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BIKESHARE EX 2017


CREDITS CRP Transportation Studio Members Matthew Adair Tyler Bender Brad Bodenmiller Jorge Carrillo Ryan Dittoe Chad Gibson (Instructor) Tad Hawthorne Evan Hertzog Matthew Jenks David Marlow Derek Miller Nick Parks Alaina Parrish William Plumley Hunter Rayfield Jamie Roberts Jakob zumFelde CoGo Advisory Panel Brad Westall Greenways and Park Development Recreation and Parks, City of Columbus Nick Sanna Designer, Greenways and Park Development Recreation and Parks, City of Columbus Derek Wurst General Manager CoGo Bike Share, Motivate Kristin Edwards, CTA Marketing Specialist, Motivate Operator of CoGo Bike Share Catherine Girves, Executive Director Yay Bikes! Scott Ulrich, AICP, CNU-A, LCI Healthy Places Program Director City Bicycle Coordinator Columbus Public Health Orange Barrel Media

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City of Bexley Bexley City Council

Michelle Wilson Executive Director Tri-Village Chamber of Commerce

Bexley Public Library

Ben Kessler Mayor, City of Bexley

Columbus Area Commissions University Area Commission—Planning Committee

Bill Dorman Public Service Director, City of Bexley

Milo-Grogan Area Commission

City of Upper Arlington

Near East Side Area Commission

Upper Arlington City Council

Clintonville Area Commission

Debbie Johnson Council President/President City of Upper Arlington

Fifth by Northwest Area Commission University/Campus Community and Others

Upper Arlington Library

Bernadette Hanlon, Assistant Professor City & Regional Planning, Knowlton School The Ohio State University

Jeanine Amid Hummer City Attorney, City of Upper Arlington Jackie Thiel, P.E. City Engineer, City of Upper Arlington

Alex Wesaw, PhD Student City & Regional Planning, Knowlton School The Ohio State University

City of Grandview Heights

Campus Partners

Grandview Heights City Council

University District Organization

Ray DeGraw Mayor, City of Grandview Heights

Alex Smith Senior Planner, Division of Planning Department of Development City of Columbus

Patrik Bowman Director of Administration City of Grandview Heights Marta Durban Senior Coordinator/Recreation Supervisor City of Grandview Heights Darryl Hughes Director of Service City of Grandview Heights Sean Robey Director Parks and Recreation City of Grandview Heights

THIS PROJECT WAS COMPLETED MAY 2017

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 6 8 14 24 32 42 48 58

Prologue Introduction Bike Share Basics Local Context CoGo Bike Share Bike Share System Reviews Station Siting Challenges & Opportunities Station Location Recommendations City of Bexley City of Columbus City of Grandview Heights City of Upper Arlington

62 76 102 116

Conclusion and Appendix

132

The Full Document with Appendix Can be Found @ issuu.com/cogoexpand

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4


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Prologue As the insight2050 report projects, the Columbus region will likely experience a 50% population increase in the next 30 years, a potential addition of one million people! Planning for transportation enhancements now is critical so that the region can better accommodate this growth, proactively mitigating the myriad of impacts caused by a dramatic increase in traffic. This studio assisted four cities in locating new bike share stations, facilitating the expansion of the established CoGo Bike Share network. Designed to provide a framework in which hardworking students can thrive, this transportation studio experience allowed for the maximization of student talent in a real-world scenario. This studio was also special due to three main factors: timing, opportunity, and the mix of 16 undergraduate and graduate students who worked on it! This project represents a perfect segue between the nearly $1M multi-jurisdictional grant awarded by MORPC and the installation of 26 new bike share stations. The document represents collaborative efforts from many individuals, municipalities, advisors and entities, all of which were instrumental and sincerely appreciated. This project presented a unique opportunity for students in the City & Regional Planning Department to play a direct role in the enhancement of the transportation network. For the Cities of Bexley, Grandview Heights and Upper Arlington this effort is bringing about a historic event, the installation of their first bike share stations ever, and the addition of a brand new transportation option for residents and visitors alike! The project holds both personal and professional meaning for me, as it brings direct benefits to the region and my own community, facilitating an alternative transportation method for a growing urban population. Witnessing the many hours of work on the grant application come to fruition has been a thrill, one that I hope the students shared and will benefit from in their careers. The quality of this product is on par with work produced by professional consultants, and I am proud to have played a small role in this effort.

Chad D. Gibson, AICP

Associated Faculty The Ohio State University The Knowlton School 740-857-1401 gibson.207@osu.edu Senior Planning Officer City of Upper Arlington, Ohio 614-583-5074 cgibson@uaoh.net

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INTRO • 2017 Expansion Project • Project Timeline • Key Players

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INTRODUCTION Each year, the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC) receives and reviews applications for funds for projects throughout central Ohio. Through the Attributable Funding Committee, a group of projects are proposed to the MORPC Transportation Policy Committee.The two groups then review the applications, prioritize them by need, and decide how to allocate available funds. Through this process, MORPC reviewed and approved a grant for over $900,000 to expand the CoGo Bike Share system in Central Ohio. The first such grant of its kind, this would see not only the growth of the network through Columbus, but carry it outside of the city into Bexley, Grandview Heights, and Upper Arlington. A team of undergraduate and graduate students in the City and Regional Planning program at the Ohio State University was tasked with a semester-long study of this expansion, which included extensive public outreach, studying other bike share systems to figure out what helps drive success, and compiling a list of recommended sites for the new stations in each of the four municipalities. The aim was for the end result, this document, to be valuable and informative to each city government involved, and will allow them to proceed to arranging installation of the new stations at recommended sites as soon as funds are available.

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MUNICIPALITIES N BROADWAY

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Upper Arlington

Columbus

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BROAD BRYDEN

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Bexley


2017 EXPANSION In December 2016, MORPC proposed a grant for over $900,000 for the construction of 26 new stations for the CoGo Bike Share network. The grant would cover 80% of the costs, while the four municipalities involved would pay for the remaining 20% for the stations going within their borders. Of the 26 new stations, 13 will go in Columbus, 5 in Upper Arlington, and 4 each in Bexley and Grandview Heights. For the latter three communities, these would be their first CoGo stations, linking them into a network that has been thriving in Columbus for nearly four years. This grant, for a bike share expansion in multiple cities, is the first of its kind in the state of Ohio, and the hope is to make it a successful model for the future, both in central Ohio and elsewhere.

Project Timeline Once each of the four cities receive the recommendations, the final locations will be selected and implementation is expected to begin as early as 2018. To maintain connectivity to Columbus and the other suburbs, there should be an order to station installation. The first to be installed will be in Columbus, building out of the High Street corridor. Each of the suburbs will follow, building out from the closest station to the one farthest away. It would ensure that no station would be stranded while waiting for the connecting station to be installed.

2016

2018

MORPC awards $900,000 for 26 stations

Expected implementation start date

2015

2017

Municipalities met to develop grant proposal

Municipalities & OSU studio choose station locations

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Key Players

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BIKE SHARE BASICS • • • • • • •

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How it Works Bike Share in the U.S. Bike Share Typologies Types of Bike Share Systems Bike Share Technology History of Bike Share Benefits of Bike Share


BIKE SHARE BASICS

How it works Bike share is a bike rental system that allows users to temporarily use a bike in an urban area. First developed in Amsterdam in 1965, bike sharing today is an increasingly-popular mode of urban transportation and recreation worldwide. Most programs are in larger cities, but even smaller cities have adopted bike share, such as Ann Arbor, MI, and Rapid City, SD. Most bike share systems are kiosk-based, which means bikes are rented from and returned to fixed locations determined by the bike share operator. While in use, the rider can travel without geographic restriction, but the bike must be returned to a system location. Stations are typically located in close proximity to one another, with a recommended density of about 4 to 6 stations per square mile.

TEMPORARY

Bike Rental

69.59 [1767,6]

4 to 6

FIXED

Stations per sq mile

‘Kiosk’ Stations

16.00 REF [406,3 ]

26.04 [661,5]

Projet:

Système de vélo en libre-service

Client:

Société de vélo en libre-service 2113 32e Avenue Lachine (Québec) H8T 3J1 Tél.: 514 397 8945 Fax.: 514 633 5688

Concepteurs:

Michel Dallaire Design Industriel Inc. 322, rue Peel Montréal, Québec, H3C 2G8 Tél.: 514-282-9262 Fax.: 514-282-9975

Restrictions:

Note: Un fichier numérique est disponible.

43.09 [1094,4]

Important:

Ce dessin doit être révisé et approuvé par le fabricant avant le début de la production.

Ce document est la propriété exclusive de la Société en commandite Stationnement de Montréal et de Michel Dallaire Design Industriel inc. et contient de l'information confidentielle. Il ne doit pas être reproduit en totalité ni en partie, et l'information qui y est contenue, ne doit pas être utilisée ni divulguée sans le consentement écrit des deux parties.

Titre du dessin:

Étudié par: Dessiné par: Vérifié par: Signature:

MD; DA DA .

Date: Échelle / Scale: Unité / Unit: Dessin / Drawing:

12 janvier 2011 .1 pouce [mm] vls_horstout_barre

Révision(s):

15

Vélo


Bike Share in the United States

Alexandria, VA Ann Arbor, MI Arlington, VA Aspen, CO Atlanta, GA Austin, TX Baltimore, MD Basalt, CO Battle Creek, MI Boise, ID Boston, MA Boulder, CO Broward County, FL Buffalo, NY Cambridge, MA Chattanooga, TN Charlotte, NC Chicago, IL Cincinnati, OH Clarksville, TN

Cleveland, OH College Park, MD Columbia Co., GA Columbus, IN Columbus, OH Dayton, OH Denver, CO Des Moines, IA Detroit, MI* El Paso, TX* Fargo, ND Ft. Worth, TX Glenwood, CO Greenville, SC Hoboken, NJ Houston, TX Indianapolis, IN Kailua, Oahu, HI* Kansas City, MO Las Vegas, NV

Louisville, KY Long Beach, CA Long Beach, NY Los Angeles, CA Madison, WI McAllen, TX Miami, FL Miami Beach, FL Milwaukee, WI Minneapolis, MN Nashville, TN New Orleans, LA* New York City, NY Norfolk, VA* Oklahoma City, OK Omaha, NB Orlando, FL Philadelphia, PA Phoenix, AZ Pittsburgh, PA

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Portland, ME* Portland, OR* Rapid City, SD Richmond, VA* Rockville, MD San Antonio, TX San Diego, CA San Francisco, CA Sacramento, CA* Salt Lake City, UT San Jose, CA Santa Monica, CA Savannah, GA Somerville, MA Shorewood Hills, WI Spartanburg, SC Tampa Bay, FL Tulsa, OK Washington, DC *Pre-launch status


Bike Share Typologies

GOVERNMENT

The locality operates the bike share service as it would any other transit service.

TRANSPORT AGENCY

A quasi-governmental organization provides the bike share.

ADVERTISING COMPANY

Advertising company runs bike share in exchange for rights to advertise in public space.

NONPROFIT

Managed by an organization, typically created to manage the bike share.

UNIVERSITY

An educational institution provides the service, usually in a campus setting.

FOR-PROFIT

Private company runs system with little to no support from the government.

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Types of Bike Share Systems BIKE LIBRARIES

Bike libraries involve a single, centralized station, requiring riders to begin and end their ride there. Ride times may vary, and this model more closely resembles bike rental rather than what is considered bike share today.

DISTRIBUTED BIKE SHARE

Distributed bike share systems are what are more commonly seen around the country in larger urban areas. Instead, multiple stations are arranged in a network throughout the city, ride time limits are set, and the station-to-station riding allows for more flexible use of the system.

Bike Share Technology SMART BIKES

The newest form of bike share involves using GPS-enabled ‘smart bikes’, with the lock and payment system technology physically integrated into each bike.

SMART DOCKS

Allows the rider to check the bike in using a mobile app, making it easier to dock the bike at any station regardless of open spaces. This works with the smart lock technology, which secures the bicycle in place, rendering it immobile until properly checked out by another rider.

ELECTRIC-ASSIST BIKES

Motor-driven pedalling for easier rides and easier climbing of hills.

INTEGRATED FARE

Metro Bike Share, of Los Angeles, has introduced fare integration allowing riders to connect their bus pass to their bike share pass. This means one account, one card, and total access to the city’s transit system across all modes.

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HISTORY OF BIKE SHARE

Four Generations of Bike Share

1 2

Bike share originated in Denmark and the Netherlands: Copenhagen and Amsterdam are rated the #1 and #2 bicycling cities on the planet, respectively. The world’s first bike share system opened in Amsterdam in 1965. The program, called White Bikes, was an informal attempt at communal bike sharing without ownership or regulation. Within days the system collapsed, perhaps revealing that bike share’s first generation lacked the technology and infrastructure necessary to create a successful urban bike share. The second generation of bike share programs was pioneered in two Danish cities in 1991, and in 1995. The larger Copenhagen program opened using a coin deposit system on individual bikes.

3

The third generation of bike sharing upgraded newly-popular technology—instituting features like GPS, smartphone access, and automatic docking stations. Most bike shares operating in the U.S. today are part of this third generation, with a station-centric rental model.

4

“The hallmark of the 4th generation will be improved efficiency, sustainability, and usability (DeMaio, 2009).. This is being accomplished by improving distribution of bikes, installation, powering of stations, tracking, offering pedalec (electric pedal assistance) bikes, and new business models.” One example of a fourth generation system is Zagster, a Massachusetts-based company with more than 140 systems in the U.S. Rather than a station-centric model, Zagster builds the user interface into the bike itself and heavily features smartphone integration. They also offer bike models to accommodate people with varying degrees of physical ability. “From 1965 to 2009, the bike sharing concept evolved from an experimental project in communal property to a high-tech municipal venture utilized by global cities to stay competitive.”

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1965

First bike share opens in Amsterdam, The Netherlands

1991

Two small bike shares open in Danish cities

1995

The first large-scale bike share opens in Copenhagen, Denmark

1996

The first university bike share opens in Portsmouth, England

2005

Lyon, France is the first successful large-scale bike share at 15,000

2007

Paris, France bike share launched, with 7,000 bikes

2009

Paris reports 50 million trips in first two years of operation

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BENEFITS OF BIKE SHARE

Economic Benefits of Bike Infrastructure Bike share has already been proven to provide environmental and social benefits, but there are new reports suggesting that bike share systems also have a positive impact on a city’s economy. Aside from reducing carbon emissions and promoting a more active lifestyle, bike share has low implementation cost relative to other public transportation (Gauthier). Modifying a streetscape to be more bike friendly also works to attract more customers to area businesses. Streets tend to be slower, sidewalks wider, and an overall higher perception of safety brings more people to the area. Its economic benefits range from saving users money to increasing sales for businesses in close proximity to a station.

Capital Bikeshare, Washington, D.C Case Study A 2013 study of the Capital Bikeshare (CaBi) system by a professor and PhD candidate from Virginia Tech looked into the broad economic impacts that five stations had on the spending patterns of annual users and the sales of surrounding businesses. Stations were chosen based on proximity to a Metrorail station, their performance level, and how many businesses were within one tenth of a mile. Two surveys were given, one to users and one to businesses. The user survey was aimed at monthly or annual users, and was designed to gather the reason for the trip, how far their destination was from the station, and how much the user was estimated to spend during this trip. The business survey was designed to learn the perceived impacts that CaBi had on the business, if the system impacted business decisions, and how likely the business was to accommodate CaBi users by allowing new stations directly in front of the building.

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SURVEY RESULTS

66%

reported biking to a spending destination

16%

in bike trips

of riders

20% of businesses 14%

reported positive impacts to business

in foot traffic

ECONOMIC BENEFITS:

Weekly Savings for Riders (2014)

17%

up to

67%

up to

$20.00

$40.00 7%

over

$40.00 N/A

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LOCAL CONTEXT • • • • • • •

COTA NextGen COTA TSR Access Ohio 2040 Connect Columbus insight2050 MORPC Active Transportation Plan Population Growth

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LOCAL TRANSPORTATION PLANS insight2050 Commissioned in partnership between MORPC, Urban Land Institute (ULI) Columbus, and Columbus 2020, insight2050 is a collaborative initiative among public and private partners designed to help communities proactively plan for development and population growth over the next 30 plus years. Components identified in the initiative include: A 50% population growth projection for the Central Ohio region equating to approximately 1 million people Outreach and development tools and resources for local officials to utilize when planning for this growth Different development scenarios depicting how this population and job growth could possibly play out in the region The scenarios described in the initiative recommend strengthening compact development and complete streets in Columbus, which would substantially enhance the usability of bike share systems. The focused growth and maximum infill scenarios both call for maintaining or reducing the amount of vehicle miles traveled from the current standard. Achieving an ambitious goal like this would require alternative transportation options to be provided to residents, like bike share.

Connect Columbus Connect Columbus is the city’s multimodal thoroughfare planning effort in which the latest city bike plan, the Bicentennial Bikeways Plan, is being updated as the Columbus Bike Plan. Since the final plan documents and recommendations are not published yet, the studio took cues from the latest city bike plan. The Bicentennial Bikeways Plan, published in 2008, laid out a plan goal to add 200 miles of bikeways by 2018 through integrating bike lanes, bike boulevards, and shared-use paths into the transportation infrastructure. Capitalizing on this original idea, the Connect Columbus effort is expected to provide detailed design, policy, and alternative transportation recommendations to improve the overall system and emphasize active transportation.

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Corridor Types ¬« ¬ «

Segment Typologies

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¬ « 315

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DELAWARE

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¬ « 605

¬ « 750

DELAWARE FRANKLIN

¬ « 736

DELAWARE

§ ¨ ¦

FRANKLIN

71

§ ¨ ¦

UNION

270

¬ « 161

£ ¤

FRANKLIN

62

£ ¤ 33

¬ « 315

¬ « 16

§ ¨ ¦

§ ¨ ¦

670

70

The Story Map tool (seen on the next page) offers a systematic approach for local officials to use when planning bike infrastructure and provides an interactive map to help engineers and planners understand key bike corridors across jurisdictional boundaries. Additionally, MORPC established and operates an online Columbus Metro Bike Map that identifies rider comfort levels on frequented corridors and keeps it updated with the latest information on biking in Central Ohio.

¬ «

¬ «

¬ «

LICKING

As a part of MORPC’s latest Metropolitan Transportation Plan (MTP), the commission created an Active Transportation Plan (ATP) to address pedestrian, bicyclist, and transit user needs across the Central Ohio region. The plan provides a Story Map tool and Cost Estimator tool to assist planners and engineers in evaluating pedestrian and bike projects. Through the ATP planning process, MORPC identified road segments in the region where bike infrastructure would best serve the community and provide complete street accommodations.

Active Transportation Plan

4

§ ¨ ¦ 270

£ ¤ 40

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£ ¤ 40

70

LICKING FAIRFIELD

§ ¨ ¦ 70

¬ « 104

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ATP Corridors Segment Type Urban Compact

¬ « 256

FRANKLIN FAIRFIELD

MORPC Active Transportation Plan

£ ¤

¬ «

33

317

ATP Boundary

0

5

10 Miles

±

Standard Rural Limited Access

The information shown on this map is compiled from various sources made available to us which we believe to be reliable. N:\ArcGIS\CORE\Active Transportation Plan\Analysis\Typologies_11x17.mxd 8/3/2015

Access Ohio 2040 The Ohio Department of Transportation updated its long-range transportation plan for Ohio in 2014 titled Access Ohio 2040. Projecting out transportation needs to 2040, the plan identified key areas in each mode of transportation and provided recommendations to improve the transportation system. For the first time, the plan identified need for biking in Ohio, predominantly at the state level. TThe plan recommended a continuing effort to designate official U.S. and State Bicycle Routes throughout the state, two of which, U.S. Bicycle Routes 21 & 50, go through the heart of Columbus. With active transportation becoming more of a priority at the state level, bike share systems are uniquely positioned to take advantage of federal and state funding to establish and expand networks.

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COTA NextGen The Central Ohio Transit Authority (COTA) put together a plan to “explore Central Ohio’s future public transportation needs” through 2050. This plan, called NextGen, identifies 14 high capacity corridors using comprehensive evaluation framework and an extensive public participation process. As part of this evaluation framework, values and priorities were identified: Make better connections Invest in underserved communities Coordinate with growth Build on success Sustainability The 14 high capacity corridors, categorized by a timeframe for potential funding and implementation, are outlined in the map below. It is important for the success of this plan and the COTA NextGen plan to address the future growth of the region and to coordinate for a truly multimodal region

High Capacity Corridors

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COTA Transit System Redesign (TSR) COTA is undergoing a major system revision on May 1, 2017. The Transit System Redesign (TSR) is a complete overhaul of the bus network. Major changes include: straightening routes, expanding the span and frequency of service, and allowing for better transfer options outside of downtown. The overall goal of this project is to connect more people to more jobs and to address the changing landscape in the region. The number of high frequency lines is doubling and weekend service will more closely match weekday service. When considering new bike share locations, it was important to take into consideration the new high frequency transit corridors and the potential for new connections. Bike share stations can also be used to address first/last mile issues with bus service.

N

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ALUM C REEK DR

COLUMBUS ST

HA

3

Groveport

270

Gender Rd Towne Centre

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52

Obetz

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33

Canal Winchester

Bus Line Park & Ride Transit Center

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52

Rush Hour Service

TC

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Eastland 23 Mall

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PARSONS AVE

Great Southern Shopping Center

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5

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ISB

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IKE

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270

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Reynoldsburg E MAIN ST

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Standard Service Frequent Service

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Grove City

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5 4

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GE OR GE

Bexley

24 LONDON GROVEPOR T RD

Transit Terminal

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GREAT Shuttle Transfer Rickenbacker International Airport

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D ST

E BROA

Mt Carmel East Hospital

E LIVINGSTON AVE

6

SULLIVANT AVE

21 9

NORTON RD

10

VA Ambulatory Care Center

7 10

BRYDEN RD

Hilltop

John Glenn Columbus International Airport

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7

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REFER TO DOWNTOWN INSET

Gahanna 7

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AVE RNON MT VE

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5 1ST AVE

6 Hollywood Casino

7 31

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12 MCKINLEY AVE

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MAPFRE Stadium 41 Ohio State University 31

670

Doctor's Hospital

- NEW ALBANY

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2L

44 45

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WIL

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INNIS RD

HUDSON ST

5 UE RD

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Upper Arlington

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HILLIARD

IN GT O

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TAYLOR STATION

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N BROADWAY

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34 44 45

STELZER RD

KENNY RD

Y

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JAMES RD

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Riverside 1 Hospital

FISHING

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Hilliard

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HENDERSON RD

7 31

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1 72

Northland

CASSADY AVE

BRITTO

34 33

161

N HAMILTON RD

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21 32

N HIGH ST

BETHEL RD

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Smart Ride Transfer

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CLEVELAND AVE

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BRENTNELL AVE

Tuttle Mall

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Worthington

315

New Albany

New Albany International Business Park

KARL RD

73

Westerville

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MAIZE RD

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2L

INDIANOLA AVE

Dublin

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St Ann's Hospital 41

161

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DATA Transfer

270 SNOUFFER RD

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Ohio Health

Polaris Fashion Place

SMOKY

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Dublin Metro Place

Y KW SP RI LA PO

TSR Bus Network


POPULATION DENSITY 2015 N BROADWAY

KE NN Y

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Upper Arlington

HIGH D

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HUDSON

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KINNEAR

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5TH 3RD

NEIL

Grandview Heights

MARYLAND

GOODALE

LEGEND

DREXEL

BROAD BRYDEN

BROAD

MAIN

People per quarter mile

GE

LIVINGSTON

LE COL

<50 51-150 150-350 350-700 >700

CASSADY

1ST

WHITTIER

ND

MOU

DATA FROM MORPC POPULATION PROJECTIONS BY 1/4 MILE TRANSPORTATION ANALYSIS ZONE GRID

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Bexley


PROJECTED DENSITY 2025 N BROADWAY

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ZOLLINGER

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Upper Arlington

HIGH D

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HUDSON

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17TH

JOYCE

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KINNEAR

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5TH 3RD

NEIL

Grandview Heights

MARYLAND

GOODALE

LEGEND

DREXEL

BROAD BRYDEN

BROAD

MAIN

People per quarter mile

WHITTIER

ND

MOU

30

GE

LIVINGSTON

LE COL

<50 51-150 150-350 350-700 >700

CASSADY

1ST

Bexley


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COGO BIKE SHARE • Current CoGo System • Overview • Types of Riders • Passes & Memberships • Usage Statistics • Ridership • Trip Characteristics

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CURRENT COGO SYSTEM Overview Beginning operation in 2013, CoGo Bike Share is a joint project with the City of Columbus and Motivate, who operates the system. Motivate also runs nearly a dozen systems across the continent. CoGo consists of 46 stations and over 365 bicycles. Users can purchase different plans ranging from 1-day passes to annual memberships. Bike share is not the same as bike rental; riders check out a bicycle at a station and ride it to a station near their destination. If the trip is under 30 minutes, or the rider checks in at an intermediate station within that time, no fee outside their plan is charged for the ride.

46

365

STATIONS

33

BIKES


SYSTEM MAP N BROADWAY

Y NN KE ACKERMAN

HIGH

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17TH

JOYCE

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5TH 3RD

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GOODALE

DREXEL

BROAD

BROAD

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eights on

WHITTIER

D

N MOU

Current CoGo Station Municipal Boundary

34

E

LIVINGSTON

LEG COL

D

CASSADY

Grandview Heights

NEIL

1ST

Bexley


Types of Riders Bike share is not only for people without a bike. Studies have shown that many users own a bike but choose to use CoGo for commuting to work or school. Riders have access to high-quality, easy-to-ride bicycles that are professionally maintained, with no need to worry about problems like storage and theft.

Types of Riders

Casual Riders Infrequent users

Visitors and Tourists

Annual Members Residents

Commuters

Passes & Memberships There are three payment options to use CoGo, two oriented toward visitors and infrequent riders, and one annual membership intended for Central Ohio residents.

DAY PASS: $8

The Day Pass offers users unlimited rides in a 24-hour period.

3-DAY PASS: $18

The 3-day pass is ideal for visitors, with unlimited rides in a 72-hour period.

ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP: $75

The Annual Membership offers unlimited 30-minute bike trips for 12 months. If a user purchased the annual pass and only used the bike once each week, the average cost per ride would be $1.44.

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Statistics

July 1, 2013 - December 31, 2016

46 STATIONS

365 BIKES

162,544 TRIPS TAKEN TOP 5 STATIONS BY USE 1. BICENTENNIAL PARK 2. HIGH ST & LINCOLN ST 3. 3RD ST & GAY ST 4. HIGH ST & 2ND AVE 5. NORTH MARKET

295k LBS CARBON SAVED

TOP ZIPCODES 1. 43215 2. 43206 3. 43201 4. 43205 5. 43202

2,285 SUBSCRIPTIONS CREATED GENDER 63%

37%

434,506 MILES RIDDEN OVER SEVENTEEN TIMES AROUND THE EARTH

OVER 18.7 MILLION CALORIES BURNED BY:

Infographic provided by CoGo

36

AGE RANGE <20: 21 20-29: 408 30-39: 495 40-49: 254 50-59: 189 60+: 80


USAGE STATISTICS Around 60% of CoGo trips are made by casual users on short-term passes, while the remaining 40% of trips are made by those with annual memberships. Those with annual memberships may use CoGo for everything from recreation to grocery shopping, but a primary purpose for trips by annual members is commuting to work or school. As shown in the figure below, weekday trips by members peak between 8:00am and 9:00am and again between 5:00pm and 6:00pm. On weekdays, trips by casual users are primarily in the afternoon, evening, and night, likely corresponding to trips for sightseeing or going to restaurants or bars. On the weekend, trips by casual users far outnumber those by members. The majority of these trips are made in the afternoon, which are likely made by tourists or less-frequent riders taking recreational or sightseeing bike rides. A surprising number of rides are made late at night on both weekend and weekdays, especially by casual users.

TRIP START TIMES Annual Member

WEEKDAY

Casual Rider

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

WEEKEND

37


Trip Characteristics Most CoGo trips are relatively short; with the vast majority of trips being either between stations within a neighborhood or to a station in a nearby neighborhood. Casual users have a particularly high number of trips that are short distances. In fact, 25% of total trips by casual users start and end at the same station. This reflects the recreational nature of these trips, but may also be the result of a lack of understanding of the CoGo system. The average daily ridership on CoGo varies by month, as shown in the figures below, with July 2016 having an average of 175 trips (75 subscriber, 100 casual) each weekday, versus December averaging 37 trips (32 subscriber, 5 casual) per weekday. This monthly variation is even more dramatic with weekend ridership, as there are fewer tourists in the winter months and the cold makes biking less desirable. Overall, average daily weekend ridership is higher than average weekday ridership due to the large number of trips by casual users on weekends.

WEEKDAY WEEKEND

AVERAGE TRIP TIME

DEC

20 MIN

NOV OCT

10 MIN

SEP AUG

Annual Member

JUL 60

40

20

Casual Rider

20 40 150 60 50 100

38


CASUAL USER RIDERSHIP N BROADWAY

Y NN KE

ZOLLINGER

ACKERMAN

HIGH

ND

LANE

CL E

E TR

VE

LA

NORTHSTAR

HUDSON

NT

MO

17TH

JOYCE

KINNEAR

KING

5TH 3RD

NEIL

1ST

MARYLAND

GOODALE

< 300

BRYDEN

BROAD

301-600

DREXEL

BROAD

Total Ridership

MAIN

801-1,000 WHITTIER

ND

MOU

July-December 2016 Ridership Data

39

E

LIVINGSTON

> 1,001

LEG

COL

601-800

CASSADY

LEGEND


ANNUAL MEMBER RIDERSHIP N BROADWAY

KE NN Y

ZOLLINGER

ACKERMAN

HIGH D

LANE

E TR

EV

EL

AN

NORTHSTAR

HUDSON

NT

CL

MO

17TH

JOYCE

KINNEAR

KING

5TH 3RD

NEIL

1ST

MARYLAND

GOODALE

< 300

BRYDEN

BROAD

301-600

DREXEL

BROAD

Total Ridership

MAIN

801-1,000 WHITTIER

ND

MOU

July-December 2016 Ridership Data

40

E

LIVINGSTON

> 1,001

LEG

COL

601-800

CASSADY

LEGEND


41


SYSTEM REVIEWS Twenty bike share systems in North America were reviewed. The assessment of best practices in station placement and system design are summarized in this section. Full reports for each system can be found in the appendix.

