental

Concept Plan Methodology Future Zoning Densification areas

Heritage

Density

38

Land Use Mix

History

Distance

25

Population

Demand Management

Destinations

19

Document Flow

Population Density Residential Density

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area

Implementation Plan

90

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Approach Strategy Area-wide Interventions Catalyst Precincts

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Corridors of freedom Realising the dream - Isifiso

Corridors of Freedom – The Concept The City of Johannesburg is embarking on a new spatial vision for the city in line with the Growth and Development Strategy 2040, based on corridor Transitoriented Development (TOD). The shape of the future city will consist of well-planned transport arterials – the “Corridors of Freedom” – linked to interchanges where the focus will be on mixed-use development – high-density accommodation, supported by office buildings, retail development and opportunities for leisure and recreation. This Strategic Area Framework (SAF) is a direct attempt from the City of Johannesburg (CoJ) to not only address the fragmented spatial form of the City, but also to ensure that the economic benefits of the future envisaged city are shared inclusively by all residents. While numerous attempts have been made to redress the physical legacy of apartheid planning in the city, the urban landscape is still dominated by sprawling low-density settlements. The harsh reality is that the majority of the working class and poor citizens are physically far removed from employment and other economic opportunities situated in or around the urban core. This often results in the poorest of the poor having to commute long distances, often at high cost, in order to reach places of employment. In order to change this, and the lives of all citizens, the City of Johannesburg introduced its new spatial vision based on TOD, where urban spaces with a vibrant mix of high density developments, accommodation options, office, retail and recreational spaces will be connected by well-planned public transport arterials. The optimal mix of economic, education, transport and recreational opportunities will ultimately give rise to a people-centered City of Johannesburg, where the needs of all citizens are placed at the core of all planning processes. There are seven focus areas: In the medium term - 2016

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Soweto to CBD along Perth Empire CBD to Alex Alex to Sandton Turffontein Node Mining Belt

In the long term – 2040

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Sandton/ Randburg to Diepsloot Alex to Ivory Park

These public transport corridors dubbed “Corridors of Freedom”, will lead to residents having freedom of choice, freedom of movement, and most importantly, connections to employment opportunities, economic freedom.

The key features of Corridors of Freedom  Safe neighbourhoods designed for cycling and walking with sufficient facilities and attractive street conditions;  Safe complete streets with features to calm traffic, control vehicle traffic speeds and discourage the use of private transport;  Mixed-use developments where residential areas, office parks, shops, schools and other public services are close together, stimulating economic activity  

and creating opportunities for emerging entrepreneurs; Rich and poor, black and white living side by side - housing options provided cover a range of types and prices including rental accommodation; Convenient transit stops and stations.

There will be a clean break with apartheid spatial distribution and people living on the periphery will be able to move closer to economic opportunities.

The advantages of Corridors of Freedom        

The City will focus productive land use and economic activities in areas around transport infrastructure, thus reducing the demand for private motorized transport; Public transport will become a viable alternative because residents will live in closer proximity to work, shopping and leisure opportunities; Residents will benefit because they will not have to spend so time and money on transport; Learners will benefit because they will be closer to school; Unemployed people will benefit because it will easier to get to places to look for work; The economy will benefit because workers will arrive at work on time; High-density housing will stimulate opportunities for the SMME sector and small-scale operators in the informal economy; Shopping centres and hawkers will benefit along the corridors and nodes due to increased number of people passing their shops The environmental impact of public transport in high- density areas will be significantly smaller than in the case of low-density urban sprawl reliant on private cars thereby reducing the city’s environmental footprint and the city’s dependence on fossil fuels

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Executive mayor, Parks Tau says that the corridors of Freedom will ensure a free and united Joburg

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Corridors of freedom Realising the dream - Isifiso In order to picture a future of Turffontein, the different elements of the aspirations of the city were repackaged into distinct themes where different ideal characteristics follow in order which shape our imaginations of the desired future environment. “…We envisage a future where: The city will consist of well-planned transport arteries:- the “Corridors of Freedom” – linked to mixed-use development nodes with high density accommodation, supported by office buildings, retail developments and opportunities of education, leisure and recreation….” - Extract taken from “Corridors of Freedom” Re-stitching our city to create a new future”

Thematic elements

Characteristics

Imagining Turffontein….

Safe

Increased liveability

Vibrant

Where personal safety is enhanced by passive street surveillance Where street design discourages the use of private vehicles and promotes walking

Knowledgeable “…change current entrenched settlement patterns of the City made up by urban sprawl and uncontrolled spread of low-density developments on the fringes of the city to high-density developments and environments made up of a mixture of residential space with office accommodation, retail, leisure and recreational opportunities These corridors, he said would have effective and affordable public transport system and nodes enabling residents to travel only short distance between home and work place, cutting down on costs and travel time Schools, clinics and community facilities will be located in close proximity to residents and workplaces meaning that children living in the same area will attend the same school together. Leisure and recreational facilities will also be integrated leading to greater social interaction between people sharing the same geographic al space. This will result in significant social and cultural interaction and help break down the barriers erected by the policies of segregation…” - EM Councillor Mpho Parks Tau

Environmentally sustainable

Health environment

The vision “Isifiso”

Social equity

Where there is good quality open spaces

Health conscious

Where people benefit from enhanced health standards free from diseases because the environment encourages more active lifestyles

Socially sensitive

Where there is enhanced social equity because planning sensitizes itself to all members of the community Where the viability of secondary activities like shops and facilities is enhanced by the intense mixed primary uses

Economic strength

Economically sustainable

Where parking and transport infrastructure is utilized more efficiently Where affordable public transport increases household’s savings Where public transport users travel short distances saving them both money and time

Isifiso is a Zulu word meaning a wish, desire, longing, yearning

Self-contained

Enhanced resilience Accessible

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area

Where there reduced private vehicle usage that results in reduced environmental pollution and more energy savings

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Where non-residential facilities are located within a close radii to residential and work places Where convenience of accesses enhances desirability for the area increasing the overall land values

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Corridors of Freedom The 6 D’s

Understanding Transit Oriented Development Corridors – Turffontein Development Area

The Benefits of TOD Planning at a Corridor Scale Corridor Planning Increases Efficiency

Corridor planning typically begins when a new transit investment is proposed, which creates a unique opportunity in Turffontein as the area can potentially be linked with the existing Rea Vaya system. Corridor planning for the study area can thus be a cost-effective planning process, as multiple future stations along a corridor face similar challenges and opportunities.

The six major objectives of planning for transit and TOD at the corridor level are listed below. TOD corridor planning may only focus on a few objectives at a time, depending on the type of corridor, its specific characteristics, and the goals of corridor stakeholders.

Planning and implementing TOD requires the significant investment of both public and private resources. Corridor planning for TOD allows public agencies to phase this investment over time, beginning with stations that have higher potential for TOD in the short term, and can send a strong signal to activate the private development market. Many station areas are likely to require similar implementation strategies – such as transit-friendly land use ordinances and revamped parking standards, and consideration of ways to reduce barriers to development – and it is more efficient to implement these changes along an entire corridor rather than station by station. Corridor planning also makes it easier to identify which amenities already exist along the corridor and which are lacking – not every station needs a grocery store, for example.

Corridor-level plans can:

Corridor Planning Creates Momentum for TOD Implementation

What defines a TOD Corridor

Clarify the corridor type and its function within the regional network;

Corridor-level transit planning and construction causes both excitement and trepidation in neighbourhoods all along the corridor and brings people to the table that might not pay attention to planning at a smaller scale. This provides an opportunity to get a broad array of stakeholders invested in the success of the transit corridor and creates powerful momentum for TOD implementation. When residents are engaged in planning for an entire corridor they have more buy-in on decisions about transit alignments and the location of stations. If developers are involved they can provide transit agencies with a better understanding of where opportunities for transit-oriented development are strongest, and how decisions about the alignment and location of stations will help activate the market.

When planning for TOD, a transit corridor is best defined as the walkable areas around all of the stations along a transit line. Different transit technologies will define different areas of influence. For example, the area of influence along light and heavy rail corridors is typically a just less than a kilometre radius around stations; because streetcars can stop as often as every street corner they tend to have a stronger influence on development all along the line and up to three blocks on either side. Any transit technology can define a transit corridor – heavy or light rail, streetcar, trolley or bus. The TOD potential depends more on the design and quality of service than it does on the transit technology. High-quality service for all transit technologies is defined as high-frequency service along dedicated lanes or rights of way that serve to “fix” the line and provide certainty for developers and investors that transit service will not be moved to another corridor. The TOD potential is also determined by the walkability and bike ability of station areas, the presence of retail amenities, and the local and regional housing market. Public transport service levels such as frequency, reliability and quality have a bigger influence on station area than the public transport technology

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area

Enhance an understanding about the roles of different station areas along the corridor, and how increased connectivity and transportation choices can benefit residents of all incomes; Enable planners to understand how development along the corridor should be phased, and the land uses and development intensity that is most appropriate at each station; Provide regions that are planning or extending transit corridors with a better sense of what to expect in terms of development; Prioritize high-potential stations for development and investment; and Broaden the perspective on both regional needs and local needs.

Corridor Planning Integrates the Regional and Local Contexts When planning for the corridor scale, it is beneficial to see how stations along the corridor make connections that will maximize ridership and TOD opportunities. This in turn helps to understand the specific infrastructure or programmatic improvements that are needed to benefit the entire transit system as well as to provide local access — for example, streetscape improvements and bicycle connections which may be needed to make “last kilometre” connections. Considering the corridor scale may cause decision makers to reconsider decisions about planned alignments in order to make a corridor more functional. When TOD is considered at the corridor scale, it enhances an understanding of how transit will influence the TOD, ridership and market potential at each station. When only the station area is considered one can often easily miss this important broader context

Choosing the ‘right’ Corridor Type – Turffontein Development Area

The corridor is also the best scale at which to predict the long-range impacts of transit on the market for new development, on commuter travel behaviour, and on where the potential for displacement of lowincome residents may be greatest

In regions that are just starting to build a transit network, as is the case with the construction of the Rea Vaya BRT system in Johannesburg, or areas that are planning to such as Turffontein, choosing the “right” corridor to construct first can determine whether there will be regional support and momentum for transit and TOD. Corridor planning that incorporates a strategic, region-wide analysis of the impact of transit can identify where the real estate market will be most active. Existing transit lines can also benefit from corridor level TOD planning, especially if there is a need for community revitalization as is the case with the Johannesburg inner city CBD, or if market fluctuations make lower income neighbourhoods vulnerable to displacement. While this categorization of types serves to advance corridor analysis and planning, areas such as Turffontein cannot necessarily be so easily categorized and tend to be a mix of types.

Objectives for Transit and TOD at the Corridor Level The six major objectives of planning for transit and TOD at the corridor level are listed below. TOD corridor planning may only focus on a few objectives at a time, depending on the type of corridor, its specific characteristics, and the goals of corridor stakeholders.

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Corridors of Freedom The 6 D’s The Three Basic TOD Corridor Types This graphic below shows the three main corridor types: destination connector, commuter and district circulator. Each is defined by what it connects and how these connections influence the overall potential for TOD.

Graphical Representation: The Destination Connector

Characteristics:

Implications for TOD:

Destination connectors link residential neighbourhoods to multiple activity centres, including employment, medical and commercial centres and academic campuses. Because they make these connections, these transit corridors consistently produce higher than projected ridership. Destination connectors encourage ridership in both directions throughout the day because they serve 9-to-5 employment centres as well as other destinations. Some destination connectors also serve as commuter corridors.

The demand for new development will likely be highest in station areas identified as “destinations,” especially if they are walkable, higher-intensity activity centres with good connections to surrounding neighbourhoods. Higher-density development is more likely to occur along destination connector corridors due to increased market demand for locations with access to job and activity centres. Destinations outside of Central Business Districts have a stronger potential market for new development if they are centres that people want to visit regularly. Car-oriented employment centres or malls along the corridor may require new pedestrian-oriented street and building design before they become truly transitaccessible, even if they are very close to stations. Providing easy pedestrian and bicycle access to stations will encourage higher transit ridership, especially at employment centres where people are less inclined to walk long distances.

The Commuter

The District Circulator

Unlike destination connector corridors, commuter corridors generally serve only one major activity centre – typically the central business district – with riders traveling into the CBD in the morning and out of the CBD at the end of the day. This is in contrast to destination corridors that provide access to a variety of activity centres and result in ridership throughout the day. Transit service along commuter corridors is typically moderate to high-frequency during peak business hours, and tapers off during off-peak business hours.

New development along commuter corridors is likely to be residential with moderate to high densities, depending on market demand and proximity to the urban core.

District circulators facilitate movement within an “activity node” – typically a Central Business District or a commercial, medical or educational centre. Circulators extend the walkability of these districts, making it easier to access amenities without a car. Circulators also connect neighbouring activity nodes.

Circulators promote biking, walking and “park once” strategies. Streetscape improvements such as wider sidewalks, street trees, benches and other amenities will encourage pedestrian activity within a district.

If transit service is only available during commute hours, most travel will be to or from work in the morning and evening, and it will be much more difficult to achieve the land use benefits associated with higher-frequency service, which tends to activate real estate markets around stations. It’s important to enhance pedestrian and bicycle access to stations to achieve higher ridership, and to provide streetscape improvements such as new sidewalks and street trees.

The frequency of service can determine whether a circulator corridor will enhance transit connectivity and become an organizing principle for development. Circulators can increase overall transit ridership in the region if they connect to the larger transportation network.

Different corridor types create different TOD opportunities. While this categorization of types serves to advance corridor analysis and planning, real transit corridors cannot be so easily categorized and tend to be a mix of types.

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area

Turffontein development area is more suited to be the commuter corridor because of the existing dynamics and the nature of physical characteristics.

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Corridors of freedom The 6 D’s

TOD Theoretical Framework The city of Johannesburg imagines a future urban form where transport arteries, coined “Corridors of Freedom” will be well connected to self- contained, high density mixed use developments that provide ample opportunity for educational and leisure activities. When one, contextualizes the dream, which is underpinned by the distinct themes of Corridors of Freedom, one imagines a future Turffontein that is:

1. DESTINATIONS

4.DENSITY

Coordinate land use and transportation by concentrating development along corridors

Intensifying development around transit stops

PD 1: Highest densities near high quality and high frequency transport services.

PD 1: Promoting mixed use re development and infill developments.

PD 2: Promoting mixed land uses around the corridors to enhance viability

PD 2: Create a balance between vertical densities and public space

PD 3: Creating good connections to surrounding areas and inner-city to increase viability of existing transportation

PD 3: Matching the right densities with specific characters of the area

2.DISTANCE

5.DIVERSITY

Permeable street network that connects open spaces and public transport

Creating a diverse and vibrant cosmopolitan environment through provision of a range of choices, services and facilities

TODs aspire to concentrate a variety of mixed use developments around high volume transit station in order to have population thresholds that support the viability of existing activity. The quality of life for local people is expected to be enhanced as a result as more pedestrians travel safely and comfortably to their destinations of choice in a vibrant and active public environment.

PD 1: Creating a fine grained street network to minimize distance and enhance connections

PD 1: Provide a mix of housing typologies, income levels and affordability

Planning for these TODs occurs at the scale of the region, the corridor, the station area, and the land parcel, and these separate levels of planning should be coordinated to achieve the most successful outcomes.

PD 4: Connecting NMT’s access to frequent transit

ACCESSIBLE

ECONOMICALLY SUSTAINABLE

ENVIRONMENTALLY SUSTAIBLE

SAFE

SOCIALLY SENSITIVE

COSMOPOLITAN

As a way to bring the dream to reality, the City of Johannesburg advocates for corridor Transit-orientated Development (TOD) to form the basis of its new spatial vision, in line with the GDS 2040. To determine suitability of TOD, an overlay exercise is conducted that takes the aspirations of “Corridors of Freedom” and weighs them against the objectives of TOD, which proves to be appropriately suited to translate the vision into reality. The architecture of “Corridors of Freedom”, as a vision, is bound to similar principles as TOD as an urban development approach as shall be demonstrated in the subsequent text through 6D approach. The 6D’s are:

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Destinations Distance Design Density Diversity Demand Management

There are three distinct corridors types, namely the destination, the commuter and the district circulator. The salient features of the Turffontein Development area can potentially be suited to a typical commuter TOD model. Unlike destination connector corridors, commuter corridors generally serve only one major activity centre – typically the central business district – with riders traveling into the CBD in the morning and out of the CBD at the end of the day. These movement dynamics are already pre-existing in the study area where the majority of the population commutes daily to work and school opportunities into the CBD. This is in contrast to destination corridors that provide access to a variety of activity centres and result in ridership throughout the day. Transit service along commuter corridors is typically moderate to high-frequency during peak business hours, and tapers off during off-peak business hours.

PD 2: Creating a multimodal mobility network with interlinked public spaces PD 3: Creating multimodal streets that prioritize pedestrians over vehicles

PD 2: Promote active and vibrant public spaces PD 3: Incorporate other support land uses that are compatible with the unique character of the area

PD 5: Coordinate street implementation with enabling utility infrastructure

3.DESIGN

6.DEMAND MANAGEMENT

People centered design that preserves the area’s district culture, history and character

Ensuring an efficient functioning system

The 6D model is the toolkit of choice utilized extensively to dive deep as an attempt to understand the current realities of the corridor. The benefits of the model are twofold; firstly it focuses the scope of the analysis into the 6 thematic preconditions for TOD. This sheds light into the key issues and challenges, and identifies pre-existing opportunities for TOD development. Secondly, it provides benchmarking where the performance of the corridor can be rated, and identifies intervention areas that will catalyse achievement of the development vision.

PD 1: Design to attract interest in users of the space

PD 1: Parking supply and demand should support objectives of trying to reduce use of private cars

Furthermore, enabling factors like infrastructure development and market conditions were scrutinized to determine the extent to which the corridor can be viable.

PD 5: Design places that enhance the local culture, history and character of the local area

PD 2: Enhance street’s sense of legibility PD 3: Parking design should be to the convenience of the pedestrian PD 4: Places around stations should be designed to benefit the users

People make places, and as such “planning for people” as an idea has been enshrined throughout the entire planning cycle in order to ensure that we create demand responsive environments that cater to the exact needs of the people. All aspects of corridor planning are done to the human scale as a deliberate attempt to evoke pleasant feelings of people’s experience of the public space. Grounded on this thinking, the study is aspiring to bring to life these envisaged well-functioning urban environments.

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area

PD 2: Create a self-contained environment where people can meet their needs in their respective areas PD 3: Ensure that the area is serviced by efficient and sustainable public transportation

“The 6 D’s” Adopted from the “TOD Overlay Plan” by the Kaka ‘ako Community Development District

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Corridors of Freedom The 6 D’s

Alignment of principles The table below is a summary of the similarities and alignment of Corridors of Freedom and TOD principles. The 6Ds are the microscopes for which the different aspects the corridor are put under scrutiny. They help offer crucial insight into the existing situation, which paves the way for more informed proposals. They should serve as a roadmap and orientate the reader as the scope of the analysis deepens to grassroots elements.

Destinations

Distance

Create access to opportunity by reducing distances Encourages compact development and transit supportive An integrated, place-based approach to land-use and between home, work and education land uses integrated into walkable neighbourhoods transport planning

Create attractive environments for walking and cycling

TOD aims to connects residents to activity centres

Good corridors provide meaningful destinations

Creates convenient pedestrian connections

A diverse and connected street network that promotes pedestrian accessibility Good corridors connect communities

Design

Create a vibrant, people-cantered city

Promote good urban design that establishes a sense of Good corridors are context-sensitive and are designed place with community outcomes in mind Good corridors create a sense of place and character

Density

Promote transit orientated development with high Transit is the organising principle for development, Good corridors are densified around transit stations density residential development around stations surrounding which densification is promoted

Diversity

Support mixed use development that allows people to Requires a mixture of transit supportive land uses live, work and play in the same space

Demand Management

Discourage the use of private cars by providing Encourage modal shifts and reduce car use by providing Good corridors are effectively managed and monitored. sustainable travel alternatives and managing parking sustainable alternatives and by effectively managing Traffic flow and parking management prevent the need parking for major capacity investments

Good corridors are characterized by a diversity of finegrained land uses and provide a variety of transportation alternatives.

A review of current best practices indicates that TOD is a unique form of urban development. How a corridor is planned and developed will depend on the particular attributes of that area and surrounding community. As indicated, the 6Ds are critical components to the success of any transit oriented development (KCCD, n.d.).This table describes them in more detail and indicates the different topic items which were analysed. Furthermore, more topic items under infrastructure and market conditions, as enablers to the success of the corridor are also listed.

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Corridors of freedom The 6 D’s

Principle

Description

Aspect to be Analysed and Improved  

Trip attractors Movement

Population density

Housing

Public transport facility

Create streets and public spaces that are carefully designed with the needs of people in mind. The public realm should be safe, comfortable, and inviting for people of all abilities and ages. To achieve these objectives, transit-oriented neighbourhoods have complete streets designed to meet the needs of a range of users, and they provide inviting public spaces that welcome lingering, gathering and celebration. Development in transit-oriented community development also reinforces the distinct history, culture, and character of the corridors’ various neighbourhoods using context-sensitive design and enhancing the pedestrian environment.

    

Grid analysis Residential life cycle Environmental Heritage Topography

Implement complete streets policies and develop a holistic transportation system within the corridor, finding ways to maximize the capacity to move people by developing environments that encourage people to walk, bike and take transit, rather than driving for all trips. A well-connected street network shortens travel distances, making it possible for people to walk or cycle to transit service quickly and conveniently from places they live, work, shop, and play and supporting walking and cycling as everyday transportation options. Implementation of the complete streets network will require coordination between work at street level and the need to consider upgrades to utilities to support new development.

  

Road hierarchy Public Transport Non-motorised transport

Diversity

Create an internally diverse and vibrant mixed-use community through the provision of a range of housing choices, services and facilities which improve the quality of life for residents and businesses.

   

Land use Social facilities and open space Housing and population Travel modes

Demand Management

Develop a comprehensive systems approach to parking and travel demand management. This will include developing the corridor in a way that allows residents of the area to meet many of their needs within the district, avoiding the need to travel longer distances for basic life needs. Combined with the emphasis on high quality, convenient, reliable and competitive transportation choices, these policies can have a wide range of positive benefits, including reducing traffic congestion and air pollution, making better use of existing capacity and infrastructure, increasing traffic safety, and improving public health.

 

Network capacity Travel Demand Management

Destinations

Coordinate transportation and land use by concentrating development along reasonably direct corridors, so that most destinations are ‘on the way’ to other destinations. When transportation and land use are well coordinated, transit, walking and biking can provide more people with fast, direct and cost-effective access to more destinations.

Density

Encourage more intensive development near frequent transit (transit service that arrives every 15 minutes or better) to enable liveable, walkable, and resilient neighbourhoods. To function well, higher density development should be combined with the other principles of good transit-oriented development, creating a compact community with a connected street network, well-designed buildings and public spaces, a mix of land uses, and managed demand for private vehicle travel. In this corridor, more intense land use will relieve development pressures on suburban and rural areas by attracting development to in the corridor that can be well served by a variety of modes.

Design

Distance

Enabling Factors within corridor that supports corridor development Enabling Factor

Description

Infrastructure

The development of the optimal future corridor is dependent on the availability of functional infrastructure to support economic and residential users. Infrastructure enables current functions and future expansions which makes it a prerequisite to any development.

  

Water Sanitation Energy

Market Conditions

The viability of the TOD corridor and the phasing of implementation is largely dependent on the market performance and the employment creation or job absorption of the economy at a regional, metropolitan and neighbourhood scale

Market performance

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area

Aspect to be Analysed

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Corridors of freedom The 6 D’s

Connected and permeable street networks that facilitate access using Complete Streets Principles Integrated land use and Transport solutions

Establish strategies that ensure the system operates Efficiently

The creation of people orientated neighbourhoods with a strong sense of place and character

Concentration and intensification of activities around transit stations

Encourage a mix of land uses, provide for multiple modes And accommodate A variety of users

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Corridors of freedom The 6 D’s

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Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Study Area Metropolitan and local context

Metropolitan Context Turffontein is situated in Region F of the City of Johannesburg, immediately to the south of the CBD, serves as a reception area for many first time entrants to Johannesburg, thereby creating a living environment to a large number of diverse user groups. The northern portion of the site consists of a swathe of industrial land, warehousing and storage space, the remnants of the city’s historic manufacturing hub. While industrial activity may have changed substantially in the city, the built form of these industrial areas continues to attract light industrial and warehousing functions. This industrial space is contiguous with a band of partially active mining land, some of which may be reclaimed in the near future. This east-west mining and industrial belt separates the inner city from the lower density residential areas such as Turffontein, Kenilworth and Rosettenville in the south. Situated to the south of the study area are the very low density residential areas of Glenvista, and further south Alberton. These areas are interspersed with agricultural activity and some significant natural resources such as the Klipriviersberg Nature Reserve and the scenic East West Ridges/Koppies. Due to its strategic location, the area is well integrated with the surrounding urban areas. All major arterial roads originate from the CBD, and radiate out into other parts of the city. This includes the national routes N1, N3, N12 and N17 and makes the Turffontein area highly accessible from a local and regional point of view. The CBD also houses a number of key transportation nodes (i.e. railway station, bus terminuses and large taxi ranks) that are important to national and sub-Saharan movements of goods and people. The study area is characterised by industrial and commercial areas predominantly in the north and north-east (City Deep, Kaserne), which is currently the main intermodal freight terminal in Gauteng, interspersed with mining land, some of which are still protected and reserved for future mining operations. There are existing mining operations and activities in the northern areas of the study area. In addition, the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Act of 2002 has given rise to prospecting activities in the mining area that affects the northern part of the Region. Turffontein’s proximity to the Inner City means that the area functions as the first point of entry into Johannesburg from Southern Gauteng. This “Gateway to the City” role also results in Turffontein not really functioning as a destination in itself, but rather an area experiencing large volumes of through traffic heading further north. As a result, Turffontein is not currently gaining substantial economic benefits from its strategic location. The recreational precinct situated in and around Glenesk is potentially the only regional attractor in the area, but has been in decline for a number of years. The residential areas, situated less than 4km from the CBD can ideally house a significantly larger population and contribute to the Johannesburg’s long term ideal to create a more sustainable city. Currently the population makes out less than two percent of the total population of Johannesburg, an indication of the fragmented spatial form of the metropolitan area. The fact that the average Johannesburg citizen spends 76 minutes per trip to access employment opportunities is a result of this functional distortion. Although not performing the function, Turffontein’s location as a strategic link between traditional poorer areas and economic opportunities in Johannesburg makes this area a “Corridor of Freedom”.