42


KEY SYSTEM TAKEAWAYS

As part of the preparation for this document, a selection of bike share networks in major cities across the United States and Canada were thoroughly researched and reported on; these reports are collected in the appendix. In addition to studying the history, pricing, station placement, and other such practical considerations, lessons were learned with each network as to what has helped it succeed, what seems to hold it back, and what makes it unique. In reviewing these key takeaways for each network, a handful of trends presented themselves. While this document is primarily a guide to station placement for a specific expansion phase, this section collects much of the wisdom that helped guide this placement, as well as giving insight into how to approach future expansion plans and refinement of network operation. This is not only to help CoGo continue to grow, but how to position it as a vital part of both central Ohio’s transportation network and its culture.

Transit Connectivity One of the biggest concerns for any public transit system is first mile/last mile movement; the ability for riders to get between transit stops and their origins and destinations. In many cities, bike share systems are emerging as a remedy to this issue; it’s faster than walking but doesn’t require users to haul their own bike onboard. Successful integration between a transit stop and a bike share stop effectively increases its service range, and may even allow passengers to skip transfer rides if they can use bike share to reach their destination. Many cities make transit integration a priority. Red Bike, in Cincinnati, has placed 70% of their stations within one block of a Metro stop, with all but one located within two blocks. Washington’s CaBi network’s current expansion plan seeks to have 97% of public transit stops within an eighth of a mile of a CaBi station. While proximity alone is valuable, some cities go even further. Los Angeles’ Metro system features fare integration with the Metro Bike Share service, allowing users to access bikes, buses, and trains, all with their TAP Card.

43


Bicycling Infrastructure Access to dedicated bike lanes, multi-use paths and recreational trails is the cornerstone of a successful bike share network. These amenities provide a safe and comfortable ride for riders of all kinds, from casual riders who may otherwise never go biking to daily commuters who would rather not contend with rush hour traffic. They also often provide unique connectivity through parks and greenways for providing a more enjoyable ride. Madison B-Cycle sees strong community support as a method to showcase the city’s award-winning bicycle infrastructure; it is one of five cities in the country to receive a Platinum rating from the League of American Bicyclists. The growth of Nice Ride Minnesota has gone alongside the overhaul of Minneapolis’s bike network, closing gaps and improving accessibility for less-skilled riders. Some cities see bike share as an integral component of recreational planning; Cleveland’s recently launched UHBikes was part of a 2014 plan to grow their bikeway network by 250%.

Diversity and Affordability A problem that many bike share systems face is a matter of demographics. Ridership, particularly among subscribers, trends towards a wealthier and whiter group than the host cities overall. Given that these networks often involve financial contributions from cities in addition to right-of-way use, there is increasing talk over whether bike share is a worthy use of resources from an equity standpoint. For example, in 2012, a Denver city council member voted against expanding their network on the grounds that few stations were placed in low-income neighborhoods, and that fewer than 10% of subscribers were Hispanic, compared to over 30% of the city’s population. Bike share in the U.S. is still a relatively new concept. Tackling this issue is one of the next steps forward. Some cities are trying alternative pricing schemes for qualifying residents. With Divvy, in Chicago, low-income users receive a discount for their first year, with that discount decreasing in the second year before reaching full price in the third year. This gives people who might not be willing to risk spending the money on an annual membership a chance to see if bike share is worthwhile to them. Austin’s B-Cycle network offers annual memberships of just $5 to people making under $25,000 per year, with $40 memberships to those making more but are in subsidized housing.

44


User Experience In order to increase perceived value of a membership, as well as make bike share stand out as more than just another transportation option, many networks employ a variety of tactics to improve the experience of users and, often, subscribers in particular. An easy place to do this is on the software end; B-Cycle’s mobile app, for example, is not only used to check out bikes and view station statuses, but also to keep track of your ride routes, mileage biked, and calories burned. Another common approach is to increase check-out time for bicycles. Bixi, in Montreal, offers 45-minute ride times to subscribers. Improving user experience is an opportunity to be more creative, however, and many cities take that opportunity. Bixi also offers ‘bike valet’ service at festivals and other city events. Rather than needing to find a station with an empty dock to park, Bixi representatives take the bike from you at a convenient location and manage them until users take them to leave at the end of the day. Chicago’s Divvy adds a dose of excitement and social media buzz by introducing ‘unicorn bikes’ into the network. With only two of them in the network, these specially branded and colored bicycles are a rare find, and users are encouraged to check them out when they see them, and boast about it to their friends.

Community Engagement Fostering an excellent user experience is a worthy endeavor, but it is all for nothing if a network lacks ridership to begin with. While station visibility allows bike share to advertise itself, many networks go a step further to not just build public awareness, but let residents start to see the network as an authentic component of the city. Much as with user experience, this is an opportunity for creativity. Advertising partnerships on bikes and on stations are a common tactic— Indianapolis’s system is sponsored by and named after the city’s NBA team, and Divvy in Chicago has specially-branded bikes for the city’s NHL team—but this can be taken further. In addition to a variety of of clever marketing events, a partnership between Cincinnati’s Red Bike and a local brewery has produced a beer named after the bike share network. A step beyond Bixi’s ‘bike valet’ service, Nashville B-Cycle sets up temporary stations at the city’s many festivals, giving the public a good excuse to give the service a try as well as making access easier for existing users.

45


KEY SYSTEM TAKEAWAYS Transit Connectivity Bicycling Infrastructure Diversity and Afforability User Experience Community Engagement

46


47


STATION SITING • Criteria • The Station • The Network • The Ride • The Neighborhood • Public Outreach • Primary Station Locations • Secondary Station Locations

48


STATION SITING CRITERIA When siting the new stations for each city, it was important to create and follow a specific set of guidelines to ensure the quality of the recommendations. In order to maximize service and to minimize practical and safety issues, four main categories of siting criteria were made: the station, the network, the ride, and the neighborhood. Further broken down, the four categories collectively justify why a location was chosen, and how that specific location will improve the CoGo network.

The Station Right of Way and Space •

Is there an adequate amount of city-owned space to fit a station and not impede pedestrian or vehicle traffic?

Visibility •

Is the station easily visible, so that current and potential users can find it?

Appearance and Safety •

Is the station in a welcoming and safely-accessible location?

The Network Station Proximity •

Is the station well-integrated in the CoGo network as a whole?

Transit Integration •

Is the station located near bus stops, park-and-pedals, or other transit amenities?

Future Expansion •

Does this station help set up for successful future expansion of the network?

49


THE STATION THE NETWORK THE RIDE THE NEIGHBORHOOD

The Ride Bike Infrastructure •

Is this station close to bike trails, routes, and lanes?

Road Safety •

Are adjacent streets comfortable and desirable for bicycling?

Geography of Area •

Is the station in a location with good topography and connectivity to neighboring areas?

The Neighborhood Density of Development •

Is the station located in a densely-developed area for maximum ridership?

Origins or Destinations •

Is this an area with lots of housing, shops, restaurants, attractions, and employment?

Potential Ridership •

Is this an area someone would want to bike to, and are locals open to bicycling?

50


PUBLIC OUTREACH: ONLINE MAP

One piece of the community outreach completed for this project was a web map survey. This was created to solicit feedback from the public regarding potential locations for new bike share stations in Central Ohio. The map was created using Survey123, an ArcGIS product offered by ESRI. By embedding the web map into the project’s public website, u.osu.edu/cogo, the map was integrated into all other information and updates were offered online. To provide a station location suggestion, users would click the “Set Location” button, and then a map of Central Ohio would appear with a blue pin in the center. Users would then pan the map until their desired location was directly under the blue pin. Next, users had the option of providing rationale for their station location suggestions. A total of 76 responses were received, with the majority of station locations suggested in the City of Columbus, followed by Grandview Heights. The least amount of suggestions came from Bexley, where only 1 station was placed. Bexley 1 1% Columbus: 48 63% Grandview Heights: 18 24% Upper Arlington: 9 12% The largest cluster of stations were suggested in the Grandview Heights and Fifth by Northwest Areas, near the intersection of Grandview Ave. and W. 5th Ave. as well as along W. Goodale Blvd. near the new Grandview Yard development. More generally, the areas with the most recommendations were the northwest corridor of Grandview Heights and Upper Arlington, along with the north side of Columbus between Hudson St. and Henderson Road.

51


SUGGESTED LOCATIONS FROM PUBLIC OUTREACH !

!

! !

N BROADWAY ! !

Y NN KE

ZOLLINGER

!! !

!

ACKERMAN !

D

LANE

!

AN

!!

HU!DSON

!!

HIGH

!

NORTHSTAR

!

Upper Arlington

EL

!!

TR

EV

!

! !

KING !!

CL

!

JOYCE

T

ON

EM

17TH KINNEAR

!

!

5TH !! ! ! !

!

! !

Grandview Heights ! !

!

GOODALE

3RD

NEIL

1ST

!

!

MARYLAND

! !

! !

! !

! ! !

!

BROAD

!

MAIN

STATIONS !

Current Suggested

!

ND

MOU

WHITTIER

These are only suggestions from the online map tool. Other suggestions were given at public meetings and through individual outreach.

52

GE

LIVINGSTON

LEGEND

LE COL

!

CASSADY

BROAD

DREXEL

!

Bexley


PRIMARY STATION LOCATIONS

Upper Arlington 1. Kingsdale Shopping Center 2. Tremont Road and Northam Road (Upper Arlington Public Library) 3. The Shops on Lane 4. Mallway Park 5. Northwest Boulevard and North Star Road Grandview Heights 6. Grandview Library 7. Grandview Avenue and Second Avenue 8. Pierce Field 9. Grandview Yard Columbus 10. 5th Avenue and Norton Avenue 11. 5th Avenue and Northwest Boulevard 12. Northwest Boulevard and Chambers Road 13. Kenny Road and Woody Hayes Drive 14. High Street and Kelso Road 15. Neil Avenue and Oakland Avenue 16. Summit Street and Maynard Avenue 17. Summit Street and 17th Avenue 18. Cleveland Avenue and 5th Avenue 19. North Bank Park 20. Oak Street and 18th Street 21. Long Street and Taylor Avenue 22. Franklin Park South and Morrison Avenue Bexley

23. 24. 25. 26.

Jeffrey Mansion East Broad Street and Merkle Road Bexley City Hall Main Street Gateway (East Main Street and Chelsea Avenue)

Stations suggested for Relocation (Columbus) 27. Bryden Road and Champion Avenue (moved from Main Street and Champion Avenue) 28. Confluence Park (moved from Columbus Museum of Art)

53


PRIMARY STATION LOCATIONS N BROADWAY

KE Y

Columbus

14

ACKERMAN

16

EL

AN

KINNEAR

KING

11

Heights

18

8 GOODALE

MARYLAND

9

28

LEGEND STATIONS

5TH

3RD

NEIL

7 6 Grandview

10

BROAD

19

20

BRYDEN

BROAD

27

LIVINGSTON

WHITTIER

ND

MOU

54

MAIN

25 GE

Grandview Heights Upper Arlington Bexley Columbus

22

24

LE COL

Current Relocate

PROPOSED

23

21

CASSADY

12

17TH

DREXEL

5

17

JOYCE

T

ON

EM

TR

13

4

1ST

D

15

LANE

EV

3

CL

2

NORTHSTAR

HUDSON HIGH

Upper Arlington

NN

1

ZOLLINGER

Bexley

26


SECONDARY STATION LOCATIONS

Bexley Secondary Stations 1. Cassady Avenue and Maryland Avenue 2. Livingston Avenue and Mayfield Place Columbus Secondary Stations 3. Indianola Avenue & Crestview Road 4. Broad Street and Dakota Avenue 5. Town Street and Dakota Avenue 6. Town Street and Hawkes Avenue 7. 4th Street and Iuka Avenue 8. Summit Street and Hudson Street 9. Olentangy River Road and Riverview Drive 10. King Avenue and Aschinger Boulevard 11. 5th Avenue and Grandview Avenue 12. 5th Avenue and Perry Street 13. Cleveland Avenue and 2nd Avenue 14. Neil Avenue and Hudson Street 15. Mt. Vernon Avenue and Ohio Avenue 16. Oak Street and Ohio Avenue Grandview Heights Secondary Stations 17. First Avenue Park 18. Wyman Woods Park 19. Broadview Avenue and Goodale Boulevard Upper Arlington Secondary Stations 20. Fancyburg Park 21. Reed Park 22. Thompson Park/Lane Rd

55


SECONDARY STATION LOCATIONS 22 FISHINGER

N BROADWAY

21 KE NN Y

ZOLLINGER

14

NORTHSTAR

HUDSON

8

LANE

ON

EV

17TH

CL

EM

TR

7

EL

AN

D

Upper Arlington

3

9 HIGH

20

ACKERMAN

KING

11 Grandview Heights

19 18

10 12

5TH 3RD

NEIL

1ST

JOYCE

T

KINNEAR

17

13 MARYLAND

1

GOODALE

LEGEND STATIONS

BROAD

16

4 5

MAIN

6 LIVINGSTON

WHITTIER

ND

MOU

56

GE

Secondary Location

LE COL

Current Relocate

DREXEL

BROAD

2

CASSADY

15

Bexley


57


CHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES • • • •

Working for Everyone Troubles of Technology Reaching the Public Meeting Rider Needs

58


CHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES

Working for Everyone One of the biggest obstacles to equitable access to a bike share network is the structure of the payment system, with the need to have a valid credit or debit card on file an obstacle for those without a stable bank account. However, this requirement is necessary for operating a modern bike share network. To better reach those left out, new payment models are necessary, one for individuals and one for non-profits.

individual

Riders determine amount to deposit to account; qualifying riders receive voucher to offset cost. Payments made in any form at authorized retailers, mimicking local transit pass purchasing. Rider card carries cash balance to cover rider and membership costs in a pay-as-yougo model. Late fees deduct from card, and system use surcharge pays for insurance against lost bikes.

non-profit

Bulk passes are sold at discount to non-profit, with late fees either waived by CoGo or drawn from required reserve fund. Lost bike coverage comes from a reserve fund or through insurance policy. Nonprofit keeps record of who received passes, eliminating individual registration with CoGo. Motivate provides usage reports to non-profit to insure effective pass use, police habitual lateness.

A recurring concern at public outreach events was the use of public funds to support a service that appears stacked against low-income populations, with some asking how community and church groups could provide passes and choose to bear any liability. By creating a standardized model, Motivate could easily engage interested groups, not only in Central Ohio, but at their other networks nationwide.

59


Troubles of Technology A credit or debit card is required to rent through most systems, and a phone app is a helpful tool for finding open bikes and docks, making effective bike share usage extremely difficult should a rider lack one of the two. Alternatively, the rapid advance of bike share technology can leave even recent systems feeling out-of-date quickly, creating a negative impression for savvy users. Exploring alternative payment plans and providing information at kiosks could help alleviate obstacles, while keeping fresh branding, kiosk interfaces, and web design will keep the network feeling new.

Reaching the Public More creative marketing campaigns and integration into Columbus’s sports teams, events, and institutions, could increase the local and tourist knowledge of the bike share system. Increasing social media integration can help get the word out to more residents, building activity through special programming such as photo contests and ‘unicorn bikes’. Interviews and surveys of how current riders users use CoGo could also get more people to give it a try. This could be accompanied with better-featured videos of how to use CoGo and its benefits, leading to greater public understanding of bike share.

Meeting Rider Needs CoGo expansion into the suburbs could mean more rides will be taken past the 30 minute limit to destinations downtown. While late fees are a significant source of revenue from casual riders, offering annual passes with longer ride limits at a higher price point could appeal to longer-range riders. Next, mobile stations at major events would increase capacity and encourage more people to bike as opposed to paying for parking.

Annual Membership-unlimited 30-minute bike trips

Annual Membership PLUS-unlimited 45-minute bike trips

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61


BEXLEY • • • • •

Demographics & Context Existing Bike Infrastructure Major Community Institutions Public Input Process Primary Station Locations

62


DEMOGRAPHICS & CONTEXT

13,442 5,482

2015 POPULATION

PEOPLE PER SQ MI

35 2.86%

MEDIAN AGE FROM 2010 - 15 85+ 80 - 84 75 - 79 70 - 74 65 - 69 60 - 64 55 - 59 50 - 54 45 - 49 40 - 44 35 - 39 30 - 34 25 - 29 20 - 24 15 - 19 10 - 14 5-9 Under 05

6

4

2

0

% Male

2

4

6

% Female

Bexley is an inner-ring suburb of Columbus, located about 3 miles east of downtown Columbus. With the distinction of being the first city classified as an arboretum in Ohio, the city is committed to offering a high quality of life to its residents. Bexley became a city in 1932 and today is home to over 13,000 residents. The population has been steadily increasing, with an influx of young adults. Bexley is predominantly white, and most residents are between the ages of 35 and 54 with a median income of $100,121.

63


EXISTING BIKE INFRASTRUCTURE There is currently no bike infrastructure in place in Bexley aside from infrequent bike racks. However, Bexley has no laws against riding bikes on the sidewalk.

As a part of the 2013 City of Bexley Strategic Plan, there are three primary goals for bike infrastructure within city limits: becoming a walkable and bikeable environment, being adaptable to the future, and collaborating with surrounding communities. The CoGo expansion would help make all of these possible by connecting Bexley to other communities via bikes, and encouraging more bike infrastructure within city limits. Also proposed is a bike route network that turns a lane of Broad Street into a commuter sharrow, hosting bicycles throughout the day while maintaining automobile traffic during peak hours. Bike boulevards are also being implemented on roads that have a speed limit of 25 and under, creating a safe way for bicyclists to get to their destination. With increasing bike boulevards and access to the Alum Creek Trail, bike share is a great fit for this growing community.

64


MAJOR COMMUNITY INSTITUTIONS The City of Bexley is bordered on all sides by the City of Columbus. The primary roads through the city are east-west corridors, beginning with Broad Street on the north, E. Main Street anchoring the central portion, and E. Livingston Ave. bordering the city on the south.

3

6

7 8 5

4

1

2

65


1

Capital University

2

Bexley Public Library

3

Bexley Police Station

4

Trinity Lutheran Seminary

5

Bexley School Complex

6

Jeffrey Mansion & Park

7

Bexley House Apartments

8

Columbus School for Girls

Local university in Bexley located on College Avenue and surrounded by East Main Street, Pleasant Ridge Avenue, and Astor Avenue. Founded in 1830 by the Theological Seminary of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Ohio and later associated with the American Lutheran Church. Student enrollment is about 3,500.

Library located along East main street founded in 1924. The original library was housed in the Bexley High School, but as it became more popular was relocated to its current location in 1929.

The Bexley Police station is at 559 N. Cassingham Road, at the northern edge of Bexley

The local seminary was founded in 1830. Today it has 16 academic staff and 94 post graduates.The total enrollment for 2010 was 155.

This site on Cassingham Road and Elm Ave. has Bexley High School, Bexley Middle School, and Cassingham Elementary School.

This early twentieth century mansion sits on nearly 40 acres of scenic land in north Bexley. Today it houses the Bexley Recreation & Parks Department and is home to the Bexley Public Pool.

The building at 2287 East Broad Street is on the western edge of Bexley, near a strip mall with Panera Bread.

The private all-girls school was founded in 1898 and enrolls students from across Central Ohio.

66


PUBLIC INPUT PROCESS The City of Bexley was the central partner for public input throughout the process. Working primarily with Bill Dorman, service director for the city, students created a map of Bexley to be placed at four locations in order to receive public input on station locations. The maps were put on display at Bexley City Hall, Bexley High School, Bexley Public Library, and Columbus School for Girls, for two weeks in order to allow community members to place stickers on locations for their preferred bike station locations. Collecting public feedback for station locations was critical to the project. An online map survey was also created to solicit feedback for station locations. This information was shared with the City of Bexley and other community institutions to be spread on social media. On March 7, students presented at the Bexley City Council meeting to explain the project and listen to suggestions from council members.

January 21

February 16

March 7

Group explored Bexley, touring the E. Main Street corridor and other portions

Four physical maps placed at locations in Bexley to obtain public input on station locations

Present at Bexley City Council

JANUARY January 26

FEBRUARY

Met with Service Director Dorman and Mayor Kessler at City Hall.

MARCH March 1 Pick up maps from Bill Dorman at the City of Bexley

67


STATION SUGGESTIONS Using the suggested station locations from the physical maps placed at the four community locations, we created a heat map of the results. Pictured to the right, the results demonstrate two major hot spots. The first is the Jeffrey Mansion and Park, which is in close proximity to where Bexleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public pool is located. There are also hiking trails on the grounds of Jeffrey Mansion, making it an attractive destination year-round. The second is the E. Main Street retail corridor, near Bexley City Hall and Capital University. These two locations were identified as primary station locations using the four established criteria of bike share siting, and also supported by public input. Stations were suggested in many other areas of the community as well, notably at the Bexley Middle and High School site at Cassingham and Elm, and Bexley House Apartments on Broad Street.

68


SYSTEM MAP N BROADWAY

Y NN KE

ZOLLINGER

ACKERMAN

Upper Arlington

HIGH

D

LANE

TR

EV

EL

AN

NORTHSTAR

HUDSON

ON

CL

EM

17TH

JOYCE

T

KINNEAR

KING

5TH 3RD

MARYLAND

GOODALE

DREXEL

BROAD

LEGEND STATIONS

BROAD

MAIN

Grandview Heights Upper Arlington Bexley Columbus

LIVINGSTON

WHITTIER

ND

MOU

PROPOSED STATION LOCATIONS 69

E

PROPOSED

LEG

COL

Current Relocate

CASSADY

Grandview Heights

NEIL

1ST

Bexley


Bexley City Hall The Station: Aside from being the center of municipal affairs, Bexley City Hall is located in a central part of the city, making it an ideal location for a bike share station. The four census tracts south of Main Street have the highest density in the city, at more than 7,000 people per square mile. The Network: There are currently COTA bus stops 600 feet east and west of Bexley City Hall, which could draw visitors to the station and serve as an entry point to exploring Bexley by bike share. The Ride: It is also less than 1000 feet from an access point to the Alum Creek trail, on the west bank of the waterway. The trail is a regional recreation amenity that has potential to bring bike share users into Bexley for shopping, dining, and leisure riding. The Neighborhood: Retail and institutions in Bexley are largely concentrated along the Main Street corridor. In addition to amenities that draw visitors, the Main Street corridor has a high population density for a suburban area.

70


Bexley House Apartments The Station: Bexley House Apartments is a residential structure near the eastern border of Bexley and Columbus. The building has a significant setback and a COTA bus stop is located directly in front. The Network: This location would be accessible from the Jeffrey Mansion Station, as well as the two Main Street locations in Bexley and the Franklin Park Conservatory station. The Ride: Broad Street will have sharrows painted to encourage safe road-sharing among all users, making the Broad Street location more attractive now. The Neighborhood: This site is near numerous local businesses and restaurants such as a frequented Panera and the Bexley Centres strip mall at the intersection of Broadleigh and Broad St.

71


Jeffrey Mansion The Station: The station would be easily visible to the public and passers by as there are not a lot of other features on the streetscape. The Network: The location would also provide connectivity with the Eastgate neighborhood of Columbus, along Clifton Avenue just 0.5 east of N. Parkview Avenue. Eastgate offers a bike lane for just over a quarter mile along Greenway Avenue, making it an attractive entry point into the Near East neighborhood of Columbus. The Ride: The proximity to the Alum Creek trail and Nelson Park also make the Jeffrey Mansion an advantageous location. The Neighborhood: Jeffrey Mansion is a key community institution that would benefit from a bike share location. The mansion is a locus of community activity, with year-round programming for all ages and an attractive outdoor environment that draws visitors.

72


East Main Street Gateway The Station: This site is clearly visible and will be easy for potential users to find it who are enjoying a leisurely day in Bexley. This location is in a welcoming, safe area that is easily accessible and central to the Bexley community. The Network: Johnson’s is at the eastern edge of Bexley’s primary business corridor along Main Street, making it ideal for connecting the east and west boundaries of the city. There is currently a COTA bus stop 600 feet east of Johnson’s, which could draw visitors to the station and serve as an entry point to exploring Bexley by bike share. The Ride: There are adjacent streets that are future bike boulevards and safe for cyclists. This station is a good connector to other neighboring destinations and is a short trip away from Bexley City Hall. The Neighborhood: It is a popular destination for Bexley residents and visitors and has an active outdoor seating space.

73


SECONDARY STATIONS & FUTURE EXPANSION

N

N. Cassady Corridor

1

CL EV

EL AN

D

A station in the North Cassady Corridor would allow CoGo users to access amenities like the Bexley Coffee Shop, Art with Anna, and Bexley Natural Market.

TH

Southwest Bexley Locating a CoGo station in the southwest corner of Bexley would capitalize on the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s adjacency to the scenic Alum Creek multi-use trail. This location is directly across Alum Creek from the trail access, which would create a desirable route from this stations north, like the proposed City Hall and Jeffrey Mansion stations. Creating possibilities for riders to use CoGo to experience the Alum Creek trail is crucial.

JOYCE

2 5TH

LEGEND MARYLAND

STATIONS Current Relocate

1

Secondary Location

CASSADY

BROAD

DREXEL

3RD

Bexley MAIN

WHITTIER

74

E LEG COL

LIVINGSTON

2


COLUMBUS • • • • •

Demographics & Context Existing Bike Infrastructure Neighborhoods Public Input Process Primary Station Locations

76


DEMOGRAPHICS & CONTEXT

824,633 3,797 32 2015 POPULATION

YEARS OLD MEDIAN AGE

PEOPLE PER SQ MI

5% 64

37.68%

TH PERCENTILE FROM 2010 - 15 IN GROWTH AMONG SIMILAR CITIES

6

6

4

2

4

2

85+ 80 - 84 85+ - 79 75 80 - 84 7570 - 79- 74 7065 - 74- 69 65 - 69 60 - 64 60 - 64 5555 - 59- 59 5050 - 54- 54 45 - 49 4045 - 44- 49 3540 - 39- 44 3035 - 34- 39 25 - 29 2030 - 24- 34 1525 - 19- 29 1020 - 14- 24 5-9 15 5- 19 Under 10 - 14 0 0 5-9 % MaleUnder % Female 5

2

0

0

% Male

% Female

Some other race

Asian

6%

6

6%

.5%

Some other race

6%

Two or more races 58%

Hispanic

27% or Latino 5% African

White

AsianAmerican

27%

African American

4

Two or more races

Hispanic or Latino

5%

6

2

.5%

6%

4

BETWEEN 18 - 65

58% White

77


BIKE INFRASTRUCTURE Columbus has a strong history of providing for the needs of bicyclists reaching back to the 1960s. Shared-use paths were first constructed along the Olentangy and Scioto Rivers. Then, in the 1970s a shared bike lane to High Street. Since then many bike lanes have been added. The city established the Bikeways Advisory Committee in 1992 and hired a Bikeway Coordinator to develop on-street bikeways. In 1998, a Greenway Coordinator created a park system connected by shared-use paths. Around this time, the Surgeon General of the United States published the Physical Activity and Health Study prompting the Columbus Health Department to promote active lifestyles. In 2015 Columbus built the only protected bike lane in Central Ohio on NSummit Street. BRO ADWAY

NN

KE

LEGEND

Y

ZOLLINGER

ACKERMAN

Bike Level of Comfort

HIGH D

LANE

Good Moderate Poor

AN

NORTHSTAR

HUDSON

EL

Bike Facilities

EV

TR ON

CL

EM

17TH

Bike Path Protected Lane Boulevard, Sharrow, Lane

JOYCE

T

KINNEAR

KING

5TH 3RD

NEIL

MARYLAND

GOODALE

DREXEL

BROAD BRYDEN

BROAD

MAIN

Bike Facilities and level of service for the Central Ohio Area. Data provided by MORPC

78

E

WHITTIER

ND

MOU

LEG

COL

LIVINGSTON

CASSADY

1ST


COLUMBUS NEIGHBORHOODS The Columbus team identified six key neighborhoods to focus on for this expansion: Clintonville, the University District, 5th by Northwest, Milo-Grogan, the Near East, and downtown infill. Each neighborhood will play a role in successfully expanding CoGo to the three suburbs, increasing station density throughout Columbus. Whether the bikes are used to commute to work, for a quick trip to the grocery store, or to travel around Columbus and its neighboring cities, the new CoGo stations will be an added amenity to each neighborhood and its residents.

79


Clintonville (South)

Median Household Income - $64,985 Population Density (Per Sq. Mile) - 7,778

University Area

Median Household Income - $25,014 Population Density (Per Sq. Mile) - 15,746

5th by Northwest

Median Household Income - $43,260 Population Density (Per Sq. Mile) - 7,905

Milo Grogan

Median Household Income - $23,556 Population Density (Per Sq. Mile) - 2,328

Near East

Median Household Income - $29,258 Population Density (Per Sq. Mile) - 5,533

Downtown

Median Household Income - $49,251 Population Density (Per Sq. Mile) - 3,461

80


PUBLIC INPUT PROCESS

The Columbus team worked with several area commissions and city officials to gain insight into the best station locations for the city. Meetings with area and planning commissions from Clintonville, 5th by Northwest, the Near East, University Area, and Milo-Grogan were all informative and each neighborhood was interested in the addition of bike share. Last, the team met with the CoGo advisory panel. This gave insight into the different aspects of running bike share from different perspectives: the general manager of CoGo, Orange Barrel Media for advertising, Columbus Public Health, and Columbus Recreation and Parks. This helped the team to narrow down station location recommendations. Individual email correspondence was completed between studio members and the Chair of the Milo-Grogan Area Commission.

February 2nd

February 16th

March 1st

March 21st

Clintonville Area Commission meeting

Near East Planning Committee meeting

University Area Planning Committee meeting

Franklin Park Conservatory meeting

MARCH

FEBRUARY February 7th

February 23rd

March 9th

5th by Northwest Area Commission meeting

Campus Partners meeting

CoGo Advisory Panel meeting

81


SYSTEM MAP N BROADWAY

Y NN KE

ZOLLINGER

ACKERMAN

Upper Arlington

HIGH

D

LANE

TR

EV

EL

AN

NORTHSTAR

HUDSON

ON

CL

EM

17TH

JOYCE

T

KINNEAR

KING

5TH 3RD

MARYLAND

GOODALE

DREXEL

BROAD

LEGEND STATIONS

BROAD

MAIN

Grandview Heights Upper Arlington Bexley Columbus

LIVINGSTON

WHITTIER

ND

MOU

PROPOSED STATION LOCATIONS 82

E

PROPOSED

LEG

COL

Current Relocate

CASSADY

Grandview Heights

NEIL

1ST

Bexley


Clintonville: N High St. & Kelso The Station: High visibility would be possible by placement along High Street to encourage the most use. Placing the station on the curb with the Olentangy Village office parking lot behind it allows for enough right-of-way. The Network: This station would be the beginning of expansion into Clintonville,

and would be relatively close to proposed stations in the Old North. It would be the northernmost station to build off of in the future.