Local Context Turffontein is located to the immediate south of the Johannesburg CBD. It is bordered by the M2 to the North, M19/ Marjorie Street to the East and Kliprivier Drive/M1 to the west and N12 to the south. The study area includes the residential suburbs of Turffontein, Kenilworth, La Rochelle, Rosettenville, and further south closer to the N12, Oakdene and Linmeyer. The area was identified due to its location and proximity to regional economic and industrial nodes such as the CBD, City Deep and Kaserne freight terminals. The area is also strategically located as the gateway to Johannesburg from South Gauteng. Although the area is in a general state of decline, its strategic location results in it being attractive to people seeking affordable accommodation. The Proposed Rea Vaya routes do not intersect the study area, however there is opportunity to propose a new public transport route alignment through the study area and unlock the full development potential of the area

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area

Figure 1: Study area in context based on estimated travel times Figure 1 indicates the proximity of the study area in relation to the Johannesburg CBD. The CBD is situated within 7km from the southern boundary of the study area, while the core residential areas are located less than 4km from the City. This proximity provides great potential and opportunities to access a wide range of economic and employment opportunities situated in the CBD and Industrial Belt. Based on reasonable average travel times, the Johannesburg CBD is less than a 30 minute cycle trip from almost anywhere in the study area.

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The residential suburbs in the study area are some of the oldest in Johannesburg. Though situated less than 3km from the CBD, the mining and industrial belt isolated these areas from the CBD and has hampered the development of the th area from the beginning of the 20 century.

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Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Corridors of Freedom Salient Features Salient Features The figure provides a summary of the salient features of the area:  The area is bordered by the Johannesburg CBD to the north, rich in employment opportunities, social amenities and transport hugs and interchanges  The northern portion of the site consist of a swathe of industrial land, warehousing and storage space, and the remnants of the city’s historic manufacturing hub – While industrial activity may have changed substantially in the City, the built form of these industrial areas continues to attract light industrial and warehousing functions. This industrial space is contiguous with a band of partially used mining land, mine dumps and Robinson Landfill site. This east west mining and industrial belt roughly situated between the railway line and the M2 highway forms a barrier between the Inner city and the residential areas in the south, with Turffontein only connected to the CBD via Booysens Road, Eloff Street and Rosettenville Road.  A clustering of recreational facilities situated in the centre of the study area, which includes sporting and recreational facilities such as Turffontein Racecourse, Rand Stadium, Hector Norris Cycling Velodrome and Wemmer Pan and its associated water sports including sailing, rowing and canoeing. Pioneers Park has numerous public and private sporting facilities, including rugby, football, swimming and tennis.  The historically residential neighbourhoods roughly situated between Turf Club Road and Rifle Range / Verona Street in the South, which are some of the oldest neighbourhoods in Johannesburg, th having been established at the turn of the 20 century. These include Turffontein, Kenilworth, Regents Park and Rosettenville. This area also includes the district node of La Rochelle / Rosettenville, the only economic node of significance within the study area. These areas are characterised by low density detached and semi-detached housing 

The area to the south of Rifle Range Road, separated to an extent from Turffontein by a natural ridge, are characterised by the higher income suburbs of Oakdene and Linmeyer and a couple of shopping malls, including The Glen, situated along the N12.

Turffontein is a gateway to the city of Johannesburg and provides affordable accommodation to first time entrants to the city? This attribute should be cherished and built upon

Figure 2: Salient features of the Turffontein development area Cycling, rowing and canoeing, which are all Olympic sports are practiced at the facilities at Wemmerpan and the Hector Norris Cycling Velodrome. The Velodrome is the only one in Johannesburg and one of only two in Gauteng while plans to increase the rowing sprint lane from 700m to 1000m would present Wemmerpan with the only Olympic quality facilities within city limits in South Africa.

Turffontein’s proximity to the CBD holds the potential to densify the area significantly, thereby providing residents access to employment opportunities and amenities with a radius of less than 15 minutes

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area

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Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Study Area History

History of the Turffontein area The southern suburbs of Johannesburg, which forms the focus point of the Turffontein Strategic Area Framework, has a unique history that is linked and almost exclusively influenced by the early development of Johannesburg, which was established as a village where miners could live, on a piece of Government-owned land known as Randjeslaagte. The area was bordered to the east by Doornfontein, to the west by Braamfontein and on the South by Turffontein. Turffontein was one of the first farms proclaimed as public gold diggings, and within a matter of months a number of gold mines operated on the farm, including Robinson, Bonanza, Ferreira Deep, Village Main and Wemmer mines. The geology of the area to a large degree dictated the fundamental layout of the city. The gold mines were all situated south of the east-west running Witwatersrand ridge, while the area to the north was situated on a much older granite dome with no gold. Although early residential settlements were concentrated in specific parts of the mining camp, it did not take long before social and economic segregation was visible in the early fabric of Johannesburg. The managerial and merchant classes quickly moved into these suburbs established to the north of the mining belt. These suburbs were however quickly abandoned again in favor of homes over the ridge, where warmer weather and the less dusty environment quickly resulted in more affluent residents settling here. The northern townships were formally proclaimed and privately developed, with the developers specifying the conditions in terms of permitted land uses and size of erven. The properties in townships to the east and north of central Johannesburg, situated away from the noise and dust of the industrial and mining activities, were more expensive than those to the west or south, and this socio-economic pattern has continued to the present day. Virtually from the outset Ferreira’s Town (1886) and Fordsburg (1889) had enjoyed solid working class credentials, and were joined by Mayfair (1898), Brixton (1902), Kensington (1903), and Malvern (1904). At the same time, a number of suburbs were also established south of the mining belt, including Ophirton (1886), Booysens (1887), Rosettenville (1889), Turffontein (1889), La Rochelle (1895), Regent’s Park (1904) and Kenilworth (1907). Most of these were marked for lower income housing by the size of their stands, usually 500m² and never more than 1000m². This contrasted with suburbs being established at the same time north of the ridge, where plots ranged in size between 1000m² and 4000m². (Exception of Norwood and Parkhurst with 500m² erven. Turffontein was established in 1889, only three years after the founding of Johannesburg, complete with the circular Rotunda Park and 500m² erven still evident today, and was initially earmarked as a wealthy neighborhood. Its proximity to the growing mine dumps, and the associated noise and dust made this improbable, and the area subsequently changed into a working class neighborhood housing miners. The layout and erf sizes off the majority of the suburbs within the study area contribute to the current character of the area. From the earliest days, the mining belt was thus a dominant structuring element dividing the northern and southern parts of the City. Characterized by unstable geological conditions, mine dumps and slimes-dams, it is often seen as a major environmental problem and a barrier to development. The belt also still today influences movement to and from the Turffontein area. The number of direct routes connecting the area to the Johannesburg CBD was limited to only three (Booysens Road, Eloff Street Extension, and Rosettenville Road) as they had to cut across privately owned mining land. Other aspects of the history still influencing the area today include:

 

Turffontein Racecourse: The racecourse was established in 1887, by the Johannesburg Turf Club and is still an important feature in the area. Both the suburb and the racecourse owe their names to the original farm Turffontein.

Portuguese Influence and legacy: The Portuguese community first settled in La Rochelle and Rosettenville between 1924 and 1972, mostly from Portugal, Madeira due to the Second World War. The area was attractive for immigrants as the smaller erven and working class character translated into more affordable property prices. The number of Mozambican immigrants also grew after the country gained independence in 1976. The Mozambican Portuguese settled in the suburbs of Rosettenville, Regent’s Park and La Rochelle. The area became known as Little Portugal, with evidence of the Portuguese influence still visible today in these suburbs.

Cosmopolitan Turffontein: Although originally developed and planned as a neighbourhood for whites only, the southern suburbs has transformed over the years into a cosmopolitan area, driven originally by the Portuguese immigrants, and after 1994, due to its proximity to the CBD and Johannesburg, by black buyers moving out of the townships and into the area. While the composition of the local population may have changed over the years, the ever growing cosmopolitan nature of the area is establishing Turffontein as a cultural melting pot.

Johannesburg Tram Network: To facilitate the movement of the growing population, a tram system was introduced in 1906, which at its height, covered more than 1 600km. Due to the stark increase in private motor vehicles, and the ageing tram fleet, the City decided in to replace the trams by trolley-buses. The decision to remove the trams not only served to encourage greater use of private cars on some routes but also provided a means of rapidly widening some of the arterials that led to and from the city as trams had their own permanent reserve parallel with the road. When the tracks were lifted the width of the road reserve was doubled and dual-carriageway arterials 'appeared' and became usable almost overnight.

Figure 3 Timeline of Historical Development of Turffontein

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area

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Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Study Area History

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area

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Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Summary Analysis Destinations: Integrated land use and transport solutions

Future Corridor Transportation and land use will be integrated in the future Turffontein area by concentrating development along transport corridors and destinations. The delineation of a possible public transport route connecting this area to the wider Rea Vaya network presents opportunities for transit-supportive development as it is a catalyst for redevelopment and intensification. The study area will be served by a quality public transport service connecting the area with employment, education and recreational destinations situated in and around the study area. This will decrease the length and number of trips and increase the possibility of living, working, learning and playing within the corridor.

Current Reality Trip attractors In economic terms, transportation may be defined as a “derived demand”, in other words movement that occurs as a result of demand for another good or services, located at a specific destination. Land use patterns therefore define movement patterns. Land uses may be characterised as either those that attract trips or those that generate trips. During a morning peak hour, residential areas (for example) typically generate trips, whilst places of education and employment are seen to attract trips. In the afternoon, the reverse would typically hold true. Movement is derived by connecting trip generators (origins) to trip attractors (destinations) and it can therefore be appreciated that not only does land use instigate movement, but the type, intensity and mix of land uses also influences travel characteristics, for example the distances people are required to travel between particular origin-destination pairs. An analysis of the broad land uses in and around Turffontein provides an indication that travel between residences; places of employment and education represent a predominant proportion of trips taken. Employment centres, education and health facilities and recreational and open spaces are typically areas that attract trips. These uses must ideally be concentrated along a transit corridor, or well connected to the corridor through feeder services or pedestrian linkages. When transportation and land use are well coordinated, public transport and nonmotorised transport can provide more people with fast, direct and cost-effective access to more destinations, thereby increasing the possibility of people living and working or learning within the corridor. While the area has a number of possible strategic locations, including the industrial belt which is a significant employment destination, these areas are not served by a reliable public transport service presently. An analysis of the broad land uses within the Turffontein area give an indication that travel between residences, places of employment and education represent a predominant proportion of passenger trip purposes. The majority of the employment opportunities lie within the ‘industrial belt’ and CBD to the north of Turffontein. There are also some employment opportunities provided within Rosettenville activity area and along local streets such as Augusta Road, Hay Street, High Street and Leonard Street in the form of shops, restaurants and other local businesses. This results in major regional and through movement being predominantly in a north south direction. The local business node of La Rochelle including the commercial facilities along Turf / Main Road, and the education facilities situated predominantly throughout the residential area results in east-west Localised movement as residents access local business and education facilities situated within the residential areas.

The industrial belt is a significant employment destination in the region, attracting trips from the wider Johannesburg region. Wemmer Pan, Pioneers Park and Rand Stadium are land uses that could be trip attractors if managed properly, and could support a possible public transport feeder route by providing diversity in terms of destinations.

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Figure 4: Trip Attractors

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Summary Analysis Destinations: Integrated land use and transport solutions

Movement patterns

Employment and education trips

Land use: instigating movement

Table 2: Turffontein local employment and education , based on 2004 National Household Travel Survey

A person’s accessibility and mobility to their daily activities are affected by land use patterns within the direct area. Accessibility is defined as a person’s general ability to reach desired goods, services and activities. Mobility refers to the amount and type of travel activity that occurs within an area and to other areas to obtain the desired goods and destination. The broad land use features identified in Turffontein are summarised in the table below and the influence on trip making is indicated. If the necessary services and features required by residents are available within the direct area, local person trips will be frequent.

Table 1: Turffontein local origins or destinations Local origins destinations

or

Description

Location

Residential dwellings

Turffontein, Kenilworth, Regents Park, The Hill, Rosettenville

Situated predominantly south of Turf Club Street to the southern study area border.

Employment opportunities

Agricultural, Business and commercial, Education, Mining, Multiple purpose, Religious purposes, Sectional title, Sectional title business

The majority of the employment opportunities lie within the ‘industrial belt’ and CBD to the north of Turffontein. There are also some employment opportunities provided within Rosettenville activity area and along local streets such as Augusta Road, Hay Street, High Street and Leonard Street in the form of shops, restaurants and other local businesses

Educational facilities

Primary, secondary combined schools.

Situated predominantly throughout the residential area

Retail and shopping

La Rochelle business node, local commercial nodes.

and

Located within La Rochelle and Rosettenville along Main Street

The facilities above also serve and attract people outside of Turffontein. Conversely, approximately 70% and 30% of Turffontein residents respectively work and study outside of Turffontein.

70% of Turffontein residents do not work within the Turffontein area. This translates to morning and afternoon peak trips from and to the area, and supports the largely “commuter-corridornature” of the area.

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Employment

Education

Number of jobs or places available in Turffontein

≈ 36,600

≈ 13,500

Number of employees or students residing within Turffontein

≈ 14,300

≈ 10,300

Number of Turffontein residents that work or study within Turffontein (internal work or education movement)

≈ 4,290

≈ 7,200

Number of people that work or study within Turffontein that live outside the study area (contributes to regional movement)

≈ 32,310

(11% of Turffontein opportunities) (30% of employees)

employment

(70% of Turffontein resident students)

Turffontein

(89% of Turffontein opportunities)

(53% of Turffontein school places)

resident ≈ 6,300

employment

(47% of Turffontein school places)

The above table indicates that approximately 13,100 Turffontein residents make regional trips (external of Turffontein) for employment and education purposes and 35,400 people come into Turffontein to work or study based on 2004 NHTS results. This indicates that approximately 48,500 trips are made in and out of Turffontein on a typical weekday in 2004 for work It is noted that since 2004, the number of employment opportunities has marginally increased together with growth in completed office, retail and industrial floor space. However, the increase in employment opportunities does not tie in with Turffontein’s considerable population growth. As such, the number of people coming into Turffontein for employment purposes can be considered to be relatively consistent but the number of Turffontein residents working outside of the study area has dramatically increased. This reinforces the fact that people are not necessarily moving to Turffontein for internal job opportunities, but for affordable housing at convenient and accessible locations.

Turffontein’s population growth since 2001 (55% increase) is considerably higher than the increase in employment opportunities in the area. The number of residents working outside the area has increased, resulting in longer trip distances

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Summary Analysis Destinations: Integrated land use and transport solutions

Mode used for employment and education trips The mode of transport used by Turffontein residents to travel to work and educational facilities also plays a crucial role in understanding regional and internal movement. The table below indicates the main mode of transport Turffontein residents use to travel to their employment or educational destinations in 2004.

It is possible for travel patterns to have changed since 2004. Demacon 2013 reports that travel to work and educational facilities by foot has increased to be on par with travel by car as a driver (approximately 28 and 30% respectively). Whilst private vehicle use is still the dominant form of travel (car as driver and passenger combined, 48%), the significant proportion of work and school trips made by walking indicates that Turffontein residents are working and studying closer to the study area compared to 2004 statistics.

Table 3: Main mode of transport for Turffontein residents (internal and regional movement), based on It is noted that 2011 car ownership statistics indicate that 41% of households (approximately 12,500 households) within 2004 NHTS Turffontein own at least one vehicle. Taking this into account, together with the modal splits presented in the 2013 Demacon Main mode of transport

Employment

Education

Bicycle

0%

2%

Bus

9%

17%

Car driver

51%

1%

Car passenger

12 %

28%

Company transport

3%

0%

Lift Club

5%

12%

Taxi

7%

11%

Train

1%

0%

Walk

12%

39%

Total

100%

100%

Total trips

14,300

10,300

report, suggests that population densities have increased since 2004, particularly in households with no access to a private vehicle, thus contributing to the increase in trips made on foot. Approximately 90% of employment and 50% of education opportunities are filled by people living outside of Turffontein. Therefore, it is critical to understand how these movements also occur. The following table shows the main mode of transport for people coming to Turffontein to work or study based on 2004 NHTS results

Table 4: Main mode of transport for people working or studying within Turffontein (residents and nonresidents)

The predominant mode of travel for employment is via private car (63% as driver or passenger), whilst walking (39%) is the mode most likely to be used to go to school based on NHTS 2004These figures show where Turffontein residents travel for work and education based on mode of transport, according to the NHTS 2004. The majority of Turffontein residents either use private transport (63%) or non-motorised transport (walking 12%) as mode to access employment opportunities. The majority of education trips within the study area occur on foot as the education facilities are all located within the residential areas.

Taking into account the above information, it is clear that there is a real opportunity to switch more internal and short regional private vehicle trips to non-motorised means of travel, especially cycling. Further, encouraging sustainable growth in suitable employment opportunities within Turffontein will shift movement patterns to align with the principal of living in proximity to employment opportunities, thus potentially decreasing travel lengths and times.

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Main mode of transport

Employment

Education

Bicycle

<1%

2%

Bus

7%

7%

Car driver

26%

0%

Car passenger

4%

33%

Company transport

<1%

0%

Lift Club

2%

12%

Motor cycle

0%

0%

Taxi

39%

15%

Train

16%

1%

Walk

4%

31%

Total

100%

100 %

Total trips

36,607

13,522

70% of Turffontein residents do not work within the Turffontein area. This translates to morning and afternoon peak trips from and to the area, and supports the largely “commuter-corridor-nature” of the area.

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Summary Analysis Destinations: Integrated land use and transport solutions

The dominant mode of transport for people coming to Turffontein to work is via taxi (39%) with travel by private car following (30% as driver or passenger). Compared to modal splits of Turffontein residents) where car as driver is the dominant form of travel (51%) suggests that the people coming into Turffontein to work is of a lower socio-economic background and are not able to travel via private vehicle according to 2004 statistics, which matches the employment opportunities (industrial and unskilled labour) within Turffontein.

Recreational facilities as trip attractor

Table 5: Movement trends of people working or studying within Turffontein Trends

Employment

Education

Car and car passenger

Car as driver dominant. Trips largely originate within a 20km radius from Turffontein.

Students studying in Turffontein get dropped off from as far as Randburg. They originate predominantly from the west and north west of Turffontein.

Public or group transport

The workforce using taxis and trains to get to Turffontein chiefly live in Soweto and its surrounds, west of the study area.

Similar to the employment pattern, the majority of students that do not live in Turffontein and travel via taxi or train to school originate in Soweto and its surrounds, west of the study area.

Walking or cycling

People that do not live in Turffontein do not walk or cycle to work.

People that do not live in Turffontein do not walk or cycle to educational facilities.

It is clear that Turffontein is highly accessible by car, as shown by the range and distance of origins of people that work but do not live in Turffontein. Further, there is a strong demand for public transport (taxis and trains) along the corridor between Soweto and Turffontein. This indicates that Turffontein is easily reached from a variety of locations by private vehicle and public transport. Taking into account that 70% of Turffontein residents work externally to the study area despite the amount of local job opportunities, reinforces that fact that Turffontein is an accessible location to both work and live. Moving forward, it is recognized that encouraging private vehicle use is not sustainable. As such, non-motorised travel, public transport routes and waiting areas should be improved and strengthened within Turffontein to facilitate access to local and external employment opportunities, matching where suitably skilled people live

Figure 5: Recreational Facilities Around Pioneers Park Though the industrial area is the only major work trip attractor, there are several areas and facilities in Turffontein could possibly influence the movement of people within and through the area, namely:

There is an equal proportion of scholars travelling to school in Turffontein from outlying areas to those residing and attending school from within Turffontein

 

Critical issues with regard to the lack of lease agreements and contracts of facilities in and around Pioneers Park have not been resolved, thus preventing development in this precinct. Detailed proposals made in the 2010 Wemmerpan Urban Design Framework have also not yet been implemented. Where possible, the projects identified in the UDF will be included in the phased implementation plan of the Corridors of Freedom Project

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 

Rand Stadium is the oldest of the major stadiums in Johannesburg. It was constructed from 1949 to 1951 and was the home of all the major football finals for many years. Between 2007 and 2009 the stadium was revamped in preparation for the 2010 FIFA World Cup as it was used as a training venue. The old stadium's scoreboard was retained for its heritage value. Hector Norris Park is one of only two cycling facilities of this nature in Gauteng. Central Gauteng Cycling have spent some funds on the track and facilities, but a major upgrade is needed. They were also granted some funds from the National Lottery for upgrading of the facilities, but need to have their lease agreement in place in order to access these funds. The cycling track and rowing facilities on Wemmer Pan, both provides the opportunity to really strengthen the sporting precinct in this area. For a number of years Pioneers Park has been the subject of numerous planning initiatives, but very little has happened. There are no central security arrangements in place and each club makes its own arrangements. From discussions with local stakeholders, it seems that there is still definite issue with regards to the leasing of facilities within Pioneers Park. Pioneers Park also forms part of a wider open space network within the study area, stretching from Rosettenville in the south to Wemmer Pan in the north. The open space is part of the movement network and could play an important role in the area in terms of providing access via a structured nmt movement system to recreational and employment opportunities further north in the industrial belt.

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Draft Report

Summary Analysis Destinations: Integrated land use and transport solutions

Regional movement

Localised movement

Figure 6 shows the major movements occurring within Turffontein and illustrates the major north-south movements along Kliprivier and Prairie Roads, which are representative of the proximity and the strength of the job base of the city north of Turffontein. However, the majority of this north-south movement is external through traffic (i.e. vehicles not originating or stopping in Turffontein) travelling directly to and from the city as represented by the red arrows in Figure 6.

Local motorised and non-motorised trips are generally characterised shorter trips. These are generally local trips such as recreation or shopping jaunts. These are highlighted in purple in Figure 7and show major linkages between residential areas and key destination areas such as schools and places of employment. The orange paths indicate routes where pedestrians walk for longer trip purposes, generally for work. These align with heavily trafficked vehicular roads which are the shortest distance between most destinations.

Through movement plays a major contribution in terms of traffic volumes on road. It is not practicable to disregard or prevent this movement occurring as it is currently perceived to provide support to local economies. Regional east-west movement occurs via the M1 and N12 motorways, with lesser movement along Turf Club and Rifle Range Roads. Moving forward, these roads must be managed effectively such that mobility needs do not compromise the accessibility requirements of internal movement. However, on a larger scale, it must be recognized that continuously providing for private vehicle travel based on current trends is not sustainable and viable. As such, stronger emphasis should be given on providing infrastructure and directing land uses which support shorter trips via public transport, walking and cycling.

There are a variety of local employment, educational, social and retail opportunities within Turffontein. However, as highlighted earlier 70% and 30% of Turffontein resident workers and students respectively travel outside of the study area. As such, the vast majority of internal trips are generally for social and retail purposes. The below figure depicts major and secondary movements within Turffontein. These movements represent travel by car and on foot. Due to the short distances travelled to local social or retail opportunities and low car ownership through the centre of Turffontein, it can be said that the majority of these trips are made on foot Onsite observations indicate that there are numerous trips already made on foot despite inadequate pedestrian facilities. Improving and providing an accessible, coherent and connected non-motorised transport will only increase the proportion of trips made in a sustainable manner.

Important note: The majority of major vehicular movement in Turffontein is through traffic destined for the CBD and beyond. This presents an opportunity to capture the through traffic market as a means to generate economic development in the area.

Non-motorised transport (i.e. walking) contributes a very large part of the daily education trips within the Turffontein area.

Localised trips predominantly east west between education, local commercial and public facilities.

35,600 workers and learners travel to Turffontein each day to access employment and education facilities

Figure 6: Major Movements

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North-south work trips from residential areas into industrial belt and CBD along Eloff and Rosettenville Roads.

Figure 7: Localised Movement

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Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Turffontein Development Area


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Summary Analysis Destinations: Integrated land use and transport solutions

Though not a significant employment and education destination, its proximity to the Central Business District of Johannesburg results in significant movement through the area. The corridor is a crucial link between Johannesburg and Gauteng South, and functions as the gateway to Johannesburg. The development history of the Turffontein area resulted in only three major north – south linkages current through the mining belt. Non-transit supportive land uses within the corridor and especially around existing rail stations prevent continuous pedestrian movement. Overall, there is a lack of adequate linkages between destinations, including large tracts of land such as mine dumps, landfill site and the race course that acts as barriers between certain suburbs within the corridor. Improving this TOD Principle within the Turffontein area   

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Improve connections between different destinations within the corridor Ensure transit-supportive land uses around transit stations Introduce Feeder service along High Street linking the corridor with Newtown and the CBD.

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Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Summary Analysis Distance: Permeable Street Network Connecting Public Transport Facilities

Future corridor The future Turffontein area will implement the complete streets design manual, thus functioning as a holistic transportation system and promoting the efficient movement of people by developing environments that encourage people to walk, cycle and use public transport rather than private cars for all trips. A well-connected street network shortens travel distances, making it possible for people to walk or cycle to public transport services, from the places they live, work, learn, and play. The future area will consist of multimodal streets which prioritise the movement of people rather than private cars.

Current reality Road Hierarchy The study area is bounded by the Class 1 east-west routes forming the northern and southern boundaries of the study area provide good regional connectivity. The N12 provides a connection between the N1 and N3, whilst the N17 connects into the eastern areas of Johannesburg. The N17 currently ceases west of City Deep but there are plans to continue the N17 and connect it to the M1 within the study area. The M1 runs within the north-west corner of Turffontein, connecting to central Johannesburg onwards. Class 2 routes within the area provide connectivity both regionally and locally. Kliprivier Road to Booysens Road, Turf Road to Rosettenville Road and Prairie Street play an important north-south role connecting Turffontein to Johannesburg. These also serve a significant amount of ‘rat running’ traffic, whose trips do not start or finish within Turffontein and use these routes as a short cut into Johannesburg instead of the Class 1 roads mentioned above. Heidelberg Road cuts into the north east corner of the study area within the industrial zone. Rifle Range Road or Verona Street is the only Class 2 road which runs east-west within the study area and effectively acts as a separation barrier to the more affluent areas to the south of Turffontein. Class 3, 4 and 5 links within the study area provide accessibility on a local level. Turf Club Street to Drakensburg Road and Southern Klipriviersberg Road play an important east-west role as they continuously span across the study area unlike other class 3 roads. Eloff Street also serves as a significant north-south link into Johannesburg supplementing the other Class 2 north-south routes. Heronmere Road runs parallel and acts as an alternative to Kliprivier Road north-south of Turffontein. There is a lack of continuous north-south linkages to areas south of the study area, with only Kliprivier Drive and Prairie Road providing linkages across the N12. There is a need to reclassify some roads in order to strengthen their function and create a legible movement network Kliprivier Road is part of a Southern Johannesburg Business and Tourism Forum’s (SOJO) initiative known as KUBiC (Kliprivier Urban Biodiversity corridor) aimed at establishing Kliprivier Road as a biodiversity corridor. The primary purpose of KUBiC is to enhance the visual travelling experience of the Southern entrance of Johannesburg, from the conservation areas to the south of the N12, northwards towards the M1 and M2 highways. The corridor aims to play a vital role in endeavours to promote tourism in the South and enhance the aesthetic value of the south. Connecting future non-motorised transport networks to this corridor is crucial in order to link Turffontein to the wider recreational areas in Johannesburg South.