The Ride: High Street has road sharing signage and Arcadia Avenue is close by to connect to more residential roads traveling South. Access to the Olentangy River Trail is close by through the Olentangy Village

The Neighborhood: The area is home to the Olentangy Village residences as well as other single family and apartment housing. Various retail and shopping is close by including a Giant Eagle.

N BROADWAY

Y

NN

KE

ER

ACKERMAN

Giant Eagle

Portal Park

ARCADIA

OSU West Campus

83 LANE

HIGH

NORTHSTAR

HUDSON


University Area: Neil Ave & Oakland Ave The Station: Comfortable residential neighborhood with room to work with, adjacent to Tuttle Park in case of right-of-way issues at the intersection.

The Network: Builds off of the campus-area stations and prepares the network for connection into Clintonville. Near High Street and Lane Avenue bus routes. The Ride: Low-stress residential roads make for a comfortable ride through the neighborhood. Easy access to Olentangy Trail for a safe and scenic way to cover long distances. The Neighborhood: Dense residential development near campus provides a large potential ridership base who are less likely to rely on private automobiles.

N BROADWAY

Y

NN

KE

ZOLLINGER

ACKERMAN

Upper Arlington

Giant Eagle

Portal Park

ARCADIA

HIGH

NORTHSTAR

HUDS OSU West Campus

LANE

NT

MO

E TR

Ohio State University

84

KINNEAR

Martha Morehouse Med Ctr

Iuka Park


University Area: Kenny Rd & Woody Hayes Dr The Station: An adequate amount of right-of-way exists on the two northern

corners of the highly visible intersection. This particular location on west campus connects the University District with Upper Arlington. Generous sidewalk space is available and used by cyclists already.

The Network: The location expands the network westward from OSU in order to provide a vital connection to Upper Arlington. The station would be primarily used as a connection station for users to stay within the 30-minute time limit. It is located near a CABS bus stop on Woody Hayes Drive and a COTA bus stop on Kenny Road. This station would be crucial for future expansion west of the Olentangy River and possibly into OSU campus once the Zagster contract expires.

The Ride: Located within decent proximity to the Olentangy Trail, station users could ride on the sidewalk to the trail or to Upper Arlington with ease. Carmack Road has a Level 1 biking comfort level and Woody Hayes Drive has a Level 2 biking comfort level, according to MORPC. Road geography in the area remains relatively flat with a slight incline along Woody Hayes Drive sloping downward from east to west. The Neighborhood: The station is located within a non-residential corridor to act

as a connecting station. However, high amounts of student traffic, either walking, biking, or taking the bus from west campus, utilize this corridor. Graduate students living just north of this intersection may be interested in using the station.

85


N BROA

Y NN KE

ZOLLINGER

ACKERMAN

NORTHSTAR

ARC

HIGH

Upper Arlington

Giant Eagle

OSU West Campus

LANE

TR ON

EM

Ohio State University

T

KINNEAR

Martha Morehouse Med Ctr

Ohio Union

Kroger

KING Meridian Apartments

Grandview Heights

NEIL

1ST

GOODALE

LEGEND STATIONS Current

86

BROAD

CO


University Area: Summit St &17th Ave The Station: Clean and well-trafficked area in a residential neighborhood makes for a safe and visible station. Numerous locations in immediate area could work well. N BROADWAY The Network: Helps build the network out from campus area and Weinland Park to set up connectivity into Clintonville. CABS and COTA access serves a variety of multi-modal users. The Ride:

Y NN KE

Builds on the recently-completed Summit St. bike lane, providing excellent and safe north-south travel. Numerous low-stress routes towards campus

HIGH

NORTHSTAR

The Neighborhood: Exceptionally dense residential Portal development near campus Park likely to rely on private Giant who are less provides a massive ridership base Eagle ACKERpotential M N automobiles. ProvidesApossibility to walk from station ARCAto DIAstate fairgrounds and Mapfre Stadium. HUDSON OSU West Campus

LANE

Iuka Park

Ohio State University

KINNEAR

Martha Morehouse Med Ctr

17TH

Ohio Union

Kroger

KING

Linden Primary Care Ctr

Meridian Apartments

5TH

Grandview Heights

NEIL

1ST

GOODALE

3RD

Fort Hayes High School

87


The Station: Adjacent to city park providing right-of-way options in an attractive high traffic area.

The Network: Helps build the network out from campus area and Weinland Park

to set up connectivity into Clintonville. CABS and COTA access serves a variety of multi-modal users.

The Ride: Builds on the recently-completed Summit Street bike lane, providing excellent and safe north-south travel. Links to Summit and 17th station to provide a route to and from campus

The Neighborhood: Exceptionally dense residential development near campus

provides a massive potential ridership base who are less likely to rely on private automobiles. Short walk from businesses and restaurants near Hudson Street.

N BROADWAY

Giant Eagle

Portal Park

ARCADIA HUDSON

17TH

88 E

Ohio Union

EV EL A

ND

HIGH Iuka Park

Ohio State University

CL

N

University Area: Summit St & Maynard Ave


5th by Northwest: Northwest Blvd & Chambers Rd The Station: Ample right-of-way gives flexibility in siting station. Curb ramps and new sidewalks make for a safe, accessible station. A busy intersection with open lines of sight leads to excellent visibility.

The Network: Helps establish Northwest Boulevard as a network connection between Upper Arlington and Grandview Heights, as well as providing connection to stations south of OSU. COTA bus stop access nearby.

The Ride: Eastbound bike lane on King Avenue 1/5 of a mile away. Both N BROAonly DWAY streets of the intersection have low speeds and clear visibility, with Chambers Road recommended by the Columbus Metro Bike Map. The Neighborhood: The station is located at a Kroger, positioned in a dense mixed-use area surrounded by apartment complexes on three sides.

Y

NN

KE ACKERMAN

Portal Park

Giant Eagle

ARCADIA

HIGH

NORTHSTAR

HUDSON OSU West Campus

LANE

Iuka Park

Ohio State University

KINNEAR

Martha Morehouse Med Ctr

17TH

Ohio Union

Kroger

KING

Linden Primary Care Ctr

Meridian Apartments

5TH

Grandview Heights

89

NEIL

1ST

3RD


NB

Y NN KE

5th by Northwest: 5th Ave & Northwest Blvd The Station: Sufficient right-of-way to place a smaller station. Site is near two Zcurb OLLramps INGERto easily dock bikes from street. The site is easily visible for the public ACKERMAN to see.

Giant Eagle

NORTHSTAR

Upper The Network: Well positioned in the center of 5th by Northwest while also connecting Upper Arlington and Grandview Heights and providing access eastward Arlington via 5th or King Ave. There are five other stations less than one mile away and access to multiple bus routes.

OSU West Campus

The Ride: 5th Ave has shared roadway signage, while nearby King Ave includes a bike lane. Many nearby streets are deemed bicycle-friendly roads, with speed LANE limits of 35 or under and good visibility.

The Neighborhood: Dense mixed-used development in the area with many ON

EM

TR

restaurants positioned immediately around the station at one of the key intersections of 5th by Northwest.

T

KINNEAR

Kroger

Ohio State University

Martha Morehouse Med Ctr

KING Meridian Apartments

Grandview Heights

NEIL

1ST

GOODALE

LEGEND STATIONS Current Relocate

BROAD

90


5th by Northwest: 5th Ave & Norton Ave The Station: Enough right-of-way available for a standard 15-dock station with

accessible curb ramps for easy movement off the street. Located on a street that will provide high visibility.

The Network: Bridges the gap for riders going across the Olentangy River.

Multiple CoGo stations less than a mile away. COTA route runs down 5th Ave with stops nearby.

The Ride: 5th Ave has road sharing signage and King Ave, a quarter-mile away,

has dedicated bike lanes. Not far from Olentangy River Trail just across the river. N BROADWAY The Neighborhood: Surrounded by recently-completed dense development, complete with bars, shops, restaurants, and large apartment complexes, this area is becoming very active.

Y

NN

KE ACKERMAN

Portal Park

Giant Eagle

ARCADIA

HIGH

NORTHSTAR

HUDSON OSU West Campus

LANE

Iuka Park

Ohio State University

KINNEAR

Martha Morehouse Med Ctr

17TH

Ohio Union

Kroger

KING

Linden Primary Care Ctr

Meridian Apartments

5TH

Grandview Heights

91

NEIL

1ST

3RD


N BROADWAY

Y NN KE

Milo-Grogan: Cleveland Ave & 5th Ave Portal Park

Giant Eagle ACThe Station the process of purchasing a nearby parcel, providing KER MAN : Columbus is in a sufficient amount of right-of-way. ARCADIA

DSON The Network: Helps build towards the plannedHU Smart Cities stations in Linden,

The Ride: Provides connectivity between northern and eastern sections of network

OSU West Campus

LANE

The Neighborhood: Residential area that is seeing new development, with Fort

Iuka Park

KINNEAR

17TH

Martha Morehouse Med Ctr

CL

Ohio State University

EV

Hayes Metropolitan Education Center nearby and Columbus State just beyond.

D

for riders seeking an alternative route to going through downtown.

EL AN

NORTHSTAR

HIGH

integrates with the CMAX stop for multi-modal users north and east of downtown.

Ohio Union

Kroger

KING

Linden Primary Care Ctr

Meridian Apartments

5TH

Grandview Heights

3RD

NEIL

T

GOODALE

Fort Hayes High School

Arena District

BROAD Capitol Square

BROAD

COSI

92

BRYDEN


EL AN D

HIGH

Near East: Franklin Park S. & Morrison Ave CL EV

Iuka Park

Ohio State University

17TH

The Station: This site is located just inside Franklin Park, along the edge of the paved perimeter path. The location is well-lit and easily visible from the road.

Ohio Union

The Network: Expands the network in Columbus and provides vital linkage to JOYCE

Bexley. Parking at Wolfe Park and along Franklin Park S. for those who may want to park-and-pedal. Linden Primary Care Ctr

The Ride: Franklin Park S is a low volume, low speed road that is part of a designated bike boulevard, running from Oak Street near downtown to the Alum Creek Trail. 5TH

NEIL

The Neighborhood: Connects the Franklin Park Conservatory destination to the network, situated in a dense residential neighborhood. Both Franklin Park 3RD Conservatory and Columbus Recreation and Parks are supportive.

MARY Fort Hayes High School

Arena District

BROAD Capitol Square

COSI

Franklin Park Conservatory

BRYDEN

Wolfe Park

DREXEL

OSU Hospital East

MAIN

93

E

WHITTIER

LEG

COL

LIVINGSTON

Audubon Metro Park


EL AN D

HIGH

Near East: Long St & Taylor Ave CL EV

Iuka Park

Ohio State University

17TH

The Station: Curb access, ample lighting, and signaled crosswalks on all sides

of this intersection make for a safe and inviting station, easily visible at a major intersection.

Ohio Union

JOYCE

The Network: Adds the northern half of the Near East to the network with room for future expansion. Provides longer-range connectivity between the Near East to Linden via Milo-Grogan. the northern part of the network, Primary Care Ctr

The Ride: Long Street has sharrows, and is marked as comfortable on the Columbus Metro Bike Map. Also near bike lanes on Champion Avenue and Ohio 5TH Avenue.

NEIL

The Neighborhood: Near the University Hospital East and the future location of the Martin Luther 3RD King Jr. Library. The station is in a dense residential neighborhood and is in close proximity to Poindexter Village.

MARY Fort Hayes High School

Arena District

BROAD Capitol Square

COSI

Franklin Park Conservatory

BRYDEN

Wolfe Park

DREXEL

OSU Hospital East

MAIN

94

E

WHITTIER

LEG

COL

LIVINGSTON

Audubon Metro Park


CL EV

EL AN D

H Iuka Park

Ohio State University

17TH

Near East: Oak St & 18th St Ohio Union

The Station: A parking space near the intersection has already been replaced JOYCE

with bike racks. If nearby businesses approve of doing a similar installation with a CoGo station, it would be easily visible and accessible. Linden Primary

Ctr The Network: This station Care would expand the network eastward from the existing

station at Oak & Parsons toward the new stations at Franklin Park and in Bexley.

5Tboulevard H The Ride: Oak St. is a bike east of downtown and connecting to the rest

NEIL

of the Near East, including Franklin Park. Existing bike racks at this corner indicate that biking is already common the area. 3RD The Neighborhood: This location has restaurants and bars on corners and is surrounded by dense residential neighborhoods. This location was suggested by a member of the Near East Planning Committee and other stakeholders.

MARY

Fort Hayes High School

Arena District

BROAD Capitol Square

COSI

Franklin Park Conservatory

BRYDEN

Wolfe Park

DREXEL

OSU Hospital East

MAIN

WHITTIER

95

E LEG

COL

LIVINGSTON

Audubon Metro Park


N BROADWAY

Near East: Move Champion & Main station to Champion & Bryden

Portal Park

Giant Eagle

ARCADIA

HUDSON

The Station: There is adequate right-of-way in the parking areas beside the bike

HIGH

lanes on Champion, either north or south of Bryden.

The Network: As Main is not desirable for biking, this provides significantly improved east-west connectivity for the CoGo network.

EL AN D

The Ride: Bryden has sharrows and is a relatively comfortable street to bike on

The Neighborhood : 17TH The neighborhood is dense residential. Though it is possible that other proposed new stops would increase use of the stop on Main, moving the stop to Bryden would improve the stationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s connectivity to the network and likely increase its use. CL

Iuka Park

Ohio State University

EV

compared to Main. Along with the bike boulevard on Oak and Franklin Park S., Bryden is a major east-west corridor for biking from downtown to Bexley.

JOYCE

Ohio Union

Linden Primary Care Ctr

5TH

NEIL

3RD

MARY Fort Hayes High School

Arena District

BROAD Capitol Square

COSI

Franklin Park Conservatory

BRYDEN

Wolfe Park

DREXEL

OSU Hospital East

MAIN

LIVINGSTON

E

Audubon

LEG

COL

96


N BROADWAY

Y NN KE

Downtown: North Bank Park Portal Park

Giant Eagle ACKERMANThe Station: This station’s location in a public park allows for many different RCAD IA right-of-way. The most visible location is off configurations on the siteAwithin public of Long St. HUDSON

HIGH

The Network: This station builds the network’s presence on the Olentangy and Scioto greenways, providing a central trunk for the network in the city.

OSU West Campus

The Ride: While nearby city streets aren’t optimal, its position at the northern end

of the Scioto Mile, near where it connects to the Olentangy River Trail, provides a safe and gorgeous riverside trip.

EL AN

D

LANE

KINNEAR

Martha Morehouse Med Ctr

CL

EV

The Neighborhood: Near dense mixed-use development and redevelopment on the southern end of the Arena District, providing numerous origins and destinations. Iuka Ohio State Park University 17TH

Kroger

Linden Primary Care Ctr

Meridian Apartments

5TH 3RD

NEIL

andview Heights

KING

JOYCE

Ohio Union

GOODALE

Fort Hayes High School

OSU Hospita East Arena District

BROAD Capitol Square

BROAD

COSI

97

BRYDEN


NO

LANE

TR

Iuka Park

T ON EM

Ohio State University

KINNEARMove Museum of Art Station Downtown: to Confluence Park Ohio Union

Kroger The Station : This station’s location in a public park allows for many different KING

configurations on the site within public right-of-way. Meridian Apartments

The Network: This station allows for more connection in the downtown area,

The Ride: The proximity to the separated bike trail is ideal. People who use this NEIL

1ST

specifically connecting riders with the Scioto greenway. It’s proximity to a parking lot allows this location to be advertised as a ‘Park & Pedal” for those who want to save some time and money by parking outside of downtown. station to park and then ride can access the trail and take the trail into downtown Grandview on moreHeights bike friendly roads.

The Neighborhood: This station is not directly located in a dense residential

GOODALE or commercial area. However, the Scioto Greenway connects up to Grandview Heights and Upper Arlington

Arena District

Capitol Square

ONS

BROAD

COSI

e

OSED

Audubon Metro Park

ew Heights rlington

us

17TH

Martha Morehouse Med Ctr

ND

MOU

98

3RD

Fort H Sch


1

Indianola Avenue & Crestview Road

2

Broad Street and Dakota Avenue

3

Town Street and Dakota Avenue

4

Town Street and Hawkes Avenue

5

4th Street and Iuka Avenue

6

Summit Street and Hudson Street

7

Olentangy River Road and Riverview Drive

8

5th Avenue and Grandview Avenue

9

5th Avenue and Perry Street

10

King Avenue and Aschinger Boulevard

11

Cleveland Avenue and 2nd Avenue

12

Neil Avenue and Hudson Street

13

Mt. Vernon Avenue and Ohio Avenue

14

Oak Street and Ohio Avenue

99


PROPOSED SECONDARY STATION LOCATIONS & FUTURE EXPANSION N BROADWAY

FISHINGER

KE NN Y

ACKERMAN

12

ON

EL EV

KING

5TH

11

3RD

NEIL

Grandview Heights

JOYCE

T

8

10 9

17TH

CL

EM

TR

5

AN

D

LANE

KINNEAR

1ST

1 6

HUDSON

HIGH

NORTHSTAR

Upper Arlington

7

MARYLAND

13

GOODALE

BROAD

STATIONS

BROAD

2 34

MAIN

LIVINGSTON

WHITTIER

ND

MOU

100

GE

Secondary Location

LE COL

Current Relocate

14

DREXEL

LEGEND

CASSADY

ZOLLINGER

Bexley


GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS • • • • •

Demographics & Context Existing Bike Infrastructure Neighborhoods Public Input Process Primary Station Locations

102


DEMOGRAPHICS & CONTEXT

7,014

5,273

32.8

2015 POPULATION PEOPLE PER SQ MI

YEARS OLD MEDIAN AGE

FROM 2010 - 15 SQUARE MI

BETWEEN 20-39 YRS OLD

7%

1.33

33%

85+ 80 - 84 75 - 79 70 - 74 65 - 69 60 - 64 55 - 59 50 - 54 45 - 49 40 - 44 35 - 39 30 - 34 25 - 29 20 - 24 15 - 19 10 - 14 5-9 Under 5 6

4

2

0

0

% Male Hispanic 2.4%

2

4

% Female

African American 1.4% Other 1.6%

White 94.6%

103

6


BIKE PILOT PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS The Bikeway Pilot Plan identifies existing bicycle infrastructure and proposes additional bike facilities. There is a multi-use path along the north side of Goodale Boulevard and an extension of the plan is planned for fall 2017. The existing path runs east from Northwest Boulevard to the railroad and provides an important connection to the Columbus Greenways Trails. The station recommendations in this plan are proposed on bicycle boulevards, which are residential streets with low speeds and traffic volume running parallel to high traffic roads. The Bike Pilot Plan also recommends creation of bike boxes and sharrows.

W FIRST AVE

BROADVIEW AV

E

W THIRD AVE W SECOND AVE

BLUFF AVE BURR AVE

LEGEND: BIKE FACILITIES

GOODALE BLVD

Existing Existing Facilities Proposed Multi-Use Path Two-Way Cycle Track (Alt) Bicycle Boulevard Bike Box / Queue Box Sharrow

Existing Facilities and proposed recommendations in Grandview. Map from Bikeway Pilot Plan (2016).

104


GRANDVIEW MAJOR DESTINATIONS

1

3

4

2

105


1 2 3 4

Library Corridor

The Grandview Heights Public Library features thousands of volumes and a connection to the larger Columbus Metropolitan Library network and is a center of learning that is a vital piece of the community as a whole. This corridor connects to Grandview Avenue, featuring locally based businesses and attract a large number of visitors all hours of the day but especially in the evenings and on weekends.

Grandview Yard

Grandview Yard is the newest site of development within the city. A large number of professionals work from this site each day and live nearby in apartment homes. Businesses are finding that this is a prime location from which to base their operations.

Pierce Field

Pierce Field is located in central Grandview and nearby to more local shops and Robert Louis Stevenson Elementary School. This site is central to many other attractions within Grandview and offers sensible proximity to other CoGo stations.

Senior and Community Center

The Senior and Community Center serve the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population and allow for residents to come together in a shared space. With social and recreational opportunities, this is a high traffic area. This region of the city also provides open green space and playground equipment for locals to use at their leisure.

106


PUBLIC INPUT PROCESS

Presentations were made to City Council that gave them an overview of what the project entailed. This gave the council a chance to ask questions that they had about the project and give their personal input about concerns, advice, and direction. City management outreach was continuous, with meetings with the Grandview’s Director of Parks and Recreation, Director of Service, and outreach to the Tri-Village Chamber of Commerce. Each having an area of expertise helped to give a well rounded idea of the desires of the city and its residents, and assisted with survey publicity. Some community partners that were engaged in addition to the city were Tour de Grandview and Tri-Village News. In order to get the most public input possible there needs to be publicity, making these organizations helpful to work with. The class then set up their own online survey that collected data over a period of a month, which received 21 responses within the Grandview corporation limits. Flyers were put-up at the Library and Stauf’s to draw attention to the online survey. A poster board was set in the Senior Center to encourage additional responses and it received 36 responses. These were in addition to the suggested locations on CoGo’s existing web survey and formed the basis for public input on station locations.

February 20th

March 9th

April 3rd

Grandview City Council Meeting

CoGo Advisory Panel meeting

Grandview City Council Meeting

FEBRUARY

MARCH

APRIL

March 9th

March 18th

April 10th

Grandview Community Center Presentation

Grandview Community Center Project Display Boards Reviewed

Met with City Administrator

107


SYSTEM MAP N BROADWAY

Y NN KE

ZOLLINGER

ACKERMAN

Upper Arlington

HIGH

D

LANE

TR

EV

EL

AN

NORTHSTAR

HUDSON

ON

CL

EM

17TH

JOYCE

T

KINNEAR

KING

5TH 3RD

MARYLAND

GOODALE

DREXEL

BROAD

LEGEND STATIONS

BROAD

MAIN

Grandview Heights Upper Arlington Bexley Columbus

LIVINGSTON

WHITTIER

ND

MOU

PROPOSED STATION LOCATIONS 108

E

PROPOSED

LEG

COL

Current Relocate

CASSADY

Grandview Heights

NEIL

1ST

Bexley


Y NN

ZOLLINGER

ACKERMAN

NORTHSTAR

Grandview Yard

A

HIGH

Upper Arlington

Giant Eagle

OSU West Campus

The Station: Right-of-way widths vary, but are sufficient. There may be a section

of right-of-way west of Burr Yard Park suitable forLA a NE large station, but this needs to be verified.

TR

The Network: This station is near multi-use paths which connect to the Scioto Greenway ½ mile or less away. Travelers heading west can dock near Pierce Field Park and choose from multiple routes to continue their journey. Martha T ON EM

KINNEAR

Ohio State University

Morehouse Med Ctr

The Ride: As this area is currently under development, the majority of streets

experience low vehicular traffic, thus providing a comfortable ride for those riding through Grandview Yard. Later on, placement of bicycle infrastructure can combat friction between bicyclists and motorists. Kroger

O U

KING

The Neighborhood: This site is unique because of its residential and employment

density, its multiple hotels, destinations, and high-traffic gym.

Meridian Apartments

Grandview Heights

NEIL

1ST

GOODALE

LEGEND STATIONS

BROAD

Current Relocate

PROPOSED

Grandview Heights Upper Arlington Bexley Columbus

109 ND

MOU


Y NN KE

ZOLLINGER

ACKERMAN

Grandview Avenue at Second Avenue NORTHSTAR

Upper Arlington The Station: The right-of-way on Second Avenue is enough to accommodate any

size station. This is the safest and most accessible of possible downtown locations. OSU West Campus

The Network: This station is less than a mile away from the nearest Columbus LANE

station, and is under 600 feet away from a COTA stop.

TR

The Ride: This station sits on level ground and is placed on a bicycle boulevard T ON EM

as stated in the city’s bike plan, indicating Grandview’s dedication to bicycle accessibility and culture. Martha Morehouse Med Ctr

KINNEAR The Neighborhood: This area houses numerous restaurants and local businesses that already serve as attractions to residents and patrons from outside Grandview. Kroger

KING Meridian Apartments

1ST

Grandview Heights

GOODALE

LEGEND STATIONS Current Relocate

PROPOSED

110 Grandview Heights Upper Arlington

BROAD


Y NN KE

ZOLLINGER

ACKERMAN

Grandview Heights Public Library NORTHSTAR

Upper Arlington

The Station: This station is in a welcoming location, with more than enough rightOSU West of-way to accommodate a station of whatever size necessary. Campus The Network: This station is closely located to a COTA bus stop, andLA would be NE about a half-mile away from the rest of Grandview Heightsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; stations. TR

The Ride: With the wide streets and low speed limits, this would serve as a comfortable ride for those taking part in the bike share system. T ON EM

The Neighborhood: The number of residents in the area can commute into the KI EAR center of Grandview or other locations throughout the Columbus areaNN from here.

Kroger

Martha Morehouse Med Ctr

KING Meridian Apartments

1ST

Grandview Heights

GOODALE

LEGEND STATIONS Current Relocate

PROPOSED 111

Grandview Heights

BROAD


Y NN KE

ZOLLINGER

ACKERMAN

NORTHSTAR

Pierce Field Upper Arlington

Giant Eagle

The Station: The entire space appears to be in city right-of-way. Its location in an

West open area near a park provides great visibility and OSU accessibility to the station with Campus few obstacles.

LANE

The Network: The station is well integrated in the network as a whole; there are four CoGo stations all less than a mile from this location. A COTA bus stop is located adjacent to this station for excellent transit integration.

TR T ON EM

The Ride: There are plans to develop First Avenue into a sharrow route which Martha would increase road safety and station connectivity. KINNEAR

Morehouse Med Ctr

The Neighborhood: Pierce Field would serve as a destination location, mostly

for recreation or for the shops along Oxley Road; however, there is moderate residential density surrounding the park. Kroger

KING Meridian Apartments

1ST

Grandview Heights

GOODALE

LEGEND STATIONS

BROAD

Current Relocate

PROPOSED

Grandview Heights Upper Arlington

112

Ohio Sta Univers


N BROADWAY

FISHINGER

Y NN KE

PROPOSED SECONDARY Upper STATION LOCATIONS Arlington ZOLLINGER

HUDSON

HIGH

NORTHSTAR

ACKERMAN

LANE

TR ON EM

17TH

T

KINNEAR

KING

Grandview Heights

3 2

1 GOODALE

LEGEND STATIONS Current Relocate

BROAD

Secondary Location

ND

MOU

113

NEIL

1ST

3RD


1

Grandview Yard: East First Avenue Park

2

Wyman Woods Park

3

Broadview Avenue and Goodale Boulevard

114


115


UPPER ARLINGTON • • • • •

Demographics & Context Public Input Process Existing Bike Infrastructure Major Destinations Primary Station Locations

116


DEMOGRAPHICS & CONTEXT

34,907

3,432

2015 POPULATION

42

YEARS OLD MEDIAN AGE

PEOPLE PER SQ MI

3.6%

$91,955

FROM 2010 - 15

58.64%

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

BETWEEN 20-64

85+ 80 to 84 75 to 79 70 to 74 65 to 69 60 to 64 55 to 59 50 to 54 45 to 49 40 to 49 35 to 39 30 to 34 25 to 29 20 to 24 15 to 19 10 to 14 05 to 09 Under 05

4

3

2

1

0

0

% Male

As i an, 5%

Hi s panic/La�no,

1%

1

2

% Female

Other,

1%

Bl a ck/AfricanAmeri can, 1%

Whi te, 92%

117

3

4


PUBLIC INPUT PROCESS The UA team worked with several city officials and members of the community and institutions in UA over the course of the semester. The team received feeback and suggestions from UA City Council. City Council was cautiously optimistic and curious about the CoGo Bike share expansion with understandable reservations we hope our research and recommendations will answer. All meetings provided the team with a helpful insight into the workings of the community and the desires for bike share expressed by the community. The survey results provided by Upper Arlington show that there is indeed an interest in developing bike share in Upper Arlington, and were a key factor in determining station locations.

JANUARY January 19th Meeting with Debbie Johnson; City Council President

January 24th

February 21st

Meeting with Jacolyn Thiel; City Engineer.

First Presentation to Upper Arlington City Council

FEBRUARY

March 21st Second presentation to UA City Council

MARCH

APRIL

February 14th

March 9th

April 17th

Meeting with Upper Arlington Public Libraries

CoGo Advisory Panel meeting

Final presentation to UA City Council

118


119


BIKE

INFRASTRUCTURE

Recent reconstruction on Tremont Road has created new bicycle infrastructure and infrastructure that is ideal for bicycle travel. As stated by Paul Selegue (2016), in his project summary for the reconstruction of Tremont Road, the first phase alone created dedicated bike lanes from Fishinger Road to Zollinger Road and a shared bike path from Zollinger to Ridgeview Road. Tremont road is now considered a “complete” street, suitable for various forms of transportation, most importantly, bicycle transportation. The second phase created shared-use paths from Ridgeview Road to Northam Road, sharrows in the immediate area, and dedicated bike lanes northbound and southbound from Kenny Road to Fishinger Road. Furthermore, Charlie Pei (2014) highlighted many existing shared-use paths near all of Upper Arlington’s parks, and potential sites for sharrows and dedicated bike lanes in the city. These potential sites for bicycle infrastructure highlight the possibility of connectivity between the various bike-friendly thoroughfares in Upper Arlington. Upper Arlington is working to create a more bike friendly environment with recent plans in place to improve the thoroughfare system. These plans highlight traffic calming measures and traffic diversion to complement existing bike lanes along Tremont Road and shared-use paths connecting the city. Additionally, Upper Arlington is working to incorporate various modes of transportation such as rideshare and COTA to create more connectivity throughout the city. With plans to improve infrastructure and an interest in increasing mixed-use development, CoGo bike share would fit into Upper Arlington and enhance the community it already is.

120


UPPER ARLINGTON DESTINATIONS

3 1

4 2

121


1

Northam Park / UA Public Library

Northam Park is located in the heart of Upper Arlington, providing recreation space for the greater city area. This location also boasts the main branch of the Upper Arlington Public Library system, the Tremont Center, and a public pool.

2

Mallway Park

3

Kingsdale Shopping Center

4

Shops on Lane

Mallway Park is the location of Upper Arlingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s old city center. This location has a scenic historic character to it. The old shops are now filled with retail opportunities for the Upper Arlington community.

The Kingsdale Shopping Center is centrally located in the City of Upper Arlington. It is home to high density retail including the Giant Eagle Market District.

The Shops on Lane are one of the main gateways into the City of Upper Arlington. This location provides a destination location that pulls people from Upper Arlington and the surrounding region.

122


SYSTEM MAP N BROADWAY

Y NN KE

ZOLLINGER

ACKERMAN

Upper Arlington

HIGH

D

LANE

TR

EV

EL

AN

NORTHSTAR

HUDSON

ON

CL

EM

17TH

JOYCE

T

KINNEAR

KING

5TH 3RD

MARYLAND

GOODALE

DREXEL

BROAD

LEGEND STATIONS

BROAD

MAIN

Grandview Heights Upper Arlington Bexley Columbus

LIVINGSTON

WHITTIER

ND

MOU

PROPOSED STATION LOCATIONS 123

E

PROPOSED

LEG

COL

Current Relocate

CASSADY

Grandview Heights

NEIL

1ST

Bexley


Northwest and North Star The Station: The station has high visibility as it is located at one of the entrances of Upper Arlington and along two major corridors. The Network:The station is in close proximity to two of the proposed stations for Upper Arlington. This station also plays a key role in connecting the UA system with Columbus and Grandview.

N BRO

Y

NN

KE

The Ride: The Station is located on future bike infrastructure routes and has access to the multi-use paths located on West Campus. ZOLLINGER The Neighborhood: The station would act as an origin station because of ANits ACKERM proximity to high density residential zones. NORTHSTAR

HIGH

Upper Arlington

LANE

ON

EM

TR T

KINNEAR

KING

Grandview Heights

NEIL

1ST

GOODALE

LEGEND STATIONS

BROAD

Current Relocate

PROPOSED

Grandview Heights Upper Arlington Bexley 124 Columbus

ND

MOU


Mallway Park The Station: The Mallway station has multiple location options because the City owns the property in the area. It is located along a safe street with good visibility. The Network: The Mallway station provides a needed connection between the more northern stations and the southern edge of Upper Arlington. It is in close proximity to current and future COTA bus stations. The Ride: The station is located on Arlington Ave. which has sharrows for bikers. Arlington Avenue has lower traffic volumes than other streets and provides bikers witha safe riding experience.

Y

NN

KE

The Neighborhood: Mallway station is located in the denser southern half of Upper Arlington which is also more walkable. This provides a good opportunity for the station to be a successful location. ZOLLINGER NORTHSTAR

Upper Arlington

ACKERMAN

LANE

ON

EM

TR T

KINNEAR

KING

1ST

Grandview Heights

GOODALE

BROAD

125

ND

MOU


Northam Park / Tremont Public Library The Station: The options for placing this station are numerous as the land is owned by the City. It has high visibility as it is located at a library, park, and a shopping center. The Network: It connects the southern three stations to Kinsdale, the furthest north. The station is in close proximity to COTA stations and featuures large parking lots for park-and-ride use. The Ride: The station is located along Tremont Rd which has dedicated bike lanes and a multi-use path, making for a safe and comfrotable ride for all users. The Neighborhood: The station would act as a destination station for the library, park, and shops. It would also be an origin station because of the residential development located around the site.

Y

NN

KE

ZOLLINGER

ACKERM

NORTHSTAR

Upper Arlington

LANE

ON

EM

TR T

KINNEAR

KING

1ST

Grandview Heights

126

GOODALE

BROAD


Shops on Lane The Station: Enjoys high visibility from being on Lane Avenue at one of its most popular shopping districts. The Network: The Lane Ave Shops station is close to three other stations. It also provides riders with the closest connection to the Ohio State campus and the CoGo stations located in the area. The Ride: The station has close access to multi-use paths located on West Campus. Riders would also be able to use residential streets with lwoer volumes of vehicular traffic.

Y

NN

KE

The Neighborhood: The station would act as a destination station for the Lane Ave shops. It would be an origin station due to residential areas around the site and its connection to campus. ZOLLINGER

ACKERMAN

NORTHSTAR

Upper Arlington

LANE

ON

EM

TR T

KINNEAR

KING

1ST

Grandview Heights

GOODALE

BROAD

127 UND


Kingsdale Shopping Center The Station: Located at the Kingsdale shopping center, this station is highly visible to shoppers and within walking distance to residential neighborhoods. The station would be located in the Kingsdale Shopping Center if the city partners with the property owner. The Network: Kingsdale is the farthest north of all the Upper Arlington stations. IIt is 0.6 miles from the next station using Tremont Rd. The location provides the city with the opportunity to expand north in the future. The Ride: Located along Tremont Rd which has dedicated bike lanes and a multiuse path. It is also located in close proximity to current and future COTA bus stops. This station has the advantage of being placed near large parking lots for riders. The Neighborhood: Kingsdale is a destination station for shoppers at the shopping center, or as an origin station for residents in the area.

Y

NN

KE

ZOLLINGER

ACKERMAN

NORTHSTAR

Upper Arlington

LANE

ON

EM

TR T

KINNEAR

KING

1ST

Grandview Heights

128

GOODALE


SECONDARY LOCATIONS 3 2

N BROADWAY

FISHINGER

NN

KE Y

ZOLLINGER

Upper Arlington

NORTHSTAR

HUDSON HIGH

1

ACKERMAN

LANE

TR ON

EM

17TH

T

KINNEAR

KING

5T

LEGEND STATIONS

Grandview Heights

NEIL

1ST

GOODALE

Current Relocate

Secondary Location

BROAD

129

3RD


Fancyburg Park

2

Reed Park

3

Thompson Park

JOYCE

CL

EV

EL

AN

D

1

TH

DREXEL

BROAD

CASSADY

MARYLAND

Bexley

MAIN

LE

COL

130


131


CONCLUSION • Conclusion • Appendix • System Assessments • Research, Outreach, Press

132


CONCLUSION

A bike share network is only as good as the location and reach of its stations. For the upcoming expansion of the CoGo network throughout Columbus and into Bexley, Grandview Heights, and Upper Arlington, station locations maximize potential ridership while bringing access to new destinations. They build a network that avoids overextension, and drives demand for future expansion. With 80% funding from the MORPC grant, available in 2018, and armed with location recommendations, the city governments involved are poised to make a swift and coordinated effort to push forward implementation. Numerous stakeholders from all levels and interests were involved in this planning process and this document lays out what CoGo needs to succeed.

Appendix: How to Use The Appendix features the work behind our work. It is important to represent all facets of the project to provide the most thorough description of the systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expansion, reference points we developed along the way for our readers, media mentions of the project, and other items that helped complete the semesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s undertaking. The foundation on which we began our research was built by developing an understanding of systems present nationwide. We analyzed the system and provided its full summarization here. The below template is an outline of the individual system assessment reports written by each student in the class and acts as a guide for interpreting the information. The remainder of the appendix follows the student reports.

The Full Document with Appendix Can be Found @ issuu.com/cogoexpand

133


134


B

AUSTIN, TX

!

BCYCLE 50 STATIONS

KEY TAKEAWAYS • • •

Increased time from 30 to 60 minutes Station siting near recreational areas and trailheads Low-income membership program

CASE STUDY ABOUT AUSTIN Austin, the capital of Texas, is a rapidly growing sunbelt city and university town. The city is known for attracting millenials from across the nation, hosting the annual South by Southwest (SXSW) festival, and as the home of the University of Texas flagship campus—with an enrollment exceeding 50,000 students. The region has experienced consistent economic expansion in recent years and was ranked 4th in the nation for job growth by Forbes in 2015. Unemployment, at 2.9% in April 2016, was nearly 2 points lower than the national average of 5%. From 2013 to 2015, the Austin-Round Rock Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) experienced 6.2% population growth, compared to an average of just 2% for the top 100 MSAs in the nation. In terms of transportation, the regional growth has increased congestion on roadways. The average automobile commuter experienced 41 hours of delay in 2014, but the number for Austin drivers was 52 in the same year. To cope, many Austinites choose alternative transportation modes to commute. In 2015, 23.1% of commuters chose to bike, walk, bus, carpool, or work from home. In Columbus (OH), just 17.5% of commuters chose alternative transportation.

HISTORY OF AUSTIN BCYCLE Launched in December of 2013, Austin Bcycle is part of the Trek Corporation’s Bcycle Company. In 2011, the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (CAMPO) offered $1.5 million in grant funding to support the creation of a bike share in Austin managed by a private operator. The current operator of the system is a nonprofit called Bike Share of Austin, which receives funding from the City of Austin, federal grants, advertising sponsorships, and user fees. Because the system is funded privately and publicly, it is considered a public-private partnership. With the initial $1.5 million from CAMPO and $500,000 raised by Bike Share of Austin, the system started with 44 stations. The number of docks on each station ranged from 9 to 18, with the most common size being 13. Funding through CAMPO used federal grant programs, such as the Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) and Congestion Mitigation Air Quality (CMAQ) program. The CAMPO board required that the $1.5 million grant opportunity be matched with 20% in local matching dollars, a $500,000 contribution that was raised through fundraising pledges by Bike Share of Austin.

135


TIMELINE December 2011 Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (CAMPO) gave $1.5 million grant for bike share May 2013 Contract between Austin Bike Share and City of Austin finalized December 2013 Austin Bcycle Launched with 110 bikes and 11 stations March 2014 SXSW Festival, record-breaking usage August 2015 Low-income membership program launched

SNAPSHOT June 2016 What does a typical month at Austin Bcycle look like? Using June 2016 as a case study, we can better understand how visitors and bike share members use the system for recreation and transportation. Austin’s summer weather is hot and wet. The average precipitation in June is 4.3”, the second wettest month behind May. Temperatures are also soaring, with a daily high of 92, making it the third warmest month of the year. Despite the rain and heat, the system receives substantial use in June. Throughout the month, there were 15,968 checkouts. The average trip duration was just over 21 minutes, and the most popular stations were centered around Austin’s downtown core. Specifically, the two most popular stations are along multi-use paths along the north and south shore of the Colorado River. A pedestrian bridge encourages nonmotorized linkage across the river.

The stations with the highest use are in the downtown core, close to the riverfront and other attractions.

October 2015 CAMPO greenlights 18-station expansion with federal funds September 2016 Austin named 7th best cycling city

The average trip length for June 2016 was just over 21 minutes.

November 2016 Austin transportation bond passes

TOP 5 STATIONS — June 2016 Station Location

November 2016 94% member approval rating December 2016 Austin City Council votes to provide more funding to add 18 new Bcycle stations.

Number of Trips

Riverside @ S. Lamar

859

Rainey St @ Cummings

737

2nd & Congress

692

City Hall / Lavaca & 2nd

625

Davis @ Rainey Street

597

USE BY MEMBER TYPE — June 2016 Rental/Membership type

January 2017 Ride time increased from 30 to 60 minutes

136

# of Trips

Percent

Walk Up

9261

58.00%

Local365

4375

27.40%

Local30

1273

7.97%

Weekender

555

3.48%

Explorer

359

2.25%

Founding/Annual Member

145

0.91%


Trip Analysis Looking at the July 2016 data reveals that the majoritiy of trips are purchased by walk-up users. This illustrates that Austin’s system is likely serving more of a recreational and tourism function than a true mobility service for Austin residents. Still, 42% of trips are from longer-term users. Furthermore, the top 15 origin-destination pairs are circular— starting and ending at the same location. The most frequent non-circular pair is starting at Riverside @ S. Lamar and ending at to Zilker Park. This pattern also points to high tourism use.

RANK OF ORIGIN-DESTINATION PAIRS — June 2016 Trip Origin

Trip Destination

Riverside @ S. Lamar

Riverside @ S. Lamar

Count 254

Rainey St @ Cummings

Rainey St @ Cummings

210

MoPac Pedestrian Bridge @ Veterans Drive

MoPac Pedestrian Bridge @ Veterans Drive

206

2nd & Congress

2nd & Congress

146

Pfluger Bridge @ W 2nd Street

Pfluger Bridge @ W 2nd Street

143

Barton Springs @ Kinney Ave

Barton Springs @ Kinney Ave

120

Zilker ParkZilker Park

167

Barton Springs Pool

Barton Springs Pool

108

Long Center @ South 1st & Riverside

Long Center @ South 1st & Riverside

105

Davis at Rainey Street

Davis at Rainey Street

104

What makes a successful station location? 1

PROXIMITY TO DESTINATIONS

2

MULTI-MODAL ACCESS

3

ROUTE COMFORT

The most popular stations in the Austin system are adjacent to recreational and cultural attractions. The Riverside @ Lamar station is on the south side of the Lamar Street Pedestrian Bridge and along the Butler Bike Trail along the south side of the Colorado River.

The MoPac Pedestrian Bridge station is located in a recreational area with plentiful parking. While bike share is seen as a move toward mode shifting transportation in the future, this station’s success can be interpreted as being supported by ample parking for visitors to use while riding Bcycle in this particular location.

High-use stations are located on or near dedicated multiuse trails. This indicates that most riders prefer to utilize bike facilities, rather than share roadway with motorists. This fits with the high proportion of walk-up users in the data, as many walk-up users may be reluctant to ride on the road. The Barton Springs Pool station is located on a network of trails, providing good access to multiple offroad options.

137


Pricing Structure EXPLORER/WALK-UP: 24-hour Access $12 for unlimited rides, up to 60 min.

$4 for each additional 30 min.

WEEKENDER: 3-day Access $15 for unlimited rides, up to 60 min.

$4 for each additional 30 min.

BY THE NUMBERS

LOCAL30: 30-day Access $11/month for unlimited rides, up to 60 min. $4 for each additional 30 min. Overage forgiveness: 5 minute grace period on every ride

13

LOCAL365: Annual Access $80 for unlimited rides, up to 60 min. $4 for each additional 30 min. Overage forgiveness: 5 minute grace period on every ride System reciprocity: Use B-fob to check out bike in over 30 other cities.

# of staff

Most downtown roads are medium- or low-comfort. High comfort roads are limited, and are usually just short stretches of roadway. The most high-comfort riding areas are dedicated multi-purpose trails, not roads.

Reception and Expansion Since launching in 2013, the Austin Bcycle program has been a success. The system has been funded primarily through two federal grants. First a $1.5 million award in December 2011, and then an expansion grant through the federal Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) in October 2015. This continued progress demonstrates the positive reception and impact of the bike share for the region. The system is undergoing an 18-station expansion, with the first locations set to begin operation in March 2017. In addition to federal funding, Austin Bcycle receives some funds from the City of Austin to support research and planning for new station locations. Given Austinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reputation as a young and innovative city, it is no surpise that bike share has been a successful addition to the transportation portfolio. To learn more about Austin Bcycle, visit their website at austinbcycle.com.

138

10 # of founding partners

400 # of bikes (approximate)

2011 year established


Portland, OR

!

MOTIVATE 100 STATIONS

KEY TAKEAWAYS • • •

Versitility of users High Density Visibility/Location

CASE STUDY

Portland Oregon is viewed by many as being one of the most bike friendly cities in the U.S. The Portland Bureau of Transportation began collecting data on bicycle use in the early 1990’s. Bicycles as a mode of transportation for commuters has been increasing by around 3% annually since recording began. The Bureau of Transportation has stated that this 3% increase is not only gained from an increase in population/commuters but from commuters changing their mode of transportation to bicycles. The City of Portland has invested heavily in biking infrastructure with the addition of Neighborhood Greenways. Neighborhood Greenways have increased from 30 miles in 2009 to 74 in 2014. The investment in biking infrastructure within the city has translated to continued growth of biking commuters. The City of Portland is divided by the Willamette River, with the city center positioned on the western bank and the majority of the urban neighborhoods located on the eastern bank. Because of this geographic layout the city can easily measure the number of bikes by counting the bike traffic crossing the cities bike friendly bridges. In 1991 the number of bike commuters using the city bridges was around 2,800. As of 2014 that number stands at 20,500. The percent of commuters using bikes as their main mode of transportation, as of 2014, is 6%. This number makes Portland the U.S. city with the highest proportion of bicycle commuters.

139


In July 2016 Portland launched their bike share system called BikeTown sponsored by Nike. The system debuted with 100 stations and 1000 bikes. The system covers an area consisting of Downtown and a handful of urban neighborhood directly adjacent from the city across the Willamette River. The system was designed for commuters from urban neighborhoods and an alternative mode of transit for Portland’s many tourists. The 2016 launch date made Portland one of the last major U.S. cities to implement a bike share program. How BikeTown Works The BikeTown system consists of an easy four step process. Join, Unlock, Ride, and Lock. There are three options when joining BikeTown; Single Ride, Day Pass, and Annual Membership. • Single Ride is the option geared towards short trips either for tourists or locals to get around quickly. The Single Ride option cost the rider $2.50 for a ride up to 30 minutes in length. If the rider goes over that 30 minutes it cost 10 cents for every extra minute. • Day Pass is the option geared toward tourists. This option costs the rider $12 for the day and provided the rider with 24-hour access and up to 180 minutes of ride time. As with the Single Ride option if the rider goes over the allotted time it costs 10 cents per every extra minute. • Annual Membership is the option geared towards locals, specifically commuters. This option costs the rider $12 per month and provides the rider with 24-hour access, 90 minutes of ride time per day, and unlimited trips. After choosing a join option the rider is free to borrow a bike, ride, and return the bike to any of the 100 BikeTown Stations.

140


2. The second stage of the BikeTown development was station was determining station locations. The city broke this process into three phases:

1.) Initial Site Identification

This phase involved engaging with the public through an interactive map where people could place pins on a map to say where they thought a station should go. This stage also included a survey of participants to get a snapshot of the demographic behind who was suggesting what. The City also conducted an aerial scan to determine optimal sites based on a set of criteria which was later used to judge all candidate stations. From this phase there were a total of 305 candidate stations.

2.) Scoring Rubric

During this phase, each candidate site was judged based on a set criteria called a scoring guide. This guide helped to narrow down station by showing how well a station met the specified criteria.

141


3.) Red Flag Analysis During this phase City employee analyzed the highest scoring candidate sites through GIS and by conducting site visits. The City employee would then determine if the site was suitable for a station based on another set of criteria developed by the City. This criterion included things such as; distance from a fire hydrant, proximity to building entrances and exits, driveways, etc. The City then determined if this site was acceptable, if it was it became the location of a station if not they would pick another from the candidate stations and repeat the site analysis. The goal of this stage was to get the system to 100 station within the system area.

Current State of the BikeTown System The Portland Bureau of Transit released a BikeTown 2016 Report describing the impact the BikeTown was having on the City. The report found that the BikeTown System had reduced automobile use, increased access to local businesses, and increased tourism. The stats included:

• 71% of tourists used the BikeTown system • 69% of local residents and users of BikeTown said they were more likely to visit business close to a BikeTown station • Since July 19 160,000 trips were taken • There were 38,000 users of BikeTown • 3,000 annual memberships were purchased • 26% of BikeTown trips eliminated car trips • 64% of residents said they were biking more • 20% of locals had or were intending to reduce their car ownership

142


143


CHICAGO, IL

!

MOTIVATE 580+ STATIONS

KEY TAKEAWAYS • Equity in membership • Partner with area organizations • “Unicorn bikes”

CASE STUDY Divvy: Moving through Chicago Chicago, Illinois is the third largest city in the United States with a population of nearly 3 million people. Additionally, almost 40 million people visit Chicago each year which translates to large revenue for the city with respect to entertainment, lodging, and transportation. Chicago is littered with taxi cabs, car sharing services, rail transit, city buses, and one of the largest bike sharing systems in North America in terms of its geographic area (Medill News Service, 2016). In “Happy City”, Charles Montgomery writes that sprawl is conducive to negative effects on citizens who must commute to their places of work, worship, entertainment, and other locations outside their isolated home. Urban density combats this and forces more regular interaction with neighbors and strangers on the street. The health benefits of bicycling are extraordinary and can improve a person’s way of life through increased physical activity as well as through a reduction in carbon emissions since fewer automobiles are required for commuting. This argument supports the implementation of bikeshare programs in nearly every city. Chicago has been a pioneer with its own successful system. Cleverly branded as “Divvy”, the reference is to sharing – as in “divvy it up” (Chicago Tribune, 2013). In an online article published in 2013 by the Chicago Tribune, it is explained that Divvy’s light-blue color palette and six-pointed stars evoke the Chicago flag. The double Vs in the Divvy logo refer to the shared-lane markers painted on bike lanes throughout the city, and are a nod to how the city prioritizes bike safety, paving the way for new riders (Chicago Tribune, 2013). This emphasis on pedestrian oriented movement through the city is directly related to long term happiness and other health benefits. This progressive attitude stems from forward thinking political groups, and should serve as a model for additional cities to operate according to what is best for their residents as well as the environment as a whole.

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CHICAGO, IL Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley served public office from 1989 to 2011. During a visit to Paris, France in 2007, Mayor Daley had the chance to use the bikeshare system in place there, named the “Velib” (NPR, 2007). The Paris Mayor cited ecological impacts as a large reason for building the system and its implementation, and that it was well-received by the city proves that it could be used as a model for other cities. Mayor Daley agreed and worked to bring a bikeshare program to Chicago. Currently, Divvy boasts high ridership of nearly 32,000 riders (Medill News Service, 2016). Built in June 2013, Divvy launched with 750 bikes at 75 stations. Today, Divvy operates with 5,837 bicycles at 576 locations (PBSC, 2017). How does Divvy work? The bicycles are utility bicycles with a unisex step-through frame that provides a lower center of gravity and ease of access to a wide range of heights. All bikes are painted “Chicago blue”, with the exception of one “unicorn bike”: a bright red bike, dubbed #Divvyred (Chicago Tribune, 2013). Since that Tribune article was published, a second red Divvy bike has been introduced into the system, according to the Divvy Bikes’s Facebook fan page. The one-piece aluminum frame and handlebars conceal cables to protect them from vandalism and inclement weather. The heavy-duty tires are designed to be puncture-resistant and filled with nitrogen to maintain proper inflation pressure longer (Evanston Patch, 2013). All of that effort is moot if riders are not using the bikes. Winter months are common points in the year in which the system sees a decline in ridership. In an effort to offset the lost ridership, Divvy offered a discount program on Groupon to attract people who may not have been interested in the system before. Additionally, crews have a snow plan in place to accommodate inclement weather and will regularly service bikes and kiosk infrastructure to ensure all facets of the system are continuing to function properly amongst the poor weather conditions (Chicago Tribune, 2013). PBSC does not set the specific fee structure in each city, but it happens that Chicago’s fee structure is somewhat in alignment with Columbus’. The Divvy system costs $99 for an annual membership or $10 for a 24-hour pass. Bicycles, like in Columbus, must be docked within 30 minutes to avoid additional fees (Red Eye Chicago, 2015). In an effort to spread awareness of the system and its benefits for the citizens of Chicago, a promotional “Divvy week” offers free 24 hour passes so that riders can try out the bikeshare system at no charge. If they are inclined to continue use, they may opt for a membership, increasing the system’s revenue. Even if no purchase is made after the tryout, being able to experience the process firsthand may increase advocacy for the system which helps reduce resistance in times of system expansion. Moreover, with all the perks Divvy offers its riders like free passes, “unicorn bikes”, and ensuring regular maintenance, the bikeshare system has paired with the Chicago Blackhawks to offer black and red Blackhawkthemed bikes to promote the city’s hockey team. This was done in mid-2016 as the Blackhawks were heading to their first playoff game, according to a 2016 Chicago Tribune article. Perhaps the most innovative and inclusive Divvy practice is known as “Divvy for Everyone” (D4E). Taken from the official Divvy webpage: The Chicago Department of Transportation (CDOT) aims to offer all Chicagoans an affordable, accessible and fun transportation option. D4E provides a one-time $5 Annual Membership to qualifying residents.

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CHICAGO, IL The program also incorporates a cash payment system for those Chicagoans who do not have debit or credit card, required for a standard Divvy membership. D4E Program Features: • One-time $5 Annual Membership • In-person enrollment at LISC Financial Opportunity Centers • No credit card required • Cash payment option for any usage fees incurred at participating 7-Eleven and Family Dollar stores • Discount in second year to support transition into full-price membership in third year • Option to keep membership through a LISC-supported credit-building program Chicago residents age 16 and older are eligible based on their family size and income level. The website provides a chart indicating brackets of which residents may be a part that helps them determine how to proceed with the membership process. There are also six locations listed on a detailed map at which residents can apply for assistance, incorporating Divvy’s philosophy of accessibility into its system. The preceding information is listed in detail on the Divvy official website under the tab “Divvy for Everyone”. Where is Divvy? With almost 600 stations, Divvy is extremely prevalent across the city of Chicago. With respect to geography, this is the largest bikeshare system in North America (Medill News Service, 2016). A station map map is published on the Divvy website and a mobile app portrays bicycle availability in real time at various locations. Additionally, the city of Chicago is bike friendly with respect to its available bike trails and shared use paths that interconnect the city. A link to Divvy stations and riding trails is listed in the references page of this document. Where does Divvy come from? Columbus, Ohio has a bikeshare system of its own already in place. Its expansion will further the reach of sustainable transportation and encourage healthier lifestyles. CoGo, in Columbus, is manufactured by the same company which also supplies the bikes and docking stations for Chicago’s Divvy system. This makes it easy to see how such a system will look and interact with itself within the context of an urban environment already in place elsewhere. In addition to the physical infrastructure, PBSC Urban Solutions, headquartered in Montreal, is the sole owner of all the intellectual property such as patents and trademarks which are related to the PBSC public bike share system (PBSC Urban Solutions, 2017). But the physical infrastructure is made to be functional and to last. In 2016, Medill Reports Chicago reported that the system would be increasing the amount of bikes and stations it offered to riders. Eighty percent of this was funded through a $3 million state grant from the Illinois Department of Transportation. Two suburbs of Chicago received bikeshare locations and “established their own separate contracts with Divvy system operator Motivate International to ensure that the City of Chicago does not incur further costs due to suburban operations” (Medill Reports Chicago, 2016).

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CHICAGO, IL What else for Divvy? As the product of a very successful system, PBSC Urban Solutions was contemplating offering helmet vending machines at Divvy locations. The latest information available is from 2015, when prototype machines were being tested, but no mention of implementation at bikeshare locations has been discussed since then. If added, this would add a vital piece of safety to the widespread program, potentially encouraging additional ridership and more revenue. Such a comprehensive system would work well with Chicago’s bike lane design guide. This is a detailed manual for implementing bike lanes across the city providing dimensions and circumstances under which effective lanes could be built. A link to this guide is listed in the references page of this document. All of these pieces of the whole system are indicative of why Chicago has been named the #1 bike-friendly city in the US by Bicycling Magazine (Chicago Tribune, 2016). Chicago’s lakefront boasts 18 miles of paths with incredible views of the city and plenty of locations from which to get a bike. As such an affordable, reliable, inclusive system, Divvy is an excellent example of a successful bikeshare program from which Columbus and comparable cities could learn. The mission of planners is inherently couched within the very name of the program itself: to “divvy up” our resources and advancements in a society is to know equality and progression as people.

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DENVER, CO

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B-CYCLE 88 STATIONS

KEY TAKEAWAYS • • •

Stations near transit Attractions draw ridership Ridership is much less diverse than the population

CASE STUDY Introduction The city of Denver, Colorado has a population of over 680,000, and the region has a population of over 3 million, making it one of the 20 largest regions in the country (Metro Denver Economic Development Corporation, 2017). The state of Colorado has one of the fastest growing populations in the US, it is the second-most highly educated state, and it has the lowest obesity rate and the highest rate of physical activity of any state. The median income in the Metro Denver area was $71,000 in 2015, compared to a national median income of $56,000. Metro Denver has a relatively young and diverse population, with about two thirds of the population being White, over 20% being of Hispanic origin, around 5% being African American, and almost 5% being Asian (Metro Denver Economic Development Corporation, 2017). Denver’s recent population growth and desire to maintain a high quality of life and attract new residents and business has led it to invest in mass transit and encourage transit-oriented development throughout the region (Metro Denver Economic Development Corporation, 2017). The Denver B-cycle system was created with many stations near mass transit to encourage multimodal trips, to encourage continued physical activity among the population, and to decrease vehicle use and emissions in the city (Wheeler, 2010).

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System History and Overview One thousand bikes were available for free use by those attending the Democratic National Convention in Denver in 2008. During the 4-day convention more than 5,000 rides were taken between the six stations in downtown Denver, and the success led Denver to desire to create a permanent bike share system (Sink, 2013). This system became a reality when Denver B-cycle began operating on April 22, 2010 (Wheeler, 2010). It was one of the first bike share systems in the U.S. and was the largest U.S. system when it opened with 400 bikes at 38 stations, compared to only 100 bikes in Washington D.C.’s system at the time. The system was built with a relatively dense concentration of stations in downtown Denver, and many stations near bus stops and light rail stations in order to encourage multi-modal transportation (Wheeler, 2010). The system was built out to more than 500 bikes at 50 stations by the end of 2010 and has continued to grow. The most recent major expansion was in 2013 and there are now 88 stations and 700 bikes, as shown in the map (Sink, 2013; B-cycle, 2017). Denver B-cycle stations are most dense in the downtown area, but stations are located throughout 10 of Denver’s neighborhoods (B-cycle, 2017). Yet few of these stations are in low-income neighborhoods, as Denver, like many other cities, has generally chosen to place stations where they can ensure relatively high use and profitability (Sachs, 2016b). This has been a criticism of the system for many years; in 2012 one city council member voted against expanding the system due to the fact that almost none of the stations were to be placed in low income or minority neighborhoods (Meyer, 2012). The dissenting Councilman, Paul Lopez, who represents a Southwest Denver district that is mostly Latino, stated that “this system shouldn’t be just for people who can afford it… it’s truly sad that just one (of the stations) is in West Denver” (Meyer, 2012).