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Figure 8: RIFSA Road Classification

October 2013

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Summary Analysis Distance: Permeable Street Network Connecting Public Transport Facilities

RIFSA classification The Road Infrastructure Framework South Africa (RIFSA) classification system of the road network in Turffontein is shown in Figure 8. Comparing this Figure to the major movements, it is evident that the higher order roads coincide with higher volumes.(i.e. Booysens and Prairie Roads) However, higher order roads implies that access (i.e. cross roads) is limited which contradicts true neighbourhood needs. This is exemplified in Turffontein where certain street front businesses require direct access on a road that is meant to be limited to predominant through and nonstopping traffic. This implies that the designated road classification does not match the actual required functionality of the road. As such, modifications to the current road classification should be considered such that the needs of Turffontein match the designated functionality of the road. This can be achieved through altering road cross sections and increasing or decreasing direct access on the road as necessary. This will address, to an extent, the need to balance the needs of through traffic without detrimentally affecting neighbourhood needs. Currently, no class 6 routes (pedestrian/bicycle only) routes are officially classified and this limits local accessibility between destinations. To address these shortcomings, the following will need to be addressed as part of the development of the future corridor:

     

  

26

The development of an alternative vehicular north-south route which clearly prioritises through traffic without detrimentally affecting local interests The development of strong north-south pedestrian and cyclist links into the CBD, particularly traversing the industrial and mining belt. Routes with significant mobility functions be appropriately defined or reclassified including Eloff Street, Wemmer Pan Road and Rosettenville Road. The development of new connections to facilitate local accessibility, particularly in the form of class 6 routes through open space networks connecting Rosettenville to Wemmerpan. Activity routes to be established to stimulate interaction between communities and to enhance connections. Main Street, Eloff Street, Prairie Street and Turf Club Street presently have the potential to facilitate this function. Strengthen east-west linkages

The proposed N17 extension dissects the study area immediately to the south of the industrial belt. The highway could, much like the M2 in the north, act as another barrier between the study area and the CBD. Improved North-South linkages are needed to counter this and better link the study area with adjacent areas. N17 also strengthens the east-west linkages in the industrial belt, although more linkages are needed.

Figure 9: Accessibility vs. mobility function of roads

October 2013

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Summary Analysis Distance: Permeable Street Network Connecting Public Transport Facilities

Table 6:2007 Gautrain Passenger Rail Census

Public Transport The Turffontein area is served by a number of public transport services linking the area with the CBD and surrounding areas. Metrorail, Metrobus and Minibus taxis operate in the area, with taxis having the largest modal share. Booysens Station is the only significant passenger rail station in the area, functioning as the main link for workers wanting to access the employment opportunities in the industrial belt.

Station

Booysens

Currently no BRT plans are in place for the Turffontein region, however, based on the current movement patterns and densification strategies proposed as part of the Corridors of Freedom initiative, a the future area could possibly be better served by a public transport feeder route providing a high quality link between the area and the wider Johannesburg.

Village Main

Kaserne West

Rail  Passenger rail in South Africa has been in a steady decline over the past two decades due to a continued lack of investment.  Current system is blighted by poor quality service, safety concerns, poor reliability, uncompetitive journey time and overcrowding on some corridors and a general lack of integration with other modes of public transport.  The current reality is that Metrorail stations in Gauteng do not contribute positively in terms of developmental planning, with stations often avoided due to the negative perception of the general.  PRASA has completed a New National and Gauteng Rail Strategic Plan in 2012 that aims to guide infrastructure investment into specific identified corridors. In terms of rail in Gauteng, the goal is to upgrade and transform the existing rail network into high-volume corridors more suitable for Transit-Oriented Development.  Rail is also proposed by the newly drafted Gauteng Integrated 25 Year Transport Master plan as the future backbone of urban development in Gauteng. In short, the interventions will consist of:  New upgraded rolling stock (more seating and standing capacity)  New facilities at stations, including platforms, upgraded ticketing and security systems and additional tracks on certain sections to alleviate bottlenecks in the wider network.  Increased frequency and speed on certain sections.  Improving modal interchange facilities at key stations to increase catchment area. The highest priority corridors include the core Gauteng network linking Mabopane in Tshwane via, Pretoria, Germiston, Park Station, New Canada, Naledi / Midway Stations in Soweto. The rail stations within Turffontein are not included in terms of these upgrades, but provide access to these improved rail corridors situated in Johannesburg CBD and New Canada to the west of the study area. The rail upgrades will also increase the regional accessibility of the study area, as it will be accessible by various mass-transit modes from anywhere in Gauteng.

27

Total

Figure 10: Existing rail stations The three rail stations within the study area generally appear to be in a state of degradation, and are poorly integrated the surrounding urban environment with Booysens Station being particularly cut off from the industrial area due to the lack of a northern entrance to the station. Booysens could potentially play a more significant role in providing access to the industrial belt and Turffontein area. It is imperative for this station to be connected with the industrial belt, as the current layout is preventing it from functioning optimally.

The main issues pertaining to rail services in this area are:

  

Booysens station is identified as a TOD node in terms of Sustainable Housing Strategy and Urbanisation Plan, but current surrounding land uses and layout is not optimal for transit-oriented-development. The lack of a northern station entrance also considerably increases the walking time of passengers wanting to access the industrial belt to the north, as passengers have to divert to either Eloff Street or Booysens Road. Although not on a priority corridor, the rail network provides connectivity to regional high-speed rail facilities at New Canada Station, and thus from a regional point of view, provides access to and from Turffontein to the wider Gauteng.

October 2013

Description

> 06:00

06:00

08:30

16:00

18:30 <

Total

08:30

16:00

18:30

Board

138

871

490

4156

88

5743

Alight

873

2615

259

918

15

4680

Board

2

214

17

827

19

1079

Alight

50

717

30

161

0

958

Board

348

599

606

1835

51

3439

Alight

1005

1402

199

919

125

3650

Board

488

1684

1113

6818

158

Alight

1928

4734

488

1998

140

Table 6 provides an overview of the usage and role of the rail operations within the area. The figures clearly illustrates the regional function of the rail services, with more than 75% (6662 passengers alighting before 08:30) of users during the morning peak period entering the study area and exiting from these stations to access employment within the CBD or industrial belt. Only 25% (2172) of passengers board trains at these three stations during the morning peak indicating the limited extent to which these stations are used by local residents. This movement pattern is reversed during the afternoon peak, as these workers return homewards to areas outside the study area. The passenger numbers at these stations are relatively low when compared to adjacent areas, and illustrates the limited role passenger rail play within the precinct. The stations, with the possible exception of Booysens, will continue to play a small role in terms of transport within the precinct due to its proximity to the CBD and Park Station, where passengers can access direct regional rail services, and the fact that it is not situated on a PRASA priority corridor in terms of investment,. Booysens Station’s location close to Eloff Street extension, which not only connects the study area to the Johannesburg CBD, but also links Village Main and Faraday Rail Stations, Metrobus routes, existing BRT services in the CBD, and further north the Gautrain, makes it a potentially decisive factor / location in terms of changing the nature of the industrial area from a movement barrier to a movement link. Any potential future public transport feeder route should ideally serve Booysens station.

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Summary Analysis Distance: Permeable Street Network Connecting Public Transport Facilities

Future public transport in Turffontein Public transport and TOD has been identified as a restructuring tool in the City of Johannesburg. The current public transport infrastructure and services in Turffontein are inadequate given the city’s intent to radically transform via the “Corridors of Freedom” concept. The potential exists for Turffontein to be integrated into existing public transport networks in the city, and these scenarios will be included in the strategic area framework. The COJ Strategic Integrated Transport Plan Framework includes a public transport mode decision matrix which can guide in assessing the role of each mode of transport in possible future public transport systems. The most important criteria in choosing a mode is capacity. Modes must be able to carry the passenger volumes over the required distance. Furthermore, from a and capital and operating costs perspective, modes can be selected on the basis of least cost over the distance operated, to ensure that over the long run the total investment of public resources is optimised. The general rule of thumb is that minibus-taxis should play a major role over shorter-distance routes, with lower volumes where good levels of accessibility are required while conventional buses and bus rapid transit (BRT) should provide services along longer, medium- to high-volume corridors. The COJ SITPF states that from a cost sustainability point of view, including also capital costs of the fleet and infrastructure, the following vehicle types are suitable under Johannesburg conditions:

  

A 15 or 18-seater minibus will be least costly for one-way passenger volumes less than 800 passengers/day. The standard bus is the least costly for one-way passenger volumes between 800 and 20,000 one way passengers/day. The articulated bus is the least costly for oneway passenger volumes between 20,000 and 40,000 one-way passengers/day

While the need to connect Turffontein to the Johannesburg CBD is critical, the mode will only be determined by the volumes, and in Turffontein’s case, this will be influenced by die future housing interventions proposed in the Strategic Area Framework. Figure 11 indicates the current Phase 1 B network. It is clear to see that the wider Turffontein area is not served by the Soweto-CBD trunk route dissecting Booysens and entering the Johannesburg CBD at Westgate Station.

Figure 11: Rea Vaya and Metrobus Routes

Municipal Bus Services (Metrobus)

Minibus Taxis

The area is served by several Metrobus routes, and given the radial pattern of the Metropolitan network, generally provides north south linkages between Southern Johannesburg and the CBD (mainly Ghandi Square and Braamfontein). Although the municipal bus network adequately serves the area in terms of coverage, the irregular frequencies and operating times of these services limits the ability of local residents to solely depend on public transport as a means of transport to adjacent areas.

The area is served by a number of taxi routes, all providing north south linkages to the Johannesburg CBD. The major Soweto-CBD taxi routes passes through Booysens in the north-western part of the study area, towards Westgate in Johannesburg, and do not serve the wider Turffontein area. While there are no major taxi ranks within the area, several regional routes, including Soweto-CBD taxis pass through the area, picking up passenger en-route to their end destinations.

 It is critical to connect the area to existing public transport network:

 

To link Turffontein to economic opportunities situated in the CBD, To make Turffontein’s recreational opportunities accessible for wider region.

It is crucial to integrate land use and population densities to support the viability of a route, which is crucial in terms of transforming the role and function of this area in future.

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Figure 12: Minibus & Metered Taxi Routes and Facilities

October 2013

The municipal bus fleet contains only six (1% of total fleet) special needs buses, with none of these operating on any of the routes serving this area. Bus stops and facilities in a state of disrepair. The majority of these are in a bad condition and currently contributes to the general negative perception towards public transport in the area Buses run at capacity within the morning peak due to the low frequency service.

The existing taxi operations could possibly be integrated in a revised public transport network for Turffontein. The wider Turffontein is not currently integrated into the existing Rea Vaya BRT system that dissects Booysens. Alternatively the area could be directly linked to the Inner City, as the initial movement pattern analysis indicates the northward movement of residents towards the CBD, and not necessarily via Booysens street. While the low population and densities are sufficiently serviced by Minibus-taxis, future high densification strategies are dependent on a high quality public transport service.

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Summary Analysis Distance: Permeable Street Network Connecting Public Transport Facilities

Public Transport Accessibility Levels (PTAL) Not only is public transport an important factor in the sustainable livelihood of a neighbourhood but also improving its accessibility. This section provides a summary of how (PTALs) can assist in analysing the accessibility of public transport facilities. Public Transport Accessibility Levels (PTALs) (Transport for London (2010) Measuring Public Transport Accessibility Levels) accurately describes the accessibility of a location to that of a public transport network. PTALs take into account walk access time and public transport service availability and essentially measure the density of a public transport network at any location within a city. Walk access time is calculated from specified points of interest to all scheduled public transport access points such as bus stops, rail stations, BRT stops, etc. within pre-defined catchments. A measure of service frequency is incorporated by calculating an average waiting time that relates to the frequency of the service at each respective public transport access point. A reliability factor/rating (between 0 and 1, with 1 being the best) is included and the total access time is calculated. Public transport service availability is calculated for each mode and at each station/stop. The end result is generated on a map which demonstrates locations with high accessibility to public transport and locations with low levels of accessibility to public transport. Interpretation of the PTAL analysis highlights the following:   

The Turffontein study area is poorly served and largely inaccessible from public transport stops Public transport route and stop coverage should be improved, particularly within the residential suburbs. Densification strategies should align and be supported by a new public transport feeder service with stops located at appropriate locations and regular frequency.

Table 7: PTAL scoring Variable

Mode

Rating

Distance

2000 m

0.5

1000 m

1

500 m

2

BRT

1

Bus

0.4

Rail

0.8

BRT

1.5

Rail

1

Bus

0.6

Reliability

Availability

Figure 13: Existing Public Transport Accessibility Levels PTALs therefore provide an indication into: The Walking Time from a point of interest to a public transport access point; and The number, availability and reliability of public transport services within a catchment area.

 

PTALs however, do not consider speed or utility of accessible services; crowding and the ability to board services; or The ease of interchanging.

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Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Summary Analysis Distance: Permeable Street Network Connecting Public Transport Facilities

NMT Facilities Non-motorised travel conditions are affected by the availability and quality of formal footpaths, road crossings, linkages to activity areas and support features such as formal taxi ranks and lay-byes. The provision of facilities for non-motorised users with special needs (especially vulnerable users such as the elderly and young children) has to be taken into account. The identification of physical and other man made barriers needs to be considered and accommodated to provide facilities that will guide the users safely around these obstacles or provide viable alternatives to gain safe access to destinations. According to 2004 NHTS statistics there are approximately 29% of work and education movements made with NMT. The Johannesburg Strategic Integrated Transport Plan (Draft 2013) indicates that the majority of these walkers and cyclists are “striders” – people who walk or cycle by choice. However, about 10% people are regarded as “stranded” in that they walk or cycle for longer than 30 minutes because they cannot afford motorized transport. Figure 14 provides an indication of the sidewalk facilities that have been provided on most Class 2 and Class 3 roads, but are considered to be inadequate as the network is discontinuous and poorly maintained. No dedicated cycle facilities currently exist. The area has a strong walking culture, which coupled with its proximity to the CBD, creates the opportunity to establish non-motorised transport as the priority mode in the area

Figure 14: Existing NMT Facilities on Class 2 and 3 Routes

The North South green spine connecting Rosettenville with Pioneers Park is an important natural movement corridor in the area.

The major trip attractors and destinations are not linked by the non-motorised transport network. The topography, range of facilities and wide road reserves makes this area ideal for large-scale nonmotorised transport interventions, including improved linkages to employment opportunities situated to the north of the railway line, existing recreational facilities and regional recreationaltourism areas situated to the south of the study area

Upgrading and lengthening this spine could provide an additional link to the industrial belt, especially Kaserne and City Deep Intermodal freight terminals

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Figure 15: Non-motorised transport movement

October 2013

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Summary Analysis Distance: Permeable Street Network Connecting Public Transport Facilities

Table 8 below provides an overview of the strength and function of each of the three possible links and serves as an options analysis influencing the alignment of the future public transport feeder route in the area.

Breaking through the industrial and mining belt barrier Three main routes connect the study area to the CBD and existing Rea Vaya services, namely Booysens Road, Eloff Street (Turffontein Road extension) and Rosettenville Road. Of these three, Eloff Street and Rosettenville Roads have the biggest impact on the study area, as the majority of trips from the study area are north-south between the area and the CBD, and thus not via Booysens. The wider area could possibly be connected via Booysens into the existing Rea Vaya

Table 8: Possible future public transport alignment options Route

Considerations

Eloff Street Extension (including Turffontein Road and La Rochelle Road from Booysens Station southwards)

Eloff Road extension (including Turffontein Road and La Rochelle Road from Booysens Station southwards) and Rosettenville Road are crucial north-south roads linking various destinations within the area.

It has been proposed that all three be developed as multi-activity spines, to facilitate a more seamless transition into the inner city. The current mono-functional role of the industrial belt acts as a movement barrier, as decaying and deserted spaces, especially at night; prevent people from moving through the areas. This has contributed to the degeneration of the south, as it is often viewed as being “on the other side of the belt”. In the wider Johannesburg, the industrial belt is one of the lasting impressions of apartheid, as industrial and mining areas were used as planning tools to create buffers segregating different population groups and settlements. It is thus imperative for the “Corridors of Freedom” to truly break through these barriers to transform the future landscape and functioning of the city.

Turf / Kliprivier Link to Booysens

Rosettenville Road While streetscaping and design, including the planting of trees and promotion of vistas, could in theory alter the perception of these streets, a more drastic approach is needed to radically transform these linkages. Public transport could potentially play the decisive role in creating a safe transit corridor, supported by land use interventions aimed at creating dense mixed use areas along corridors to promote 24-hour activity along routes linking to the CBD. The existing function of the area and socio-economic profile of its residents also provides the potential for a large number of working class residents to either work in the industrial belt or the CBD. The large road reserves could potentially aid in the design of dedicated bicycling lanes and wide pedestrian walkways. The South has a long history of professional and recreational cycling and walking culture, which coupled with the gentle topographical conditions, makes the area ideal in terms of potentially being “THE” non-motorised transport area in the city. This will also tie in with the strategic thrusts of the SITPF for the City of Johannesburg, which promotes NMT as the mode of choice in the future City. This chapter provided an overview of existing transportation infrastructure and services within the Turffontein study area in which the following shortcomings and opportunities were identified:

    

31

There is a lack of east-west linkages in the mining belt and gaps in connectivity The layout of the current network prioritises cars over all other modes Lack of non-motorised transport facilities and network discourages walking and cycling as a viable mode, despite Rail stations are poorly integrated with the surrounds The Turffontein study area is poorly served and largely inaccessible from public transport stops

October 2013

Possible future Role

 Links residential areas (including main economic node in La Rochelle) to CBD via main movement patterns  Booysens, Village Main and Faraday rail stations along route  Links into Ghandi Square, an important Metrobus interchange, and further into Johannesburg Park Station  Links into Rea Vaya CBD network  Dissects the recreational precinct, the only regional attractor in the study area  Adjacent land uses includes schools, training centres, offices. Potential to transform into multi-activity corridor with interventions

 Main public transport corridor linking area to CBD.  Multi-activity street with mixed use corridor from recreational precinct to CBD.  Transportation gateway if incorporating rail, public transport and non-motorised transport as restructuring elements.  Main point of access into recreational and sporting precinct.

 Links wider area into existing Trunk route in Pat Mbatha Bus and Taxiway in Booysens.  Not on main movement network as Turffontein area residents don’t use this route to link into CBD.

 Strengthen local link into Rea Vaya in Pat Mbatha Busways to facilitate direct link to Soweto and areas to the West.

 Links residential areas (including main economic node in La Rochelle) to CBD via main movement patterns  Links into Rea Vaya CBD network  Links the recreational precinct with CBD, the only regional attractor in the study area.  Adjacent land uses include large industrial warehouse complex, mine dumps and areas with active mining rights.  Adjacent land uses cannot be changed entirely, limiting the extent to which road could be a multi-activity link. Nonetheless, the road is an important link to the freight-terminals and can strengthen the multi-activity zone through the industrial belt.

 Secondary link through industrial belt into CBD, with lower scale interventions applied according to same principles.  Linkage into green belt and ancillary open space movement network  Public transport corridor with mixed-use where possible.

Improving this TOD Principle within the Turffontein area

     

Propose the alignment of a high quality public transport route connecting the area with the existing Rea Vaya network The development of an alternative vehicular north-south route which clearly prioritises through traffic without detrimentally affecting local interests The development of strong north-south pedestrian and cyclist links into the city of Johannesburg. Routes with significant mobility functions be appropriately defined or reclassified including Eloff Street, Wemmer Pan Road and Rosettenville Road. The development of new connections to facilitate local accessibility, particularly in the form of class 6 routes through open space networks Activity routes to be established to stimulate interaction between communities and to enhance connections. Eloff Street, Tramway Road, De Villiers Road and Turf Club Street presently have the potential to facilitate this function.

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Summary Analysis Design: Create places for people

Future Corridor

Formalist tradition of Block and Building lay out:

The future corridor will consist of streets and public spaces that are carefully designed with the needs of all residents and visitors in mind. The public environment should be safe, comfortable and inviting for people of all abilities and age.

  

Good corridors typically have complete streets designed to meet the needs of a range of users, and they provide inviting public spaces that welcome lingering, gathering and celebration. The unique history, culture and character of the various neighbourhoods within the corridor will be reinforced through context sensitive design and by enhancing the pedestrian environment. Improving the distance principle of transit-oriented-development is not enough to facilitate a modal shift away towards non-motorised and public transport in South Africa. Safe, convenient and comfortable “last-mile” connectivity must be enhanced through the efficient design of the public realm.

Organic design:  

Grid Analysis

The grid is seen as a vital aspect of urban planning and urban design, as it is seen as an important tool that helps with the creation of efficient movement. The most important consequence of the choice of block and street layout lies in their adaptability for accommodating different activities (land uses); and the accessibility of pedestrian to the various activities.

Organic and Traditional combined Grid: these grids are formally planned but due to the nature of the topography (steep inclines) the grid has an organic characteristic as well, due to the fact that it has to adapt to the natural elements.

32

Tradition

of

subdivision

Found in low-density areas and new developments Not conducive for mixed used developments, seen as an individualised layout of urban form. Block lengths tend to be greater than that for the formalist tradition grid layout. The street pattern allows for disorientation in the specified areas and reduces accessibility.

Modernist Grid Lay out Approach:  

 Organic

pattern: the organic patterns in terms of the study area are prevalent in the lower-income areas, this could be largely contributed to the fact that lower-income areas tend to develop more organically without formal structure, creating structure where organic road networks are prevalent.  Traditional: the traditional pattern is evident closer to the CBD. This is largely contributed to the fact that grid patterns where seen as the most effective grid layouts in the earlier planning phases of cities, thus the older more established areas will have a well-defined grid pattern layout.  Modernist Grid: this grid is seen as a super block grid and provides the opportunity for developers to develop cost effectively. In terms of the study area these types of grid patterns are prevalent around in areas that have primarily one land use such as; the University and Hospital areas. These grids have a unique opportunity to promote future mixed land use developments.

Size and shapes of blocks circumscribed Width of streets dependent on the function of the road Accommodate a range of buildings such as Single-family freestanding and Multi-story residential and commercial buildings

 

Favours single uses within super blocks (apartments, office parks). Characterised by large commercial developments and institutional arrangements. Ability to control car access and parking. Seen as an economical layout and is favoured by developers as it allows for single-purpose and mass-producible structures which equates to lower development costs

Figure 16: Turffontein Grid Analysis

Figure 17: Grid Analysis Types

The grid layout affects erf sizes and will shape our consolidation zones to achieve greater erf sizes required for densification.

October 2013

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Summary Analysis Design: Create places for people

Mid-Block access ways The layout of the grid design in the neighbourhoods of Kenilworth, Turffontein and Turffontein-West are further diversified by numerous mid-block access ways stretching from Kliprivier Drive in the west to Turf / Main Road in the east. The backyard alleys are predominantly continuous, often connecting the residential areas, via the open spaces to the commercial activities in the area. The wide road reserves in Turffontein create the unique opportunity for a quality continuous non-motorised transport network. Backyard access ways could possibly play a larger role in the future corridor, as it allows for higher densities and more compact building footprints. These alleys could serve as emergency and service access-ways. As it provides a second access-point to all erven within the highlighted section. Mid-block walkways are sometimes destinations themselves as is it may lead to many interesting and diverse destinations, including small trading areas of local bars, often found in cornershops in Turffontein. Turffontein’s unique character can be further enhanced through these alleys, which at this scale is unique to the area. Mid-block access ways creates unique opportunity for densification as it increases possible footprints of buildings in future. Access ways could also enhance pedestrian movement placemaking, and contributes to the unique character of area.

and

Figure 18: Access ways in Lindhorst Street

Figure 19: Turffontein mid-block access ways

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October 2013

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Summary Analysis Design: Create places for people

Character of area The wider Turffontein area consists of various neighbourhoods, each with a distinct character. This character is influenced by history, religion and socio-economic conditions within each area. The design of public spaces and facilities much take cognisance of the local character within an area, and strengthen the identity of the various destinations within the corridor. Context sensitive design typically takes cognisance of the following aspects:

Regional identity, Linkages to surroundings, Local character, Morphology, Natural features, Socio- economic profile The Turffontein area has several unique character zones due to the unique history of the area as a migrant destination throughout th the 20 century. The Portuguese influence is still visible in La Rochelle, with the area almost reminiscent of the Bo-Kaap district in Cape Town.

Turffontein and Kenilworth, with its Parkhurst-like design and layout, complete with cornershops and café’s is unique in a sense that urban landscapes in South Africa moved away from this trend. The area also has an African flavour due to the diverse population from neighbouring countries. These areas require a unique approach in terms of design to ensure that the streets relate to buildings in a way that creates porosity, interest, and public space opportunities

The area has a distinct lack in terms of welldesigned open and public spaces to cater for the wide variety of users. A lack of urban management in certain areas, residential and socio-economic degradation, and a lack of sufficient demarcated open spaces result in an uninviting public environment in large sections of the corridor.

Figure 20: Urban character within the area

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area

October 2013

34


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Summary Analysis Design: Create places for people

Residential Life Cycle Based on the outcome of the site visits and the overall character analysis. A Residential Life Cycle Graph to try and covey the current broad analysis of the current residential character.

Older neighbourhoods of Turffontein, Rosettenville, La Rochelle, Kenilworth and Regents Park: the population is reaching a point of extreme densification which will is currently placing Turffontein at a crossroad in terms of development paths. (Between 4 & 5) characterised as:

Stage 4: Downgrading in urban character, densities become too high to substantiating the current character.

Stage 5: two outcomes possible- no interventions from the municipality will result in the prevalence of informal settlement, but if interventions are implemented, development will be controlled and regulated.

Lower property values and informal densification (informal backyard dwellings) makes these areas the critical housing ad public environment intervention areas. A high quality public transport route serving these areas can act as a catalyst for regeneration.

The suburbs of Oakdene, Linmeyer (suburbs situated to the south of Rifle Range Road) shows definite potential for further development as it has not yet reached its full occupancy density (Stage 3) as per the Residential Development Life Cycle. Figure 22: Turffontein Topography

Heritage Historical and heritage resources contribute to the character of the corridor, and are often landmarks and destinations. Although the entire corridor can theoretically be classified as a “heritage area” due to the age of the suburbs within the corridor, it will not necessarily influence the future development of the area. Turffontein can typically be classified as a mosaic-pattern in terms of heritage, with specific heritage structures scattered throughout the corridor. Heritage structures could be transformed into different uses, or incorporated into redesigned higher density structures .Figure 24 provides a high level overview of the heritage resources per area, which would normally trigger the need for varying levels of heritage applications should the erven be redeveloped. The areas of moderate heritage constraint includes a mixture of buildings ages from early 1900’s up to 2000’s – clusters of buildings of similar age occur to make up a mosaic , La Rochelle / Rosettenville provides real development opportunity. The remainder of the area can be classified as no heritage constraint.

Topography The topography of the area is indicated in Figure 22 and clearly indicates the gentle gradient evident in the majority of the area. The natural ridge acts as a barrier, separating the older residential areas of Turffontein with Oakdene and Linmeyer. This has an impact on the functioning of the area, as the southern neighbourhoods are cut-off from Turffontein and Rosettenville to a large extent.