System Pricing and Revenue The pass options for using the Denver B-cycle system have changed over time, as has the cost of the passes, as user needs have been identified and as the system continues to work to increase membership (Sachs, 2016a). Currently an “annual plus” pass costs $135 for unlimited 60 minute trips, or unlimited 30 minutes trips can be purchased for $95 per year, $15 per month or $9 per 24 hours (B-cycle, 2017). A subsidized annual pass is available for only $10 for residents who live in subsidized housing, are enrolled in Medicaid or Medicare, or meet other criteria. A unique “Flex Pass” is also available for $15/year and reduces the cost of each 30-minute trip to $3 (B-cycle, 2017). Purchases of passes and memberships are the major source of revenue for the system, making up 42% of the system’s income in 2015, with other income sources including sponsorships, gifts, and grants (Denver Bike Sharing, 2015). Kaiser Permanente Colorado, a nonprofit health care provider, has been the title sponsor and “founding funder” for the system since it opened in 2010 (Melear, 2016). Purchase of bicycles and funding for station installation have been provided by multiple sources, with the majority of funding for the 2013 expansion coming from the Federal Highway Administration and the Colorado Transportation Commission (Hayden, 2013). Additional funds came from foundation grants and contributions from organizations located near new bike share locations, such as the Denver Zoo. In 2015, the first privately financed station was installed by Avanti Food and Beverage (Hendee, 2015). 149


System Use and Demographics There have been well over a million trips taken on Denver B-cycle since it opened in 2010, with over 350,000 trips in both 2014 and 2015 - the two most recent years where data is available (Denver Bike Sharing, 2015). About two-thirds of these trips were taken by riders who have annual memberships, while the remaining third had either 24-hr, 7-day, or 30-day passes. There were over 60,000 24-hr passes purchased in both 2014 and 2015, with between 3,500 and 4,000 annual passes purchased both years. In fitting with the goal of encouraging multi-modal transportation, Denver B-cycleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s surveys suggest that 46% of B-cycle trips replaced car trips and 31% of B-cycle users jointly use transit (Denver Bike Sharing, 2015). The majority of rides happen in the downtown area, where land use and stations are the most dense. Yet multiple attractions that are a few miles from downtown also attract many riders, particularly tourists and others who purchase 24-hr passes. These attractions include Cherry Creek Mall, the Denver Botanic Gardens, and the Denver Museum of Nature and Science (Denver Bike Sharing, 2015). As previously noted, Denver offers a discounted annual pass for residents who meet certain income or other criteria, yet Denver has also been criticized for not providing stations in low income neighborhoods. Demographic data was collected from users each fall from 2010 to 2014 and a professor at the University of Colorado Denver created a report with the results in 2015 (Duvall, 2015). According to the report, users with a household income under $35,000 have always made up less than 11% of those with annual passes, although they have accounted for up to 20% of those with short-term passes. Regarding other demographics, females made up about 46% of those with annual passes in 2014, up from only 36% in 2010. While over 30% of the population of the city of Denver identify as Hispanic or Latino, less than 10% of those with annual passes identified as Hispanic or Latino. The median age of those with annual passes was around 37 for each year, 2010-2014, and around 90% of them have at least a Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree. Other results of the survey include that more than 70% of those with annual passes say that the system has increased the amount that they ride bike, and over 70% also say that they have encouraged others to try Denver B-cycle (Duvall, 2015). Overall, the survey indicates that Denver, like most other bike share systems, serves a primarily high-income and well-educated group that is not as diverse as the population as a whole.

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Conclusion and Lessons for Columbus Denver, as a city and region of similar scale to Columbus, has multiple lessons for Columbus as Columbus plans to expand the CoGo system to new neighborhoods and cities. Denver’s emphasis on placing stations near transit stops and stations is one thing Columbus may want to emulate. Union Station in Denver is a good example of how a commuter can use transit to get to the downtown core and then use bike share to reach their final destination (CBS4, 2016). Unfortunately, COTA (the Central Ohio Transit Agency) doesn’t have an asset such as Union Station, but CoGo can still be implemented as a “last mile” service for those who travel to downtown using express bus service, for example. A second lesson that is particularly important as CoGo plans for expansion, is that attractions can draw ridership, particularly from tourists, even if they are a few miles from downtown and somewhat distant from other stations. Denver has a few examples of this, mentioned previously, with the Denver Botanic Gardens likely being the most relevant to Columbus. There is a B-cycle station at the Denver Botanic Gardens, more than 2 miles from the downtown core and outside of the densest B-cycle neighborhoods, yet it was one of the top 15 stations for ridership by those with a 24-hour pass (generally tourists), as they used nearly 2500 bikes from that station in 2015 (Denver Bike Sharing, 2015). While the context may be different in Columbus, the fact that Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical gardens is similarly just over 2 miles from the downtown core may make it a desirable place for a station.

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BICYCLE TRANSIT SYSTEMS 61 STATIONS

KEY TAKEAWAYS • • •

Transit Fare Integration Station Density Low-Income Outreach

CASE STUDY

In the city known for traffic jams lasting hours, “Carmageddon”, and sprawling development, Los Angeles recently implemented a bike share program centered in Downtown L.A. In partnership between the City of Los Angeles and Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (otherwise known as Metro), the Metro Bike Share program launched on July 7, 2016. The concept for a bikesharing system to finally reach the city of angels originated from a study, commissioned by Metro, to examine how to best implement bike share in Los Angeles County. One year and three months later, the Regional Bike Share Implementation Plan for Los Angeles County was published and provided a phased approach to establishing a bike share program in the county, starting with Downtown L.A as the pilot. The phased approach laid out future expansion into neighboring communities and cities such as Pasadena, Hollywood, West Hollywood, Venice, Marina del Rey, and Huntington Park. A Bikeshare Working Group was established to guide the undertaking and preparation of the final plan. The group included representatives from Metro and the cities of Los Angeles, Pasadena, Santa Monica, and Long Beach. The City of Santa Monica leap frogged the plan and established their own, independent program, with the Breeze Bike Share being the first program in L.A. County. Several cities followed suit before Los Angeles implemented its program in the July 2016 and used Santa Monica’s model. Beverly Hills, Long Beach, and West Hollywood all use the same vendor as Santa Monica making their systems compatible with each other. The Metro Bike Share system went with a different vendor which is incompatible with the vendor the other cities chose. Metro has stated that the dual systems will not be a problem due to the different geographies they serve. Within the first three months of operation, the program registered around 55,400 rides which amounts to an average 73 trips per bike. These numbers excited the local transportation officials but lagged behind the first three months’ statistics for other comparable US cities. Chicago registered twice as many trips per bike and New York registered five times the amount L.A. did. Officials are optimistic for the program due to its relative young age in comparison to other programs in the country. The most popular check-out station in Downtown L.A. was outside the Caltrans building close to City Hall, with 152 following it. the Grand Central Market on Broadway station closely


SYSTEM OVERVIEW The Metro Bike Share system is owned by the Metro agency but Bicycle Transit Systems, Inc. manages all operation elements including bike and station maintenance, marketing, and customer service. B-Cycle, LLC, who’s equipment is utilized in several major US cities including Denver, Philadephia, and Indianapolis, manufactured the equipment for Los Angeles’ system. The bike’s features include a front basket, 3-gear shift, automatic lights, and a splash guard. Termed the 3rd Generation of bike-share technology, Metro’s program uses a docking system referred to as “smart dock/dumb bike”. This means the bikes can only be removed at a docking station and must be returned to another station in order to complete the trip. Metro attempts to maintain a balance of at least twice as many empty docks for returning bikes as there are bikes present. The contract between Metro and Bicycle Transit Systems was recently extended by Metro’s Board of Directors at a meeting on October 27, 2016. Extensions were granted to the Downtown L.A. pilot program for an additional five years and expansions into the neighboring communities of Pasadena, Venice, and Port of Los Angeles for six years. Current plans for expanding the program include: 34 stations in Pasadena with 375 bikes in summer 2017, 15 stations in Venice in summer of 2017, and 11 stations in the Port of Los Angeles neighborhood with 120 bikes in summer 2017. The overall goal at the end of the contract period is to have 254 Metro Bike Share stations in L.A. County. Metro is currently working on attaining a title sponsor for the program.

QUICK FACTS Contract: $53,792,912 through July 30, 2017 Passes Sold: 3,724* Total Trips: 133,637* Calories Burned: 9,290,091* Emission Reduced: 318,327* lbs. of CO2 Expansions (station number): Pasadena (34) — Venice (15) — Port of Los Angeles (11) * Data estimated using ridership data, trip duration, and origin/destination information from Metro as of 3/30/2017 https://bikeshare.metro.net/

Timeline January 2014 Metro Board of Directors approves study for bike share April 2015 Regional Bike Share Implementation Plan for LA County published November 2015 Santa Monica Breeze Bike Share launched February 2016 Beverly Hills Bike Share launched March 2016 Long Beach Bike Share launched April 2016 WeHo Pedals (West Hollywood bike share) launched July 2016 Metro Bike Share launched in Downtown L.A. for monthly and annual pass holders August 2016 Metro Bike Share open for casual riders

Spring 2017 UCLA bike share expected to launch 153


FARE STRUCTURE A major component and selling point of Metro Bike Share that Metro stressed in the Regional Bike Share Implementation Plan was to integrate the fare structure of the system into the existing transit system. Metro achieved this goal and the system is fully integrated with the TAP (Transit Access Pass) payment structure used by all Metro transit services. Metro owns and operates all light rail, heavy rail, and bus rapid transit systems in the county, making it easy to incorporate bike share use into a transit trip. Metro Bike Share was actually the first large regional bike share program in the country to integrate the fare structure like this. As seen in the image below, a customer can easily tap their TAP card on the bike dock and wait a few seconds and then take a bike out for a ride. For station financing, Metro stated in the implementation plan that they will contribute up to 50% capital costs and up to 35% operating and maintenance costs. The rest is covered by the City of Los Angeles. The system offers three different ways to access the Metro Bike Share and includes a walk-up/casual option, monthly pass option, and an annual option (titled flex pass). They can all be seen in the pricing graphic to the right with the prices involved with each. Metro provides discounts to low-income riders that qualify for the Rider Relief Program ran by the transportation authority. Currently for the bike share program, Metro has distributed 40,000 annual pass coupons that waive the $40 fee for these qualified riders. The Rider Relief Program provides monthly coupons to Metro transit riders that meet annual income criteria in addition to the number of person in the household. An example for a qualifying household for a family of four would need to have an annual income of $43,400 or below. Discounts are also offered for Metroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other transit services to seniors, students, and disabled riders. Outreach to lower-income communities is also performed through a grant provided by the national Better Bike Share Partnership for $100,000. Metro also engages in efforts to entice employers to provide bike share passes to their employees through the Bike Share for Business discount program. The program offers three plans, Gold, Silver, and Bronze, to businesses to offer bike share as an alternative option for their employees to commute to and from work. In the plans, differing options are presented for employer vs. employee contributions toward the bike share pass, which add up to a 40% discount on the monthly pass option.

Walk-Up All trips 30 minutes or less are $3.50 $3.50 per 30 minutes after

Monthly Pass $20/month All trips 30 minutes or less are free $1.75 per 30 minutes after

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Flex Pass $40/year All trips 30 minutes or less are $1.75 $1.75 per 30 minutes after


STATION SITING The Regional Bike Share Implementation Plan created a suitability index based on several factors that work into bike-shareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s success and a scoring system to evaluate where the stations would best be placed. Most of LA county scored fairly well with the Downtown L.A. area scoring the highest with a 4.43 out of a maximum of 7.1. The factors that went into this analysis included: housing density, population density, employment density, intersection density, and transit frequency. All this information went into deciding how and where to best implement the new Metro Bike Share. The main categories that Metro used to site the stations included proximity to community resources, employment centers, bike infrastructure, and transit as well as basics such as access, visibility and safety. Using the trip origin and destination data provided by Metro for the Fourth Quarter of FY 2016 (October 1st â&#x20AC;&#x201C; December 31st), maps were created to show the most popular check-in and check-out stations, seen below. From these maps, the stations with the highest use are centrally located around the downtown core and next to popular locations such as Grand Central Market, Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles, and the Walt Disney Concert Hall. The popular stations are all located in the financial district of downtown and numerous hotels so it is likely that tourist and business travelers might be using the system a lot in the area. Metro took existing and future bike infrastructure into account as well in locating the stations, trying to place them adjacent to desirable bike lanes. In Los Angeles County, a total of 2,016 miles of bikeways exists, however, only 7.57 miles of that are separated from vehicular traffic by a physical barrier. In order to keep customers happy, Metro provides the option to extend a trip by 15 minutes for free if a docking station is full when trying to return a bike.

Trip Origin Map

Station Siting Guide

Trip Destination Map

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CONCLUSION Overall, the Los Angeles Metro Bike Share is still in its infancy but shows promise to evolve into a major mode of transportation in the city. Current commitments from the Metro Board of Directors to expand the program into other communities of Los Angeles County depict the transportation authorityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s faith in bike share. While advertising and sponsorship revenues are near non-existent yet, the efforts by Metro appear to be stepping up to help bring in this addition stream of revenue. Station siting underwent a vigorous vetting process in order to place them in the best locations and brought in many factors from density, bike infrastructure, and transit access. This assessment from their program shows how these factors are very important in propping a city bike-share system to perform well. Another take away includes the low-income community outreach and discounts to help provide bike share to all residents of the city. Possibly the main take away from L.A.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bike-share program would be its fare integration with the existing transit system. Simplicity and easy-of-use are extremely important in bike share programs, and the integration of Metroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transit services with the bike share place it above many other program across the US.

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PITTSBURGH

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PITTSBURGH BIKE SHARE 50 STATIONS

KEY TAKEAWAYS • Density matters • Existing Connections & Infrastructure matter • Public Input matters

CASE STUDY This brief provides an abbreviated history of the Pittsburgh bike share program and “takeaway” ideas for CoGo station siting in Columbus. Brief History Bike Pittsburgh is 501(c)(3) charitable non-profit organization. It advocates for friendlier bicycle and pedestrian streets. Its outreach efforts include community engagement and education (Bike Pittsburgh, 2017). In 2013, Bike Pittsburgh raised funds from local organizations to match a $1.6 million Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) grant from the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). Bike Pittsburgh, working with the City Planning Department, hired Alta Planning + Design to create a bike share system business plan. The plan was completed in 2013 (Bike Pittsburgh, 2017). In 2014, the City bid for bike share equipment and installation of the bike share system. S.E.T. won the bid and partnered with nextbike, a bike share equipment provider. CDR Maguire managed the implementation (Pittsburgh Bike Share, 2017). CMAQ Grant There are several CMAQ requirements. Both the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation and the CMAQ grant required federally certified management to manage implementation (Pittsburgh Bike Share, 2017). The Buy America requirement means station hardware must have a certain percentage of American-made steel (i.e. base plates and docks). The useful life requirement means stations must be in-service for at least 5 years. CMAQ funding also requires inspections and inspection fees. Also, stations must be placed and kept in the right-of-way. 157


Equipment As noted, a German company, nextbike, provided the bike share system equipment. There are 50 stations and 500 bikes. Stations include a kiosk, powered by a solar panel and battery, and several docks. The bikes are smart bikes, which means bikes include features such as LED status lights, GPS, Smart Lock, and an on-Board computer (nextbike, 2016). Bikes are 7-speed and include front/ rear lights, a rack, a kickstand, and front/rear fenders to prevent water-splash. The replacement cost for a bike is $1,175 (Healthy Ride, 2017).

Figure 1. One of the Healthy Ride stations in Pittsburgh (An Arrant Knight, 2015). How It Works Healthy Ride is the Pittsburgh bike share system and the operator is Pittsburgh Bike Share, Inc. (Pittsburgh Bike Share, 2017). There are several ways to register in order to use a bike: Through the Healthy Ride website, a mobile app, station kiosks, or by calling customer service. Registration allows users to rent bikes in any nextbike city or country. Pricing models include individual and group memberships; group membership allows employees to register and Healthy Ride invoices the company at a per employee rate (Healthy Ride, 2017).

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Table 1. Individual Pricing Models (Healthy Ride, 2017). Plan Pay As You Go Standard

Price $2 per 30-minute ride $12 per month

Deluxe

$20 per month

Time required Limited to 30-minute rides Unlimited 30-minute rides (check-in required every 30 minutes) Unlimited 60-minute rides (check-in required every 60 minutes)

Table 2. Group Membership Pricing Models (Healthy Ride, 2017). Plan Level One Level Two

Organization $3 per employee, per month $6 per employee, per month

Employee $3 per month

Typically, bikes are returned to the docks and an LED light confirms receipt of bikes. Smart Lock allows users to temporarily lock bikes without using a station dock. This provides a solution to users when a station is full; confirmation of the return is required via mobile app, customer service, or member card. If a bike is not returned within 25 hours, users are charged $800 (Healthy Ride, 2017). Pittsburgh Visit My research began with a call to the City Planning Department. I learned, and was pleasantly surprised, there are downtown historic bike tours. Being a preservationist, I called Bike the Burgh and, that weekend, I found myself in Pittsburgh on a three-hour bike tour! From our hotel, we ordered a ride from a car-hailing app and road to a Healthy Ride bike share station, 500 First Avenue, where our tour was to begin. We rented two bikes through the kiosk and the process took about 1 minute each time. Figure 2. Bike Interface (Bodenmiller, 2017).

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I never felt unsafe on the bike tour and our tour guide was gracious and patient. The short block lengths of downtown slowed traffic and no driver acted uncourteously. There were sharrows and some bicycle lanes as well. We crossed the Allegheny River via bridges and went as far north as the old Heinz factory. The tour ended after a visit to Allegheny Point State Park and we had no issues returning the bicycles. From there, we ordered another car and visited Healthy Ride.

Figure 3. Approximate Tour Route (Google, 2017). Siting Suggestions I spoke with a number people in Pittsburgh about the bike share program and everyone was generous with their time. Siting criteria I gleaned is listed below: What to look for: • • • • • • •

Population density (2-3 times the average city population density) Walkable neighborhoods Bike infrastructure Stations within 1,000-1,300 ft. New stations should increase the existing system’s density (Consider how many existing connection points are direct locations to any new station) Employment density Low-income indicators: Median income, car ownership, minority population den sity 160


• • •

What to avoid:

Nearby bike racks indicate possible cyclists in area Availability of solar Public input supplements what data suggests (The public is able to suggest sta tions through an online map to Healthy Ride)

• • • • • •

Steep slopes (The City actually has a steep slopes GIS layer.) Stations under trees get dirty and covered with leaves Areas with low or no light may not feel safe at night Stations on or too close to the road (Sometimes, this is the only option.) Small/Short blocks may indicate walking is faster Tails, or isolated sections, in the system (Parallel expansions are better)

Additional resources:

• NACTO Intercept Survey Toolkit • INDIGO: Ambassador Toolkit • Temple University publication, Bike Sharing in Low-Income Communities Conclusion Several siting recommendations were gleaned from a visit to Pittsburgh. Population density, employment density, and bike infrastructure are important station siting criteria. While those criteria are important, public input is also critical for appropriate station siting. Ideally, stations are no farther apart than 1,000-1,300 ft., new stations are sited parallel to existing stations, and new stations have multiple direct connections to existing stations. These are all important elements of successful stations.

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SEATTLE, WA

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MOTIVATE 50 STATIONS

KEY TAKEAWAYS • • •

Geography matters Visibility matters Transparancy matters

CASE STUDY Seattle’s bike share system, Pronto, began in October of 2014 and quickly grew to 50 stations in the first two years. Seattle’s system saw slow returns and struggled with how to fix the failing bike share program. The data suggested that the topography and weather had a lot to do with the success of the system and others blame the poorly sited stations. Either way, in March 2017 the stations will begin to be sold off and any money dedicated to subsidizing the system will be put into pedestrian and bike infrastructure throughout the city. Seattle is a very progressive multi-modal city and the lessons learned from the implementation and lifetime of the Pronto bike share system are valuable to other cities. Annual memberships, 3 day passes and 24 hour passes were available to customers. • Annual pass- $7.95 per month (45 minutes free) • 3-day pass- $16.00 (30 minutes free) • 24-hour pass- $8.00 (30 minutes free) • Helmet Rental- Free for annual members, $2.00 short-term pass holders • Missing Bike (over 24 hours)- $1,200.00 charge • Rides between 8-24 hours- $77.00 charge Stations were sited using the following criteria provided by Pronto: • Population density and points of interest for residents and tourists • The proximity to existing transit infrastructure in order to extend the city’s overall network mass-transit footprint • Proximity or frequency of a nearby station in order to create a contiguous service area that can be travelled end-to-end with relative ease and speed • Technical feasibility – solar access, etc. • Compliance with City siting guidelines • In addition, we are sensitive to feedback from adjacent business owners and the general public, and do our best to accommodate everyone’s needs and concerns. 162


FIRST YEAR TRENDS Annual members (61%) most likely Mon-Fri commute trips and were less than 15 minutes on average. According to a bike counting program, annual Pronto members accounted for only 10% of daily bike commuters. Nearly 77% of annual members are male. Men and women used the stations differently. For example, the station near the hospital was over 60% women and the station near the Amazon campus was nearly 90% men. Many annual members use the program as a utility. They will ride the bike to a downhill station but do not return uphill by bike. It takes longer to ride uphill so it was thought that it was difficult for them to return the bike without incurring usage fees. Only 33% of trips were uphill and over 100 bikes had to be balanced to uphill stations each day. Some original ideas for how to fix this problem included: • Use gamification to incentivize users to make uphill bike trips. • Partner with uphill businesses to offer coupons and discounts in the afternoon to allow users to return the bikes • Give additional time for elevation changes greater than 200 feet. Annual members showed a general increase in speed over the year that they recorded, indicating that the bike share use was increasing health and physical ability, aligning with city goals. Of the top 20 annual riders, the top three Short-term pass holders (39%) most likely Weekend trips and much more likely to make round trips and hang out by the docks. • One in four short-term trips went over the allotted free 30 minutes. • Only 8% of all Pronto trips were round trips and were clustered towards the edges of the Pronto service area. STATION SITING Seattle municipal code encourages the mixing of bike infrastructure at other transit stations and along transit corridors. It states that the aim should be to “incorporate bicycle facilities as essential elements of station design.” There are also guidelines for sidewalk use and specific set back requirements for each type of sidewalk use. Specifically, the stations need to be placed: • Stations should be at least 6 inches away from the curb • Stations should have a wheel stop and safe hit post at least 4 feet from both of the short ends of the station • On street locations should be placed on streets with speed limits lower than 30 mph • If higher speed and traffic exists, the station should be protected by parking, bike lane or another buffer • Stations cannot be placed in bus or loading zones • Stations should be placed at least 5 feet from any driveway or curb cuts. • Stations need to leave 5 feet of pedestrian clearance on the sidewalks • Also, should leave around 3 feet of car door clearance from the curb if on street parking is present.

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Each standard station is approximately $75,000 which includes site assessment, permitting, installation, hardware and software and about 10 bikes. Developers who wished to have a bike station near their facility would be expected to pay as much as 36,000 to 75,000 dollars of the costs. Each station includes a helmet bin for pick-up and return. Each helmet in the bin is clean before checking it out. Since 2003, King county has enforced an all age, all time bike helmet law and Pronto responded to this by providing helmet rentals at each station. THE END AND WHY IT DIDN’T WORK In 2016, underperforming several stations were relocated and updated to try to capture more riders. For example, this stop was relocated to be closer to the street car and light rail station (Pictured right). The city originally decided that investing in electric assisted bikes would be a better use of city funds considering the underperformance of uphill stations. However, Mayor Ed Murray has recently decided to use the $3 million to fund city-wide bicycle and pedestrian improvements. “This shift in funding priorities allows us to make critical bicycle and pedestrian improvements — especially for students walking and biking to school,” Murray said “While I remain optimistic about the future of bike share in Seattle, today we are focusing on a set of existing projects that will help build a safe, world-class bicycle and pedestrian network” (Soper, Jan 13, 2017, GeekWire) Concurrently through the decision to take away subsidies from the failing bike system was a hearing on the potential conflict of interest from Seattle Department of Transportation Director, Scott Kubly who was a former employee of the bike share non-profit. The lack of proof that Pronto could succeed with expansion, and the perceived conflict of interest lead to the decision to pull the plug early in 2017. Tom Fucoloro, administrator of the Seattle Bike Blog, noted that geography and weather are not all to blame for the bike share’s demise. Bike share is successful in cold and snowy cities, as well as other hilly cities in the U.S. Others noted that Seattle’s bike helmet law discourages people from wanting to use the bike share as a means of commuting. Whether the stations were not planned appropriately around the topography or if it was the helmet policies that produced low ridership will be debated for some time, but the point is that ridership was dismal compared to other similar cities. One other challenge was the delay in the second phase of the project. With the delay of the expansion, many major destinations were left without stations so people could not use the bikes to get where they wanted to go. Funding and sponsorship was a complex struggle for Pronto. Pudget Sound Bike Share (PSBS) gave the reigns over to SDOT in 2015 and funding during this time was placed in limbo. Even before this move, PSBS was not able to secure the funding that was needed to cover the costs fof the program.

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Indianapolis, IN

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BCYCLE 27 STATIONS

KEY TAKEAWAYS • System connectivity • Bike share vs bike rental • Single sponsorship

CASE STUDY By looking into this system in Indianapolis we can learn many ways to not only improve the Columbus CoGo system but to avoid the mistakes that caused problems elsewhere. The main take away from the Pacers Bike Share is that proper advertising is both important and, in many cases, necessary to the process in order to avoid public confusion from preventing riderships. Another mistake of the Pacers Bike Share system was that people felt they were hiding potential charges and liabilities in their user agreement. Though the user agreements were, and are, standard agreements that would likely be seen if someone were to rent a car when they weren’t brought up first thing potential riders got the wrong idea and assumed the bike share company was trying to hide them. At the same time we can learn from the overall success and expansion of the stations. With 71% of riders owning bikes there must be something convenient about the system. The Indianapolis system thrives on connectivity. Linking the outer areas to the inner parts of the city is the convenience that riders have come to enjoy. Riding a bike out to a different neighborhood without the absolute commitment to ride it back is a big selling point for riders. By using a bike share, if riders get tired on their trip checking their bike into the nearest station and taking a bus is a very simple process. The Indiana Pacers Bike Share is a system that has been working well in the city for over 2 years now. Looking into the practices of Indianapolis Cultural Trail Inc. and how they run the system can give valuable insight to what works and what doesn’t. By using this insight the CoGo bike share can work to avoid some of the misgivings generated when the public is confused about a concept while also implementing the ideas and core concepts that work well in a system.

165


Introduction to the system Indianapolis Indiana has implemented the Indiana Pacers Bikeshare, named after the NBA team owned by the generous donators the Herb Simon Family Foundation, into their transit options in an effort to expand the coverage of transit. The bikeshare heavily connects their downtown and leads off into some of the outer communities. The bikeshare goes through the heart of Indiana University Purdue University and the surrounding hospitals. There are currently 26 active bike share stations in the Indianapolis system with a clustering of stations around the Wholesale District and Mile Square. Bike Shares such as these provide the connections between places that other systems either cannot or are impractical to use given specific situations. Largely this system has been a successful addition to the system for Indianapolis. However, the system, like any other, went through many modifications and changes in order to become what it is today. System Specifics and memberships Indianapolis Cultural Trail, Inc. a not for profit organization operates the Indiana Pacers Bikeshare system with 26 stations and 250 bikes. The funding for the Indianapolis bikeshare including the equipment needed to both start and keep the stations running is funded by a federal grant for congestion mitigation and air quality from the federal highway administration as well as annual memberships, 24-hour passes, user fees, grants, and various sponsorships (B-cycle, 2015). The fee for memberships, which can be bought online or at a kiosk, range from $8 to $80. $80 for an annual pass of unlimited 30 minute trips or $8 for a 24 hour pass for unlimited 30 minute trips. If a trip goes longer than 30 minutes additional fees will be added. These fees, though they should always try to be avoided on the riderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s side, help to keep the stations running and in good condition. The fees themselves are as follows: $2 for an additional 30-60 minutes $4 for each additional 30 minutes after that This is, of course, on top of either the annual membership or one time 24 hour use pass. Any passes bought from the Indiana Pacers Bikeshare can be used in any B-Connected system, the company in charge of the bikeshare. In order to participate in the Indianapolis bikeshare the rider must be 18 years of age. Demographics The majority of riders are college educated white men between the ages of 18-35 with an annual household income between $50,000 - $99,000. The majority use is for leisure or fun coming in at 31% of the polled users while 24% use the system to get to lunch or meetings, 21% to run errands, and 20% to commute to work. Given the bike shares location in downtown Indianapolis many people find transportation via bike a good alternative to driving by car when not going long distances. With the connected areas away from the city leasure will also be a part of the use riders can enjoy from the bikeshare.

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The system at work Over all the Indiana Pacers Bikeshare has been a success. In fact, most members of the bike share own their own bike but find the bike share system to be more useful in their day to day lives. 71% of annual members own their own bike and 93% own a vehicle. 96% of users list Indiana as their home state. According to the IndyStar one year after the program was implemented there were 100,000 rides in Indianapolis. Indianapolis Cultural Trail Inc. is excited by the numbers (IndyStar, 2015). The system has seen no major situations in which moving one of the stations was necessary but that does not mean there aren’t stations more heavily visited than others. The station at Washington and Meridian is the most visited with 25.6 checkouts per day. Closely followed by White River State Park with 22.6 checkouts a day (Bikeshare by the numbers, 2015). Not everything starts out smoothly though and bike share is no different. When the system was first introduced people had their fair share of issues and concerns. Many still do. Mainly, peoples worries were on the charges that could be racked up. Of course there were the overage fees. However, that doesn’t pose as big as a concern with the people of Indianapolis as the other “hidden” fees and liabilities associated with riding a bikeshare bike in Indianapolis. If a rider is killed or injured while riding a bike, even if caused by the Indiana Cultural Trails negligence, the company cannot be sued for it. If a bike is damaged, even if the rider went through all the precautions to keep it safe they will be charged repair costs. Lastly, if a bike is stolen or otherwise out for longer than 24 hours the initial rider could be charged $1,500 for the bike. Though these sort of agreements are not uncommon for rentals many people still do not feel comfortable assuming that level of risk for a bike and so shy away from the system. Another aspect of the bike share system that many citizens did not understand at first was the billing practices. When bikeshare first launched in the city, and to many newer members today, they read the ‘24 hour pass’ as meaning they get the bike for 24 hours. Mary Ellen Mellitz was one such case was listed in the Indianapolis Star newspaper, “I was under the idea that this was a 24-pass and that meant I could have the bike for 24 hours.” Mary and her sister had the bikes out for 8 hours while they went through the city, ate lunch, and shopped. The ride ended up being over $60 (IndyStar, 2014). Though this money was refunded, this makes the point that advertising for the bikeshare programs need to drive home that this is a bike share and not a bike rental. Conclusion The Indiana Pacers Bikeshare is a system that has been working well in the city for over 2 years now. Looking into the practices of Indianapolis Cultural Trail Inc. and how they run the system can give valuable insight to what works and what doesn’t. By using this insight the CoGo bikeshare can work to avoid some of the misgivings generated when the public is confused about a concept while also implementing the ideas and core concepts that work well in a system.