Figure 21: Residential Life-cycle

Informal densification in several suburbs within corridor Critical intervention is needed in older residential suburbs of Turffontein, Kenilworth, La Rochelle and Kenilworth to prevent urban decay. Figure 23: Heritage Conditions

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Summary Analysis Design: Create places for people

Environmental Environmentally sensitive areas are typically formally protected areas, such as ecological sensitive areas. These normally include certain natural open spaces or wetlands, and while acting as a constraint for development, more importantly function as the green lungs of the corridor. Environmentally sensitive areas often contribute to the open spaces within an area. The area has several environmental sensitive areas that act as constraints to development. This includes several mine dumps, properties with active mining rights, natural open spaces and Robinson Landfill Site. Village Reef gold mine and City Deep gold mine are non-operational mines laying within the study area. These gold mine residues have a potential environmental or health risk as a result of minerals and their weathering processes by means of oxidation and dust problems associated with it. The buffer-zones around the dumps, slime dams and the Landfill site represent GDARDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s development guidelines, and indicate areas not suitable for residential densification; however, some of the highest residential densities in the study area are located here. This includes social housing developments adjacent to Kliprivier Drive, situated within the buffer zones.

There is a number of Critical Biodiversity Areas (CBA) within the Turffontein area. CBAs are categorised as follows:

Table 9: Biodiversity and Ecological support classification Category on the CBA Map

Description

Protected Areas

Formal Protected Areas and Protected Areas pending declaration under NEMPA

Critical Biodiversity Areas (1)

Areas required to be maintained in a natural or near state to meet targets for biodiversity patterns (features) or ecological processes

Critical Biodiversity Area (2)

Cultivated landscapes which retain importance for supporting threatened species

Ecological Support Areas (1)

Natural, near natural and degraded areas required to be maintained in an ecological functional state to support Critical Biodiversity Areas

Ecological Support Areas (2)

Areas with no natural habitat which retain potential importance for supporting ecological processes

Figure 24: Environmental Issues

Structured and connected open space systems play an important role in the local non-motorised transport movement network. Natural open spaces link Rosettenville, The Hill and Linmeyer to the recreational facilities in Pioneers Park, and should be strengthened and integrated into the wider non-motorised transport network.

Environmental degradation due to mining history. Areas around mine-dumps, slime dams and landfill site not suitable for residential development of further densification

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Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Summary Analysis Design: Create places for people

The corridor connects various different destinations and neighbourhoods with distinctly different characters that are influenced by history, religion and socio-economic conditions. Given the current residential life-cycle of the corridor, there is a need for intervention in order to prevent urban decay. Environmental degradation prevents residential densification in certain suburbs within the area. Historical and heritage resources contribute to the character of the corridor. Unique history of development and diversification of residents during the past decade greatly influences the unique character of the corridor. Improving this TOD Principle within the Turffontein Corridor

     

Apply Complete Street principles on roads within the corridor to meet the needs of a range of users whilst keeping in mind the topographical character of the areas. Develop safe, comfortable and inviting public areas that integrate the unique history, culture and character of the corridor. Enhance safe, convenient and comfortable” connectivity through efficient design of the public realm. Apply appropriate urban management strategies to protect ‘mature’ areas from urban decay. Identify consolidation areas and minimum erf sizes required to support intensification and densification strategies. Protect and include urban green space in a structured, accessible and well-connected design framework to off-set/balance intensification and densification strategies.

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Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Summary Analysis Density: Concentrate and intensify activities near transit stations

The major factors constraining and enabling densification and impacting on the form of densification (location, design and quality) include:

Future Corridor The Turffontein area should strive to concentrate and intensify activities near frequent transit areas. This goal can be achieved through encouraging more intensive developments near important transit services to ensure better liveability, walkability and more resilient neighbourhoods. To make the corridor function in this manner there should be a focus on higher density development and densification around the identified transit points.

    

policy, legislation and regulations economic and market forces social and lifestyle considerations form and nature of the built environment technological issues

An overview of the most important factors to density, in terms of the study area, is summarised in the table below:

Taking this into consideration, this section will analyse the current reality in terms of:

    

population, households and average household size, population density, residential density, and Population distribution.

This analysis will give an indication of current densities and to what extent densification and compaction will have to take place, and where, to achieve the goals of a densified, mixed use corridor, as stated above.

Density: Current Reality The increased use of space both horizontally and vertically within existing areas/ properties and new developments accompanied by an increased number of units and/or population thresholds.

Densification is a means of creating an improved, more sustainable environment that promotes public transport and improves the vitality of urban precincts. It is also a relative indicator of the intensity of development. Densification can contribute to the creation of good quality, efficient and sustainable urban environments in a number of different ways. This includes:

    

Reducing the consumption of valuable or non-renewable resources. The development of a viable public transport system (if applicable). Ensuring that an area is more equitable in terms of access to opportunities. Creating an environment that promotes economic opportunities and supports sustainable service delivery. Improving the choice of housing types and housing patterns.

Density fact sheet Population

81 778

Households

36 123

Average Household size

2.2

Extent of the study area

3 315 ha

Extent of residential stands

986 ha

Gross density

11 du/ha

Net density

37 du/ha

Gross population density

25 people/ha

Nett population density

83 people/ha

Generally the figures show that current densities are relatively low, despite the fact that large areas within the study area are zoned as Residential 4, which encourages densification. This is to be expected taking into account the current nature of the study area. These densities are also a reflection of the current land use and the segregated manner in which development is taking place.Figure 26 indicates the population density distribution with the Turffontein study area

Figure 25: Population Density and distribution Figure 26 indicates the population distribution of the study area. There are clear pockets of higher and lower densities. The higher density pockets correlates with lower income areas, while the lower density areas align with suburbs that are associated with higher income groups. The northern part has a very low density and reflects the current land use within the industrial and mining belt.

 

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Population densities do not support public transport. Any feeder route needs concentrated densification to warrant investment

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Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Summary Analysis Demand Management

Densification takes place in developed areas, on vacant infill sites within the developed areas and on green field sites that are within an urban areas’ planned growth direction. The general process of densification takes place in a number of ways and is supported by a range of zoning and land use regulations. There are a number of ways to increasing urban densities: The following describes generic ways in which densification takes place.

           Figure 26: Vertical densities

Additional dwelling units: Construction of attached/detached second dwellings including the changing of non-residential buildings, or parts of buildings, to residential buildings (e.g. garages). Subdivisions: Subdivision of land and redevelopment at higher densities. Consolidation and redevelopment: Block consolidation of erven with redevelopment at higher densities. Consolidation with redevelopment at higher densities including the demolition and integration of existing structures. Increased land use rights: Increasing the existing bulk rights through the extension of the building or adding one of floors to accommodate an increased number of units. Higher density infill on underutilised land: Higher density infill on vacant and under- utilised land throughout the built area of the City. Large scale precinct development: Consolidation of sites within a street block to create a single larger parcel for redevelopment into multi-storey units.

Figure 26 indicates the vertical density of the study area in storey. It is important to know that in order to increase the density of an area and create more compact living environments, vertical densities play an important role. It is key to note that the map does not take into account residential densities. What is clear is that in general residential densities are very low. As one moves north, through the industrial area, towards the inner city, vertical densities do increase but there is clearly room for higher vertical densities along important movement routes.

Current indications are that land uses and densities need to increase significantly to support a BRT feeder route. Currently higher density areas are associated with poor or lower income neighbourhoods, while low densities are located in higher income areas and these densities are not aligned with the current BRT feeder route. Higher density developments should be focused in and around the BRT stations in accordance with PTAL and walkability assessment. This will ensure a more liveable, walkable and sustainable area. The combination of higher densities and the other principles associated with TODs will result in a compact community with a connected street network, well-designed buildings and public spaces, a mix of land uses and managed demand for private vehicle travel. This will relieve development pressure on suburban and rural areas by attracting development to urban areas in the areas that can be well served by a variety of modes of transport.

Improving this TOD Principle within the Turffontein Corridor

  

Encourage mixed-use redevelopment along the proposed feeder route within a highly accessible/walkable zone. Offset increased vertical densities with increased connected active public space amenities that directly benefit the building’s residents and tenants (both soft/green open space). Plan for density that supports community character and promotes a high quality of life

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Summary Analysis Diversity: Encourage a mix of uses and users

Future Corridor The future corridor will have a diverse and vibrant mixture in terms of land uses and residents. The corridor will have a wide range of housing, land uses and public and open space facilities that caters for a variety of users. A wide range of options will also insure that the corridor and its benefits are shared by people from different backgrounds, with lower-income residents enjoying the same level of access to various opportunities within the corridor

Current Reality Land Use Mix The relationships between land use, transportation, and the environment are at the heart of growth management. Land use is also the physical manifestation of socio-economic, cultural, political and environmental forces shaping the use of land in urban areas. Transit oriented development and smart growth, which forms part of newurbanism, focuses on creating a balanced mix of land uses capable of generating 24 hour movement. The aim of this is to create environments where people can live, work and play and where their daily needs are catered for. Uses that support this are those that generate and facilitate pedestrian movement through an area. This includes residential, retail, office, business, recreational and social facilities in close proximity to a nodal area. For such an area to be successful it is important that the area has the right mix of these different uses. Segregated land uses are evident within the corridor. Monotonous zoning and clustering of single use erven are not transit supportive. Land uses need to diversify and be provided at higher intensity around BRT stations.

Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Turffontein Development Area

Figure 28: Residential

Figure 29: Business / Commercial

The map clearly shows the dominance of residential uses in the southern part of the study area (55% residential). These residential uses are mostly detached single residential in nature with a few higher densities, 3 story walk up type of housing scattered throughout the area.

The land uses indicated as business/commercial uses in the northern part of the study area are mostly large industrial uses. In the southern part, small retail facilities are located mostly along important internal roads. There is very little mixing of uses as can clearly be seen.

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Table 10: Land use composition within Turffontein Land use Business & Commercial Education Public open space Municipal housing Private open space Public Service Infrastructure Religious purposes Residential: low density Residential: medium density State Vacant Land Total

to

high

Coun t

%

Area

%

2,737 64 131 163 7 70 94 10,97 9 382

18.6% 0.4% 0.9% 1.1% 0.0% 0.5% 0.6% 74.7%

4,879,453 626,303 1,355,072 393,458 7,265 137,962 123,939 8,648,255

28.2% 3.6% 7.8% 2.3% 0.0% 0.8% 0.7% 50.0%

2.6%

860,424

5.0%

36 36 14,69 9

0.2% 0.2% 100.0 %

127,163 127,163 17,286,45 6

0.7% 0.7% 100.0 %

The land use data was derived from the municipal valuation role and are summarized in the table and depicted on the maps. From the data it becomes evident that there is a clear distinction between the northern and southern parts of the study area. The northern part of the study area is dominated by large business and commercial uses, which include industrial uses, (25% of study area) as expected. There are also some mining uses located here. The southern part of the study area is more residential in nature (50% of study area). As one would expect, this is where most of the educational uses and open spaces are located. It is interesting to note the various business and commercial uses in the southern part of the study area. The business and commercial uses are scattered but also follow some of the residential streets in a linear pattern. In general the land uses in the area a segregated and disjointed. These are clear distinctions between different areas and the role these areas play are reflected in the land use. Creating a more sustainable mix of uses will be difficult but the southern part of the study area does show some potential to create a more vibrant sustainable area where people can live, work, and, play.

Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Turffontein Development Area

Figure 30: Education & Public Services

Figure 31:Open Space & Mining Land

The education facilities are concentrated in the southern part of the study area, as expected. These are mostly primary-, and high schools.

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Open spaces in the area are mostly large neglected areas in a poor condition. Some of these areas are ideal for future development. Most of the open spaces in the residential areas are sports facilities. (8% of study area) The mining areas are located in between the industrial uses in the northern part of the study area. Most of the mining uses are not suitable for development as they still have mining rights and rehabilitation of these areas will take many years.

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Summary Analysis Diversity: Encourage a mix of uses and users

Population Good corridors provide a wide range of facilities and housing options for a wide variety of users, thereby increasing the diversity of the area and ensuring various different trips and movement during various stages of the day. The need for these facilities and options will change as the population changes. This section provides an outline of the current population trends.

Other important statistics relating to the population in the study area include: Level of employment Occupation profile

       

The study area presents the following key statistics relating to population Population: 81 778 people

Figure 28: Population structure Weighted Average household income

Households: 36 495 Average HH Size: 2.2 The study area reflects moderate population densities, in line with surrounding areas.

The age profile shows that the majority of the population is contained in the 20 – 35 cohorts. These age groups account for approximately 33.6% of the population. This represents the upcoming market segment. The cohorts 36-65 represent 33.3% of the population. This reflects an older more stable market segment. These aspects are reflected in the average household income. The study area shows a good level of employment. And a diverse occupation profile. Linked to the employment figures are the average household income figures. The annual and monthly figures are high and show good potential for growth in the corridor. It is important to note that almost half of the population in the study area makes use of private transport (47.6%) while 28.4% of the population travels by foot. 11.8% of the population make use of buses to travel.

Mode of Transport

Employed: 78.3% Unemployed: 21.7% Clerks: 15.2% Elementary occupations: 22.4% Professionals: 10.8% Technicians and associate professionals: 12.9% Service workers: 12.5% Craft and related trades: 9.9%.

 

Total market earning income: R263 324.7/annum R21 943.7/month

   

Private Vehicle: 47.6% On Foot: 28.4% Bus: 11.8% Min-Bus: 9.5%

an

Population growth results in increased demand for housing in the area. The majority of residents are below the age of 35, (active working population), and supports the commuter corridor type.

Figure 27: Racial profile The racial profile of the study area is depicted in the previous chart. The information shows that Black Africans make up the majority of the population in the study area (57%). The Coloured population accounts for 23% while the other racial groups make up small numbers with Whites contributing 11% to the population, Asian 7% and those indicated as other 2%.

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Summary Analysis Diversity: Encourage a mix of uses and users

Housing

Tenure

The Housing Act of 1997 (Act 107 of 1997 defines “housing development” as: 1(vi) “… the establishment and maintenance of habitable, stable and sustainable public and private residential environments to ensure viable households and communities in areas allowing convenient access to economic opportunities, and to health, educational and social amenities in which all citizens and permanent residents of the Republic will, on a progressive basis, have access to: (a) permanent residential structures with secure tenure, ensuring internal and external privacy and providing adequate protection against the elements; and (b) Potable water, adequate sanitary facilities and domestic energy supply.” This definition links all the key elements in the urban environment and relates to TOD. It is important that in a TOD a variety of housing options are provided for different income groups. The Turffontein study area has some unique characteristics. These are closely link to the income levels and population figures discussed above.

Figure 29: Tenure type The majority of dwellings in the area are rented (52%). This relates to figure 27 which show that 50% of all dwellings in the area are flats or apartments. This can be attributed to the income levels present in the study area.

There is currently a large supply of formal affordable housing stock that can be found in the study area; Figure 31: Housing affordability

There is a strong formal housing market to the south and eastern parts of the study area, which is greatly contributed to the high level of social and educational infrastructure that is currently present within these areas

Housing types are formal with the majority of dwelling types being houses on a separate stand (50%) of Flats (20%).

Figure 30: Type of dwelling

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Summary Analysis Diversity: Encourage a mix of uses and users

Access to social facilities Good transit corridors have a wide variety of accessible public and social facilities. These facilities should ideally be connected via public or non-motorised transport linkages, to ensure that a wide range of users could access social, recreational or educational opportunities via these modes. Figure 28 shows the distribution and mix of social facilities within the study area.

According to the CSIR guidelines, the corridor currently has a sufficient supply of social, education and health facilities based on the current population, although the spatial distribution of these facilities i.t.o. walking distances are not optimal. Similar to infrastructure, accessible social facilities should be a pre-requisite for future densification as an increase in population will necessitate an increase in social facilities The Turffontein area is adequately supplied in terms of health facilities, with a hospital and numerous health clinics all situated within the study boundaries. The study area should however not be viewed in isolation, as its proximity to the Johannesburg CBD means the area is also within reach of its social facilities. Education facilities are very accessible for the majority of areas within the study areas. The northern portion of the site is predominantly industrial areas, hence the lack of schools in this zone. It is important to note that although the above facilities do have good coverage in terms of walking distances, facilities to support walking and other NMT modes of travel are lacking in some areas, thus preventing non-motorised transport movement and the active use of this mode According to the Johannesburg NMT strategy for schools, an NMT buffer zone for all schools within the area should not exceed a walking distance of 2 km. All primary schools within the study area are within a 2km walk.

Figure 32: Social Facilities

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Summary Analysis Diversity: Encourage a mix of uses and users

Figure 33: Access to Health Facilities

A significant portion of the study area is not within an acceptable (1km) walking distance of a health facility. The distribution of new facilities should be a key consideration going forward.

Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Turffontein Development Area

Figure 35: Access to Secondary Schools

Figure 34: Access to Primary Schools

The corridor is sufficiently supplied in terms of primary schools, with most areas within 1km walking distance from the nearest primary school

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The majority of the residential suburbs within the corridor are located within 2km walking distance from the nearest secondary school

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Summary Analysis Diversity: Encourage a mix of uses and users

Diverse and accessible open spaces Good transit corridors have sufficient open spaces which ideally are well located, or easily accessible from anywhere within the corridor. These open spaces should ideally be connected via public or non-motorised transport linkages, or form part of wider movement network by linking residential areas with destinations such as education, social or employment opportunities. According to the CSIR Guidelines for Social Facility Provision, open space should be provided at 0.5ha per 1000 population within urban areas. In terms of Turffontein, an open space accessibility level analysis was carried out to determine the accessibility of all erven within the corridor to local and community parks in the area. This analysis did not include private open spaces (within university campuses) and open space provided within residential developments. Figure 36 indicates the Open Space Accessibility Levels of the Turffontein Study Area, and provides a visual representation of an accessibility analysis that was carried out whereby all erven were rated according to:  Distance from local or community open space (parks)  Quality and amenities of park  Distance from District Park  Total open space in area per property. The parks were grouped into two groups according to general planning guidelines and focused on:  

Local and community parks, which can be defined as any landscaped open space with recreational facilities which serve the public. This may include active or passive recreational areas, excluding sports fields. Local neighbourhood parks are smaller public spaces serving the immediate local community. District / Regional parks, which are large-scale multi-functional parks which meet a wide range of needs in the district and often serve a multi-functional purpose.

All Erven were scored out of a possible score of 15, (A score of 12 to 15 indicates that the applicable erven is well served and located in proximity to open spaces) with scores attributed to:

Table 11: Local park scoring Type Local / Community Park

Table 12: District park scoring

Distance

Type

Quality

Safety

Score

Rating

Score

4

Distance (within 10km)

2

1

> 500m

3

Formal

1

Informal

0

0

500m – 1 km

1

3

Distance

Score

Rating

Score

> 500m

7

1

500m – 1 km

4

>1 km

1

District Park

Distance

Figure 36: Open space accessibility levels The assessment only included public open space, of which the corridor has over 319 ha for the approximately 81 778 population. This equates to 3 ha per 1000 population. (General standard is 0.5ha per 1000 population) A large portion of this however is natural ridges or parks that are in a generally poor condition. While in terms of size the open space is adequate, the quality is often lacking. The natural ridges in Turffontein are also not nature reserves or conservation areas, often resulting in illegal dumping and generally unsafe conditions. While erven may be close to these areas, they are not necessarily used as open space. The corridor has sufficient open space, but existing spaces are not of high quality, with various open spaces consisting of natural ridges and areas that are not accessible to local residents. A lack of urban management also means that several formal parks are neglected and not currently acting as focal points within the area. Open space provision should be a pre-requisite for densification, as the current available land area is not sufficient for the existing population. Higher densities also translate into smaller unit size and vertical densification, thereby further increasing the demand for well-connected open spaces within the corridor

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Summary Analysis Diversity: Encourage a mix of uses and users

Diversity of travel modes

Figure 37: Turffontein modal split

The majority of areas within the Turffontein corridor are situated less than 6km away from the Johannesburg CBD and is conveniently located in proximity to Booysens rail station, taxi routes and future and present public transport facilities. For these reasons, Turffontein is geared to provide a wide variety of transport options to its residents and visitors alike. However, as shown in Figure 37, car drivers and passengers dominate the modal proportions for travel to work and educational facilities. This is symptomatic of the fact that at present, although a wide variety of travel options are available, public and non-motorised transport facilities are substandard in terms of infrastructure provision and frequency of services.

60%

Improving and providing quality and continuous walking and cycling paths or networks will contribute to the viability and safety of this mode. In general, walking and cycling have a negative image and is generally associated as a ‘poor’ mode of travel. As such, for the poor it is equally important to raise the profile of non-motorised transport through active community campaigns and educational strategies widening the catchment and acceptability of walking and cycling. Similarly, public transport waiting areas are in need of revitalisation and community ownership. Increasing frequency and lengthening times of service will contribute significantly to the viability of these modes. Taking all of this into consideration, Turffontein is perfectly situated to be a sustainable transport orientated community and a leading community for sustainable transport in Johannesburg. This is especially critical due to the fact that Turffontein cannot continue to grow as a car dependant society as there is simply not enough space for road expansions within the study area.

50%

Turffontein origin Turffontein destination

Trips to Work Trips to School

40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

Public transport and cars accommodate almost equal mode shares for long distance trips to work, while short internal work trips are largely undertaken using non-motorized transport, predominantly walking. Non-motorized transport is a significant mode for education trips. Walking and cycling culture needs to be supported by supporting infrastructure such as quality and continuous sidewalks and cycle paths

The corridor currently exhibits segregated land uses with monotonous zoning and clustering of single use erven which are not transit-supportive. This is evident in the older residential suburbs of Turffontein, Kenilworth and La Rochelle. There is a clear need to diversify and densify land uses around a new public transport alignment. The corridor currently has a sufficient supply of social, education and health facilities based on the current population. Similar to infrastructure, accessible social facilities should be a pre-requisite for future densification, as an increase in population will necessitate an increase in social facilities. NMT modes of travel play an important role in accessing social facilities and should be supported. The corridor has a sufficient supply of open spaces, though the majority of these areas are inaccessible or of poor quality. Often, these open spaces are either not accessible. Open space provision should be a pre-requisite for densification, as the current available land area is not sufficient for the existing population. Higher densities also translate into smaller unit size and vertical densification, thereby further increasing the demand for well-connected open spaces within the corridor. There is a need for developing complete streets that accommodate a diversity of travel modes. Improving this TOD Principle within the Turffontein area

    

Promote a mixture of land uses to decrease need for long trips Mixed use industrial zone to support public transport in breaking through the industrial belt Provide a wide range of affordable housing options to cater for growing demand Ensure provision of sufficient quality open spaces for increased population Improve public realm and infrastructure to support non-motorised transport as priority mode

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Summary Analysis Demand Management: Ensure an efficient functioning system

Demand Management Demand Management is the application of strategies in order to reduce demand in a bid to improve mobility options, improve economic measures, and to enable Smart Growth interventions.

Demand Management: Capacity An analysis of the existing capacity of the higher order roads (Class 1, 2 or 3) that form the network indicates that they are approaching or exceeding capacity. Encouraging and supporting private vehicle reliance is therefore not sustainable and travel behaviour changes are required. This requires that travel demand management measures be adopted as part of the development of the area.

A comprehensive and holistic approach to TDM takes into consideration three aspects:

Improved Mobility Options - Improved facilities for non-motorised and public transport services with regard to availability, speed, comfort, and security. These measures often include physical design changes such as reconfiguration of streets to increase capacity or comfort. The introduction of the BRT provides a high quality public transport alternative and is expected to promote modal shifts within the area. Economic Measures - Financial incentives to discourage private vehicle usage and shift ridership towards more efficient modes of transport. Not only do economic measures effectively solve traffic problems but it is also an effective revenue source that can generate funds to subsidise transport developments and operations. Within the context of this study economic measures will typically take the form of parking pricing and vehicle restrictions i.e. reducing space for vehicles to promote other modes. Smart Growth and Land Use Policies - Development policies to create more accessible and multimodal communities. Smart growth and land use policies are the focus of this study, but should be implemented in combination with economic and/or mobility improvements

Figure 38: Existing network capacity

Private vehicle travel can no longer be sustained. Demand management measures are required to encourage sustainable travel alternatives as Class 1, 2 and 3 roads within the study area are approaching, and in some instances exceeding capacity.

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Summary Analysis Demand Management: Ensure an efficient functioning system

The effective implementation of TDM typically includes the following the four stages:

Parity Provision of nonmotorised transport infrastructure Provision of public transport infrastructure Improve quality of existing modes of transport Planning process to adopt an integrated transport approach, instead of focussing on private vehicle usage

Demand side management

Figure 39: Typical Travel Demand Management Measures

Infrastructure management (supply side management)

Pull Once parity has been achieved, provide benefits to encourage use of TDM programmes Could include discounted tolls, preferential parking and parking rates, access to HOV lanes Few commuters will make a mode shift simply because it is the right thing to do.

Promotion Market benefits of TDM Promote TDM "pull" programmes specifically Target large employers and businesses Aim to achieve critical mass required for the succesful implementation of TDM programmes

Push Once the previous steps have been implemented to a sufficient degree, disincentives may be implemented to force a mode shift or behavoioral change Could include measures such as congestion charging, private vehicle zone restrictions and taxation policies. May require political buy in due to public aversion

•TDM techniques that manage the need for travel and reduce the need for travel using a particular mode of transport during a particular point in time i.e. during peak periods. This could also imply land use management to ensure that the need for travel between different land uses are minimised. •Capital expenditure on roads with the aim of increasing capacity through: lane additions, traffic control improvements, the use of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS), the introduction of an efficient and cost-effective public transport system etc. Infrastructure provision can also be done with the specific aim of providing facilities for specific modes of transport such as High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and bus lanes.

TDM measures can typically be addressed by two strategies, namely:

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Summary Analysis Demand Management: Ensure an efficient functioning system

There are a variety of TDM measures that can be implemented in Turffontein, as shown in the following tables, which are separated in supply and demand side proposals.

Supply side measures Supply measures

Demand side measures

side

Stage

Description and objective

Demand measures

Non-Motorised Transport facilities

Parity

The provision of cycle lanes and safe pedestrian walkways to ensure that these modes of transport are accommodated safely within the road reserve to minimise the risk of accidents and injury.

side

Stage

Description and objective

Land use / Zoning policies

Parity

As addressed the Diversity and Density of this document.

Work schedules

Pull

Reduce the number of trips and reduce the travel distances of users.

Protect vulnerable non-motorised road users and increase accessibility. Freeway Ramp Control

Parity

Traffic signals controlling the flow of vehicles on to the M1, thereby ensuring that the traffic flow on the main road is maintained at an optimum level. It can also be used to give preference to specific vehicle types such as public transport or HOV vehicles. Reduce bottle necks and unnecessary congestion on freeways and bridges.

Traffic signal settings

Network TDM capacity improvements

Parity

Parity

Can be adjusted to favour certain movements if used by public transport or pre-emption by public transport vehicles (e.g. bus/taxi priority systems). The provision of advanced traffic signal control systems can also optimise the flow of traffic and minimise lost time, thereby maximising the capacity of a section of road. Reduce congestion and optimise the flow of traffic and minimise lost time, thereby maximising the capacity of a section of road. Increase or decrease in network capacity can be done to the advantage of public transport specifically. The implementation of the BRT feeder route in Turffontein will utilised this measure i.e. where private vehicle lanes have been removed for the utilisation of public transport. This measure similarly applies to the use of traffic calming measures on residential streets within Turffontein where through traffic is not encouraged.

Reduce the number of trips and travel demand. Ride-share programmes

Pull

Parity

Dedicated lanes for public transport and / or high occupancy vehicles (HOV), as per the Bus Rapid Transit system in Turffontein. Reduce the amount of trips buy promoting carpooling and use of public transportation.

Park-and-Ride

Parity

For private vehicles to access a public transport hub easily via accessible routes, park their cars and use HOV / small busses / taxis to travel to high congested areas. This scheme can be applied in underutilised shopping centre parking facilities. Reduce private vehicle trips as well as urban (CBD) congestion.

Connector / Feeder Services

Parity

Connecting to or feeding a high capacity public transport services such as BRT, rail and light rail. It implies the provision a frequent, reliable connector / circulation bus / mini-bus service to reduce private traffic to the congested areas - may be integrated with a park and ride facility.

Also referred to as carpooling, where commuters travel together often sharing vehicles on alternate days. However, it should be noted that in South Africa carpooling schemes where only one vehicle is used and the owner is compensated by other occupants is in conflict with legislation and therefore illegal. Reduce the number of trips and travel demand by using one vehicle for multiple users.

Parking management

Push

Management through parking costs. Schemes can compensate employees if they wave their allocated parking bays, or allocate parking to car pool vehicles at a lower cost. Preferential parking can also be provided to off-peak travellers. This may include implementing or increasing parking charges for busy areas of Turffontein. Reduce the number of required parking bays and promote carpooling.

Pre-Trip Travel Information

Promotion

Increase or decrease in network capacity HOV Lanes

Flexi-time and alternative working times will allow for off-peak travel. Compressed working hours allow employees to work the required number of hour in fewer days, thereby reducing the demand for travel.

To be provided with travel information, ride-share information, public transport information, congested route information before travel. The information is provided in attempt to influence mode choice as well as the time of travel to avoid congested roads or peak period. Reduce unnecessary trips and consequently reducing unnecessary congestion.

Improved walking, cycling and public transport image

Promotion

Private vehicle restriction zones

Push

Taxation policy

Push

Make walking; cycling and public transport an attractive, safe, and accessible service in order to be able to encourage a mode shift to sustainable transport. This can be achieved through Turffontein based campaigns in schools, universities and workplaces and/or community ‘car-free’ days or cycling events. Encourage walking, cycling and the use of public transport by making it a viable transport option. Prohibition of access to specific zones for private vehicles to encourage the use of public transport. Reduce the number of trips and usage of private vehicles. Can be used to discourage private vehicle subsidies and for tax rebates where public transport is actively promoted. Reduce usage of private vehicles.

Reduce private vehicle traffic to the congested areas. In-vehicle Travel Information

Promotion

Provides travel information or congested route information in the vehicle while travelling e.g. traffic reports. This is a management technique which attempts to route vehicles to uncongested routes, thereby using available infrastructure optimally. Informs road users about accident and congestion hot spots as well reduce travel time.

On-road Travel Information

Promotion

The corridor is characterised by higher order roads that are approaching or exceeding capacity. Private vehicle travel can no longer be sustained. Demand management measures are required to encourage sustainable travel alternatives

To be provided with travel information along-side the road via fixed or variable message signs providing information on public transport, ride-sharing, alternative routes, and toll or parking information. Provide users with relevant information to make choices on appropriate means and times to travel.

Parking Supply Limitations

Push

Improving this TOD Principle within the Turffontein development area

Parking provision requirements can be reduced during the development stages of development to encourage the use of public transport. However, such strategies are only effective where alternative modes of transport are available. Reduce usage of private vehicles and promote the usage of public transportation and non-motorised transport

Congestion pricing

Push

Generally associated with higher or variable toll during peak periods or on very congested roads to influence travel and mode choice patterns.

 

Improve mobility options.

Manage parking requirements

Introduce Smart Growth and Land Use Policies to create more accessible and multimodal communities.

Reduce usage of private vehicles, trips and promote other means of travel.

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Summary Analysis Enablers – Market analysis

Market Analysis The purpose of the market analysis is to determine the performance and capacity of the market within the Turffontein area. The extent to which the area can be redeveloped or repositioned is influenced by the current and predicted market trends in Johannesburg

ECONOMIC TRENDS IN TERMS OF GVA : Economic Size - GVA Figure 40 indicates the size of the local economy in relation to the metropolitan economy, and the metro in relation to the provincial economy. The sub-economy (Turffontein and the CBD), contributed 41.6% towards the metropolitan economy. This figure is skewed by the performance of the financial and business, trade and government sectors which is largely based in the Central Business District of Johannesburg. The contribution of the metropolitan area towards the Gauteng provincial economy was 38.9% in 2011

Figure 41:Sub-sector contribution to the total economy

Figure 40:Sub-Economy contribution to Metropolitan economy

Economic Profile The assessment in the following sections serves to highlight sub-regional growth trends in the market. Future investment opportunities will be informed by this sub-regional assessment. Figure 41 indicates the contribution of the ten major economic sectors to the total economic production of the local economy. The ten economic sectors referred to include:

General government services, Community, social and other personal services, Finance and business services, Transport and communication, Trade sector (Wholesale and retail; catering and accommodation), Construction, Electricity and water, Manufacturing, Mining and Agriculture, forestry and fishing.

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area

The pillars of the sub-economy include: Finance and Business Services, Trade, General Government Services, Manufacturing and Transport and Communication - contributing approximately 88.0% towards the local economy. The Finance and Business Services Sector represents the largest contributing sector - increasing its contribution from 34.1% to 35.3% between 2007 and 2011. The Trade Sector represents the second largest contributing sector – with its contribution declining slightly from 16.8% to 16.5% between 2007 and 2011. The General Government Services Sector represents the third largest contributing sector – with its contribution increasing from 13.1% to 13.8% between 2007 and 2011. The Manufacturing Sector represents the fourth largest contributing sector with a contribution of 13.8% in 2011 – the sector’s contribution declined slightly from 15.5% in 2007. The Transport and Communication Sector represents the fifth dominant sector with its share increasing from 8.5% to 8.6% between 2007 and 2011.

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Summary Analysis Enablers – Market analysis Economic growth

ECONOMIC TRENDS IN TERMS OF EMPLOYMENT

Figure 42 provides detail on the growth performance of the Johannesburg sub-economy in respect of the metropolitan, provincial and national economies between 1995 and 2011.

Economic Size - Employment

The local and aggregate economies reflected similar growth trend patterns.

Figure 43indicates the size of the local economy in relation to the metropolitan economy, and the metro in relation to the provincial economy.

The Johannesburg sub-economy contributed 38.9% towards the metropolitan economy’s labour force in 2011.

The Metropolitan economy contributed 38.9% towards the provincial economy’s labour force in 2011.

Figure 42: Economic growth comparison

The average annual growth rate of the provincial economy over the period from 1996 to 2011 amounted to 3.6% per annum.

Figure 43:Sub-economy contribution to metropolitan labour force

The average growth of the metropolitan economy was 4.3% per annum and the subeconomy 4.6% per annum. This illustrates the importance of the Johannesburg sub-economy (Johannesburg CBD and surrounds) as an economic hub.

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Summary Analysis Enablers – Market analysis Employment Growth Trends Figure 44 provides detail on the growth performance of the Johannesburg sub-economy labour force in respect of the metropolitan, provincial and national economies between 1995 and 2011.

Employment Profile The employment pillars of the sub-economy include: Finance and Business Services, Trade, Community, Social and Personal Services, General Government Services and, Manufacturing - contributing approximately 89.4% towards the local economy.

    

The Finance and Business Services Sector represents the largest employment contributing sector - its contribution declining slightly from 30.6% to 30.4% between 2007 and 2011. The Trade Sector represents the second largest employment contributing sector – with its contribution remaining the same at 23.3% between 2007 and 2011. Community, Social and Personal Services Sector represents the third largest employment contributing sector – with its contribution increasing from 14.8% to 15.3% between 2007 and 2011. The General Government Services Sector represents the fourth largest employment contributing sector – with its contribution increasing from 8.5% to 10.5% between 2007 and 2011. The Manufacturing Sector represents the fifth largest employment contributing sector with a contribution of 10.0% in 2011 – the sector’s contribution declined slightly from 11.4% in 2007.

Figure 44: Employment Growth Performance, 1995 – 2011 (GVA at basic prices) The local and aggregate economies reflected similar employment growth trend patterns. The average annual growth rate of the labour force of the provincial economy over this time period amounted to 2.2% per annum, the metropolitan economy to 2.8% per annum and the sub-economy to 3.0% per annum.

Figure 45: Employment Profile of Johannesburg Sub-Economy, 2007 to 2011

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Summary Analysis Enablers – Market analysis

Retail

Market Analysis The purpose of the market analysis is to determine the performance and capacity of the market within the Turffontein area. The extent to which the area can be redeveloped or repositioned is influenced by the current and predicted market trends in Johannesburg.

Residential

In terms of the retail demand it is vital to understand what the main characteristics of retail is in Turffontein. The following key conclusions can be reached: The study area consists of one major regional centre, two community centres, a neighbourhood centre and two local convenience centres. Retail opportunities are predominantly located within the residential sections of the corridor, primarily within the southern sections. A district node is located within the centre of the corridor in the nature of La Rochelle/Rosettenville. The regional node is however located to the most southern part of the study area, the Glen Shopping Centre.

Based on the property valuation map and values that were derived from the 2004 valuation roll, the following key trends came to light that showed how the property values in the corridor have changed over the past 7 year. The trends that were visible in 2004 in comparison to the 2011 trends can be set out as follows:

2004

2011

Numerous properties in the northern part of the corridor sold for values exceeding R 1.0 Million. These premises predominantly represent Industrial/Commercial buildings.

Industrial and commercial properties in the northern part of the corridor sold at values exceeding R2.0 million. With some selected properties selling at values below R700k

Residential uses towards the southern part of the corridor predominantly sold for between R400k and R700k, with a large segment also selling below R200K.

Residential uses within the southern section of the corridor predominantly sold at values between R700k and R1.0 million with a large market segment also selling between R400k and R700k. Limited properties changed hands at values lower than R400k

The industrial and commercial sector has not increased in terms of monetary investments made. The rate of trade is still similar to that of 2004 indicating that these markets are not flourishing in the corridor.

The residential market in the study area is predominantly focussed on middle income individuals to the south and affordable housing individuals to the mid-sections of the study area.

Figure 46: Retail market

Residential market is predominantly middle income

The Glen is the only shopping centres of regional significance within the study area. Its location to the south of the study area, and its proximity to the N12 however mean that regional visitors do not enter the wider Turffontein area.

Retail opportunities predominantly integrated within residential component Office market small scale with no notable office nodes Better performing industrial nodes in the western side and opportunity for redevelopment across study area

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Summary Analysis Enablers – Market analysis

Office

Industrial

The study area currently has no office nodes that are located within it. A majority of the office nodes are located to the North in the CBD area which is in close proximity to the study area. The proximity of Turffontein to the Johannesburg CBD and other established office node diminishes the role of Turffontein in terms of being an office-oriented business node. The type and extent of office and business developments in this area is thus likely to remain on a local scale. There are as yet no monitored office nodes within the study area, but small office parks have however emerged in the vicinity of The Glen. Office development elsewhere in the study area is limited to low key offices and home-to-office conversions along main routes. In the context of the Gauteng Improvement Plan and anticipated impacts associated with the ancillary toll road strategy real estate on the inside of this traffic box (N12, N1, N3) can be expected to become increasingly valuable. Due to the strategic nature of these areas infill development pressures can be expected to become increasingly pronounced – impacting all property markets.

The industrial nodes in the study area are predominantly located to the north of the study area. A number of monitored industrial nodes are situated within the northern portions of the study area. Prominent industrial land uses include inter alia, Kaserne Marshalling Yards, Portions of City Deep, Booysens, Selby, and, Village Deep. Industrial areas mostly contain dated industrial stock and expansion capacity is limited. Large portions of the industrial belt are undermined. The performance of the industrial nodes (with reference to rentals commanded) within the western parts of the corridor is slightly better compared to that of the performance of the industrial nodes towards the eastern parts of the study area. Industrial performance in terms of stand values is relatively stable and comparable across the length of the corridor. The central /strategic location of the industrial areas coupled with low rentals and dated stock holds significant redevelopment opportunities

Figure 47: Office nodes

Figure 48: Industrial nodes

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Summary Analysis Enablers – Infrastructure

The development of the optimal future corridor is dependent on the availability of functional infrastructure to support economic and residential users. Infrastructure enables current functions and future expansions which makes it a pre requisite to any development. An assessment of the current infrastructure was done to determine its current capacity and the requirement for additional capacity in line with the projected developments. The infrastructure assessment is done upfront due to the size of the required investment and the extended timeline to upgrade or replace current infrastructure

Energy This section provides a high-level explanation of the approach and results of the City Power Network Master Plan analysis for the Turffontein area. Energy supply and capacity is critical in terms of the future development of the area, with all future proposals impacting on the network capacity. It is thus crucial to establish the current condition and capacity of the network. Turffontein area is mainly supplied by City Power Johannesburg via

   

The area is mainly supplied by Wemmer substation and Selby substation as shown above. The remaining substations feed the area partially as their main supply zones fall outside the study area. Wemmer substation consists of 4x 45MVA, 88/11kV and is fed from 2 Prospect via an 4.74km Goat lines and 4.74km 185mm Copper oil cables with a capacity of 110MVA for each conductors. The substation supplies the area via three 11kV satellite switching stations: Market Boundary, Produce Market and Turffontein.

Wemmer substation (4x 45MVA, 88/11kV), John Ware (2x 40MVA, 88/20.5) via Selby substation to the North, Robertsham substation (4x 45MVA, 88/11kV) supplying a small portion of the study area in Booysens. Eskom supplies the North-East portion via City Sands substation.

Figure 49: Turffontein transmission and distribution network

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area

Figure 50: Turffontein Substation supply areas

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Summary Analysis Enablers – Infrastructure

Energy demand forecast Turffontein’s electricity demand is forecasted as shown in the table below

Table 13: Turffontein Transformer loadings Substation Selby 20.5/6.6kV Wemmer 88/11kV

StandBy Transformer

Transformer 3 x 20/6.6kV, 11MVA 4 x 88/11kV, 45MVA

Install Capacity

None 1 x 88/11kV, 45MVA

Firm Capacity

33 180

2012

22 90

14.0 98.3

2013 18.9 107.1

2014 23.8 112.4

2015 28.7 117.0

2020 38.8 130.1

2025 40.0 135.4

2030

2031

41.3 138.3

2032

41.6 139.0

41.9 139.7

Network Assessment From the table above table it is clear to see that the two substations will run out of firm. Although Wemmer has 4x 45MVA transformers there are no 88kV busbar for back-up and protection purposes, thus leaving the substation with a 90MVA firm. The substation will not be able to supply the area in case of N-1 contingency either of the transformer or the line. The two lines that feed the substation are limited to 2x 110MVA with a firm of 110MVA. With the load increasing to more than 110MVA around 2014, the substation will not be able to supply the area in case of a N-1 line contingency.

Network Development In order to solve the energy issues in this region, the master plan proposed the following:

  

Install 2x 88KV Busbars and bus-section in Wemmer substation to increase the firm capacity. Shift 11kV Load (~25MVA) in 2014 from Wemmer to the proposed new substation Oakdene substation to the south of the study area. This will reduce the load on the lines feeding Wemmer to a maximum of 100MVA hence keeping the load under the firm capacity of the lines in case of N-1 line contingency. Upgrade Selby from 3x 11MVA, 20.5/6.6kV to 2x 45MVA, 88/11kV substation.

The table below shows the cost of each proposed project

Table 14: Turffontein Energy upgrades. Planned Date 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2016 2014 2014 2014

Substation Market Boundary Sws Produce Market Sws Selby Selby Selby Selby Wemmer Wemmer Wemmer

Project Description Market Boundary S/S Produce Market S/S Selby Selby_6.6kV De-commision. New Substation Wemmer Wemmer_11kV Add 88kV Busbar

Category Refurbishment - Distribution R Refurbishment - Distribution R Refurbishment - Transformer Refurbishment - Switchgear R Strengthening Strengthening Refurbishment - Transformer Refurbishment - Switchgear R Add 2x 88kV Busbars

Total

Project Status Planned Planned Planned Planned Proposed Proposed Planned Planned Proposed

Project Details E Replace 6.6 & 11kV Switchgear(Oil) E Replace 6.6 & 11kV Switchgear(Oil) E Replace New 20.5/6.6kV 11-3MVA E Replace 6.6 & 11kV Switchgear(Oil) De-commision. 2 x 1.1km 88kV 1c 1000 Al E Replace New 88/11kV 45-30MVA E Replace 6.6 & 11kV Switchgear(Oil) Add 88kV Busbar

Tot Cost (xR1000) R R R R R R R R R R

11 520.00 11 520.00 11 520.00 11 520.00 41 791.00 17 507.23 3 600.00 11 520.00 91 673.47 212 171.70

Figure 51: Turffontein Network Development

The Wemmer substation, which supplies the majority of the residential areas within the study area is almost at capacity, R212 million

Figure 52: Turffontein CAPEX per Category

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Figure 53: Turffontein CAPEX per year

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Summary Analysis Enablers – Infrastructure

Water and sanitation The study area is supplied via a water-pipeline network ranging from 20 to 750mm diameter totalling 336 km in length.

An assessment was carried out in the area to determine the status quo of the water and sanitation in terms of network, capacity and condition. Water and sanitation and infrastructure are two of the key components to any area as sufficient supply is critical for any possible densification measures. The map below gives an overview of the existing water infrastructure in the Turffontein area.

The total current replacement cost of the water infrastructure amounts R295, 853,207. The remaining useful life of the infrastructure is summarized in the table and graph below.

Table 15: Water Infrastructure Current Replacement Cost Remaining Useful Life

Figure 54: Water Infrastructure

1 – 5 years

6 – 10 years

11 – 15 years

16 – 20 years

TOTAL

R 181 542 347

R 38 373 500

R 75 937 360

0

R 295 853 207

As indicated in the graph, 61% of the infrastructure as a remaining useful life of between 1 and 5 years. Although this gives an indication of the age of the infrastructure this is not an exact representation of the remaining useful life. A more detailed analysis of the current water infrastructure needs to be done. For example an infrastructure type that has a remaining useful life of between 1 and 5 years can still function optimally for another 10 to 15 years, depending on the real condition of the infrastructure. The remaining useful life is determined theoretically through the asset register process and does not necessarily mean that the figure corresponds with the actual condition of the infrastructure. It does however indicate that the majority of the water infrastructure in the area is older than 15 years. Operation and maintenance cost can increase over time due to the age of infrastructure. Once the maintenance cost of the infrastructure or the water loss in the area becomes too great it will be more cost effective to replace the water networks in some of the areas.

A summary of the infrastructure is provided in the following tables. The majority of the water infrastructure is older than 15 years. While this does not necessarily reflect the actual condition of the infrastructure, operation and maintenance cost can increase over time due to the age of the infrastructure. The water service points within the study area consist of:

  

1 bulk meter 8 Rand Water Connections 3 Water towers

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Summary Analysis Enablers – Infrastructure

The total number of consumers per land use in the Turffontein study area is summarided in the table below:

Table 16: Consumers per land use (Erven) Land Use Business/Commercial Cluster development

Consumers 1 426 198

Education

40

Farm AH

2

Flats Government Industry

160 45 239

Other

15

Parks

34

Residential (500m²)

5 355

Residential (1000m²)

3 292

Residential (1500m²)

894

Residential (2000m²)

165

Residential (2500m²)

50

Residential (>2500m²)

110

Servitude TOTAL

Figure 55: Turffontein water capacity

The overall assessment of the Turffontein area shows that there is some spare capacity available, except for the Forest Hill tower water district that has no spare capacity and requires immediate upgrading.

21 12 046

The total volume of water used in the area is approximately 46 Ml/d; this includes a water loss of approximately 30%. A high level capacity assessment was also done to determine the available capacity for the water infrastructure. Water planning is done on water district level.

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Summary Analysis Enablers – Infrastructure

The table below gives a detail breakdown of the capacity overview per water district area within the Turffontein area.

Table 18: Turffontein Master plan Water Project Costs

Table 17: Water capacity per district Water District

Comments

JHBCBD

The northern portion of this corridor falls within the JHB CBD water districts as supplied directly via RW and JW's Hector Norris variable speed pump station. Major spare capacity is available (approximately 50%), especially on the bulk distribution to the CBD and the Hector Norris pump station, but reticulation also generally has significant spare capacity.

RW1663_Abattoir_Market_PRV

Crown Gardens reservoir

South Hills Reservoir Forest Hill Tower Oakdene Direct Feed

The central part of this corridor falls within the Abattoir/ Market direct feed water district, which is supplied directly by RW. Substantial spare capacity exists (approximately 35%), but it should be noted that this assumes that the Moffat RW meter (currently closed) will be opened. otherwise substantial upgrading will be required to the bulk distribution system. A small portion of the corridor is located in the Crown Gardens Reservoir district. The reticulation has some spare capacity (approximately 25%), but an additional reservoir is currently required to meet the current demand. The southern portion is located within the South Hills Tower, Forest Hill Tower and Oakdene Direct feed water districts, with also no JW on-site storage. The Forest Hill Tower and pump station is too small and requires upgrading immediately as there is 0% bulk capacity, whilst the reticulation has some spare capacity (approximately 20%). The South Hills Tower has limited spare capacity but an additional direct feed has been proposed to avoid the need for an extra tower. The reticulation also has limited capacity (15%) which is also the case for the Oakdene Direct Feed.

Project No

Project Description

HB24

Required to calibrate bulk and telemetry meters.

ABM3

Required to improve water pressures.

ABM4

Required to improve network redundancy

Total Cost (R) 8 820 68 880 1 387 540

CG6

To improve supply and alleviate low residual pressures

176 260

FHT1

Required to improve storage capacity.

FHT2

Required to improve pump station capacity

634 200

FHT3

Required to reduce high flow velocities

158 200

FHT4

Required to reduce high flow velocities and improve peak pressures

FHT6

Required to improve network redundancy

FHT7

Required to reduce high flow velocities

709 800

FHT8

Required to reduce high flow velocities

133 420

FHT9

Required to improve network redundancy

ODF1

To reduce high static pressures.

ODF2

Required to reduce high flow velocities

1 665 580

ODF3

Required to reduce high flow velocities

129 220

SHE1

Upgrade supply/Establish PRV sub-zone

SHE2

Upgrade pipeline

363 440

SHT1

Required to improve network redundancy

116 760

SHT2

Required to reduce high static pressure

171 640

SHT3

Required to improve network redundancy

SHT6

Required to improve pump station capacity

SHT7

Required to reduce high flow velocities

14 000 000

1 627 780 33 740

42 840 196 000

2 855 440

Capital Investment: Water infrastructure There is currently a water service infrastructure “backlog” in the Turffontein area. There are a number of infrastructure components that have to be upgraded or replaced in order for the water infrastructure system to operate optimally. Table 18 gives an indication of what project are currently required for the water infrastructure. It is important to note that the current projects do not make provision for the replacement of networks in the area, and only provides an indication of the projects currently included in the master plan.

A total of R26.4 million is required to eradicate the current water service backlog in the Turffontein area.

TOTAL

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area

66 500 349 300 1 505 140 26 400 500

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Summary Analysis Enablers – Infrastructure

Sanitation The same assessment approach as for the water infrastructure was followed for the sanitation infrastructure. The map below gives an overview of the existing sanitation infrastructure in the Turffontein area.

The study area is supplied via a sanitation-pipeline network ranging from 100mm to 750mm diameter totalling 260 km in length.

Table 19: Sanitation Infrastructure Current Replacement Cost Remaining Useful Life 1 – 5 years

6 – 10 years

11 – 15 years

16 – 20 years

TOTAL

R 96 782 361

R 70 939 473

R 33 102 423

R 43 651 002

R 244 475 265

Figure 56: Sanitation infrastructure The remaining useful life of the infrastructure is summarized in Table 19 and Figure 57 and indicates that the majority of sewer infrastructure is between 1 and 10 years on the remaining useful life. Although this gives an indication of the age of the infrastructure this is not an exact representation of the remaining useful life. A more detailed analysis of the current water infrastructure needs to be done. For example an infrastructure type that has a remaining useful life of between 1 and 5 years can still function optimally for another 10 to 15 years, depending on the real condition of the infrastructure. The remaining useful life is determined theoretically though the asset registers process and does not necessarily mean that the figure corresponds with the actual condition of the infrastructure. Operation and maintenance cost can increase over time due to the age of infrastructure.

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area

Figure 57: Sanitation infrastructure remaining useful life The total current replacement cost of the sewer infrastructure amounts R244, 475 ,265

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Summary Analysis Enablers – Infrastructure

The estimated number of sewer consumers is taken as the same as the total water consumers which totals 12 046 consumers. The volume of sewer is estimated at 60% of the total water supplied; this amounts to 27.9 Ml/d. A high level capacity assessment was carried out to determine what the available capacity for the sewer infrastructure is. Sewer planning is done on sewer corridor basin areas. The map and table below gives an overall summary of the estimated available capacity for the sewer infrastructure in the Turffontein area. The current capital requirements in the area are also indicated on the map.

Table 20: Capacity per corridor Sewer Corridor Basin

Comments

South eastern

No apparent hydraulic capacity issues, capacity generally exceeding 40 - 50% relative spare capacity.

Klipspruit

Isolated instances of sewer collectors which have insufficient capacity within Turffontein which require upgrading. General capacity exceeding 40 - 50% spare capacity elsewhere.

Capital Investment: Sanitation infrastructure There is currently a water sewer infrastructure “backlog” in the Turffontein area. There are a number of infrastructure components that have to be upgraded or replaced according to the current master plan. The table below gives an indication of what project are currently required for the water infrastructure. Table 21: Turffontein master plan Project Costs Turffontein master plan Project Costs MP Project Number

Description

Total Cost

KSS_GEN11

Upgrade existing Gravity

459,900.00

KSS_TF2

Upgrade existing Gravity

1,159,100.00

KSS_TF3

Upgrade existing Gravity

1,643,800.00

KSS_TF3

Upgrade existing Gravity

272,200.00

SES_GEN2

Upgrade existing Gravity (Investigate first)

2,754,100.00

Figure 58: Sewerage Capacity and projects

SES_GEN4

Upgrade existing Gravity

357,400.00

The overall assessment of the Turffontein area shows that there is some spare capacity available and no apparent hydraulic capacity issues exists.

TOTAL

6,646,500.00

A total of R 6 646 500 is needed to implement the current sewer master plan items in the area, this does not include any replacement of existing sewer network systems that might be required.