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Minneapolis, MN

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BIXI 190 STATIONS

KEY TAKEAWAYS • Site near food destinations • Site near attraction points • Accessibility and connectivity

CASE STUDY

Overview The Minneapolis bicycle system is a good example of a network that is working well and still expanding. A lot of the practices they have used to create the successful bike share network can be used when looking at how Columbus can improve upon their own system. The research Minneapolis did into regional bicycle corridors can be very helpful in Columbus’s expansion. If we are able to identify the major and minor bicycle corridors throughout the city, it will provide a stronger framework that will make it easier to find locations for additional bike share stations in the future. Having established corridors would make for a more organized expansion of the system off these major bikeways. The scoring guidelines that Minneapolis used could be modified to suit our own city’s needs. Although the goal is to identify new station locations, the Critical Bicycle Transportation Links are a good idea to think about long term for the city. If it’s not possible to easily fix a network connectivity issue, then it would be best to avoid that location for a bike dock. Identifying the critical link issues within Columbus can be helpful to narrow down the amount of station locations that are being evaluated. Also, by determining where the link issues are in the city, it may be possible to solve those problems with an addition of a station if the issue is the distance to the next station. Once the general area for a new station is chosen, it is most important to look at the distances to food business and job access in particular. These factors have the most positive effect on amount of ridership at a particular station. Once a location is chosen, being creative with how the station will fit in the space will make a big difference in how people move around the new addition. Having options like placing a station on grass or in the street can improve siting options, traffic flow, and sway unconvinced residents. The Columbus CoGo system is still young but there is positive outlook for its future success in the city. 168


Ridership and Pricing Since beginning operation, Nice Ride has had a steadily increasing number of riders year to year. With yearly expansions adding more bikes and stations, Nice Ride’s ridership rose, with over 100,000 more rides being taken in 2011 than in 2010. The following two years continued the trend with a 25% increase in 2012 and an 11% increase in 2013. The system surged again in 2014 with a 100% increase in ridership to over 400,000 rides completed. The most surprising thing is that no new stations were added to the network in 2014, yet that was the year of the most growth. The following year saw 18% growth while adding 20 new stations. 2016 became the first year that Nice Ride lost ridership at about a 10% loss. This drop in rides was due to construction in the downtown area that deterred tourists from using the bikes. Memberships rides still increased in 2016, but the number of casual rides being taken dropped by almost 40%. This is something that can be very important to the success of a system. It would be key to be aware of what construction is happening and temporarily re-locate stations if necessary to avoid the drop in ridership. Nice Ride’s payment system is similar to most other bike share systems. This is an effective pricing system and should motivate more people to buy month and year memberships. Nice Ride’s revenue has been able to pay the operating costs with a small amount of money left over. The majority of revenue came from casual pass users and their extra time fees. These two categories made up 70% of Nice Ride’s revenue in 2016 with the next majority coming from annual memberships at 22%. The majority of their operating expenses come from software and data housing followed by operations wages. Overall, Nice Ride has created an effective bike share system that is providing the city with alternative transportation.

Single Rides

$3 per half hour

24 Hour Pass

$6

Unlimited 30 min rides $3 extra for rides longer

30 Day

pay-as-you-go

$18

Unlimited 60 min rides $3 extra for rides longer

Station Types Nice Ride stations are split into three categories based on the station location. The first category is Network stations that are located in high density multi family areas, employment centers, and retail centers. These stations are geared toward daily resident transport needs and make up the majority of the Nice Ride system at around 62%. Attraction Point stations are located near destinations like museums, hotels, restaurants, and outdoor seating that will bring in possible first time riders. These stations generally bring in more revenue than network stations and can still perform well even though they may not be close to other stations. Attraction Point stations make up approximately 20% of the network. Lastly are Regional Equity stations that are situated in neither high density areas nor tourist areas. These stations provide access to low income 169

1 Year

$75

Unlimited 60 min rides $3 extra for rides longer


areas. It is expected that equity stations will be used less due to lower residential density as well as commercial activity. Nice Ride pays a $2500 annual operating loss on each equity station and they make up about 18% of the system. A big part of the expansion of the system came from a partnership with the National Park Service in 2012. The partnership brought Attraction Point stations to a 72-mile stretch of riverfront called the Mississippi National River and Recreation Area. The stations were centered in downtown St. Paul with installations in the busiest areas of the National Park. Stations run off solar power and are connected to an app that users can check bike availability with and see a map of stations. Siting Ideas There are many factors that go into siting a new bike share station. The location chosen needs to be in an area where there are enough people and attractions that the station will be used a profitable amount. In 2012, Students at the University of Minnesota did a study on the Nice Ride bike share stations and the relations between the amount of rides taken and the proximity of food, business, residents, and other transit options. The top 10 most used stations in 2011 were found and compared to the top 10 least used stations. Eight of the most used stations were in areas of dense retail destinations mostly in the central business district. The other two most used stations were on the University of Minnesota campus. The 10 least used stations were in areas with less retail and consumer business. The team used regression analysis to analyze trip origin and destination data. When siting for new stations, a focus should be placed on proximity to food businesses and job accessibility. “Each additional food business in a bike share station area is associated with 4.5% more trips at that station” (Schoner, Harrison, Wang, 2012). Shopping destinations don’t have the same impact. They went on to identify what they found to be the breakdown of importance of many other factors. The next most important characteristics of a possible station location are race, distance to water, distance to the central business district, and trail existence. Following these are age and distance to the nearest station. When examining specific sites of bike share stations throughout the Twin Cities, the majority of stations are simple straight row stations of bike docks. Stations generally had no less than 15 bike docks and were placed so they would not disrupt pedestrian or vehicle traffic. The majority of stations were placed on large sidewalks where there was still enough room for pedestrians to walk. There were also stations placed on the shoulder of streets where there would generally be parking. Lastly, in areas where there was not enough sidewalk space and no room in the street, stations were placed on the grass just next to walkways. Stations placed on grass tended to be in park areas where there were many smaller trails. There is discussion that a good way to increase ridership is to densify the number of stations in an area therefore making the system more easily accessible to the community. It is important to have enough stations to adequately serve an area but having too many is also problematic from an economic standpoint. With too many stations concentrated in one place, ridership will dilute between the stations (Schoner, Harrison, Wang, 2012). Even though the same amount or more riders will be using the network, there will be a loss due to having to operate another station in an area that didn’t have the demand for it. There is a lot to think about when adding a new station to a network. The Twin Cities region plans to develop a Regional Bicycle Transportation Network as part of their Transportation Policy Plan (TPP) to bring more alternative transportation to the area. The main goal of their project is to identify major regional corridors that would benefit from bicycle infrastructure. By creating these corridors, they then hope to be able to build further outward. To do so they are gathering a project advisory committee made up of representatives from the 7 counties, 5 cities, bike/ transit advocates, U of M, Three Rivers Parks District, Met Council, and MnDOT. They are also forming a project management committee with staff from Met Council, Metro Transit, and MnDOT. Public engagement will be done through four listening sessioins in outlying suburbs, four public workshops/ 170


open houses, and an on-line route preference tool. Below are the guidelines that the project team used to identify the corridors. Regional bicycling corridors should… - Overcome physical barriers and eliminate critical system gaps - Facilitate safe and continuous trips to regional destinations in urban/suburban/rural areas - Function as arteries to connect regional destinations and the transit system year-round - Accommodate a broad range of cyclist abilities/preferences to attract variety of users - Integrate and/or supplement existing and planned infrastructure - Provide improved opportunities to increase the share of trips made by bicycle - Connect to local, state, and national bikeway networks - Consider opportunities to enhance economic development - Be equitably distributed throughout the region - Follow spacing guidelines to reflect established development and transportation patterns - Consider regional priorities reflected in adopted bicycle plans Regional Bicycle Transportation Network: The entire set of proposed network corridors or facilities that serve as the “backbone” arterial system that will connect city and county bikeways with regional destinations. Priority Regional Bicycle Transportation Corridors: A subset of the Regional Bicycle Transportation Network that have been identified as high priority based on the network scoring and the degree to which the corridors connect population centers with key regional destinations and the regional transit system. The “priority” corridors or designated alignments are intended to serve the highest potential bicycle demand based on the Met Council’s urban/suburban development context reflecting the existing and planned population and employment densities in the region. (Twin Cities Regional Bicycle System Study, 2014) When the committee began to analyze the data and identify the possible bicycle corridors, they created a scoring system to compare the advantages of all the options. The total possible score was 15.5 with more points possible in categories of the most importance. Researchers also looked into how the corridors should be spaced within the city. Local communities within the Twin Cities region have guidelines in place already about the spacing of bicycle facilities. These plans state that “principal arterial bikeways should be spaced about two miles apart with minor arterial bikeways spaced 1 mile apart” (Minneapolis Bicycle Master Plan, 2011). St. Paul’s Transportation Plan stated that, “generally, bikeways should be no more than a half-mile apart, and arterial striped bike lanes and/or off-street trails should be no more than one mile apart” (2008). Minneapolis also looked at three peer regions, Atlanta, Denver, and Nashville to see how their spacing compared. Spacing measurements were taken at 5, 10, and 15 miles from the center of the primary business district of each city. After averaging this data, they found that the average spacing was 2 miles greater in the peer cities at each distance than for the proposed regional bicycle transportation network in Minneapolis. This was seen to be as a result of the large amount of existing bicycle facilities that are already in the Twin Cities region that provided the base for a more a complete network. By using the scoring guidelines, origin and destination requests from the public, and general spacing guidelines the committee made GIS maps with all the info. These maps were then refined to highlight the priority corridors. Overall, their proposed network would be 1,270 miles with 579 miles being priority corridors. The study also introduces what they call “Critical Bicycle Transportation Links” that attempt to link isolated communities and destinations to the rest of the regional network. A link will try to complete one or more functions to improve the network. A link can close a gap in the bicycle network by improving bike facilities to make them usable for all skill levels or by constructing a short (up to 1/4-mile) critical 171


link to a regional destination (Twin Cities Regional Bicycle System Study, p.13). Another function would be to improve continuity between jurisdictions. Bike paths will sometimes 1896 be only up to the border of a county and not further, creating a consistent amount of bike access will improve the overall quality and bikeability of the system. The last critical link they identify is the need to remove physical barriers preventing bicycles from passing. They suggest that these projects should be completed on an opportunity basis since they will likely be costly and often involve bridges and underpasses. These critical links are a small yet large part of any bike system. The more they can be minimized, the more efficient 1970’s and use to use the bike network will be.

On-street bicycle facilities constructed along Lake Street

Paving of 55-mile offroad loop of the Grand Rounds park system

History of Nice Ride Minneapolis started its bike share program in 2008 with Nice Ride that became officially operational on June 10, 2010 with a fleet of 700 bikes and 65 stations across the city. That first season was successful with 100,000 rides taken which prompted further expansion of the system. More bikes and 1990’s stations were added throughout Minneapolis, and St. Paul started to have stations installed as well. By 2016, there were 190 stations and 1700 bikes with 1.75 million rides taken on Nice Ride bikes. In the decades before the bike share began, the Twin Cities began investing in their bicycle infrastructure. As early as 1896, on-street bicycling facilities were constructed along Lake Street. In the 1970’s they completed paving off-road trails of a 55 mile loop of the Grand Rounds 1991 park system. Abandoned railroads were converted to trail use, most notably the Cedar Lake Trail from downtown Minneapolis to the west suburbs. This particular trail was nicknamed the first “bicycle highway” in the US. The U of M Transitway between the Minneapolis and St. Paul campuses was also paved over. The Twin Cities began to bolster on-road bike lanes and more projects were made possible through the Intermodal Surface Transportation Equity Act (ISTEA) in 1991. The regions bicycling infrastructure be2005 came interconnected in the early 2000’s with the opening of the Midtown Greenway and Saint Paul’s Sam Morgan trail. Cities and counties across the Twin Cities joined in to build bike specific infrastructure to improve connectivity. In 2005, Minneapolis was chosen to receive special federal funding through the Non-Motorized Transportation Pilot Program (NTPP). Over $25 million was marked for bike and walking investments in the Twin Cities. This money was used to add 2011 75 miles of new bike facilities and kickstart the Nice Ride bike share program. This early investment in bicycle paths made it much easier to implement a bike share system that is efficient and connected. 172

Rail to Trail conversions of Cedar Lake, U of M Transitway, Gateway State Trail, among others. Onroad bike lanes on Park and Portland Avenues

Twin Cities revieve money from the Intermodal Surface Transportation Equity Act (ISTEA)

Minneapolis is chosen by the Non-Motorized Transportation Pilot Program (NTPP) to recieve $25 million earmarked for bike and walking investments

Minnesota segment of the Mississippi River Trail (MRT) designated as Minnesota’s first state bikeway and the first segment of the United States Bicycle Route System


B

MADISON, WI

!

BCYCLE 50 STATIONS

KEY TAKEAWAYS • Distant stations can work • Bike infrastructure key • Revenue drives expansion

CASE STUDY City Context

The city of Madison is quite comparable to Columbus; despite having a third of the population (2015 estimates put it at around 250,000), it has a similar density, has a shape and development pattern defined by bodies of water, is its state’s capital and home to a major university, and is also a Midwestern city with the climate that entails. (DADS) The city’s downtown is positioned on an isthmus between two large lakes, with the University of Wisconsin on one end of this. Because of this, traffic is funneled through a very tight corridor, magnifying the transportation density that is already seen from students on campuses and commuters in downtown areas even further. Despite the famously harsh winters of Wisconsin, Madison is famous for its opportunities for outdoor recreation, particularly in bicycling. The city is home to seventy-five miles of off-street bicycle paths, much of which is well-lit and through scenic greenways, and another 120 miles of on-street bicycle lanes. It is one of only five cities in the country to earn the League of American Bicyclists’ platinum status in their Bicycle Friendly Communities program, putting it on par with the likes of Davis, California, and Portland, Oregon. (Wahlberg) This focus on bicycling isn’t expected to change soon: The city’s new 30-year transportation master plan, Madison in Motion, calls for further expansion of the biking network, complete with reach into suburbs and more off-street paths along major streets that could be deemed dangerous in the eyes of most riders. (Speckhard)

Operator

Madison’s system is operated by BCycle, a company owned by Trek Bicycle Corporation. At the time of first approaching the city of Madison, the company had only four networks in operation, with anoth 173


er four planned; Madison became the ninth. (Czubkowski) One of the biggest bike share operating companies in the country, they have expanded to reach thirty-four cities in the United States, as well as a network in Santiago, Chile. (BCycle, “Cities”) From its launch in 2011 to its most recent season in 2016, BCycle has been operating under the same contract with the city, which is currently in renewal talks this winter. As described below, this contract was not the original plan between BCycle and Madison, and was renegotiated to minimize the financial cost to the city. While the city assists with siting the stations and hooking up to the power grid, BCycle owns all involved equipment, and the city only pays a token $1 contribution annually. Any profits derived from the system would go entirely to BCycle. (Czubkowski)

System History

Negotiations between the City of Madison and BCycle began in 2010, with the first agreement coming up for City Council vote in January, 2011. Very quickly, the issue became contentious. BCycle is a company closely tied to Trek Bicycle Corporation, which is headquartered in the area, which lead to allegations of conflicts-of-interest. Former Alderwoman and open government advocate Brenda Konkel filed formal complaints alleging that at least four people associated with BCycle and Trek attended meetings and participated in studying the proposed plan without registering as lobbyists. (Kittner, “Former”) Both the way the negotiations were handled and the terms of the agreement came under attack early in 2011, as the city’s mayoral election drew near. The agreement with the incumbent mayor would have the city contribute $100,000 per year, the first year of which would come from city reserve funds, for a three-year contract with profits shared equally; projections showed the program almost certain to fail to turn a profit during the contract’s term. (Czubkowski) (Kittner, “Former”) The challenger for the mayoral race, who promised to renegotiate the contract as part of an overhaul of the city’s finances, ended up winning office and implementing the current contract. Installment of the first stations and bikes began that spring as part of a ‘soft launch’ at the end of May, with the full launch that July, and the last of the initial stations placed in the fall. The soft launch allowed the operators to troubleshoot software and network issues ahead of time, and served as an early marketing push. Between this, enthusiasm from the bicyclist community, and marketing pushes at public events complete with free-ride vouchers, the system was off to a strong start. (Kittner, “Bicycle Rental”)

Current Business Situation

While ridership has grown over the years, network expansion has been limited, with BCycle finding it difficult to reach beyond the dense core of downtown Madison and the UW-Madison campus. Its biggest obstacle has been in securing the funds to build more infrastructure. As reported in 2016, Trek invested $1.4 million in the program’s launch, and has been absorbing the annual losses, which range from $300,000 to $400,000. (Elbow, “Despite Challenges”) There hasn’t been any talk of the program shutting down, however, and Trek has identified several reasons why it continues to support it. BCycle continues to offer lower prices in Madison compared to several other of their systems, and couples those prices with numerous discount opportunities. The harsh climate, including the program’s winter shutdown, limits ridership through much of the year. Trek’s proximity positions the Madison system as a showpiece for the company, and they do use the system to test out new software changes or modifications to bicycles. And, recently, they’ve started looking at using the system for charitable purposes with local equity groups. (Elbow, “Despite Challenges”) 174


All the same, they are looking for alternative opportunities for expansion. Sponsorship of new stations is something they’ve looked at, with the local community college, Madison Area Technical College, opting to pay for the construction of a station on their campus in 2015. They are also in talks with inner-ring suburbs to expand into their communities. (Elbow, “Despite Challenges”) Madison, itself, may emerge as a source of help further down the road; even if contract terms don’t change on renewal, the Madison in Motion transportation plan suggests the city invest in additional stations. (Speckhard)

Network Layout

Madison BCycle currently consists of just under 40 stations and 350 bicycles, centered around downtown Madison and the University of Wisconsin on the southwest end of the Isthmus. (Madison BCycle, “2015”) This links such destinations as the UW Hospital; the university campus; the shops and restaurants of State Street, Willy Street, and Atwood Avenue; the State Capitol and the Square; the Overture Center, the Monona Terrace convention center; Olbrich Botanical Gardens; and the parks along Lakes Mendota and Monona. Extensions of the network further southeast reach along three corridors: the University Avenue corridor with numerous shops and residential neighborhoods, down Monroe Street towards the Arboretum and Lake Wingra, and southward towards the Henry Vilas Zoo and the hotels near the Veterans Memorial Coliseum and Alliant Energy Center exhibition hall. Far to the Northeast is the station at Madison Area Technical College. This is an unusual station; as mentioned, the college paid for its construction, but it’s far removed from the rest of the network. The nearest station, at Olbrich, is already at the fringe of the network, and getting there is either 2.5 miles by road or 3.2 miles by bike path.

Usage and Pricing

Barring a few notable exceptions, the Madison BCycle system follows the standard bike share structure for usage and membership fees. The system, like many in cities with less-amenable winters, shuts down for three months, from mid-December to mid-March, and thus operates in nine-month seasons, with plans designed and priced accordingly. (Madison BCycle, “FAQs”) In the winter of 2015-2016, BCycle experimented with operating a reduced network, but lack of use and revenue lead to that being a one-time attempt. (Elbow, “Winter Bikers”) BCycle offers three standard plans for users, as seen below. This system is designed with the same philosophy as most, for station-to-station trips kept short in duration, as opposed to traditional bike rental. Trip times are held to 30 or 60 minutes, with each

Plan Offerings for Madison BCycle (Madison BCycle, “Rates”) 175


additional half-hour charged an additional $3 fee. Riders are free to renew the rental period at intermediate stations along their route. The 60-minute trip length option is unusual for bike share systems, but makes more sense in this context; due to geography, the network is more linear than most, and features a few more-remote stations. For students and employees of the University of Wisconsin, Madison Area Technical College, and the UW Health system, the Commuter Annual plan is offered at a reduced price of $20 per year. Students and employees of other schools can get the reduced price of $45 so long as they register with an active .edu email address. (Madison BCycle, “Rates”) Madison BCycle also offer discounts for employers to buy memberships for their employees at up to $40 off per person, a program which includes on-site registration and training, as well as promotional materials. (Madison BCycle, “Rates”) Additionally, they work with social equity groups in the Madison area to arrange free memberships. (Elbow, “Despite Challenges”) In addition to bicycle access, users get access to a personalized profile page and mobile app, which tracks (via GPS units in each bicycle) information for the user such as how often they use the service, how many miles they’ve covered in total, and an estimate of how many calories they’ve burned by using the service. This information, BCycle believes, encourages users to keep using the service. (BCycle, “FAQs”)

Ridership and Growth

Despite modest growth in the network itself, moving from 24 stations and 230 bikes at launch to 39 stations and 350 bikes today, ridership and mileage rose steadily. The most recently available annual report, released for the 2015 season, shows some interesting trends. Despite only making up 11% of the user base, subscribers account for 68% of the rides taken. According to internal surveys, the average rider is male (57% of respondents) between the age of 25 and 44 (50% of respondents), well-educated (87% of respondents with a college degree), and are bike owners outside of BCycle (over half own 1 or 2 bikes of their own). (Madison BCycle, “2015”)

2011 27 270 6437

Stations Bikes Total Users change on prev year

Subscribers

472

change on prev year

Trips

18501

change on prev year

Mileage

39618

change on prev year

2012 33 290 13603 111% 2150 356% 63325 242% 94402 138%

2013 35 290 17210 27% 1843 -14% 81662 29% 173940 84%

2014 39 350 21273 24% 2622 42% 104274 28% 219108 26%

Network and Ridership Data (Madison BCycle, “2012” and “2015”) 176

2015 38 350 28523 34% 2789 6% 101339 -3% 307241 40%


Montreal

!

Public Bike Share Company 460 STATIONS

KEY TAKEAWAYS • • •

Customer service matters Increased ride time for members matters Efficient software system matters

CASE STUDY Montreal Bike Share History Bike share started in Montreal with Quebecers creating the bikes, and implementing the system. The original Public Bike System Co. (PBSC) had $50 million in debt, cash flow problems, and bad software that was running the system. The main problem that crippled the company was a decision to change software systems; in 2012 there was a dispute with the original software designer 8D Technologies, so PBSC decided to design it’s own software, which began the company’s decline. Then the company faced shortages of parts and rivals gained some of their top customers. Due to all the issues the company split into two parts, one was the city of Montreal who bought the bikes and stations that allowed the system to run under a non-profit company and the other was real estate developer, Bruno Rodi, who was the only bid on the $4 million international company. One of the first things he did was hire developer to the software issues. He sold the majority of the business to a local businessman, Luc Sabbatini for an undisclosed amount in January 2015. Sabbatini moved fast to iron out all the issues and stopped doing things that were not profitable. PBSC stopped providing customer service to cities across the country and became primarily the supplier instead of operations and supply. The company is now called PBSC Urban Solutions and it sells bike-sharing systems including both the bicycles and docking stations to cities around the world.

BIXI Launch BIXI Montreal was started in 2014 as a non-profit organization by the Village of Montreal to help the city manage its bike-sharing system. Even though they are two separate companies now, potential customers are brought to BIXI’s head office to demonstrate how a city can successfully manage its bike-share program. Now the BIXI network consists of 5,200 bikes and 460 stations throughout Montreal, Westmount, and Longueuil Canada. BIXI’s goal is to be an active mode of transportation for Montreal and recognized as a main part in the public transportation system. Devinci bicycles are designed to be rugged enough to withstand staying outside in the difficult conditions and to be ridden over rough, pothole terrain built the bikes. Michael Dallaire did the design 177


of the bikes. Those design elements were implemented into the station designs so they easily blended into the urban environment of Montreal. The BIXI name comes from marrying the words “bicycle” and “taxi” after a contest asking citizens to identify the bike with a name, a great way for the community to feel empowerment over their system.

Bike Usage There are two different ways to remove the bike depending on if you are a season pass holder or a shortterm user. All one-season members have a BIXI key that they can insert into the reader at the bike dock. And for those who have one of the temporary passes they enter a five-digit code that they received at the pay station into the BIXI bike. First, a yellow light will flash displaying that the code is correct, then a green light will come on once the validation is complete and the dock that the bike is in will unlock. There is a total of 15 seconds that the dock will unlock allowing the rider to remove the bike. To remove the bike the rider must pull the bike firmly out towards them, then the dock will lock again. If the key isn’t valid or there is something wrong with the bike a red light will appear and the bike will not be released from the dock. Similarly to other bike sharing experiences you have 30 minutes between rides before you must stop at another dock to check in. If you are a monthly, half season, or yearly pass holder you have access to 45 minute rides. There are currently four different ways to pay for the services. The largest, one-season membership is $89.00 for the entire season that the bikes are out. The next step is a 3-day pass for $14.00. There is a $5.00 24hour pass for riders who just want to use the bike for a day. Then the one-way trip option is $2.95. There are a variety of passes for users from the person who uses it as their main mode of transportation, the weekend visitor, or rider who is in a pinch and needs something to get from their point A to point B. There is not one set type of terrain or location that the BIXI stations are located on. They are in the streets, taking up the parking spaces of two cars, on the sidewalk where users can pull the bikes out onto the pathway behind them, and sometimes they are located on grass near the street. Since BIXI takes their stations out of commission totally over the winter months, if they must adjust where a station goes they make the changes for the upcoming season and they station itself is more flexible in it’s placement. Compared to other bike-share systems there are a lot more trips made by members instead of occasional users. The total number of trips in 2016 was 4,099,829 combining both members and occasional users. Since BIXI has 460 stations and 5,200 bikes that equates to just fewer than 790 rides for each bike during the 2016 season.

178

Number of trips by members and occasional riders in 2016


Partners At the beginning of the 2016-year Montreal’s mayor, Mr. Denis Coderre announced a new partnership between Manulife and BIXI. This was a great win for the company and indicated that BIXI’s re-launch was successful. Manulife provides financial, insurance, wealth, and asset management advice for individuals to partnership is one that will benefit Manulife by becoming more involved in the Montreal community and show their commitment to healthy lifestyles. Mr. Charles Guay, Executive Vice President and General Manager, Institutional Markets, Manulife Canada and President and CEO commented on the partnership “Physical and financial well-being are of the utmost importance and the best way to show that is by getting involved with a mode of transportation that Montrealers appreciate, in addition to being a responsible mode of transportation.”(2) Everyone was excited by the partnership and all of the other collaborations between the pairings.

Free BIXI Sundays during the 2016 season sponsored by Manulife Photo by: BIXI Team Since customer service is a priority BIXI-Manuvie valets started in Montreal in 2016, which made for faster access to bikes and parking spaces during busy hours at major events. To jump start the 2016 season the partnership between the two offered a $12.00 discount on annual subscriptions from March 17th to April 3rd and a 20% group discount for friends, teammates, or employees of 20 people or more until the 1st of June. BIXI is also partnered with STM, AMT, Velo Quebec, Communauto, and Acces Montreal, but they do not have the same exposure as Manulife.

Analysis

Montreal’s bike share system was not the first large-scale bike sharing systems, but it was one of the firsts and has been considered one of the most innovative as it has technologies specifically designed for bike share. BIXI is starting to turn a profit after years of establishing itself and a lot of setbacks. It has had to over come a lot of obstacles and pave the way for other cities since it started with the entire process of making the bikes all the way to customer service of riders. Since Columbus is in a different situation and is able to benefit from PBSC’s learning curve we can enjoy the high-quality sturdy bikes. Our climate and bumpy roads need the durable bikes compared to southern cities such as San Antonio. It does make sense that we are using the same system as Montreal for our weather, but we do not have to remove our stations over the winter months and CoGo does not have the same amount of users compared to BIXI, but hopefully since it was one of the earlier established bike-share programs rider-ship will increase. 179


B

NASHVILLE, TN

!

BCycle 36 STATIONS

KEY TAKEAWAYS • Nationwide membership pass • Virtual kiosks for festivals • Low annual membership fee

CASE STUDY

Throughout recent years, large cities around the country have been experimenting in bike share systems. These systems allow riders to take short trips from one station to the next for a low cost. Whether it’s to provide an alternative way to travel, attract tourists to the area, or to promote healthier lifestyles, each system uses the same general operations with slight variations to cater to the needs of the city. This analysis is on Nashville’s bike share system, Nashville B-Cycle. It contains information on the current bicycle infrastructure and ridership throughout the city and the system’s operation.

Nashville Nashville is a large city located in Central Tennessee, and home to around 679,000 people (Nashville, n.d.). It’s a vibrant city that boasts being the music capital of the world, bringing in a large number of tourists annually (Nashville, n.d.). Additionally, its downtown area contains the offices and workplaces of both residents and commuters from surrounding suburbs (Nashville, n.d.). While most drive into and throughout the city, there have been regional studies detailing current and recent-past bicycle ridership data.