Once the desired built form and resulting revised population projections for the study area are known (based on the proposed land parcel redevelopment / intensification / densification) the new infrastructure capital investment required to enable or support the redevelopment initiatives can be calculated. This assessment indicates the capital infrastructure investment required to stimulate or enable / support new development / growth within the study area based on new development pressure / population growth. The redevelopment induced infrastructure assessment yields a map and a list of refurbishment projects to support future development within the study area

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Summary of Analysis Issues and Challenges

ASPECT

Destinations

ISSUE

 Industrial Belt barrier  Lack of urban management – signs of urban decay  Land use and transportation not integrated  Recreational

precinct not functioning according to its potential as a regional destination – leasing issues to be resolved

Distance

Density:

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 Discontinuous, unattractive non-motorised transport network  Lack of public transport facilities, and poor general condition of existing facilities  Low residential densities not supportive of public transport, but future role of area demands public transport interventions  Need for new public transport route aligned with densities and mixed use  Road functions and layouts not matching access and mobility priorities as per existing classifications.  Lack of east-west linkages within industrial belt  Current movement patterns not towards Trunk BRT route in Pat Mbatha.  Rail stations are poorly integrated with the surrounding area, especially Booysens station with highest passenger volumes. Station needs to be integrated with future public transport route stop.  Concentration of poverty and overcrowding in older neighbourhoods.  Current housing stock not serving demand – predominantly rentals  Affordable housing stock that encourages ownership should be introduced Low economic investment and retail market potential Figure 59: Summary of Issues and Challenges  No high order public transport route or facilities to concentrate densification

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Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area


Executive Summary

Summary of Analysis Issues and Challenges

ASPECT

Diversity:

Design

Demand Management

ISSUE

 Low economic investment and retail market potential, indicating that economic development opportunities need to be created and encouraged in the area  Lack of quality open spaces within area. Areas are either not maintained or discontinuous  Urgent need to intervene in degrading housing stock  Not enough mixed land use to shorten trip lengths within corridor. Current Land-uses not supportive of transit  Incompatible land uses located in close proximity in northern areas, with residential areas adjacent to mining and environmentally unsafe areas

 Public realm not contributing to the creation of user-friendly public spaces.  Existing public spaces not focal points  Unique character not supported by f urban management initiatives  Unhealthy residential areas due to poor air quality  Critical no-go areas in terms of residential development  Mine dumps and active mining rights reduce development areas  No critical heritage areas, but residential stock classified as heritage due to age of structure  Major linkages close to capacity, indicating need to promote nonmotorised and public transport  Poor quality infrastructure  Major linkages close to capacity, indicating need to promote nonmotorised and public transport  Water & sewerage backlog in southern section of study area  Forest Hill Pump station insufficient  Limited electrical capacity

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Area

Figure 60: Summary of Issues and Challenges

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Summary Of Analysis Opportunities

ASPECT

Destinations

Distance

Opportunity  Strengthen connections to CBD and break through industrial belt to regenerate the wider area.  Multiple linkages into and through mining belt (including NMT)  Manage Recreational precinct, including improving connections linking residential areas to Pioneers Park

 Proximity to the CBD and the diversity of land uses

Turffontein offers the following development opportunities:

      

Proximity to CBD Linking area with Rea Vaya network Property values enables large scale intervention Multi-Activity corridors breaking the barrier Recreational precinct Open space movement networks & prioritise NMT Unique character & heritage

within the area means travelling distances support the use of non-motorised transport.

Design

Density

Diversity

Demand Management

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 Wide Road reserves and proximity to CBD makes area ideal for large scale non-motorised transport interventions  Booysens Station Intermodal Development and integration  Provide a wide range of housing options to cater for the housing needs.  Affordable housing destination, with good linkages to suitable employment opportunities  Control densification and adequate social facilities to cater for wide variety of cultural groups  Affordable housing typologies to support public transport  Skills development for local population (artisan training) that suits local employment needs  Build on strengths including proximity to employment, education, recreational opportunities and affordable housing need, to increase residential densities: Improve viability of public transport interventions  Transport as main restructuring tool in area, supported by densification strategy to create viable links into adjacent areas (& through mining and industrial belt  Integrate area with Rea Vaya system, either as feeder or complimentary service. Though Kliprivier and Prairie may serve as future trunk routes, a local feeder system could stimulate development in the core housing interventions area that includes , Turffontein, Kenilworth, La Rochelle and Rosettenville

 Support regeneration by promoting mix-use precincts

f

 Infill development to radically densify the area  Facilitate development of areas through attractive zoning and development guidelines  Mixture of land uses supportive of TOD through Spatial Assessment of proposed route according to TOD Indicator-model  Road classifications to complement adjoining land uses in terms of accessibility and mobility. This is to be supported by appropriate street cross sections.

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Corridor Performance Current performance of the 6 D’s The figure below provides a brief summary of the current performance of the study area when analysis according to the 6 D’s, and at a glance highlights the important aspects that need to be improved within the Turffontein corridor in to transform this corridor into a true future “Corridor of Freedom”

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Corridor Performance Current performance of the 6 D’s

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Concept Plan Vision - Isifiso

Turffontein Vision The development of the concept plan for the Turffontein Strategic Area rests on the analysis of the current realities, opportunities and constraints, identified during the status quo assessment. The vision underpinned by the “Corridors of Freedom” concept seeks to entrench the principles of good urban environments, namely creating access to opportunity by reducing distances between home, work and education; creating attractive environments for walking and cycling; creating a vibrant, people-centred city; promoting transit-orientated development with high density residential development around transit stations; support mixed-use development that allows people to live, work and play in the same space; and to discourage the use of private cars by providing sustainable travel alternatives and managing transport demand. The vision for the Turffontein Strategic Area is therefore to become a quality urban environment by providing a range of housing, economic and social amenity options with affordable higher residential density provided in mixed-use precincts surrounding quality transit service routes and stops (which provide both choice in terms of transport options as well as high frequency, reliability and user-quality); supported by an integrated public (hard and soft) open space system; connected by user friendly, high quality, continuous non-motorised transport networks; making Turffontein the premium non-motorised transport community of Johannesburg, within walking distance from Johannesburg CBD. In order to achieve this vision, and the quality urban environment principles which support the vision, three primary enablers have been identified to guide the development of the concept plan and which informs detail proposals for the Turffontein Strategic Area Framework. Enabler 1

Enabler 2

Enabler 3

Provide a mix of affordable housing typologies that can accommodate five-times the current population within the next 40 years.

Provide a high quality transport system that will support and promote the proposed increase in population and vice versa.

Provide sufficient public open space (both hard and soft), and social amenities to support the increase in population and to provide a quality urban environment.

The current population in Turffontein is approximately 106 000. The population growth rate for the area for the past 10 years was approximately 5.8%.

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Turffontein is currently serviced by a Johannesburg Metrobus service (approximately one bus per hour during morning and afternoon peak hour).

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The current open space in Turffontein covers approximately 320 hectares; however, the quality of the open space is questionable with many public parks requiring upgrading and maintenance.

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Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Concept Plan Methodology

Concept Plan Development Methodology The concept plan for the area stemmed from the transit-orientated development (TOD) approach and the six main objectives of good transit corridor design. The premise of TOD development is a high quality public transport system that is aligned and integrated with a variety of land uses, amenities and public spaces within specific nodes (destinations) of an area, supported by a permeable non-motorised transport (NMT) network. The Concept Plan was developed through an iterative two-step process:  Step 1: Identify the future public transport and non-motorised transport system

Identification of the optimal location, service type and coverage of a transit system (i.e. public transport routes and facilities) in accordance with V. Vuchic’s theory propagated in Transportation for Liveable Cities – Rutgers Centre for Urban Policy Research (1999).

Classify public transport stops into premium and local stops. The classification will guide the location of destinations and densification based on the identified goals of TOD.

Provide a non-motorised transport network supporting selected stops and provide access for NMT users to these stops.

 Step 2: Delineate development areas

Delineate areas of high densification potential based on highest public transport and non-motorised transport accessibility levels.

Delineate areas of medium densification potential adjacent to the high density areas (whilst maintaining a sense of scale, place and liveable urban environment).

Delineate areas of lower densification potential (whilst maintaining a sense of scale, place and liveable urban environment).

The outcome of a concept plan is shown in Figure 61.

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Figure 61: TOD Concept Plan Once the concept plan has been developed, the outcomes of the plan will be quantified through determining detailed land uses per area, development particulars (i.e. units per hectare, vertical density etc.) and required open space, social amenities and the impact on infrastructure.

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Concept Plan Applied Methodology

Public Transport System Identification Vuchic’s theory (Transportation for Liveable Cities – Rutgers Centre for Urban Policy Research (1999) and Urban Transit Operations, Planning and Economics – John Wiley & Sons, 2005) regarding good transit system design can be used to determine the best routes and type of service that will serve Turffontein taking into consideration the future vision for the area. Vuchic’s theory is based on four design elements:

   

Design Element 1: Area Coverage

Design Element 2: Transfer between routes Once the area coverage has been determined, various operational factors should be examined such as possible transfers between routes and different modes. Passengers always prefer a direct route as opposed to one that requires a transfer. Passengers exhibit a reluctance to transfer primarily due to the conditions under which transfer take place. During the last few decades transfer facilities have been seriously neglected which led to the exaggerated belief that transfer is the biggest obstacle to the use of public transport. However, it has been proved, that in cities that have excellent transfer facilities, that passenger objections to transfer diminish and that a network of routes can operate much more economically with transfer than when it attempts to avoid them.

Design Element 2: Transfer between public transport routes There are a number of basic elements that contribute to a positive transfer experience for public transport passengers. These include:

Design Element 3: Directness of routes Design Element 4: Spacing between routes

Design Element 1: Area Coverage One of the first factors to consider in transit system design is the extent of the network and the area it covers/serves. A transit network should ideally cover to the greatest extent possible whilst balancing what is considered to be economically reasonable and socially desirable. Areas within a 5 minute walking distance from transit stations are seen as the primary service areas; the highest number of potential passengers living in this area can be expected to make use of the available service provided it is of satisfactory quality. Areas with a 5 – 10 minute walking distance from a public transport stop represent the secondary service area; in this area the percentage of people willing to use the transit service reduces rapidly the further they are from a public transport stop. This unwillingness of people to walk long distances is illustrated in Figure 62. The figure illustrates that people living or working in an area that requires more than 10 minutes of walking to a public transport stop, will require some form of feeder system in conjunction with the primary transport service.

    

Convenience such as a short walking, full rain protection, escalators etc. Cleanliness, comfort and safety Clear information about schedules, routes and directions Short waiting times Availability of amenities such as minor food stops, convenience stores etc.

Design Element 3: Directness of routes The directness of a route can be defined as the ratio between the actual travel distance between two points when using the transit system, and the straight line distance between the two points. This ratio should preferably be minimised, although this can prove to be quite difficult in some cases because transit routes are constrained by street patterns and topography. The best way to minimise the “Directness of route ratio” is to create routes that connect large traffic generators (land use) and place routes along the highest passenger desire lines, while serving populated areas in between as much as possible. Optimising the directness of the route is often in direct conflict with an attempt to maximise coverage. The best coverage is often obtained by using circuitous routes, rather than direct routes. Direct routes are justified in areas where transit demand is high, but in areas with low demand service would be too infrequent if direct routes where used.

Design Element 4: Spacing between routes The spacing between routes has to do with the distance between parallel routes. This is determined by the density of travel demand along parallel corridors. As mentioned before, a person is considered to be well served by a transit system if he resides within a 5 minute walking distance of the transit line (approximately 400m if a person walks at a speed of 1,3m/s). For a given transit demand in one direction, there is an option of either supplying a few routes with frequent service or many routes with infrequent service. In general it is preferable to have fewer lines with very frequent service rather than many lines with infrequent service.

Figure 62: Percentage of potential transit passengers using transit as a function of walking access time.

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If there is sufficient demand, line spacing of 800m is advised (which means maximum walking distance from transit service will be 400m), if demand is not enough to support lines so close to each other, spacing can be increased to 1,6km, which will result in a maximum walking distance of 800m (10minutes) which is also still acceptable. Spacing bigger than this will result in poor coverage.

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Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Concept Plan Applied Methodology

Public Tranport Provision in Turffontein The public transport services and facilities provided in the Turffontein area is shown in Figure 63 below.

Design Element 1: Area Coverage When evaluating the current provision (or area coverage) of public transport in Turffontein against the ideal system described in Vichic’s theory, the area is covered adequetly for commuters that travel in a north south direction. These routes predominately link the residential areas of Turffontein with the CBD of Johannesburg. Commuters can travel from the residential areas directly to the CBD without transfers – which is ideal. The majority of roads that these services run along are lower order roads and the provision of facilities comprsie of a bus stop sign with no shelter of other information.

Design Element 2: Transfers between Routes The existing Metrobus service operating in Turffontein is a low freqeuncy service with a typical headway of more than 30 minutes. The implication is that only one bus will run through the area per hour during peak hours. Taking into consideration that the CBD is less than 11 minutes travel by car, this low frequency service does not provide a attractive alternative to private car use.

The current public transport service provided by Metrobus in Turffontein is operating at a very low frequency – equating to only one bus per hour within the peak hour.

Design Element 3: Directness of Routes The current Metrobus services’ most significant shortfall is with respect to “Directness of Routes” when evaluated according to Vuchic’s theory. Routes are provided in the north-south direction but east-west services that link all the areas with the business centres in Turffontein and other areas of public amenities and open spaces is lacking.

Based on the area coverage assessment of the existing Turffontein Public Transport system it is evident that additional east-west services are required to adequately address the user demand for the area.

Design Element 4: Spacing between Routes The spacing on north-south routes are within the range specified for a good public transport system. However the east-west provision is limited in terms of accesibility to the area.

Public transport stops should be located on the new public transport route at a facility spacing of 800m thereby resulting in a maximum walking distance of 400m to any public transport stop. Figure 63: Public transport services and facilities in the Turffontein study area

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Concept Plan Applied Methodology

Proposed Transit System to enable High Density Development Available Road Reserve Width

Public Transport Service Route and Stops

The Corridors of Freedom concept advocates a drastic increase in development density which potentially could triple or even quadruple the population within the Turffontein study area. This drastic increase in density and population numbers will require a public transport system with a minimum service frequency of 5-minute headways and a service coverage that addresses both north-south and east-west passenger desirelines. The streets where such a service could potentially be provided were determined based on existing road reserve widths and by linking existing bussiness nodes with residential areas.

The classification of public transport stops is depended on the distance to the next stop on the route as well as the land use surrounding the stop. If the stops are 400m apart, one of the stops will be classified as a local stop. If stops are more than 700m apart the both stations will be premium stations depending on next and previous stops along the line.

Several of the streets in Turffontein used to be tramway reserves and consequently De Villiers-, Turf- and Turffontein Road have road reserve widths of more than 18m. These road reserve widths are suitable to accommodate a Bus Rapid Transit System.

Base on the above principle, the stops in Turffontein were identified based on current land use mix and land use trip attractor / generator characteristics. The first stops were positioned near or in the current central business districts of Turffontein. Thereafter the stops were spaced at 400m intervals. It is important to note that the stops will be accessible for both travel directions and it was assumed that the stops will be situated in the median of the road. The classified stops and the proposed BRT route are shown in Figure 65. These classified stops will provide the basis for the walkability analysis, required to determine the areas or precincts best suited for densification.

The conceptual new public transport service alignment within Turffontein and the relevant road reserve widths are shown in Figure 64. It is apparent that a few of the road reserves are at the minimum reserve width required for BRT implementation but during detail design one-way road traffic systems could be investigated to overcome this constraint.

Figure 65: Turffontein BRT Routes and Stops

Figure 64: Roads Identified for BRT Operations

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Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Strategic Area Framework Allowable use

Demarcation of Areas of Densification TOD is based primarily on the principle of a “walkable urban environment”, meaning that people can walk to work, parks or public squares, schools and shops. The second major premise of TOD development is focused around access to transit or high quality public transport services by means of walking. Given the above, walking distance to and from premium BRT stops was therefore considered to be a critical indicator in the delineation of areas of future densification.

For the purpose of determining land use zoning and development controls per area, the walkability isochrones were simplified to delineated areas of high densification and lower densification. Figure 67 indicates the delineated densification areas for the Turffontein study area. These areas form the backbone for densification policies, land use, zoning and development controls.

Pedestrian walkability isochrones (network level analysis) were developed based on walking distances of 400m and 800m from premium BRT stops (Refer to Figure 66). The walking isochrones are shown as 400m walking distances (light red) indicating areas with highest transit accessibility, and 800m walking distances (darker red areas) indicating areas of moderate accessibility which would typically still be densified, but at a rate of fewer units per hectare than the core areas. The blue shaded isochrones indicate accessibility around other public transport services such as Metrobus or Minibus-taxi stops. The purpose of these isochrones is to indicate the potential of incorporating these stops into the BRT feeder system, and the densification which could be achieved around these stops in future.

Figure 66: Pedestrian Walk Distance Isochrones from BRT stops Figure 67: Delineated Areas of Densification

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Strategic Area Framework Densification Principles

Strategic Area Framework

Densification Principles

During the concept plan phase, the proposed new public transport services (i.e. routes and stops) were identified. Thereafter, the areas of high and moderate densification was identified and delineated based on a walkability assessment from primary and secondary transport stops. This section of the report sets out to further detail the proposals and implementation issues surrounding the Turffontein Strategic Area Framework.

Strategic Area Framework Design Principles • • • • •

Define Densification Principles Zoning Framework Urban Design Principles Development Controles Mix of use per land use zone

Strategic Area Framework • Zoning • Allowable uses • Units per hectare •Vertical density profile •Consolidations required • Amenities Required • Yields

Interventions Required • • • • • • •

Roads Public transport Parks and Open Space Schools Social Facilities Water and Sewer Energy

Densification is defined as the increased use of space both horizontally and vertically within existing areas/properties and new developments accompanied by an increased number of units and/or population thresholds.

Densification Options considered in Turffontein Large Scale Precinct Development (Highest Priority)

It is critically important that once an area has been earmarked for densification, the design team takes into account the character of the area in question, as well as the socioeconomic demographic of residents of the area. Densification typically takes place in developed areas, on vacant infill sites within the developed areas and on green field sites that are within an urban areas’ planned growth direction. The general process of densification takes place in a number of ways and is supported by a range of zoning and land use regulations (generally guided by the institutional arrangements of the institution with jurisdictional powers). The following describes generic ways in which densification takes place.

Consolidation and Redevelopment (Moderate Priority)

 Additional dwelling units, consisting of construction of attached/detached second dwellings including the changing of non-residential buildings, or parts of buildings, to residential buildings (e.g. garages).  Subdivisions, consisting of subdivision of land and redevelopment at higher densities.  Consolidation and redevelopment, consisting of block consolidation of erven for redevelopment at higher densities as well as consolidation with redevelopment at higher densities including the demolition and integration of existing structures.  Increased land use rights, consisting of increasing the existing bulk rights through the extension of the building or adding one of floors to accommodate an increased number of units.

High Density Infill on Underutilised Land (Lower Priority)

 Higher density infill on underutilised land, consisting of higher density infill on vacant and underutilised land throughout the built area of the City, large scale precinct development, as well as consolidation of sites within a street block to create a single larger parcel for redevelopment into multi-storey units. Based on the densification options discussed above, a few of the typical methods were omitted as being not applicable to the Turffontein area, given that these are currently occurring in Turffontein and leading to urban decay in some locations in the study area. In order to attain the vision articulated for Turffontein, the following options (in order of priority) form part of the densification strategy:  Large scale precinct development.  Consolidation and redevelopment  Higher density infill on underutilised land Increased land use rights is not omitted as a strategy, however given that the majority of stands in Turffontein are already rezoned for Residential 4 and the fact that these rights have not been executed to date, other densification policies might be more effective.

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Strategic Area Framework Land use zoning framework

Zoning Framework The densification strategies can only be quantified in terms of a specific land use zone. For the purpose of the Turffontein Strategic Area Framework the land use zones defined in the current town planning scheme was used to ensure seamless implementation. The existing land use zones cover the following zoning categories:

        

High density residential Medium density residential Low density residential Business Commercial Educational Industrial Community facilities Public open space and recreational

From the list of zones above, a first order screening stemming from the situational analysis was undertaken to select those zones and land uses that were deemed as complimentary and contributing to the area’s economy, job creation and character. These land uses need to be retained and strengthened into the future.

Vision: Turffontein…a quality urban environment providing a range of housing, economic and social amenity options with affordable higher residential density provided in mixed use precincts surrounding quality transit service routes and stops (which provide both choice in terms of transport options as well as high frequency, reliability and user-quality), supported by an integrated public (hard and soft) open space system, connected by user friendly, high quality, continuous non-motorised transport networks, making Turffontein the premium non-motorised transport community of Johannesburg, within walking distance from Johannesburg CBD. “The southern gateway to the CBD” Land use zones identified from the above process were:

    

Business development through the area Community facilities and schools Parks, recreational areas and open spaces Industrial developments Existing high density developments.

Figure 68: Turffontein Future Zoning Framework

These zones will only be changed if a specific proposal occurs in a specific area. Starting from the principle that areas falling outside of the above zones will be approach from a “clean slate” perspective. The design needs to be guided by a set of land use planning and urban design principles that was adapted taking into account the character of Turffontein.

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Strategic Area Framework Design principles gg

The residential densification zones are located in close proximity to existing and planned public transport routes. The existing Metrobus routes feeds into the higher order Feeder service alignment. Where the Rea Vaya route does not serve specific social and health facilities (mainly due to the limiting road reserve) Metrobus and non-motorised transport interventions links these facilities to the feeder route.

Zoning Framework in relation to Transport routes

A GIS database is currently under development and will provide detailed information with regard to zoning, allowable use, densities and broad design parameters per erf.

Figure 69: Turffontein Future Zoning Framework (including proposed BRT Stations and Routes)

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Strategic Area Framework Land use zoning framework

Principle One

Principle Three

Densification of an area is associated with tall buildings, however the positioning of tall buildings on a site and the vertical density of adjacent buildings needs to be carefully considered to ensure that the area provides for a liveable community and does not create dead spaces with limited light and air circulation. A few basic rules were applied in the determining of vertical densities on a block to block level.

The positioning of buildings on stands can provide large private open space that is accessible to residence. These open spaces can be traded off against public open space and can be a pre-requisite to the approval of densities of 250 units per hectare and higher. This principle was applied in the positioning of buildings and the allocation of high density uses in the Turffontein study area.

ď&#x201A;§ Principle Four The mix of use within buildings is guided by principle four. The vertical densities in Turffontein will be restricted to 6 storey buildings. Where the area is zoned as business, the first two to three floors will be dedicated to business uses and the rest of the floors to residential units. The adjacent figure illustrates the different variations of principle four.

Principle Two The placement of buildings that will provide for a mix of uses (i.e. retail, office and high density residential) will form a buffer zone along the transit routes. This line of high rise buildings will be followed by a step down of vertical densities as one move away from the street frontage. The principle of the design and the broad land use that is envisaged to line the transit routes is shown in the adjacent figure.

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Implementation Plan Catalytic Development Precincts gg

Applying design principle two to the densification of the Turffontein study area, high rise mix use along the public transport routes and stops will be followed by medium density and later low density, as one move further away from the transit corridor. To give effect to this design principle, broad category land use zones were allocated, followed by detail calculation of number of units per hectare and allowable vertical density. The broad land use categories that were allocated are:

   

High density residential

The following variables were taken into account in calculating the number of development units:

Stand area (m ): Extent of the stand that can be developed. The area per stand was obtained from the GIS information provided by the City of Johannesburg.

Vertical density: Represents the number of floors that is allowed. The vertical density restrictions per densification zones are provided in a range and the actual height of the development will depend on the height restriction areas that was determine to ensure a city scape that will enhance the character of the area and area.

Coverage: Coverage represents the extent to which the building covers the stand on which it is built. Coverage was assumed to be 60% in low density area and 50% for high density residential areas. High density residential development requires higher communal space and restricting the area coverage will ensure that sufficient space can be provided between buildings. These open spaces needs to be linked to each other to provide private open space in the area.

Leasable Area: In all buildings a portion of the building needs to be allocated to hallways, service areas, stairs, lifts and entrance areas. These areas are usually in the order of 15 to 20% and can be excluded when the number of units that can be developed is calculated.

Percentage area allocated per land use: For residential use the entire developable area was allocated to residential units. For business use a split were provided between Retail, office and residential. These percentages were based on the assumption (Design Principle Four). Maximum of first three floors can be allocated to other uses.

Average people per unit: The number of residence per unit was based on the population figures in Turffontein in the different income levels and validated against the greater Johannesburg averages.

Medium density residential Low density residential Business

The land use zones are shown in Figure 68. Detail development controls linked to each land use zone is shown in Table 22 below. These development controls were derived from current high density developments that were approved recently in Johannesburg area. The development controls are presented in ranges to accommodate a variety of vertical densities and unit sizes. This is required to ensure that housing typologies for all income categories are catered for.

Table 22: Turffontein Strategic Area Framework Development Controls Development control

Business

Vertical Density(Storeys) Site Coverage 2 Average Unit Size (m ) Average people per unit Residential Space % Retail Space % Office Space % Leasable area

6 60% 80 -110 2 40% 30% 30% 75%

High Density Residential 4-6 50% 48-110 3 100%

Medium Density Residential 4 60% 50 - 120 2.5 -3.5 100%

80%

Low Density Residential 1-3 65% 120 3 100%

80%

2

Applying the development controls per land use zone to each stand the estimated future population for Turffontein based on the Strategic Area Framework’s densification strategy is 450 300 people consisting of a total of 150 400 units

80%

(based on a fully developed area).. To determine the total number of units that can be developed in Turffontein the development controls were used and the units per stand were calculated. The number of units was calculated as follows: The population and number of units per land use zone earmarked for Turffontein study area according to the Strategic Area Framework’s densification strategy is detailed in Table 23.

Table 23: Population Estimate

((

(

Land use Zone

(

78

Residents

Business

17 175

36217

High Density Residential

28 088

91137

Medium Density Residential

93 615

288465

Low Density Residential

11 510

34529

150 388

450348

Total

Units Per hectare

Units

Units Per hectare in relation to Public Transport Routes

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Strategic Area Framework Allowable uses

The calculated units per hectare based on the proposed development controls are shown in Figure 70 below.

Figure 70: Development Control - Units per Hectare Allowable

Figure 71: Development Control - Units per Hectare Allowable (including proposed BRT and NMT)

Vertical Density Profile

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Implementation Plan Catalytic Development Precincts gg

The calculated vertical density based on the proposed development controls are shown in Error! Reference source not found.. The areas character will be preserved and a mix land use of retail, office and residential will be strengthened in the core areas.

The future vertical density allows for a maximum of 6 storeys in the Turffontein Development Area Height restrictions based on existing trends, road hierarchy and future public transport services. Highest vertical density allowed in areas of high accessibility

Figure 72: Development control – Vertical density Restriction

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Strategic Area Framework Pre-requisites for densification

Consolidation Area

Social Amenity Requirements

The housing typology associated with higher density residential development, such as flats, needs large stands. Typically a 2 minimum stand size of 900m is required. Many stands in the study area, indicated as future medium and high density residential zones, do not meet the minimum requirement. This entails that stands will have to be consolidated to allow for such development to take place. The Figure 73 indicates stands, in the proposed medium and high density residential zones, that 2 are smaller than a 900m and that will need to be consolidated to allow for higher density development.

A large number of social amenities will be required in the Turffontein area on implementation of the densification strategy. The figures below indicate the areas and stands that were identified where the schools and parks could be provided. The provision of social facilities relates to access distances and area of influence. The provision of the social amenities has various factors that must be taken into consideration to create not only a liveable but also an integrated community with sufficient amenities. The standards for social facility provision within settlements were taken from the “CSIR Guidelines for the Provision of Social Amenities in South African Settlements”. There are various social amenities within the guidelines but there are three that must be included to insure the sustainability of human settlements. The amenities are

  

Primary Schools Secondary Schools Open Spaces Primary Schools: The following standards are taken into consideration for calculating the required supply:

  

1 Primary school per 7000 population 1 primary school within a 5 km walkable distance radius 2.8 ha land parcel size requirement per primary school

The required primary school supply was calculated by dividing the population of each zone with the threshold, with the output then the required number of schools as shown in Table 24. The amenities already provided within the study area were then optimized to accommodate the threshold of 7 000 population. The optimized figure was then subtracted from the required total and the required supply multiplied by the required hectares for each school. Table 24: Primary School Requirements

Figure 73: Areas identified for Consolidation as prerequisite to approval of 200 units per hectare

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No of Primary School Required

No of Primary School Provided

7000

23

8

2

7000

8

3

7000

4

Required Supply

Hectares Required

20

3

8.4

2

5

3

8.4

17

5

12.5

5

12.6

7000

10

2

5

5

14

5

7000

5

0

0

5

14

6

7000

5

1

2.5

3

7

68

18

45

23

64.4

Zone

Threshold

1

Optimisation

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Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Strategic Area Framework Pre-requisites for densification gg

Social Amenity Requirements

Secondary Schools: The following standards are taken into consideration for calculating the required supply:

  

1 Secondary school per 12 500 population 1 Secondary school within a 5 km walkable distance radius 4.8 ha land parcel size requirement per secondary school

The supply calculation for secondary schools was done according to the same principle as the Primary Schools. Table 25: Secondary School Requirements No Secondary Schools Required

of

No Provided Secondary Schools

Required Supply

Hectares Required

8

5

24

0

0

5

24

10

3

8

2

9.6

12500

6

1

3

3

14.4

5

12500

3

0

0

3

14.4

6

12500

3

1

3

0

0

40

8

20

18

86.4

Zone

Threshold

1

12500

13

3

2

12500

5

3

12500

4

Optimisation

Figure 74 shows the impact of the shortage in supply of schools on the specific zones within the Turffontein study area. It is evident from the map that a great percentage of developable residential land will have to be expropriated to supply the required number of schools within the area after densification.

(Identified properties do not represent the actual properties that will be expropriated to provide social facilities, as the required facilities are dependent on the future population, which may be altered during the public participation process)

Figure 74: Required education facilities

Social Amenity Requirements 82

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Strategic Area Framework Pre-requisites for densification

Table 27: Summary of Education Facility Provision Open Space: The following standards are taken into consideration for calculating the required supply:

 

0.5ha of open space for every 1000 population 0.3 km walkable distance radius

Primary Schools

Secondary Schools

Based on average provision of 1 School per 7000 population

Based on average provision of 1 School per 12 500 population

Space required based on further optimisation and shared facilities The population of Turffontein corridor was divided by 1000 then multiplied by the required 0.5ha requirement which then indicates the required open space in hectares. The required open space is then subtracted from the provided open space and the adequacy or shortage in supply is obtained.

Number Required

Number Provided

Shortage in Supply after optimizing

Hectares Required

Space required based on further optimisation and shared facilities Number Required

Number Provided

Shortage in Supply after optimizing

Hectares Required

Table 26: Open Space Requirements Future Population

Population / 1000

450 348

452 ha

Hectares Required

Open Space provided

Adequate or Shortage in Supply Hectare

226 ha

320 ha

Table 28: Summary of Open Space and Health Facility Provision

93 ha Adequate Supply

Open Space

Health Clinics

Average 0.5ha of Open Space per 1000 population

1 Clinic per 90 000 population

Open Space provided 320

Adequate or Shortage in Supply 93.6

Adequate or Shortage in Supply Adequate Supply

Methodology in identifying land for possible future social clusters:     

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Council owned properties that could possibly be converted to social / education facilities Council owned properties that could possibly be enlarged by buying adjacent properties Erven within corridor that meet space requirement (2.8 ha) or (1.2ha) if shared sporting facilities approach is followed Allocation of facilities are related to accessibility to public transport and areas of high densification Corridor viewed in isolation, whereas several schools outside corridor are with the prescribed 5km and 10km distance, o Further optimisation, shared sporting facilities and multi-storey education centres will decrease the land required for future social facilities

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Economic Growth Proposals

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Economic Growth Proposals identified for the Turffontein Development Corridor includes areas for formalised informal trading (in addition to existing informal trading areas), mixed use areas, and industrial uses. The Economic Growth Proposals takes cognisance of the TOD principles and are therefore focused around areas where public transport routes and stations as well as NMT facilities are located.

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Strategic Area Framework Development guidelines

High Density Class 2a and Class 2b Gross Density

Class 2

Residential Density- Dwelling Units per ha

Class 3

>250 units/ha

>250 units/ha

Maximum Floor Area Ratio (FAR)

2.4

2.4

Maximum Net Residential Density

250- 500 u/ha

250- 500 u/ha

6 stories

6 stories

90%

90%

18 hours

18 hours

800m

600m

Access to Property

No

Yes

Speed

60

60

Intensity/Density of Use

Maximum Vertical Density Maximum Lot Coverage Business Minimum Hours of ‘Significant’ Activity Street Network Intersection Spacing

Intersection Control

Traffic Signal

Public Transport Stops and Stations Traffic Calming

Traffic Signal/ Roundabout

At intersections

At intersections

No

No

1 space/unit

1 space/unit

Parking Maximum Residential Parking ( Space per unit) Maximum Office/Retail Parking ( Spaces per 100 m On Street Parking Shared vs. Single-Use Parking Facility

2)

1 space/ 100 m

2

1 space/ 100 m

No

Yes

Shared

Shared

NMT Shared space

NMT Shared space

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General traffic lanes

Median

General traffic lanes

NMT Shared space

2

General traffic lanes

General traffic lanes

NMT Shared space

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Strategic Area Framework Development guidelines

Medium Density Class 2a and Class 2b Gross Density

Class 2

Residential Density- Dwelling Units per ha

Class 3

`

>100 units/ha

>100 units/ha

Maximum Floor Area Ratio (FAR)

1.2

1.2

Maximum Net Residential Density

100- 250 u/ha

100- 250 u/ha

4 stories

4 stories

90%

90%

16 hours

16 hours

800m

600m

Access to Property

No

Yes

Speed

60

60

Intensity/Density of Use

Maximum Vertical Density Maximum Lot Coverage Business Minimum Hours of ‘Significant’ Activity Street Network Intersection Spacing

Intersection Control

Traffic Signal

Public Transport Stops and Stations Traffic Calming

Traffic Signal/ Roundabout

At intersections

At intersections

No

No

Parking Maximum Residential Parking ( Space per unit) Maximum Office/Retail Parking ( Spaces per 100 m On Street Parking Shared vs. Single-Use Parking Facility

1.5 space/unit 2)

2 space/ 100 m

1.5 space/unit 2

2 space/ 100 m

No

Yes

Shared

Single- Use

2

NMT Shared space

NMT Shared space

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General traffic lanes

General traffic lanes

Median

General traffic lanes

General traffic lanes

NMT Shared space

NMT Shared space

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Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Strategic Area Framework Yield calculation methodology

Low Density Class 3 and Class 4/5 Gross Density

Class 3

Class 4/5

30-80 units/ha

30-80 units/ha

Maximum Floor Area Ratio (FAR)

0.6

N/A

Maximum Net Residential Density

30- 60 u/ha

20- 30 u/ha

2 Stories

2 stories

60%

N/A

14 hours

14 hours

600m

>150m

Yes

Yes

60

40

Traffic Signal/ Roundabout

Roundabout/Mini circle or priority

At intersections

At intersections

No

Yes

Residential Density- Dwelling Units per ha Intensity/Density of Use

Maximum Vertical Density Maximum Lot Coverage Mixed Use and Diversity Minimum Hours of ‘Significant’ Activity Street Network Intersection Spacing Access to Property Speed Intersection Control Public Transport Stops and Stations Traffic Calming Parking Maximum Residential Parking ( Space per unit)

1.5 space/unit 2

Maximum Office/Retail Parking ( Spaces per 100 m ) On Street Parking Shared vs. Single-Use Parking Facility

87

3 space/ 100 m

2 space/unit 2

4 space/ 100 m

Yes

Yes

Single

Single

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Strategic Area Framework Development yield calculation

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Implementation Plan Development Strategy

Methodology A Just City

The Implementation Plan is defined in this context as the realization of the Corridors of Freedom based on the Strategic Area Framework for the next 40 years. The Implementation Plan is divided into three (3) sub-sections namely the, Implementation Strategy; the Development Strategy; and the Action Plan.

Implementation Strategy

   

An ecological city

The Implementation Strategy sets out the process of implementing the Strategic Area Framework, i.e. what needs to be in place in order for the Strategic Area Framework to be implemented.

A Beautiful city

• where the built environment is resource efficient and environmental impact is minimized.

Strategies include Financial and Institutional. Financial strategies identify sources of funding that can be utilised and earmarked for the implementation of projects. These funding sources include both public and private partners. Institutional strategies include strategies where the city can intervene through applying its powers and legislative functions as levers to ensure the implementation of the Strategic Area Framework.

• where art, architecture and landscape are inspiring.

Development Strategy The Development Strategy provides the foundation for what the Implementation Plan is aimed at in terms of realizing the Strategic Area Framework and is structured around four (4) sections, namely:

Development Phasing: Implementing the Strategic Area Framework (SAF) cannot materialize at once. Development initiatives must focus on areas where it will have the highest impact in the short term followed by medium and long term development initiatives. The identification of these areas is founded in the status quo where areas with the highest potential or need were identified. These areas are seen as the catalyst to the development strategy. When development initiatives are implemented in specific areas the surrounding areas naturally react to the investment made and therefore initiate development in the secondary areas surrounding the catalytic node. The secondary areas range between 800 to 1600m of the catalytic node. Areas beyond this range will required reassessment of the initial plan and usually occur after 10 to 15 years of the original SAF.

A compact and polycentric city

Catalytic Precincts: The outcome of the status quo assessment and development phasing resulted in the identification of catalytic precincts that will enable the activation of the SAF. Two (2) catalytic precincts were identified for the Turffontein Development area namely: the Booysens Station Precinct and the Turffontein Residential Precinct. In addition, the Pioneers Park tourism and recreation precinct will play a crucial role in the future development of the corridor. Existing studies have been carried out to determine the optimal development of this precinct. Additional projects identified as part of this study will improve the functioning of the precinct.

 

• where a fair distribution of justice, food and shelter are equitably distributed and people participate in government.

Population Growth: In order to realize and sustain the Strategic Area Framework, specific population growth figures were identified as essential to ensure its success.

Area Wide Projects: The Strategic Area Framework is not exclusive and limited to its immediate area but is cognisant of how area wide projects can be supported and can also be supportive in realizing the vision of the corridors of freedom.

Action Plan The Action Plan for the Strategic Area Framework promotes its delivery through projects and programmes identified and prioritised for each phase for the 40-year period.

Corridors of freedom: Creating a sustainable city

A connected city • where access to services and to information is easy.

A creative city

A diverse city

• where innovation and maximising human potential is emphasized

• where a broad range of interesting activities fosters a vital public life

A productive city of opportunity • where residents can realize sustainable livelihoods and enterprises are able to develop.

In order for the city to reach their end goal of creating a future Johannesburg where people will live closer to their workplace and be able to work, stay and play without having to use private motorised transport in a safe, affordable and convenient manor means that the city will have to intervene. The level to which the City can intervene is limited to their powers and functions. The City has several powers and legislated functions that can be used as levers to ensure this vision. These include:

Institutional Implementation Strategy The City of Johannesburg is in the process of re-developing the city, led by the ‘Corridors of Freedom’ initiative, to create urban environments where the focus will be on mixed-use development providing high-density housing options supported by office and retail uses and providing the people of the city with leisure and recreation activities in close proximity to one another. In essence the city is creating more sustainable human settlements for the future. This sustainable city is:

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     

Planning and land use management Public land asset management Built environment development Local economic development interventions Service delivery Governance, financing and institutional capacity Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Strategic Area Framework Pre-requisites for densification gg

The City applies these levers through the use of its corresponding resources, namely:

     

understood as a particularly significant lever for sustainable development. And yet, public land may be the greatest asset a city has. How the city uses it can significantly influence the sustainability of the city.

Planning frameworks and ecological resources

The management of public land becomes a lever for promoting sustainable human settlements when property is seen as a resource that has financial, social and economic value. By defining property as a resource, the city can then define how it would like to maximize this resource towards its sustainable human settlements objectives. For example, all properties have:

Public property Built environment: housing, economic development and transportation networks Local economic development: civil society and the private sector Services networks and infrastructure: clinics, schools, water, electricity, sanitation, etc. Institutional capacity: human resources, the city budget, and the non-governmental capacity of civil society

All city governments have powers and functions, set by the national constitution and other legislation, to govern and serve their residents. How these powers and functions are applied can also influence the sustainability of the city, both at an overall level and also at the individual, local settlement level.

Financial value:  Realizing a financial return through a sale or lease arrangement  Reducing costs of maintenance and security of properties

Social value:

Lever 1: Planning and Land Use Management

 Realising services from NGOs and CBOs using properties

Planning and land use management is one of the main functions of a local municipality. Engaging with this function as a sustainability lever means making explicit sustainability decisions about how to work with two city resources: its land and its ecology.

 Generating LED opportunities from the properties

Land, both public and private, is the spatial resource of the city. How the city engages with the land in its jurisdiction – through its application of development rights and other measures – can have a significant impact on the sustainability of its settlements.

 Tying the use of the property with required social services to be performed, e.g. Places of worship being required to use the property for other social purposes

Ecology involves the natural and environmental resources on which the City’s health depends. How the City manages its environmental resources through conservation and other measures will also have a significant impact on the sustainability of its settlements.

 Tying development rights to development obligations, e.g. the development of a casino or shopping centre is permitted on condition that a museum or other social facility is developed.

 Subsidising the cost of a good location to support mixed income housing objectives

Economic:

Land

 Number of jobs created through the use and development of property

In the development of private property, the local authority has the power to apply land use and density rights; target infrastructural investments (bulk and internal); direct service provision; and plan transportation networks and systems to ensure realization of positive development and a sustainable human settlement. Sustainability principles in land management include the promotion of mixed land uses and increasing residential and non-residential densities. Mixed-use settlements and developments have a greater ability to respond to the diversity of needs found among residents in a settlement.

 Economic activity generated from the property

The city needs to set out its sustainability conditions for new and existing developments in a clear and transparent framework so that developers and investors understand the parameters of their work. The city has many tools that it can apply, zoning being the most powerful of these. Revising zoning regulations to not only facilitate but also direct mixed land uses, increased densities, non-motorised transport alternatives and so on, is an important intervention that the city can make. By taking a more proactive approach, the city can use the interests of the private sector to also meet its own sustainability goals.

Ecology The ecological resources of the city are fundamental to the sustainability of its settlements. Of course, much of what relates to the environment and environmental management also links with other sectoral focus areas, namely housing, service delivery, and so on. A key focus area for the environmental department therefore, will be to mainstream environmental sustainability principles and approaches in other departmental programmes.

Lever 2: Public Land Asset Management Cities often see their property assets as the `left over’ portions of their city that are not owned and managed privately. The process of managing and disposing of these city-owned properties is seen as a non-core function and has never been

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 Catalyst for economic activity in the area that the property is located in through the development of that property. A first step in taking a value-based approach to your land assets is to understand who owns what property in the City. In many instances, previous rights (that may not have been recorded) also need to be established and addressed. Then, once you have a list of the public property assets, you need to consider what is core (essential to the city’s operations) and noncore (available for other uses).

Core properties are the buildings and other properties that the various city departments occupy. The main objective in maximising the value of these properties is to reduce costs – in other words, to implement conservation strategies for reduced electricity and water use, reduced square meter use, and so on. In addition, core properties may be assessed on the basis of whether they are appropriately located, or whether another of the city’s properties might be better used for the particular departmental function.

Non-core properties are those the city owns but does not use for itself. This includes:  Social use properties: these may be properties leased to places of worship, NGOs, sports clubs and so on. These properties give the city the opportunity to allow non-governmental organisations to serve the public. The city may, for example, decide to offer these properties at a reduced rental, or may decide to target some of its greening initiatives on these properties. The city may also identify an unused plot of land for social use and advertise among the NGO community for a particular service to be offered. The main property management objective for the city with these properties would be to maximize the social benefit they offer. Financial returns (such as through rental) would be deemphasized.  Economic development properties: these include properties that have the potential to realize significant value or support economic development goals. Public land located close to existing areas of economic opportunity or on strategic transport routes may fall into this category. The city may forgo a financial (i.e. rental or rates) return in the interest of promoting a certain type of economic development.

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Strategic Area Framework Pre-requisites for densification  Disposable properties: these are properties that are unsuitable for a social or economic use, which the city can decide to dispose of for private sector investment. The overriding goal with respect to these properties would be to maximize the financial return (through sale or lease, and later through rates) to the city while also contributing significantly to the productive potential of the surrounding area. Classifying properties in this way is known in some cities as a `Best Use’ approach to public land. By considering the variety of values (financial, social, economic) that may be derived from a piece of land, the “best use” approach gives the city the opportunity to implement its sustainability objectives through how its land is used.

Lever 3: Built environment development Within the context of the built environment, the City has three main levers with which to directly enhance the sustainability of its human settlements. These levers focus explicitly on the realisation of sustainable livelihoods for the city’s residents: that is, through access and mobility, housing (and the concomitant services), and economic development.

Lever 5: Service delivery The nature, target and scale of service delivery as provided or facilitated by the City is a key lever to be used towards the development of sustainable human settlements. Two specific types of ‘service’ are suggested in this section. The first, infrastructure services, relates to the bulk, connector and household infrastructure that makes settlements function: water, electricity, sanitation, storm water, and refuse removal. In many jurisdictions, residents are constitutionally entitled to a basic minimum standard which must be achieved, even if they are living in temporary dwellings. The second, social services, relates to the facilitative structures which assist households realise sustainable livelihoods in their neighbourhoods: schools, clinics, libraries, public facilities such as pools and parks, SME development centres and so on. Social services also relate to the ways in which residents engage with and actively participate in the affairs of their city. These are both explored below.

Infrastructure services

The housing lever seeks to enhance the integration of residential areas through the development of well-located, affordable housing, closely linked with social and economic amenities, enhancing the location of new housing while supporting urban renewal and inner city regeneration. This supports the realisation of physical capital, in the form of the house, and financial capital in the form of the housing asset. Social and natural capital can also be realised through the location of the dwelling within the broader neighbourhood. The housing lever considers the entire housing ladder from its lowest to highest rung (it may involve the delivery of subsidised housing); rental to ownership, and emphasises the performance of the land and property assets from a sustainability perspective. In this regard, a key target of the housing lever is the integration of new housing into the broader urban fabric.

The most critical intervention in respect of infrastructure must be the eradication of backlogs ensuring equitable access to infrastructure services. This means setting realistic targets and identifying what resources (financial and human) will be required to meet them. It also means that targets must consider both the financial and ecological sustainability of service delivery projections within the framework of how local settlements engage with service availability and what demand parameters drive their use of services. So, for instance, in high income settlements, specific demand management interventions would seek to manage the ecological sustainability of our current services trajectory. In lower income settlements, renewable resource alternatives, together with recycling, might be applied. Once this new approach is established, the strategy must be to eradicate services backlogs to an acceptable, sustainable service level standard.

The economic development lever is about economic growth and job creation in the city, making it focus specifically on human, financial and social capital. Different from local economic development (addressed in the next section), this lever is about the systems and interventions that the City can make to enhance its GDP growth. In this regard, it is about business attraction, retention and expansion; and about the promotion of trade and exports while also promoting inward investment and development opportunities.

Financial sustainability must be a key objective of an infrastructure strategy and for this the City must employ appropriate financial management to mobilise the necessary funding to invest in the backlog eradication programme. Long-term ecological sustainability will require short to medium term financial investments that must also be sustainable. Further, on the demand management side of the equation, transparent pricing and budgeting offer the opportunity for a framework that charges not only for specific levels of usage at a per unit cost, but also a premium for additional usage. This should also make it possible to financially identify water leakages, the cost for which the City itself must be accountable.

The mobility / access lever involves transportation, planning and other forms of connectivity (for instance, internet). Transportation involves road and rail linkages with an emphasis on public and non-motorised transport options, building linkages within and between neighbourhoods, linking the city internally as well as externally to other urban areas. Critical to this consideration is not the distance between two points, but the accessibility of one point (or service, or amenity) to another, given the linkages that exist – i.e. access to opportunities to maximise the five forms of capital. The realisation of mobility and access depends therefore not only on the transportation services that are available, but also the integration (both spatial and functional) of the neighbourhoods, services and amenities that are available to the residents of your city. This lever works therefore both at the settlement and internal city level.

Lever 4: Local economic development The focus of your local economic development (LED) strategy should be on the promotion of sustainable livelihoods among all of your city residents. This is in keeping with international precedent in which LED has focused more keenly on the encouragement and building of sustainable institutions and processes, rather than on achieving specific economic outputs. This thinking also aligns closely with the ‘making markets work (for the poor)’ (MMW4P) paradigm that many international donors and their development partners throughout the world have adopted and adapted over the past five to ten years. The LED lever works in cooperation with the economic development strategy defined in the Built Environment lever. The distinction is subtle, but made to enforce an active engagement with local communities and the specific needs of low income communities. Economic development therefore focuses on the broader issues of job creation and economic growth for the city. The LED approach on the other hand, focuses far more on the capacity for low income households to realise sustainable livelihoods through the development of economic potential at the local settlement level.

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Finally, interventions relating to environmental sustainability of infrastructure services relate to the exploration and implementation of services and resource use alternatives. Technologies exist and continue to be developed world wide as cities across the globe are seeking to address the global climate crisis head on.

Social services A key component of sustainable human settlements is the availability of appropriate social services and amenities. Often, however, this objective translates into a simple checklist and settlements are evaluated on whether they have enough clinics, schools, etc. for their population. A sustainable human settlements approach also considers how these function and relate to the specific settlement concerned. Further, services and amenities might be accessible to multiple settlements – this becomes a linkage and mobility question.

Lever 6: Governance, financing and institutional capacity Across the diversity of its powers and functions and within the legislative framework, a city generally acts in three different ways:

Investment: A city makes capital investments in public infrastructure and in engineering services. A sustainable approach can be promoted in the nature of capital investments and the process followed in making such investments.

Management: the city is also responsible for a range of management interventions. A sustainable approach can be promoted in the nature of the operational interventions and the process followed in carrying out such services. Lack of, or poor management by a city can lead to frequent breakdowns and health and safety hazards that fundamentally impact on the sustainability of the settlement Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Strategic Area Framework Pre-requisites for densification gg

Engagement: finally the city is responsible for the development of constructive relationships between and among government and the population, the private sector and civil society. These relationships can be directed in the interests of sustainable human settlements through the introduction of innovative partnerships and enabling governance, citizenship and community building programmes, and broad based empowerment

Financial resources and budgeting Budgetary and financial interventions towards SHS creation in your city relate to financial management, budgeting and new financing. In respect of the former, these interventions are closely related to infrastructure service delivery and property. This approach to financial management leads to new budgeting systems and especially triple bottom line accounting, which addresses financial, social and environmental sustainability in the immediate and long term.

Investment Optimisation Strategy The Investment Optimisation Strategy (developed as part of the recent Consolidated Infrastructure Plan for the City of Johannesburg) is aimed at creating savings in the amount invested in infrastructure by minimising the overlap between bulk refurbishment projects and bulk capital projects within the same sectors. In some instances maintenance work is required on a specific piece of infrastructure to keep it functional. An upgrade is planned shortly after the maintenance work, which would result in the refurbished infrastructure’s being replaced. The refurbishment work is thus cancelled, and a saving in cost is made. The following diagram indicates the principle of the strategy.

A final strategic area relates to the City’s capacity to generate new financing. This may involve borrowing, and there are a variety of creative ways in which this could be done on a sustainable basis, which should be explored. Alternatively, it may also involve an increase to rates – a special sustainability ‘tax’ for a specified period of time, to finance your city’s sustainability interventions.

B

Institutional and human resources

A 2

At its most simple, the implementation of a sustainable human settlements strategy and the realisation of sustainable human settlements throughout your city demands sustainable human resources. This means having the right people do the right jobs: first the right people (and the right number of people) need to be identified and drawn into the process, and then their jobs – their Key Performance Areas (KPA’s) and Indicators (KPI’s) – must be clearly defined with a view to responding directly to the sustainable human settlements framework. A sustainable human settlements approach also seeks to realise political & social inclusion on the part of all residents. To this end, and linked with the interventions set out under social services, opportunities for citizen participation in governance (whether individual or corporate) should be identified and promoted. Regional governance structures (such as Ward committees) that residents can use to actively engage with government are also valuable.

Funding Implementation NDP The National Treasury’s Neighbourhood Development Programme (NDP) Unit was established in 2006 and is responsible for managing the Neighbourhood Development Partnership Grant (NDPG). The NDPG is motivated by the concept that public investment and funding can be utilized creatively to attract and promote private and community investment to unlock the social and economic potential in targeted neighbourhoods. The purpose of the grant is to fund, support and facilitate the planning and development of neighbourhood development programmes and projects that provide catalytic infrastructure to leverage public and private sector investment for future and more sustainable development. The NDP Unit is responsible for the management of the NDPG, and includes a planning grant for technical assistance (TA) and a capital grant (CG). The NDP unit recently reviewed the NDPG and formulated a new strategy, known as the Urban Networks Strategy (UNS) which is a pro-poor/pro-growth investment approach. The strategy is aimed at facilitating the eradication of spatial inequality to enable the creation of liveable, sustainable, resilient, efficient and integrated human settlements. The focus of this strategy is to shift infrastructure investments towards the creation of efficient and effective urban centres through an approach of spatial targeting of public investment, primarily infrastructure. The amended NDPG is reflected in the 2013/2014 DORA NDPG Framework , which states that future NDPG allocations will be focused on municipalities and projects that align with the NDPG’s prioritisation criteria. These for example include population densities, levels and diversity of economic activity, concentration of poverty and the presence of connectivity networks i.e. public transport. The application of these criteria across the NDPG portfolio of municipalities has resulted in the identification of 18 municipalities (including the City of Joburg). The NDP will work in partnership with other strategic spatial, transit orientated grants including the Public Transport Infrastructure and Systems (PTIS) Grant and Urban Settlement Development Grant (USDG) to support the implementation of projects across the urban network.