Nashville Ridership Data In response to the lack of bicycle data, the Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (Nashville MPO) conducted a study to count pedestrian and bicycle traffic at certain major intersections. In addition to the counts, they also surveyed the public about their bicycle riding habits. The results of the study showed that 25% of respondents bike to work at least once a week, which resulted in a 7% increase in morning ridership from the years 2011 to 2013 (Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization, 2013). While that is reassuring for a bikeshare system, that increase is significantly smaller than the 2009 to 2011 60% morning ridership increase (Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization, 2013). The current interest in biking throughout Nashville is imperative when choosing to install a bikeshare system. It shows that residents are willing to bike around the city, and that there is more interest as the years progress. 180


Nashville Existing Bike Infrastructure

S 14th St

S 19th St S 20th St

Riverside Dr

e Av

Tredco Dr

Thistlewood

Preston Dr

l St Campbel

n Dr Presto

Greenwood Cemetery Elm Hill Pike

ess busintricts dis Hill Ave

Pop lar Ln 40

h attistoric ract / ions

Ln

Arlin

gto

n

53

venues

ce

Menzler Rd

Foster oster A Ave

Polk olk Ave A

Enos Ree d Dr

Spence Ln

with bike lanes

Corn

elia

St

agan Rd

Ln Fesslers

Mount Olivet Cemetery

s greenway t Mu rfre ff-stree (oesboro s) th paPike

Pinewood Rd

Harwood Dr

Stratford Ave

e St

Oxford

Katherin mead e Dr Glen

Burns St

Sherwood Ln

Ave

Branch St

Groves Park Rd

Riverside

N 17th St S 17th St

Dr

Skyview Dr

n Pike

B-cycle bikeshare

Parris Ave

Nance Ln

Lester Ave

Dr

dro

Wilh

n

Cave Rd

Spen

Stanley St

24

S

Ter erm miina nal Dr

rro

River Overlook

Dr

Calvary Cemetery

Wood W oodyycres crestt

He

Tammany Dr

Pik e llati n Ga Ave

Scott Ave

Bronte Northview Ave

Scott Ave

Gentry Ave

e Pik latin Gal

N 14th St

St N 14 th N 14th St

N 16th St S 16th St

S 15th St

S 13th St Village Ct

S 10th St

S 11th St S 13th St

S 12th St

S 18th St

Oakwood Ave

Ambrose Ave

aS t Ing

Emmett

ent Laur

tin Av e Galla

N 12th St

McFerrin Ave

Hart Ave

Neill Ave

N 9th St

Driftwo od St St

St

Maury St

Lewis St

Fairfield

Claiborne

Wharf Ave

Pillow St

Rains Ave

Culvert St

Main Trailhead

Lebano

40

Woodard

y gg s Fro ttom Bo ail Tr

r

un

Ae Av itage Herm

Elm Hill Pike

St

Pennington

Jones Ave

Ave

omery

dale

Jones Ave

Rose

Montg

Ave Evanston

N 7th St

N 6th St

Lischey Ave

N 5th St

N 3rd St

Myrtle Ave

Ave

Ave

Pennock Ave

Stainback

Lischey

Meridian St

Meridian St

Martin St

Allison Pl

Stewart Pl

Neal Ter Carvell Ave

Hagan St

Scott Ave

Woodyhi ll Dr

Flamingo Dr

Ave

Dickerso n Pike Stockell St

Joseph Ave N 2nd St Ewing

8th Ave S

13th Ave S 12th Av eS

Trevecca Nazarene University

B

Observation Deck

Hidden Pond

Nature Center

P Shelby Park

oh

Om

easyriding zones

t

4th

15th Ave S

7th Ave S

Music Cir E

15th Ave S 14th Ave S

Villa Pl

11th Ave S

17th Ave S 16th Ave S

Ave S 21st

Kore Memoan Vets rial Br

Jam

y

wa

ad

Bro

20th

l nP

isto Ell

25th Ave S

24th Ave S

Trace

Luton St

d Fre eS ilve rR

Way

ens

Pl m tha ea Ch

18th Ave N

23rd Ave N

Natchez

19th Ave S 18th Ave S

24th Ave N 26th Ave N

27th Ave N

31st Ave N

En rou

th 57

25th Ave N

dA ve

40th

41st

39th

We st

gh

39th Ave N

40th Ave N

38th Ave N Chamberlin St

37th Ave N

Park Cir

44th

Meadowcres t Ln

28th Ave N

st 61

N

Av e th 60

d rily nR

Love ll er A ve Snyd

Ath

r ive dR an

26th Ave N

28th Ave N

Mexico Dr Briarwick Dr

Hydes Ferry Rd

bo

S

Wilson Blvd N

Ave

Ma rl

N Av e

N Av e rd

63

Ma

Elaine

P

son St

David

Fortland Ave Connector

ide Dr

y

rne

Ca

4th

49

Dog Shelby Park Park Community Sevier Center Lake

P e Av

Ave

oD

Community Center

h 52 dit re Robertson Me

Ensley Blvd

Rd

181

St

Tillman Ln

Rivers

Nestor

Waters Ave

St

Carter Ave

Rosebank

Pl Omohundro

Hart

S

Ave

P

Visc

Visco Dr

Park ard Figure 1: Nashville Riding Routes We Retrieved on January 23, 2017 from https://d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.net/walkbikenashville/pages/49/attachments/original/1421783591/NashvilleGroove.pdf?1421783591 Bern

Dr

Fesslers Ln

Fain

Lewis St

Ave

Benton Ave

St

Greenwood

Fortland Ave Trailhead

Sevier St

eS

3rd

Acklen Ave

tc

Cru

N Hill St

South Nashville

Southgate

St

St

S

Merritt Ave

Moore

51

S

Ave

65

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50

t

Houston St Humphreys St Gray St

r he

Vinny Links Golf Course

Trimble St

tS

tnu

es

Ch

Hamilton Ave

Reservoir Park

S

48

Summit Ave

Argyle Ave

4th

Fort Negley

Fort Park Negley Greer Stadium

Ave

47

Rose Community Park Center

Lafa

Ave

Archer St

Adventure Science Ctr

2nd

Edgehill

St

1st

6th

Hawkins St

k Oa

St

S

e

Vin

Mu

Le

Glenview

30b

South Inglewood Park

P P

Long Ave 5th S1

th S7

n

y

St

Hanover Rd

Piedmont Ave Marsden Ave

Shelby Golf Course

Ave

Eastside Ave Electric Ave

e

Pik

Riverside Village

Ann St Community Center

East Nashville

Woodland St

31 Hol ly St

Lillian St

Sevier St

Ave

Russell St

St Shelby Ave

ck

vo

Cahal Ave

Benjamin

Ordway Pl

Fatherland

e Av

Ga

Mc

30a

son St

Av e

rr lbe

Forrest Ave

t

re no

Mc Ewen

Gartland Ave

David

to dle

40

33

wS

De

St

ge tled

Ru

Fogg

ge

Kirkpatrick

Eastwood

Boscobel

St

Rolling Mill Hill Greenway

M Fulton ley ds Complex Lin

Ave

t

S

The Gulch

ita

id

3rd

Ave

12th

Exercise caution in traffic circle

th S6

Vernon Ave

St

rm

5th

10th

Lea

t yS od ab Pe Lafa yett eS

Davidson

St

ve yA

elb

th S5

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Blv

a

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S

N

Ave

Ave

N

Eastboro Dr

th N8

8th

e Av

Music City rans te Ctr n Ve

bel

sco

Bo

t th S S4

th

SoBro d

24

St

13

N

th

Acklen Caldwell

st S1

N

e Av

N

24

ld

Ave

Belmont University

nb

mo

nd S2

Ave

10th

th

14th

Mc

Arena un re

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Buffered lane limited outbound

Cumberland Park West Riverfront Park Amphitheater

18 Bridgestone

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32

t n S Park lva Sy Community Center

ve ry A

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Broadway District ock St

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46

Hillsboro Village

t

hS

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Ch

e Av

N

Music Row

N Ave 1st N Ave N 2nd N Ave 3rd Ave 4th

7th

Alley

t ll S

Nissan Stadium

St ck eri n St io Un Printers

d ea

D

South St

Ave

N 1st St

N

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a Ch

nd

dla

St

ve dA

Ave

Manchester Ave

N

Ave

Capitol Hill tte Ave

t

St

on

elt

Ave

Pike

Litton Ave

t

S

Sh

Ave

Eastland Ave

Woodland St

3

ll S

sse

Sh

St

o Wo

Music City Central

YMCA

11

St lan

e Av

th

18

N

N

Edgehill

Capers

Portland

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R es

St

Grand Ave

lia gno Ma lvd B

Go straight onto sidewalk in median

Ma

St

Mil

th

16

e Av

io

is Div

East Park

Five Points

St

nd

dla

Ru

N

on

Mc

th

e Av

ve st A

44

Barton Ave

nd River

Ave

5th

Ave

N

17th

20 21

rd

23

N

Children’s

N

N

N

Ave

N

th 19

e Av

Midtown

n

H Vanderbilt

Belcourt Ave Acklen Ave

Ave

Ave N

Ave

Ave

7th

6th

10th

Ave

d Blv

t

sS

ye

Ha

Pierce Ave

H

1st

2nd

3rd

9th

16th

r

nd

H

Cumberla

N

N

N

N

St

ch

ur

t in S

Ma

26

McGavock

29

Franklin Ave

olf

G

Kenmore Pl

Otay St

Greenwood

Sumner Ave

Stratton Ave

Calvin Ave

dy

ne

en K

Douglas Ave

Benjamin

Ave

Ave

Chester Ave

Roberts Ave Sharpe Ave

St

25

sA ve

Cahal Ave

Straightway

Sharpe Ave

a Ave

St

lma

28 Ave Chester

27 Greenwood

Chicamaug

St

ey

ms

Community 34 Center in

t err yS Ga on M ls Ne

t

Ch

Thomas H Saint Midtown

e Av

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nA ve

Petway Ave

Mansfield

De

YMCA

rka

Granada Ave

Greenwood Ra

Ave

Ave

Kirkland

Ave

Ave

St

Ave

Ave

Ave

Ave

St

Marina St

Frederick Douglass Park 24

Clu

od

l

pel

Cowan

4th

5th

12th

N Ave St 11th on rris Mo

14th

dJ Tod

22

rfie

este

e

lsid

Dr

DB

20th

Dees Park

Hil

N Ave

Ave

Belcourt Ave 45 Acklen Ave Fannie Mae Fairfax Ave

Ave

lvd

N

19th

Blakemore

sB

e Av Dr

s Way

ark LP

N th

Children’

te

Sta

Cleveland

iley

in A ve nA ve

Nashville Auto Diesel Douglas Ave College

Community Center

Sm

Ave

Strouse Ave

Carter St

o Wo

P

t yS

hn

U N I V E R S I T Y Scarritt

V.A.

Farmers’ Market

Downtown

St

on

ers

tt Pa

Garland

Highland

sa

th

14

rb

de

n Va

Ro

11

e Av

N 24th Ave

N 21st Ave

r

nd

tE

Bicentennial State Park

rl S

l

hy

Foster St g St

St

Seymour

CAUTION: STAIRS

Sprin

First Tennessee Park

65

a Pe

23

Mc

wo

roly

hal

er P

sA ve

Fair w

Ca Ca

Dozi

rch

lma

asaw

N 9th St

Marina

d

rris

n sto

Jo

Jo

Pear

rp

ilt

n

nto

Cli

McFerrin Park

Treutlan St

n iso

Ma

40

Marathon Village St

Grace St

Bu ain

De

Chick

Cleveland Park

frey

St

22

Ave

Vernon Win

Vaughn St

E Trinity Ln

Sp

Crockett

No bike lane eastbound through underpass – walk bike

Ave

Community Berry St Center

Germantown

Ha

16

VANDERBILT

West End

Ch

Ave

St

Elmington

th

N vd Jr Bl Todd eN Av Dr DB

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Chris

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Aquinas College

Murphy Rd Route goes through Westb Elmington Park parking lot

17

lo

S

Ch

Tennessee Technology Center

Richland Creek Greenway

an

d

R

(Coming soon)

Sentinel Dr

k roo

a St

sli

St

an

He

Hermos

Le

H

za

la

P

Fisk

St

lor

y Ta

2

St

rson

Va

St

St

t

vel S

Ja

e

roe

Mon Sco

rm

tte Av

N

Jeffe

H

Charlo

Av e

8

o cks

440 Greenway P

Av e

a St Moren

Centennial Centennial Parthenon Sports Plex Park

Utah Ave

Westlawn Dr

th

P

Community Center

McCabe Park & Golf Course

Sylvan Park

440

Nevada Ave

h

Nashville Fisk General University n St

Blvd

CAUTION: Walk bike on sidewalks here

S ve st A eS 31 Av nd 32

Rd

Nashville State Community College

Sylvan Park

Dakota Ave

rk Pa

40 Elkins Ave

s St

Clifton Ave

eN Av th eN 28 Av th 29

Idaho Ave

Clifton Park

42nd Ave N

48th Ave N

ob

Dakota Ave

39 Nebraska Ave

t Cir

36

46th Ave N

51st Ave N

50th Ave N

r

eD

idg

eR

Vin

49th Ave N

Dr

ll

da

P

Oakmon

Kn

Nevada Ave

Wyoming Ave

Kendall Dr

ay Trail

n Ke

53rd Ave N

35

Knob Rd Stonew

52nd Ave N

N 54th Ave

Rural Ave

Rd

Elkins Ave

ek

West Nashville

re dC

Oceola Ave

Demoss

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For any bike share system to be successful in a city, there needs to be adequate infrastructure to accommodate bikers. In 2009, Nashville MPO conducted a regional bicycle and pedestrian study, part of which surveyed the current status of bike lanes, paths, and sidewalks (Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization, 2009). Most roads throughout Nashville, with the exception of highways, are shared (Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization, 2009). These are clearly marked as shared with bicycles, are paved, and have a wide shoulder for bikers to safely travel on while cars pass (Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization, 2009). In 2009, there were 354 miles of bike lanes, bike routes, and greenways in the Nashville region, shown in Figure 1 (Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization, 2009). The dark brown paths are main loops consisting of shared roads with bike lanes, the dark orange lines show cut-throughs that are also along shared roads, and the green depict greenways.

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On busier roads, such as arterials where bike lanes are not possible, there are 460 miles of sidewalks that are wider to accommodate bikers and walkers (Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization, 2009). Having the lanes and routes for bikers to use is imperative to the potential success of a bike share system. While Nashville was already equipped with the right infrastructure, the plans to expand will enable more people to get more places on bikes. The increase in bicycle friendly roads and routes paired with the growing number of bike commuters created an atmosphere for bikeshare to move into the city.

Nashville B-Cycle With supporting infrastructure and an existing base of riders, the conditions were right for a bikeshare system to be put in place. The city received a $1.3 million grant to fund the first 20 stations (Brown, 2014). With their success, they added 5 more in 2015, and an additional 4 station expansion is in progress (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). Nashville B-Cycle is a collaboration between Trek Bike Company and Crispin & Bogusky, and locally managed by Nashville Downtown Partnership (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). The B-Cycle system is used in other cities such as Austin and Denver (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). There are two apps that partner with the system: Nashville B-Cycle app and the NashVitality app, which shows routes and trails (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). This provides riders an on the go option for checking out a bike as well as finding places to ride.

Initial Success The first two years of B-Cycle in Nashville were successful as the system took off and continued to expand. In 2014, two years after its initiation, 643 people held annual memberships (Brown, 2014). This represents a 17% increase in memberships from 2013 to 2014 (Brown, 2014). Named one of the “greatest assets in building a biking culture” by Nashville mayor Karl Dean, the system generated over 100,000 trips spanning over 260,000 miles (Nashville B-Cycle, 2015). Their success can be attributed to both their commuter riders and the business from tourists to the music capital of the world. When planning initial station locations, Nashville Downtown Partnership wanted to place them near both major attractions and the business core (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). The map, Figure 2, shows all of the stations. They are mostly close together to make it easier for riders to make it from one station to the next in the allotted time. It also ensures that riders won’t have to walk far to get to a station, something that could deter them from riding rather than just driving. Demand for bikes during frequent summer festivals lead to the addition of mobile kiosks and extra bikes near the festival location (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). During these weekends, the system shifts to a tourist-heavy business that works to mainly accommodate the increased numbers of potential riders. While it may take bikes away from other stations, it ultimately increases the ridership and therefore the money made by giving festival goers a better mode of transportation than fighting traffic.

Rates The Nashville bike share system has a similar pricing structure to others nationwide, providing riders with different options depending on what they wish to get out of it. For the tourists, or the casual rider testing the system out, a 24-hour option can be purchased for $5 (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). This can be bought on site at the kiosk (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). For $10, week long passes can be bought online, and for $15 riders can have access for a whole month (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). Lastly, yearly memberships can be purchased online for $50 (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). These four options give riders flexibility in their commitment to B-Cycle, allowing them to test it out before buying an annual membership.

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Using the System Whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting a one day pass or an annual pass, checking out a bike is a simple process that occurs either on site (24-hour pass) or online. Every rider regardless of the pass being bought must have a credit card on file (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). B-Cycle does offer gift cards, but a credit card still needs to be registered in order for a bike to be checked out (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). Your pass time begins the first time you check out a bike, rather than from the time you buy the pass, allowing riders to sort out their transportation plans ahead of time to avoid delays (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). Once your membership is purchased, you will receive a B-Card that you use at each kiosk when checking out a bike (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). There are fees for losing it, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also their way of tracking down where to apply overage charges to (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). Riders check in every hour, but can purchase an additional 30 minutes for $1.50 (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). This can continue up to $45 a day (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). If the station is full, riders are able to alert the system of the problem, and will be given 15 free minutes to ride to another station with vacancies (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). The Nashville B-Cycle system is setup to be user friendly and convenient for anyone wishing to ride. The B-Cycle system is used in several other cities around the country, including places like Austin, Denver, Madison, and Salt Lake City (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). To make B-Cycle more accessible and attractive, the B-Card can be used all around the country when accompanied by the card associated with the account (Nashville B-Cycle, n.d.). Riders that signed up in Nashville are able to check a bike out when visiting Denver, or to ride around the campus in Madison. This allows a membership to be nationwide, it goes where you go to ensure maximum utility.

Analysis Within its first four years of operation, Nashville B-Cycle has been successful and has gained popularity. The twenty initial stations were expanded on twice to meet demand, totaling 29 stations all within a three mile radius of the downtown core. Catering to a large tourist base and the residents that work downtown, the stations have been placed near main attractions and major business clusters. This dual focus is part of why B-Cycle in Nashville has been so successful. The stations are located so that everyone could depart from or arrive at one of them and be close to where they are coming from or going to. The small radius of station locations ensures that riders will be able to make it from one to the next without having to worry about overage fees. Additionally, Nashville has accounted for the increase in riders during the summer months when festivals are going on almost every weekend. Having virtual kiosks set up works as a way to advertise what B-Cycle is, as well as getting more people to ride as an alternative to driving and waiting in traffic. Lastly, the ability to take the membership throughout the country and utilize other B-Cycle systems works to increase riders, knowing that they could have an alternative mode of transportation already paid for at their destination.

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CINCINNATI, OH

!

REDBIKE

B-cycle 56 STATIONS

KEY TAKEAWAYS • Bike Infrastructure • Locate Near Transit • Outreach Through Media

CASE STUDY Intro to Bike-Share A new trend is popping up in big cities all over the country. This trend has been growing for the past five years and is being called the bike share system. Bike share systems are set-up in the city’s downtown and surrounding urban areas. In Cincinnati, how it works is you rent a Red Bike at one of the many Red Bike stations located in the city, then ride the bike from Point A to Point B. Once you are done riding the bike simply find the nearest bike station and return it. The purpose of the bike share system is to reduce how much people rely on cars, improve traffic, better our health/environment, and attract tourists. The City of Cincinnati recently started its bike share system, the Red Bike.

Red Bike The Cincinnati Red Bike has an adjustable saddle which allows anybody from 4’10” – 6’5” to ride comfortably. Both wheels have fenders to help guard the biker from mud/water. There is also a guard for the chain to protect your pants from getting tangled and dirty. There are lights behind the seat and right above the front tire to help alert other drivers on the street that there is a bicyclist. The tires are wide to help make for a smooth ride and hard for a rider to lose their balance. Hooked to the front of the bike is a basket which can hold up to 30 pounds and big enough to carry a book bag or groceries. The last amenity on the bike is the bike lock which will let you enjoy a nice meal with friends and not worry about your bike being stolen.

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City Infrastructure for Bikes The City of Cincinnati has worked hard to make the city bike friendly. Their mission is for bicycling to have a good impact in everybody’s daily life, so that everybody is able to utilize bicycles for everday need. The city has implemented bicycles facilities and educated the community on bicycle transportation. “The City of Cincinnati Bicycle Transportation Program has built 23 miles of bicycle lanes, installed roughly 450 bike racks, created 20 miles of shared use paths/trails, upgraded 231 miles of streets with bike friendly storm water inlets, and installed 5 miles of shared lane markings” (Bicycle Transportation Program).

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Price The Red Bike has two payment options: the 24-Hour Pass and the Annual Pass. The 24-Hour Pass cost $8 to ride the bike for a day. You are allowed to ride the bike for 60 minutes before you have to take it back to a station. Once back at the station you are allowed to take it back out for a spin. After 60 minutes you will be charged an additional $4 every 30 minutes it isn’t brought back to a station. You can buy the 24-Hour Pass online or at any Red Bike Station, but has to be paid with a credit card and you are only allowed to check out four Red Bikes per credit card. 24-Hour Passes are great for tourists and people who don’t visit the downtown area often. The Annual Pass costs $80 a year, or 22 cents a day. It is great for people who live/work downtown or always find themselves wandering downtown weekly. Like the 24-Hour Pass it is an unlimited ride for 60 minutes then you need to check it back in before riding it again. If not, you will be charged an additional $4 for every 30 minutes. Unlike the 24-Hour Pass though the Annual Pass can only be purchased online.

Ridership The ridership for the Red Bikes is extremely diverse. The percent of male rides is roughly 51% while female riders is 49% (rounded to the nearest percent). Nationwide, most biking systems are not as evenly dispersed between the genders as most riders are usually male. If you were to look at the 2010 census you would be able to tell that the ridership is similar to the racial background of that specific region of Cincinnati. The different riders based on race are Caucasian (77%), African-American (13.8%), 2 or more races (2.8%), Asian (2.3%), Other (2.0%), and American Indian/Alaska Native (1.5%). Riders varied from 18-64 years of age, but the majority of riders were between the ages of 2534. When comparing rider’s household income in 2015, people with incomes less than $25,000 took 11.8% of the rides, $25,000-$40,000 (14.6%), $40,000-$75,000 (23.9%), $75,000-$100,000 (12.3%), $100,000+ (26.2%), and 11.1% of riders surveyed did not reveal their income status. The percent of riders between the ages of 0-18 is (0.3%), 18-24 (19.3%), 25-34 (42.2%), 35-44 (14%), 45-54 (13.9%), 55-64 (8.5%), 65+ (1.2%), and 0.6% of the riders surveyed did not reveal their age.

Location The Red Bike Stations are located all around Cincinnati and even occupy the northern part of Kentucky. The total amount of stations is 56 with Cincinnati having 44, Covington 6, Newport 4, and Bellevue 2. Out of the 44 in Cincinnati, 30 of them are located downtown and the other 14 are just north of downtown where the University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati Zoo, and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital are located. Out of the 56 stations, 41 are located on a street or at an intersection, 7 park locations, 2 libraries, and 1 at a YMCA, casino, market, zoo, hospital, and college. These stations are in prime locations, because they are all close to a Metro bus stop. 70 percent of the stations were within one block of a Metro bus stop and another 28 percent were within one to two blocks. There is only one station that is located more than two blocks from a Metro station.

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Social Media On Facebook if you look up “Cincy Red Bike” you will go to the Red Bike Facebook page. The Facebook page has 2,947 likes and 2,876 followers. On the page you will find information on future special events, pictures of fellow Red Bike riders, news videos on the Red Bike, and contact information (phone number, website, and email). There is also an app for Apple phones that can allow you to find the closest Red Bike station, real-time stats on available bikes, and open docks. Below is the cover photo on the Facebook Page.

Success/Growth In April of 2014 the Cincinnati City Council approved of a $1.1 million proposal to provide Red Bike in start-up funds. In September of the same year 29 stations and 263 bikes opened up all around the city. By the end of 2014 the Red Bike had 15,000 rides and 569 annual memberships. That next March another four stations were added; in April UC Health became a sponsor, and 17 more stations were added in June with some of them opening up in Kentucky. The first 12 months had 88,400 rides, 1,330 annual members, and its own beer! The Red Bike Beer is brewed by Taft’s Ale House. The Red Bike program saw its 100,000th ride in October of 2015, which took under 13 months from when the first stations opened up. By the end of 2015 there was 115,000 rides, 1515 annual members, 293,802 miles road, 11,651,944 calories burned, 18,092 gallons of gas saved, and 116,739 total rides. The Red Bike bike-sharing program has been a huge success for the City of Cincinnati and its residents. They now have 56 stations with over 450 bikes and many more stations/bikes soon to pop up all over the city.

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SAN ANTONIO,TX

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B-cycle 58 STATIONS

KEY TAKEAWAYS • Sponsorship matters • Targeting demographics • Proximity matters

CASE STUDY The city of San Antonio created its bike sharing system in March, 2011. With funds stimulus funds and other grants provided the US Energy Department and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, San Antonio was able to establish B-Cycle San Antonio, Texas’ first bike sharing system (Davila, 2011). The first 14 stations were located in Downtown San Antonio, included 140 bicycles, and were meant to compliment San Antonio’s Bicycle Master Plan, San Antonio Bikes! B-Cycle San Antonio offers daily passes, monthly passes, and annual subscriptions for customers. As of today, San Antonio boasts 58 stations (classified as “active”, “special event”, and “partial service”) and 500 bicycles. According to Robert Rivard (2015), San Antonio B-Cycle will eventually have 76 stations in the city According to their website, santonio.bcycle.com, San Antonio B-Cycle provides 24/7 bike share services for downtown San Antonio. B-Cycle stations are comprised of a docks for the bicycles and a kiosk for those looking to purchase a 24-hour pass (those with monthly or annual subscriptions simply swipe a membership card at the dock where the bicycle they choose to ride is located). There are 3 ways to access a B-Cycle; a 24-hour day pass, a month long subscription, and a year long subscription. Each of these passes allows you to have unlimited 60-minute checkouts of bicycles, with an additional $2 charge every 30-minutes after the 60-minute time limit. After the user’s ride, the bicycle may be returned to any active station in San Antonio. Those with 24-hour passes are required to use the credit card which they paid with at the kiosk to check out a bike, and those with annual/monthly passes simply use a membership card at the bicycles dock to check it out. B-Cycle also provides a free mobile application available for both Android and iOS, which provides users with station locations, station maps, bicycle availability, and dock availability for returning checked-out bicycles.Memberships and passes for San Antonio B-Cyle are $12 per day, $18 per month, and $100 per year. As previously mentioned, there is also a $2 charge per 30 minutes after the 60 minute limit per checkout. According to sanantonio.bcycycle.com, San Antonio B-Cycle has 12 main sponsors and partners, both private companies and government entities; mostly local. Some of these sponsors/partners include the Freetail Brewing Company, San Antonio 2020 (SA2020), and the Alamo Colleges (San Antonio College). 188


In 2015, San Antonio B-Cycle received a $1.2 million grant to create 76 stations with 650 bicycles in the city so that “every neighborhood surrounding downtown will have stations” (Rivard, 2015). However, at 76 stations, it is estimated that maintaining the stations would cost San Antonio $750,000 per year. As per sanantonio.bcycle.com’s B-Cycle station map, most active stations are located in downtown San Antonio along the San Antonio River. The stations are in in linear formation The stations are mostly spread out in the center of Downtown, then revert back to a linear formation. Each station is no more than 2.5 miles apart, and cover an area 15 miles long, from its southern most station at Mission Espada to its northern most station at the Witte Museum. The stations are located conveniently near parks, college campuses, and tourist attractions; for example: there are stations at Roosevelt Park, San Antonio college campus, various stations near the San Antonio Riverwalk, and stations near the San Antonio Zoo. Finding a committed, local sponsor was San Antonio B-Cycle’s biggest challenge upon its creation, but as previously mentioned, SA B-Cycle has since found partners and sponsors. However, as recently as 2015, B-Cycle struggled to find committed sponsorship from the local government, corporate, and philanthropic support; so much that many in the city believed that they were on the verge of losing B-Cycle (Rivard, 2015). At the time, San Antonio’s B-Cycle was not sponsored, and funding either came through grants, donations, or revenue from subscriptions. In comparison, Austin had 10 individual sponsors in 2015. Ridership has continuously grown with the addition of new stations across the city. According to the 2013 Update of San Antonio’s 2011 Bike Plan, B-Cycle users have taken “over 135,000 trips” and have rode 480,000 miles. Furthermore, as of 2015, over 3,000 San Antonio locals had purchased yearly passes to use B-Cycle (Rivard, 2015). Further, that year the number of miles traveled on the bikes nearly doubled at 818,000. The amount of trips taken also grew to 270,000. The majority of riders (71%) were listed as white, 21% as Hispanic, and 8% were listed as “other”.

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WASHINGTON, D.C.

!

MOTIVATE 440 STATIONS

KEY TAKEAWAYS • Groundbreaking • Density Is Key • Rapid Expansion

CASE STUDY Sytem Context Capital Bikeshare, or CaBi for short, is the name of the current bicycle sharing system in our nation’s capital. Formerly the largest network in the nation before New York City’s Citi Bike program surpassed it, Washington, D.C. was ground zero for the bike share concept. In its current state Washington, D.C. has more than 430 stations and 3,500 bikes. This map from Capital Bikeshare’s website shows just how expansive their network is. The network spreads well into the surrounding counties of Arlington, Alexandria, Montgomery, and Fairfax. This massive network did not just spring up overnight however, Capital’s system is an example of how a bikeshare program organically grows outward over time. The roots of this bikeshare, North America’s first, took time to take hold. System History The first iteration of bikeshare in Washington, D.C. was SmartBike DC, which was deployed in 2008 with 10 stations and 120 bikes. Like many current bikeshare systems in other cities, SmartBike DC was a public-private partnership. The partnership was specifically between the District of Columbia’s Department of Transportation and Clear Channel Outdoor. Clear Channel Outdoor was actually an advertising firm that had experience with systems similar to bikeshare in European cities. From its inception, the new program took three years to launch. In an article by the Washington Post after its launch back in 2008, Elissa Silverman talks about the installation of these “metal racks have already grabbed attention.” Soon after SmartBike’s launch a new head of the Department of Transportation was appointed, Director Gabe Klein. Klein saw the potential of bikeshare and pushed for further expansion of the program, unfortunately this effort was met with resistance. The partnership between the DoT and Clear Channel excluded the DoT from paying for anything regarding SmartBike, thus making expansion impossible. After negotiations between the two made no progress, Director Klein made the decision to dissolve the partnership. Despite the disappearance of 190


SmartBike, the venture was in fact a massive success. As the D.C. cycling advocacy website Washcycle wrote, “Smartbike was a success. I doubt we’d have CaBi right now if it weren’t for SmartBike.” Wasting no time however, a new partnership was formed between the DoT and Arlington County to form Capital Bikeshare. Both Washington D.C.’s CaBi system and Columbus’ CoGo system are owned by the same operator, Motivate International Inc. This is very advantageous for Columbus due to the similarities between Washington D.C. and Columbus. In Washington D.C.’s current state there is cooperation between the surrounding counties and cities to create one cohesive bikeshare network. This should be seen for CoGo as the gold standard since cooperation between Columbus, Upper Arlington, Grandview Heights, and Bexley to also create one cohesive bikeshare network is the objective with the coming expansion. In addition the physical landscape are alike with rivers cutting through both cities. While New York City’s Citi-Bike program is obviously the best in the country, it is on such a vastly different scale that there are few similarities. Above on the left we have CaBi and on the right CoGo. As can be seen, development radiates outward from the urban core of the cities. With another round of expansion after what is currently underway, CoGo will share a very similar skeleton to CaBi.

Single Trip

24-Hour Pass

$2

$8/day

One ride up to 30 min., great for quick, one-way trips

Our most popular option for tourists and visitors

Annual Membership $85/year

Or $8/month with annual commitment

Pricing The pricing model of CoGo follows is nearly identical to CaBi’s. There are no usage fees for trips under the normal limit of thirty minutes. One interesting way in which Washington D.C.’s bikeshare strays from the norm is their pilot program of accepting cash in certain areas. This is an effort to provide assistance or access for users without credit cards. The ability to use cash is not something that crosses many bikeshare planners minds. By making a card only system, one can believe they’re improving accessibility by increasing convenience, but in reality this removes all accessibility to residents who are only able to use cash. Future Development In the latest development plan prepared by the District Department of Transportation, they cited that as of September 2015 there have been over 11 million trips taken. They detail their current plan moving forward saying, “Under this plan, Capital Bikeshare in the District would expand by 99 stations over the next three years. By 2018, approximately 65 percent of residents, 90 percent of jobs, and 97 percent of all transit boardings in the District would be within an eighth of a mile walk of a bikeshare station.”