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Figure 75: Investment optimisation strategy According to the diagram, the need for the particular service is higher than the supply at year 5, indicated by point A, at which point an upgrade would be required to increase the capacity of the service. The refurbishment of the asset is scheduled in year 4 for the asset, as indicated by point 1. If the investment is made to refurbish the asset in year 4, and the scheduled upgrade is done in year 5, then the amount invested for the refurbishment is wasted. The same is indicated for points B and 2, but the investment wasted is almost double, as indicated by 2 compared to point 1. The strategy is therefore based on the following principle: it is valuable to align refurbishment with upgrades to maximise the return on investment by saving on the cost of refurbishment. The value from the exercise is a direct saving in refurbishment cost which would be wasted otherwise. The available data does not allow for solid waste and roads and stormwater projects to be assessed according to the cost saving strategy. These sectors will therefore be excluded from the assessment. The cost saving made from subtracting the refurbishment overlay from the relevant capital projects can make a significant cost saving for re-investment. The Consolidated Infrastructure Plan (Phase 1) investigated the bulk infrastructure components and was able to make a 30% saving on the refurbishment budget.

Homeowner Retention Loans and Incentive Grants In the United States homeowner retention loans have been initiated in order to encourage homeowners to reinvest and stay in specific areas earmarked for development/revitalization. A homeowner or business owner can apply for such a grant and is approved subject to and depending on, specific criteria. The homeowner retention loan provides the opportunity for funds to be allocated towards the existing home loan subject to certain criteria such as the homeowner committing to staying in the area as well as upgrading his/her property. The incentive grant programme allows property owners to apply subject to meeting specific criteria (e.g. historic retention of an area). The programme requires that grants be used on exterior improvements (based on certain prescriptive criteria for example a painted colour or specific façade).

Catalytic Precincts

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Strategic Area Framework Pre-requisites for densification The long-term development and densification of the Turffontein Corridor is centered on the identification of development precincts that will act as catalysts for further development. A phased developmental approach is needed due to the extent of the study area, the large financial cost involved in land development, and the current performance of the property market. These precincts will, both through their development potential or strategic location, form the backbone of the initial development phase, and thus be the first step in altering the future spatial form of the corridor. There is no doubt that the proposed Rea Vaya route in Turffontein will be highly influential in shaping the future urban form in its proximity, as firstly it centres on the core economic and recreational areas of Turffontein, secondly it brings with it many development opportunities which the private market is certain to identify and explore and thirdly density and land use changes are inevitable. The phased approach will establish new development nodes, which will be strengthened during phase two of the implementation, and expanded thereafter. In order to support the long term development of the Turffontein area, two catalytic precincts were chosen:  Booysens Station Precinct. o This precinct is situated around the busiest existing public transport facility in the Turffontein area and is a crucial entry point to the Turffontein area. Its proximity to long term land use interventions aimed at creating a mixed use corridor in Eloff Street, and the alignment of the Rea Vaya route creates an opportunity for a nodal development centered on a public transport interchange.  Turffontein Precinct. o This precinct is, due to its proximity to exiting educational, recreational and social facilities, as well as the Rea Vaya alignment, the focus for the residential densification in the area. The establishment of a development precinct in the Turffontein area will support the viability of the Rea Vaya route and increase the lure of the area as a destination for affordable accommodation seekers in the City.

surrounds during latter phases of the implementation of the densification and development strategy. (Projects as identified in the Wemmerpan UDF) The location, function, and development potential of the two catalytic precincts, supported by the already established recreational precinct, creates a development triangle (roughly following the Rea Vaya alignment) that will

Development Phasing Phasing within the corridor was done taking into consideration the transportation routes, business activity and the proposed densification strategies as shown by the future zoning plan. The phases were identified with the theory of the ripple effect, making phase one the drop in the water rippling out. In phase 1, all the catalytic projects with impact interventions are allocated. The phases to follow will complement the first phase on the assumption that the interventions of phase 1 will initiate private developments. Phase 2 was selected around the catalytic projects to compliment the infrastructure that was put in during the first phase and to stimulate growth within the area. Phase 3 covering a bigger area and suggesting a great population impact on the corridor was selected on the basis that the necessary infrastructure will be available to accommodate a large population growth and private investment will influence development. Although phase 4 was made on an assumption that no immediate interventions are needed since areas within phase 4 are well established and functioning well. The following factors influenced the population for each development phase:

  

Future number of units in each zone Average household size Unit typology

Phased Population Growth Current Population

These two catalytic precincts are supported by the existing tourism and recreation precinct situated in and around Pioneers Park.  Tourism and Recreational Precinct  This precinct is a possible regional destination, and could, through urban management and public environment upgrades further increase the viability of the Rea Vaya route, and lead to development in La Rochelle and

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Additional Population

Future Population

Growth Percentage

Growth Ratio

Phase 1

13458

27623

41081

67%

2.05

Phase 2

9216

77709

86925

89%

8.43

Phase 3

23348

103067

126415

82%

4.41

Phase 4

31207

155674

186881

83%

4.99

4548

4498

9046

50%

0.99

81778

368570

450348

74%

4.51

Phase Industrial Total

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Draft Report

Implementation Plan Development Strategy

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Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Implementation Plan Area-wide Interventions

Public Transport: Turffontein Rea Vaya route Public transport and TOD has been identified as a restructuring tool in the City of Johannesburg. The existing public transport infrastructure and services in Turffontein are inadequate given the city’s intent to radically transform and re-stitch the City. The identification of a new high quality public transport route linking Turffontein with the wider Rea Vaya Network is central to the Corridors of Freedom initiative for Turffontein. The new public transport route is pivotal in terms of determining future densification and land use strategies in Turffontein and thus one of the catalytic projects aimed at unlocking the full development potential of the wider area. The proposed route links a number of destinations including the Johannesburg CBD, industrial and mining belt, Faraday, Village Main and Booysens Rail Station, sport and recreational facilities in and around Pioneers Park, Turffontein Racecourse and the residential suburbs in the study area. More importantly, the feeder route links Turffontein with the Rea Vaya network and the Johannesburg CBD, thereby connecting the area with the wider Rea Vaya network and increasing the viability of public transport as a feasible mode from and to the area. The COJ Strategic Integrated Transport Plan Framework includes a public transport mode decision matrix which provides guidelines in assessing the role of each mode of transport in possible future public transport systems. Given the need for a high quality public transport service in the area, especially in terms of frequency and level of service, it is proposed that the route be classified as a BRT feeder route. The demand for passenger transport is the determining factor in terms of the mode of public transport service. Increased future demand as a result of the strategic densification in the Turffontein corridor could potentially necessitate a higher order public transport service. The implementation of a feeder or complimentary route serving the Turffontein area is the main objective of the first phase of this project. It is envisaged that a population of approximately 250 000 will generate sufficient peak hour trips to warrant the possibility of Phase 2 (possible trunk route / dedicated busways) of this project. The phasing of this project is thus influenced by the Population of this corridor rather than a specific timeframe. Locality and alignment (Complimentary route for population less than 250 000)

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Preliminary route description

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Stops

CBD East to CBD West

CBD West to CBD East

The location and spacing of provisional bus stops were informed by the current and future land use and densification precincts within the corridor.

Johannesburg CBD, Southbound on Von Wielligh (becomes Rosettenville, becomes Turf Road) turn left rd > Geranium – turn right > 3 Ave (M19) – turn right > Daisy – turn right > Main – turn left > Tramway – turn right > Hay (becomes Turffontein, becomes Eloff)

Johannesburg CBD, Southbound on Eloff (becomes Turffontein, becomes Hay) – turn left > Tramway – turn left > Main – turn right > Lily – turn left > rd Victoria – turn left > 3 Ave (M19) – turn left > Geranium – turn right > Turf Club (becomes Rosettenville, becomes Von Wielligh)

On average, stops are located at 500 – 800m intervals within the core commercial and residential areas of La Rochelle, The Hill, Rosettenville, Kenilworth, Turffontein and Turffontein West.

Project

Specification

Cost

In the industrial belt, stops are located at 1 – 1.5km intervals. The spacing is influenced by the largely unpermeable land uses such as mine dumps, demarcated mining areas and Robinson Landfill site, and improves the travelling time between the residential area and the CBD.

Responsible*

1 Turffontein Rea Vaya Route

Operational Plan & Concept Design

Joburg Transport

2 Turffontein Rea Vaya Route

Business Plan

Joburg Transport

3 Turffontein Rea Vaya Route

Pre-feasibilility

Joburg Transport

4 Turffontein Rea Vaya Route

Feasilibility Study

Joburg Transport

5 Turffontein Rea Vaya Route

Operational Plan & Concept Design

Joburg Transport

6 Turffontein Rea Vaya Route

Detailed design

Joburg Transport

7 Turffontein Rea Vaya Route

Business Plan

Joburg Transport

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Implementation Plan Area-wide Interventions

Non-Motorised Transport Non-motorised transport is the preferred mode for short-distance education, recreational and employment trips in Turffontein. The favourable topography, and its proximity to a wide range of activities and opportunities situated in the Johannesburg CBD, the industrial and mining belt, and the recreational areas around Wemmer Pan and Klipriviersberg, creates the possibility for non-motorised transport to be a dominant mode of transport in the area. COJ has, in addition to aiming for streets to be “complete”, also identified continuous NMT routes and networks as a way to establish a stronger walking and cycling culture in Johannesburg. Though Turffontein was not identified as a priority area, the proposed densification and public transport strategies of the Corridors of Freedom initiative necessitate non-motorised transport interventions in this area. While walking is the dominant mode of transport (almost 40%) for education trips, less than 15% of employment opportunities are accessed through non-motorised transport. The low modal share can be attributed to poor urban management, unsafe conditions and the lack of quality, continuous facilities in the area. There is no provision for cycle lanes in the area, and NMT is not prioritised in the streetscape. Where pedestrian paths are evident, they are often noncontinuous or in a state of disrepair. The major trip attractors and destinations are not linked by a quality non-motorised transport network. The topography, range of facilities and some of the widest road reserves in Johannesburg makes this area ideal for large-scale non-motorised transport interventions, including improved linkages to employment opportunities situated to the north of the railway line, existing recreational facilities and regional recreational-tourism areas situated to the south of the study area

Objective The objective of this intervention is to create a quality, continuous non-motorised transport network in the area linking Turffontein to the wide range of education, employment and recreational opportunities situated within the corridor and the adjacent areas. In addition, the network will provide a valuable link between all existing and future public transport facilities, thereby contributing to the growth of the walking and cycling culture in the area. Proposed NMT links will also link Turffontein with private initiatives such as the Klipriver Urban Biodiversity Corridor along Klipriver Drive.

Factors influencing design

Project costing

Non-Motorised Transport with in the study area is an important factor to connect neighbourhoods physically, socially and economically, making the areas relevant and desirable places for a community.

The Non-Motorised Transportation routes were classified according to the implementation priority in terms of the catalytic precincts, as well as road hierarchy. An estimated cost was calculated per running meter for each nonmotorised intervention, which relates to the applicable street width and the function related to the street.

      

Road Reserves Movement patterns Existing pedestrian routes Densification areas Accessibility to trip attractors NMT Catalysts Complete Streets Design Guidelines Manual

The cost estimation includes the professional fees, construction, street furniture and the vegetation per running meter. Each identified street was measured and classified according to the function and hierarchy of the street. The wide road reserves in Turffontein necessitated the two-pronged approach as several lower order streets within Turffontein can accommodate pedestrian infrastructure associated with higher order roads. Pathways within parks were assumed to have the same cost implication as a residential street with a better finished product.

Cross-Sections Each route must comply with the Complete Streets Design Guidelines Manual to ensure safe and effective pedestrian movements.

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  

Residential Streets - R 2 400/m Special Activity Streets - R3 000/m Business/ High Activity Streets - R 13 600/m

October 2013

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Implementation Plan Area-wide Interventions

Infrastructure

The projected growth in population will have a significant increase in the demand for water and energy. To ensure that these services and other civil service will be in place when the anticipated growth occur a first order cost was developed for energy, water and sewer service to service the ultimate population.

The existing JW hydraulic models and master plans were used as the basis to compile a list of all bulk CAPEX requirements. No updating of the master plan items were done, albeit possible, given the short time frame available for this project.

Total Cost The analysis shows that the future water demand, based on the Base-scenario, increases by approximately 127% within these corridors in comparison to the current ultimate demand scenario. Service

Cost based on Full Population

Water

Work in Progress

Sewer

Work in Progress

Energy

Work in Progress

Future development scenario analysis

The GIS analysis mentioned was used to develop the additional base demand scenario. This scenario was evaluated to identify whether CAPEX projects are triggered and the results thereof used to adjust the phasing of all master plan (CAPEX) projects. Additionally, new projects were also designed and added based on the demand requirements. Full Population All results were summarised in terms of bulk master plan items, estimated cost and year of implementation and reported within both excel and GIS format categorized as follows: R 94 783 360 (excl. VAT)  MP – Master plan upgrade items.  (excl. MPi – Master plan upgrade investigate items, possible upgrading to be confirmed. R 21 959 200 VAT)  MPp – Master plan upgrade items being implemented at present.

Energy Quantification

Detail per Service

Water and sewer demand quantification  Assumptions - The following assumptions were made for the purpose of the analysis:

Status of existing water- and sewer master plans: The existing Johannesburg Water (JW) hydraulic models and master plans were used for this analysis. Although the models were updated using latest demands, no updating of the master plan items were done, albeit possible, due to the short time frame available. The models were only used to verify phasing requirements of master plan items as impacted by projected growth scenario. The analysis also assumed that all backlog/immediate master plan projects were unaffected by the proposed future scenarios and therefore retained “as-is”. Furthermore, an interpretation of the phasing of Capex requirements were made where projected development data was not available or not sufficiently detailed as required for master planning purposes.

Projected growth data The projected growth data supplied was assumed to be accurate and used “as is”. However, growth projections were compared to already establish future development databases (compiled for JW as part of above-mentioned established master plans) and any missing future development areas was also taken into consideration to determine the bulk CAPEX project costs.

 Methodology - The following paragraphs briefly summarize the methodology adopted for the analysis:

GIS data conversion and model loading The GIS data provided were inspected and analysed in terms of the total projected population. The above mentioned figures were used to calculate the theoretical future water demands using on the projected population figures and assuming a consumption rate of 150l/c/d. The calculated theoretical demands for the above mentioned GIS datasets were superimposed to create a single polygon layer representing all future demands. Furthermore, a thiessen polygon analysis was subsequently used to calculate the proportional water demand allocation within the respective master plan models nodes to create the scenario for analysis.

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Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Implementation Plan Area-wide Interventions

Social Amenities The densification strategies within the Turffontein corridor will demand an increase of various social and educational facilities in the area to adequately cater for the incremental increase in population. Although Turffontein is currently adequately supplied in terms of social facilities, the location of future facilities will influence the functioning of the future corridor. Sufficient facilities within walking distance from residential areas will greatly contribute to the future sustainable corridor, as residents will be able to access health, education, and recreational facilities by walking or cycling, or short public transport trips. The figure below indicates the impact in terms of land required for primary and secondary schools in the corridor, should the densification strategy be implemented across the corridor. It is evident from the map that a great percentage of developable residential land will have to be expropriated to supply the required number of schools within the area after densification.

Work In Progress 

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Identification of social facility clusters – with procurement of properties phased within the implementation plan

October 2013

Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Implementation Plan Area-wide Interventions

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Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Implementation Plan Catalytic Development Precincts

Booysens Station: Transportation Precinct

Precinct Analysis Booysens Station is, from a public transportation point of view, the most important entry point into the Turffontein corridor. Approximately 10 000 passengers use the station on a daily basis to access employment opportunities situated to the north of the station in the industrial and mining belt. The station’s only entrance is situated to the south of the railway line in Booysens Station Street, resulting in passengers having to walk long distances (either 800m west to Booysens Road or 650m east to Eloff Street) to cross the railway line in order to access economic and employment opportunities. The non-motorised transport facilities and public environment along Booysens Station Road is severely lacking, and not suitable to accommodate the large number of daily users.

Booysens Station’s only entrance

The proposed Rea Vaya route in Eloff Street, offers the unique opportunity for an intermodal facility in the vicinity of the station. Altering the land use in specific pockets along Eloff Street is a crucial aspect in terms of breaking through the industrial barrier. Increased pedestrian movement along Eloff Street will increase the viability of commercial and retail space in this area. Though the station is not part of PRASA’s modernisation corridor, it offers regional connectivity as it’s located in close proximity to several prominent rail stations including New Canada to the west of the precinct. The future expansion and prominent role of City Deep and Kaserne Intermodal Freight Terminals, and the associated increase in employment opportunities further increases the probability of a rise in passengers using Booysens Station. The station is also strategically located close to the tourism and recreational precinct around Pioneers Park, which further increases the importance and need for a possible quality public transport facility in the area.

View from Smollen Street towards station

The precinct is thus a crucial “transportation Gateway” to the corridor, supporting the area wide initiative for a mixed use corridor and large scale non-motorised transport interventions through the industrial belt, as well as functioning as an entry point to the recreational facilities within Turffontein. Crucial Aspects and Issues:

Access from Eloff Street into unused road reserve

Need to break railway barrier for pedestrians,

Need for catalyst development supporting alteration of land uses along Eloff Street in mining belt.

Transportation Gateway into corridor and the recreational and tourism precinct

Urban environment issues. Informal settlement opposite railway lines, urban degradation.

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Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Implementation Plan Catalytic Development Precincts

Booysens Station: Transportation Precinct

Concept Plan The development concept for Booysens Station is centered on the establishing Booysens Station as a transportation gateway to the Turffontein corridor. A well designed station precinct could ultimately change the functioning of not only the immediate surrounding areas, but also Eloff Street by facilitating increased pedestrian movement through the area. It is thus crucial for the design and layout of the future station precinct to address the critical issues and needs identified during the precinct analysis. The future precinct must improve pedestrian movement from the station to the industrial belt, and allow for modal integration between rail, Rea Vaya and other public transport services operating in the area. The potential of this precinct to be redeveloped is enhanced by a number of factors including:  The large tracts of vacant land on the northern side of the railway line, which includes an unused road reserve linking Eloff Street and John Street to the north. A small informal settlement has formed on a portion of this road reserve, to the immediate north of the station.  The road reserve links the station precinct to the old Top Star Drive-in situated in John Street, which is currently being redeveloped as an Industrial Park, thereby increasing the employment opportunities in the area.  A strategically located erf, (currently occupied by “Aberdare Metallic Profiles) situated between Eloff Street and Smollen Street, and bordering the vacant road reserve. Incorporating the above, and the need for a quality intermodal facility to act as a catalyst for development in the industrial belt, the Booysens Station precinct will be repositioned through:  The development of a pedestrian bridge crossing the railway lines from the station, thereby providing a northern entrance to the station and drastically shortening the walking distance of commuters. The development of a pedestrian promenade on the vacant land and road reserve on the northern side of the station. The pedestrian walkway will link John Street in the north with the station, and eastwards, provide the crucial link to the intermodal facility. The promenade will make provision for a market and trading area between the pedestrian bridge and the BRT station. The promenade will also provide a crucial link between the station and Eloff Street, where nonmotorised transport interventions are planned to transform the area into a pedestrian oriented environment.  The development of an intermodal facility incorporating the property currently occupied by “Aberdare Metallic Profiles”, the vacant road reserve and pedestrian promenade, and Smollen Street. The Rea Vaya route could be aligned to enter the facility via the road reserve, while exiting via Smollen Street.  The property currently occupied by “Aberdare Metallic Profiles” will be redeveloped as part of the intermodal facility. This location is strategically located as it will be passed by large numbers of pedestrians accessing rail and Rea Vaya services at Booysens Station. This increases the viability for commercial and retail development on this property, coupled with an public open space bordering Eloff Street.  The intermodal facility will make provision for metered taxis, and more importantly given non-motorised transport role in Turffontein, will provide Bike-share and Bike-Rental facilities where visitors can lease bicycles to access the recreational and tourism precincts, where similar facilities will be provided. . Overall, the Booysens Station precinct will play a significant part in breaking the industrial barrier that greatly influences the functioning of the corridor. On a focused level, the redesigned precinct will alter the immediate public environment by greatly improving the urban environment and pedestrian movement across the railway line. More importantly, the precinct will support area-wide initiatives to establish Eloff Street as a mixed use zone, supporting the viability of non-motorised transport and on a larger scale, breaking through the industrial and mining barrier that largely separates Turffontein from the Johannesburg CBD.

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Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Draft Report

Implementation Plan Catalytic Development Precinct

Visualising the Booysens Station Precinct

This visualisation is an artistic impression of possible future public environment.

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Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Draft Report

Implementation Plan Catalytic Development Precinct

Visualising the Booysens Station Precinct

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Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Draft Report

Implementation Plan Catalytic Development Precinct

Visualising the Booysens Station Precinct

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Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Draft Report

Implementation Plan Catalytic Development Precinct

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Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Implementation Plan Catalytic Development Precinct

Turffontein Residential Precinct

Precinct Analysis Though the wider Turffontein has a unique character due to its long and interesting history th dating back to the end of the 20 century, the area has been in a general state of decline for a number of decades. Its traditional grid layout creates numerous opportunities to create a network of quality spaces the varying block sizes improves the permeability of the area. The layout of the grid design in the neighbourhoods of Kenilworth, Turffontein and TurffonteinWest are further diversified by numerous mid-block access ways stretching from Kliprivier Drive in the west to Turf / Main Road in the east. The backyard alleys are predominantly continuous, often connecting the residential areas, via the open spaces to the commercial activities in the area. Backyard access ways could possibly play a larger role in the future corridor, as it allows for higher densities and more compact building footprints. These alleys could serve as emergency and service access-ways. Mid-block walkways are sometimes destinations themselves as is it may lead to many interesting and diverse destinations, including small trading areas of local bars, often found in cornershops in Turffontein. Though the cultural diversification in the area has created a unique character, including the continued existence of the traditional cornershop in the area, the lack of a quality urban environment in this area has thus far prevented development in the area. The Turffontein precinct is an important east-west link between the residential neighbourhoods and the local economic node situated in La Rochelle and Rosettenville along Main Road. This results in a large number of local non-motorised transport trips between these areas, often along Tramway and de Villiers Street within the precinct. The Turffontein precinct is a focus of numerous area wide interventions, with the Rea Vaya alignment in Tramway Road and Hay Street, and numerous non-motorised transport interventions in Tramway, Lindhorst and Turf Club Street Road providing possible opportunities for redevelopment and densification in the area. Crucial aspects and issues: 

There is a big demand for affordable housing in the area. Diversification of the housing stock is thus a priority.  The Rea Vaya alignment along Tramway Rd and Hay Street creates opportunity for mixed use development and the strengthening of the local neighbourhood node in the area.  Turffontein has some of the widest road reserves in Johannesburg, which creates the opportunity to establish a quality non-motorised transport network in the area. Rotunda Park is one of the oldest parks in Johannesburg, and could play a larger role in the area as a quality open space. Wide Road reserves of crucial east-west road of Tramway and de Villiers Street creates opportunity for catalytic project.

 Densification strategies must be supported by quality open spaces within the area to prevent the creation of slums.  Opportunity exists to strengthen linkage between La Rochelle node and local economic node within the precinct.  Need to create a destination in the area to support area-wide tourism and recreation initiatives, including bike-share facilities.

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Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Implementation Plan Catalytic Development Precincts

Turffontein Residential Precinct

Concept Plan The Turffontein residential precinct is centered on the creation of a catalytic linear park in de Villiers Street, which will become a main focal point in the area. The park will contribute greatly to the strengthening of the area’s unique character and support the establishing of Turffontein as a recreational destination in Johannesburg due to its excellent nonmotorised- and public transport linkages with the recreational precinct in Pioneers Park Green Link De Villiers Road is situated within a formal urban grid layout, stretching in an east – west direction with businesses located on both edges. The street has a strong character, with its boulevard of trees and wide sidewalks. An opportunity exists where De Villiers Street can become a green link between the Turffontein local node and the La Rochelle node. The centre part will become a themed, meandering green corridor, with a service road for local access, on either side. Various activities, including a space for an urban market and a trim park, will be introduced into the themed walk, this allows for pockets of interest, creating a push pull factor leading the user through the space. These activities will introduce a vibrant atmosphere into the neighbourhood linking up with the proposed tourism precinct. Residential Densification Two storey residential walk ups will be introduced along the road (directly facing the green corridor) with four storey units located further back. Mixed use, which includes spaza shops etc., should be incorporated in some of the lower level two storey walk ups, especially in the area which can be converted into an urban market over weekends. Rotunda Park The existing Rotunda Park will be incorporated into the green corridor by extending the proposed trim park to the existing tennis courts. Two interactive activity areas, catering for various ages and fitness levels will be included in the overall concept for Rotunda Park. This will increase the pedestrian activity in the area, creating a well-used safe environment. An original Portuguese fountain will be restored and placed together with a small neighbourhood amphitheatre; this will serve as a celebration of the areas rich history dating back from the early 1900’s. The sports activities and amphitheatre will be separated by the existing north south and east west axis. Bicycle share points Bicycle share points will be placed in strategic places, one at the eastern side of the green link and one in Rotunda Park. This links up with the proposed NMT development for this area and will allow tourists to explore the greater area by means of a bicycle. Pedestrian links will be created between Tramway Street (future BRT route) and De Villiers Street.

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Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework – Draft Report

Implementation Plan Catalytic Development Precinct

Visualising the Turffontein Residential Precinct

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Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Corridor

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Strategic Area Framework – Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Draft Report

Implementation Plan Catalytic Development Precincts

This visualisation is an artistic impression of the possible future public environment. Additional housing typologies and consolidation options are currently under development

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Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Draft Report

Implementation Plan Catalytic Development Precinct

Visualising the Turffontein Residential Precinct

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Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Draft Report

Implementation Plan Action Plan

Visualising the Turffontein Residential Precinct

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Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Draft Report

Implementation Plan Catalytic Development Precinct

Visualising the Turffontein Residential Precinct

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Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Draft Report

Implementation Plan Action Plan

Visualising the Turffontein Residential Precinct

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Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Draft Report

Implementation Plan Catalytic Development Precinct gg

Housing Typologies The table below indicates the housing typologies to be used for the Turffontein Precinct along de Villiers Street. Due to the single residential dwelling unit character of the area, the

Additional Housing typologies, design guidelines and consolidation options are currently under development

Table 29: Turffontein Housing Typologies Turffontein Precinct

Medium Residential Type 1

Medium Residential Type 2

Medium Density

120 - 200 u/ha

120 - 200 u/ha

Unit size:

43sqm

50sqm

Coverage:

50%

55%

Vertical Density:

4 Storeys

4 Storeys

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Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Turffontein Development Corridor


Turffontein Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Draft Report

Implementation Plan Action Plan

The Action Plan is currently under development and is aimed at identifying phased projects and programmes that will ensure the successful implementation of the Strategic Area Framework over the next 40-year period. The Action Plan is influenced by the outcome of the public participation process currently led by the City of Joburg.

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Strategic Area Framework â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Turffontein Development Corridor

Turffontein draft saf report for public comments