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This estimate shows just how important Capital Bikeshare believe in the strength of density. Ridership depends entirely on the proximity of stations to one another. This combined with having a dense population creates versatility within a bikeshareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s system. What is reflected by this philosophy is the amount of registered users versus casual users. First of all the a casual user is one that has only purchased a membership of one to three days, whereas a registered user is one that has subscribed for one to twelve months. In Columbus the majority of users are that of the causal category. People use it to take a ride on the weekend or for lunch every now and then. With Capital Bikeshare however, 79% were registered users in an annual survey. This comparison shows evidence of how much ridership increases once the network passes a certain threshold. Ridership changes from using bikshare sparingly to using it for their daily commute or for their daily activities. In addition, the average userâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trip length in Columbus lasted about 25 minutes, whereas Washington D.C.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lasted only 11.6 minutes. Once again this demonstrates just how dense their activity centers are as well as their existing stations.

Analysis Above we have the trip frequency between neighborhood clusters. One problem that develops when you have intense traffic at certain stations is that users are not able to end their trip due to there being no open docks. This can end up warping the ridership statistics of certain stations since users must then find another station to park, however Capital has stated that this is usually only minimal. Station downtime can become a significant problem when bikeshare systems do reach this large of a size. Below are the results of a study done to find out the amount of lost trips in a day as well as the duration of the downtime.

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Cleveland, OH

!

CycleHop Social Bikes 30 STATIONS

KEY TAKEAWAYS • Integrate with Infrastructure • User Convenience • Acquire sponsorship

CASE STUDY Cleveland didn’t adopt the UHBikes bike share system until July of 2016 with the intrduction of 100 bikes in time for the Republican National Convention. Though Cleveland is a little late to install a bike share system compared to other cities, their 30 station system sponsored by University Hospitals has had early success. The planned expansion into surrounding neighborhoods should help connnect the two hub system created by the need for stations near downtown and the University Circle. The 250% increase in bicycle infrastructure in Cleveland by the end of 2017 according to their Bikeway Implentation Plan should give the UHBike system a huge boost in ridership in the coming years. GPS Technology in the smart bikes used for this system enable convenient options for users compared to bikes without or using smart docks. UHBikes can keep track of their ridership data easily. They can create a zone within an acceptable limit from a station where users can lock their bikes to a rack without putting it in a UHBike rack. Pay As You Go, Prepaid for 3 hours, and monthly plans are available to customers. • Pay As You Go: $3.50 per 30 minutes • Prepaid: $21 for 3 hours ride time and an additional 1 hour free • Monthly Basic Plan: $15 a month includes 60 min. daily ride time • Monthly Plus Plan: $20 a month includes 90 min. daily ride time • Overtime fees: 12 cents per minute which equates to $7 per hour • $2 fee when returning bikes to to a non-bike share hub located within the acceptable system area • $1 credit given to users that returns out of hub bikes to a UHBike hub

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Cleveland Bikeshare Analysis In the last decade American cities have been introduced to multimodal transportation options to replace the previous century’s over reliance on the automobile. Among these options, the idea of Bikeshare is becoming more and more widespread. Its implementation in major cities is now being recognized by many as a way to give access to a transit option that promotes a healthy, cheap, and environmentally friendly lifestyle. The City of Cleveland recently launched its formal Bikeshare system, UHBikes, in July of 2016 in time for the Republican National Convention. The following will be an analysis of its implementation, its operation, and initial performance as well as a look at Cleveland’s existing and planned infrastructure to accommodate this new system.

Cleveland The City of Cleveland is located on the south shore of Lake Erie in Northeast Ohio, and is the county seat of Cuyahoga County. The 2015 Census Estimate lists the total population of the city at around 388,072 which makes it Ohio’s second largest city after Columbus. At the peak of its success it was a major manufacturing/industrial center in the Midwest though its more recent history has been a steady decline. The Downtown areas especially have seen a revival, however, and city officials hope to build on these efforts with a bike share system as a transit option for further local economic opportunity.

History

The adoption of the Cleveland Bikeway Master Plan in 2007 marks the beginning of the City’s efforts to provide a public bike infrastructure. In 2008 the City passed a Bicycle Parking Zoning Ordinance, and in 2012 and 2013 they passed and developed a Complete & Green Streets Plan. Finally, 2014 saw the adoption of the Bikeway Implementation Plan. This plan would increase the number of bikeway miles by 250% (at least 118 miles) by the end of 2017, building on the existing infrastructure in the City. These bikeway miles would include sharrows, dedicated bike lanes, trails and signage. In addition, the City identified an additional 82.5 miles of roadway that would be eligible for cycling amenities. Meanwhile, in 2013, Bike Cleveland (a nonprofit organization with the goal of making Cleveland a leader in bicycling in America) partnered with Green City Blue Lake Institute and University Circle Inc. to form a Bike Share Task Force that worked with the Cleveland Sustainability Office to do a feasibility study to determine if a bike share system should be implemented in the City. Bike Share companies like Zagster had already begun working with local private business to install stations around the City. The study was funded by the City and the RTA (Regional Transit Authority); they recommended a 700 bike, 70 station system with a dual hub configuration that would be placed in the downtown area and the University Circle in phase 1 with a planned expansion into surrounding neighborhoods in phase 2. In 2015 the Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency (NOACA) received $1.4 million in federal funding, and in order to petition for a portion of this, the Bike Share Task Force partnered with the Cuyahoga County Department of Sustainability. They were awarded $357,000 from NOACA and got to work picking a suitable vendor for the project. The vendor chosen, CycleHop-Social Bikes (SoBi), provided 100 temporary green colored bikes to the City by July 2016 in time for the RNC. For this pre-launch all station locations were placed in the downtown area, the full system of 250 red colored bikes branded with the system’s sponsor’s (University Hospitals) logo would become available in September 2016. This formal launch 194


included 30 stations in multiple locations around Cleveland including Downtown, University Circle, Central, Ohio City, Tremont, and the Campus District. The Executive Director of Bike Cleveland, Jacob VanSickle, stated in the July press release that “A BikeShare system is a clear signal of a city on the move, and we want to display Cleveland’s progress on the national stage.”

Existing Infrastructure A city’s Bikeshare system will of course depend heavily on the infrastructure that the city provides for potential riders. As mentioned above, the Bikeway Implementation Plan for the City of Cleveland will create 118 miles of bikeway by the end of 2017. As of 2014 the City had approximately 47.5 miles of bikeway that included 3.71 miles of roads with sharrows, 0.33 miles of bike lanes and 34.6 miles of bike trails. The Plan utilizes all of these forms depending on what was needed and the design of the road. The 82.5 miles of roadway that could potentially be eligible for cycling additions based on the road conditions and traffic patterns would only expand the system and make the Bike Share system more convenient for riders with approximately 200 miles of a bikeway network.

Figure 1: Existing and Planned Bikeways in Cleveland. January 27 2017 https://clecityhall.com/2014/01/17/new-plan-will-add-more-than-70-miles-of-bikeway-by-end-of-2017-supports-mayors-efforts-for-sustainable-healthy-living/ Figure 1 demonstrates the bikeways in Cleveland that riders could expect to utilize. The blue lines indicate what paths existed as of 2014. The green and yellow lines are paths that were added according to the Bikeway Implementation Plan. The red lines are the 82.5 miles of roads that would be suitable for riders given a few minor changes to the roads such as restriping and including new signage for bicyclists. Websites such as www.mapmyride.com and organizations such as Bike Cleveland 195


provide riders the resources to plan their routes. Many users have shared their routes using existing paths such as the Lakefront Bikeway, the Euclid Avenue Bike Lanes, the Morgana Run Trail, and many more. Bicycling.com listed Cleveland in its top 50 American cities to bike in as of September 2016. The continued construction of a convenient bike infrastructure for the City will play a huge role in developing the success of their bike share system, and organization like Bike Cleveland are optimistic about the future of this mode of transit in the City.

UHBikes

Cleveland’s University Hospitals took on sponsorship of the formal bike share system and named it UHBikes with red colored branding on the bikes to match. The preferred vendor CycleHop-SoBi is the second largest bike share operator in North America. They offer a complete bike share solution for their clients that includes planning, funding, equipment selection implementation operations, marketing, sponsorship sales, and regional expansion. The equipment is provided by Social Bicycles, an industry leader in bike share products, with GPS enabled smart bikes. SoBi equipment is currently being used in multiple cities across America including Orlando, Tampa, Buffalo, Atlanta, Phoenix and Portland to name a few. Their bikes features include a shaft-drive transmission (which means no greasy chain), internal wiring for brakes and gear shifters, a secure steel U-lock, LCD display and keypad communication, grip bell and shifters with 3 speeds, adjustable seats for optimal comfort, solar panel powered automatic lighting for safety, puncture resistant Kevlar tires, real time GPS and RFID technology, and a basket with 20 lbs of cargo capacity. All of the technology on the smart bikes eliminates the need for expensive docks making the system more sustainable and less reliant on a single point for its maintenance and usage. Smart bike GPS data can be shared with Planning departments for valuable insights into planning an infrastructure to accommodate the demands of the system’s users. They can gauge system performance, analyze heat maps and bike flow, miles ridden, trips taken, CO2 emissions reduced, calories burned and more. Users can download their own data for personal use. The UHBikes Twitter account @ UHBikes publishes their weekly ridership data that includes trips taken ,miles ridden, carbon reduced, and calories burned. The data for the week from @UHBikes of January 16-22, 2017, for example, saw 119 trips, 204 miles and 47 hours ridden, 179 lbs carbon reduced, 8,160 calories burned! With the use of a smartphone app or web browser users can interact with the system and reserve individual bikes to ensure a bike will be found at a station when and where they need it. People are able to use a UHBike in 4 easy steps. First off, to rent a bike the user must enter his/her account number or tap a member card on the bicycle keypad. Alternatively, they could download the Social Bicycles mobile app to find and reserve a bike. Next, when prompted the user enters a 4 digit PIN code using the keypad on the bicycle. To release the bike pull out the yellow U-lock bar and place it in the side holster towards the back end of the bicycle. Then, adjustments on the bike such as seat height can be made for the comfort of the rider. If the rider needs to make quick stop, they simply secure their bike to any rack and use the ‘HOLD’ button. This will ensure the bike is still registered to that particular user and in use, instead of waiting to be returned to a station. It is unlocked again using the same 4 digit code. Finally, to end the trip the user returns the bike to a station or a bike rack within 100 feet of a station if that particular station is full. The smart bike system lets the user lock the bike to any public bike rack for a small additional fee. The LCD screen display will provide confirmation of the end of the trip. Users will be given a credit for returning a bike parked in a non-station rack to ensure the system is rebalanced regularly.

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Membership/Payment You can sign up for membership through the UHBikes site or smartphone app. They have 4 different payment options for both visitors and locals wishing to become regular members. The first is a Pay As You Go plan for $3.50 per 30 minutes. The second is a prepaid fee of $21 for 3 hours and an additional 1 hour free. For members, UHBikes offers a monthly Basic plan for $15 a month that includes 60 minutes of daily ride time. For an extended daily ride time limit, users can choose the $20 monthly Plus plan that would bring the daily ride time up to 90 minutes. For the Pay As You Go plan, minutes are purchased in advance. For Monthly and Annual Memberships, “Daily Riding Time” is the number of minutes included with your plan per day with no rollover credit and every minute spent in excess of the daily plan will then be charged to the user at the Pay As You Go rates. Users must commit to 3 months at a minimum for the monthly plans. Finally, you must be 18 years old to check out a bike with a credit card and at least 16 years old to ride one. Overtime fees are listed as 12 cents per minute which equates to around $7 per hour. There is a $2 fee when returning bikes to a non-bike share hub located within the system area. If left outside the system area users will be charged with a $20 fee. A $1 credit will be given to any user that returns an “out of hub” bike back to a bike share station. The ability to lock the bikes on non-station racks exists because of the use of smart bikes rather than smart docks, which reduces the cost of installation. Operators are able to establish the stations boundary using an interactive map and GPS coordinates and with each smart bike’s GPS technology the system will be able to determine whether or not the bike is within the system. Each station will have a kiosk users can interact with that provides an account number if they do not use the smartphone app or web browser.

Analysis The City of Cleveland is not an early adopter for formal bike share systems compared to other cities. The system is still only a few months old, and any ridership data offered to date will be impacted by the winter weather of Northeast Ohio. The systems performance must still be evaluated in the Spring and Summer months though UHBikes and organizations have expressed optimism for the future of the system and maintain that bike sharing and an extended bike infrastructure in the City is not only needed but welcome by the public. Their payment plans seem to follow the average bike share system seen around the country to provide as many people as possible the opportunity to utilize the sys tem. In addition, the smart bike GPS technology will be a valuable tool moving forward in discovering the most used and optimal routes used by riders. This will of course be needed to expand the system further if it does indeed prove successful.

Figure 2: Diagram of Social Bicycles used in the UHBike system. January 27 2017 http://help.socialbicycles.com/hc/en-us/articles/201224749-Smart-Bikes

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Washington District of Columbia Capital Bikeshare Development Plan https://ddot.dc.gov/sites/default/files/dc/sites/ddot/page_content/attachments/Draft%20DDOT%20Bikeshare%20Development%20FINAL%20reduced.pdf Washington Post Bicycle-Sharing Program to Debut http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/04/18/AR2008041803037.html Capital Bikeshare http://www.capitalbikeshare.com/ Washcycle Why SmartBike didn’t fail http://www.thewashcycle.com/2010/11/why-smartbike-didnt-fail.html What happened to SmartBike? http://www.thewashcycle.com/2013/01/whatever-happened-to-smartbike.html The Washington Post Sun sets on SmartBikeDC http://voices.washingtonpost.com/dr-gridlock/2010/12/sun_sets_on_smartbikes.html Cleveland http://www.bikecleveland.org/bikeshare/ http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2016/05/clevelands_bike_sharing_progra.html http://www.zagster.com/press/zagster-expands-cleveland-bike-share-again-with-more-bikes-as-well-as-new-locationsand-new-partners https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqO_FkX6PlU http://uhbikes.com/ http://help.socialbicycles.com/hc/en-us/categories/200092565-Why-We-re-Different http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/gis/cpc/basemap.jsp http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/bike/index.php http://www.bicycling.com/culture/news/the-50-best-bike-cities-of-2016 Indianapolis Indiana Pacers Bikeshare main website: https://www.pacersbikeshare.org/ Indiana Pacers Bikeshare FAQ’s: https://www.pacersbikeshare.org/faqs Bikeshare map and pricing PDF: http://ftpcontent.worldnow.com/wthr/PDF/bikesharemap.pdf Bikeshare by the numbers PDF: http://www.ibj.com/ext/resources/IBJ-Print2/2016/080816/bikeshare-graphic.pdf BCycle main website FAQ’s: https://www.bcycle.com/faqs BCycle article on the celebration for the 200,000th trip: https://www.bcycle.com/single-news-item/2015/11/18/indiana-pacers-bikeshare-celebrates-200-000th-trip IndyStar article on 24 hour pass understanding mix-up: http://www.indystar.com/story/life/2014/08/05/pacers-bikeshare-mix-up-lands-100-bills-refunds/13619557 IndyStar article on user agreement:http://www.indystar.com/story/news/politics/2014/09/03/renting-bike-share-read-fineprint/15036885/ IndyStar article on bikeshare success: http://www.indystar.com/story/news/2015/04/16/year-rides-later-indy-bike-share-program-thrives/25880751/ Yelp Reviews: https://www.yelp.com/biz/indiana-pacers-bikeshare-indianapolis WishTV Report on Pacers Bikeshare: http://wishtv.com/2014/04/30/indiana-pacers-bikeshare/ Inside Indiana Business article:http://www.insideindianabusiness.com/story/31793330/pacers-bikeshare-marks-second-anniversary

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Austin Walkable Station Spacing Is Key to Successful, Equitable Bike Share. 28 April 2015. http://nacto.org/2015/04/28/walkablestation-spacing-is-key-to-successful-equitable-bike-share/ Bike-sharing: History, Impacts, Models of Provision, and Future. Paul DeMaio. http://bike.cofc.edu/bike-share-program/ history%20of%20bike%20sharing.pdf http://bikeshare.com/map/ https://wired.com/2015/06/copenhagenize-worlds-most-bike-friendly-cities/ San Antonio https://sanantonio.bcycle.com https://therivardreport.com/san-antonio-could-lose-bikeshare-too/ http://images.talkingphonebook.com/images/timesunion/media_library/328/800/media5.pdf Portland https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/545858 https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/568268 https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/569875 https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/568273 https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/568266 https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/568265 https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/568270 http://suggest.biketownpdx.com/page/about https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/570577 https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/569888 https://www.biketownpdx.com/blog/portland-debuts-biketown-for-all https://www.biketownpdx.com/blog/biketown-survey-report-2016

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Press Release, 04-18-2017 Final Presentation

CoGo Bikeshare Expansion Presentation Over the past several months, graduate and undergraduate students from The Ohio State University have been developing a recommendation plan for an expansion to Columbusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; COGO bikeshare network. In addition, this expansion will be providing stations for the neighboring cities of Bexley, Grandview Heights, and Upper Arlington. Students will be presenting their ďż˝inal work regarding their proposed station locations. This presentaton is open to the public and media outlets.

April 18th, 2017 5:30 P.M. Knowlton School of Architecture 275 West Woodruff Ave. Columbus, Ohio 43210 For more information please visit: Room 175 u.osu.edu/cogo

@CoGoExpand

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Invitation, 04-18-2017 Final Presentation (Letter)

Date: April 7, 2017 Dear Local Business Manager, We are a group of City and Regional Planning students from The Ohio State University working on the current CoGo bike share system expansion. We are contacting you to let you know that we are considering a station near your business. Bike share has been shown to improve business and increase foot traffic around and inside surrounding businesses. We feel that the addition of a nearby station would positively impact your business and prove to be an asset to the area. We would love to hear your thoughts and answer any questions you may have at our upcoming presentation on Tuesday, April 18th. It will be in Knowlton Hall, room 175 at 5:30 pm. If you have any further questions, feel free to contact us via email at cogoexpand@gmail.com. To learn about our work this semester and for more details on our project, visit us at u.osu.edu/cogo. We look forward to seeing you! Thanks, The OSU CoGo Expansion Team Email: cogoexpand@gmail.com Website: u.osu.edu/cogo Twitter: @cogoexpand

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Outreach, Business Card

Bexley Columbus Upper Arlington Grandview Heights

cogoexpand@gmail.com @cogoexpand u.osu.edu/cogo

EXPAND

2017

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Copy of Bike Share Gateway

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Copy of Example Bike Share Site Plan

P:\Greenways\BIKESHARE\~Planning\2016 Expansion\2016 Site Specific Station Planning\0066 Town St and Front St\0066 Front St and Town St.dwg, 5/9/2016 10:02:49 AM, ANSI B (17.00 x 11.00 Inches)

LEGEND LIGHT POST

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5.12.2016

0066_v001

STATE OF OHIO 145 FRONT ST.

S ER KIOSK FREE-PAP

SIGNED:

COLUMBUS

APPROVALS

8'

CoGo BIKESHARE - 15 DOCK STATION PLACED ON SIDEWALK IN R.O.W.

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njSanna

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Article, 02-15-2017 Grandview Heights Website Post

City of Grandview Heights OH - Official Website

http://grandviewheights.org/Blog.aspx?IID=158#item

City of Grandview Heights Blog

Tools RSS (Really Simple Syndication) Notify Me

View All Posts Feb Resident input sought (February 15) expansion locations

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for CoGo

Posted on February 15, 2017 at 10:18 AM by Laura Oldham

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Blog City of Grandview Heights Blog

Students at The Ohio State University are working with four Columbus communities, including Grandview Heights, to research and recommend 26 new CoGo bike share station locations. The students researched bike share systems across the country in order to identify successful bike share systems and cite criteria. Keeping those criteria in mind, the students will use the semester to create a report that recommends new locations to the participating communities. At the end of the semester, student groups will present their findings to the respective city councils. A grant is sought from the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC) to cover 80% of the costs and bring bike share to these communities. The class created a website to seek resident input on station locations and to post information and updates 1 of 2

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City of Grandview Heights OH - Official Website

http://grandviewheights.org/Blog.aspx?IID=158#item

related to research findings. The main page, a class blog, is a space for general information and for interested persons to learn more about project developments. Each city has its own section on the website that allows for city-specific news. Residents can suggest locations using the interactive map found under â&#x20AC;&#x153;Suggest A Station.â&#x20AC;? Grandview Heights CoGo Expansion Plan Page Suggest a CoGo Station You can also contact the group by email at cogoexpand@gmail.com or through Twitter @cogoexpand.

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Article, 03-07-2017 ThisWeek Community News

CoGo, OSU students seek bike-docking hotspots in Grandview Tuesday

Posted Mar 7, 2017 at 6:05 PM

By ALAN FROMAN

THISWEEKNEWS.COM Follow

Grandview Heights officials are working with a group of Ohio State University students to determine the best spots in the city to install CoGo bike-sharing stations. Grandview joined with Bexley, Columbus and Upper Arlington last year to apply for a MidOhio Regional Planning Commission grant totaling about $1 million to pay most of the cost of installing 26 CoGo stations across the four communities. Four of the stations would be in Grandview, four in Bexley, five in Upper Arlington and 13 in Columbus, which already has 46 stations with more than 350 bicycles. The other three communities would be installing their first CoGo stations.

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The CoGo Bike Share program started four years ago in Columbus. Operated by Motivate, a Brooklyn-based company, the program allows people to rent bikes from docking stations, unlocking them with their credit cards. The current fees are $8 for a 24-hour ride pass, $18 for a three-day pass or $75 for an annual membership. A group of 16 city and regional planning students from Ohio State's Knowlton School of Architecture are working on a studio project to research how other cities have determined locations for their bike-share programs and to gather suggestions from the public about where they would like to see the new stations placed in local communities. MORPC's Attributable Funds Committee has recommended the CoGo grant for final approval, said Grandview Director of Administration/ Economic Development Patrik Bowman. "We've gone through the competitive application process and it looks good for the grant," he said. "I believe the grant will be official in the spring and the funds would become available by July 1." "As far as I can tell from MORPC, the grant is all but funded," said Upper Arlington Senior Planning Officer Chad Gibson. "That's great news. There are not any impediments to this grant being issued to us." The grant money would cover 80 percent of the cost of the bike-docking stations, Bowman said. "We would be responsible for the other 20 percent," he said. "Our share of the cost for each station would be about $9,000, so our total cost for the four stations in our community would be about $36,000." Brad Bodenmiller is part of the team of three OSU students researching Grandview. Bodenmiller and OSU student Ryan Dittoe made a presentation about the project at the Feb. 21 meeting of City Council. The team met with Bowman and Mayor Ray DeGraw in January to discuss the perimeters of the study and also has spent time visiting potential station sites in Grandview.

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"We looked for sites that might meet the criteria other cities have used in establishing their own bike-share programs," Bodenmiller said. Each of the 16 students participating in the project chose a U.S. city to research. Bodenmiller visited Pittsburgh to meet with its bike-sharing coordinator. "He talked a lot about looking for locations with population and employment density or that are at destination points," Bodenmiller said. Locations at or near Grandview Yard, Pierce Field, the library and Grandview Avenue are potential sites in Grandview that would meet those criteria, Bowman said. "One of the most important factors is making sure the stations aren't too far apart," he said. "Ideally, you'd want the distance between stations to be no more than a quarter-mile to a halfmile." Another important factor is to place stations in the public right of way to avoid the additional cost of gaining easement rights, Bowman said. Establishing CoGo stations in Grandview would enhance the city's bike-friendly characteristics, he said. "We're a very connected community and putting some bike-share stations in town would serve our businesses, residents and visitors by making us even more connected to other communities," Bowman said. In October, Columbus Parks and Recreation Department Planning Manager Brad Westall said Columbus was excited to work with Grandview, Bexley and Upper Arlington because the program already had seen more than 129,000 trips taken since July 2013. The grant will allow the local project to become regional and grow by 30 percent, he said. "Bike sharing has been a really popular, successful way to get around on short trips, whether you're a resident who just wants to get around a bit, whether you're a visitor who wants to see our city or whether you're a commuter using it for alternative transportation," Westall said. "This would really tie Upper Arlington into the OSU campus, to Grandview, to Grandview

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Yard," he said. Residents are encouraged to add their suggestions and comments about where bike stations should be located in Grandview, Bodenmiller said. "We've gotten some good responses so far," he said. "People seem to favor places like Grandview Yard and the intersection of Grandview and Third Avenue." Comments about potential locations can be made at https://u.osu.edu/cogo, Bodenmiller

said.

The students will wrap up their project next month and plan to report on their recommendations at an upcoming council meeting, he said. ThisWeek staff writer Nate Ellis contributed to this story. afroman@thisweeknews.com @ThisWeekAfroman

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Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not your imagination: bike sharing systems are popping up all over the place - Vox

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Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not your imagination: bike sharing systems are popping up all over the place They now provide Americans 28 million pollution-free trips a year. Updated by David Roberts @drvox

david@vox.com

Mar 9, 2017, 9:30am EST

Sharing and caring in Philadelphia.

When I was in grad school at the University of Montana back in the late 1990s, they launched a small bike sharing system as an experiment. I forget if it was

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Missoula-wide or just the university (Google is no help), but there were these funky green bikes with wire baskets, kept, unlocked, in wooden sheds. Anyone could take one — you were just supposed to put it back in one of the sheds. It all ran on the honor system. And as I recall, it was a disaster. The bikes were cheap and broke down all over the place. They got abandoned, stolen, beat up. No one ever put them back in the sheds. The experiment was quickly abandoned. (If someone has a better memory and/or documentation of this peculiar historical episode, contact me!) Ever since then, I’ve wondered when the technology of bike sharing systems would catch up to the good intentions. In theory, bike sharing offers all sorts of benefits. It makes cycling a service, available to casual commuters, people who do not wear spandex or own road bikes. It can work as a complement to a multimodal urban transit system, covering the “last mile” between transit stops and home/work. Bike trips often replace motorized vehicle trips, improving air quality and reducing carbon emissions. Plus, it’s a nice way to encourage exercise. But it’s got to work; all the pieces have to come together to make it convenient, useful, and pleasant. So when will that happen? The answer is: It’s happening now.

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A bow-tied gentleman making use of Chicago’s Divvy bike-share system.

The National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) has just released the first comprehensive snapshot of bike-share growth in the US. What it shows is that, from 2010 to 2016, bike sharing has gone from virtually nothing to … well, something. It is still a marginal means of transportation in the grand scheme of things, but if current growth rates hold, that won’t be true for long. Let’s look at some of the top-line numbers. There were 88 million total bike-share trips taken in the US between 2010 and 2016. The annual number of trips reached 28 million in 2016. (By way of comparison, there were 10.75 billion trips on public transportation in 2016.) The number of bikes has grown to 42,000.

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Bike share systems are rapidly spreading. Though the concept dates back to 1965 (in Amsterdam, of course), there were only four systems in the US in 2010; there are now 55. (NACTO defines a bike-share system as “at least 10 stations and 100 bikes.”)

As the size of those dots indicates, however, the overwhelming share (85 percent) of bike-share rides are taken in a few key cities with large systems: Citi Bike in New York, Capital Bikeshare in Greater Washington DC, Citi Bike in Miami, Divvy in Chicago, and Hubway in Greater Boston.

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As you can see, New York City is responsible for a lion’s share of the nation’s total bike-share riders (just as it is responsible for a lion’s share of its total transit riders). Bike sharing systems don’t run on cheap-bikes-in-wooden-sheds any more. Most existing systems have “smart docks,” with automatic locks and digital tracking. And just about all new systems since 2014 use “smart bikes,” which have all the locking, tracking, and other digital gear onboard, making use more convenient.

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Here’s a smart bike from Portland, Oregon’s Biketown system, with the keypad, screen, and lock all built in:

biketownpdx Portland, Oregon

Follow

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There have been persistent concerns about equity in bike share systems. Especially early on, they were generally marketed to and used by upscale professionals. However, more and more bike-share systems (24 percent) are offering subsidies for low-income riders.

Philadelphia’s Indego system, for instance, offers cash payment (for those without a credit card) and has begun offering subsidies for low-income riders. As a result, NACTO says, “the number of new subscribers with a household income under $35,000 using the system jumped from 27% in 2015 to 44% in 2016.” It’s also worth noting that bike sharing systems are extremely, almost spookily, safe. My colleague Brad Plumer wrote last year that while the overall fatality rate for cycling in the US stands at 21 per 100 million trips, bike sharing fatalities currently stand at: zero. (Sadly, that is no longer current — in July 2016, bike sharing saw its first-ever fatality, in Chicago.)

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Docking a bike with Philadelphia’s Indego system.

NACTO emphasizes that its snapshot is only a snapshot; many existing systems are planning expansions. Houston’s B-Cycle plans to more than double its number of both bikes and stations. New York City’s Citi Bike, already the nation’s largest system, plans to go from 10,000 to 12,000 bikes and from 600 to 750 stations. Expansions are also in the works in Philadelphia, Atlanta, Phoenix/Mesa, and San Francisco/Oakland, among others. More cities are sure to jump on the bandwagon. Bike sharing systems are almost universally popular. They typically use very little tax revenue, covering costs with sponsorships and user fees. They both complement and support public transit systems. And, of course, riding bikes just makes people happy. People could use a little happy these days.

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Further reading • A while back, CityLab did a gorgeous visual history of bike sharing systems. • Sadly, my home city of Seattle is one of the few to kill a bike sharing system — a victim of poor finances, bad management, lack of ambition, and a dumb helmet law. • Bike sharing is also big internationally; you can find every system in the world on bikesharingmap.com.

The Bike-sharing Map

Follow

@BikesharingMap

Europe has 4% more cities with #bikesharing programs than Asia, Asia has 1,400% more bicycles in public use programs! #publibike 8:38 AM - 2 Feb 2017 2

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• In a recent story for Outside Magazine, Joe Lindsey rounded up the (admittedly still sketchy at this early stage) evidence for bike sharing’s benefits: A 2015 study in Transport Reviews looked at systems in five cities, including Washington, D.C., and Minneapolis, and found that users substituted rides via bike shares for car trips 8 percent of the time in D.C. and almost 20 percent of the time in Minneapolis. A separate study on D.C.’s Capital Bikeshare found that it contributed a modest but noticeable 2 to 3 percent reduction in traffic congestion. And a 2014 report from the NYC Department of Transportation found that even though some traffic lanes were converted to protected bike lanes on various streets, travel times for car traffic remained steady or improved: on Eighth Avenue, they were 14 percent faster, for example. More people on bikes translates to not only less traffic congestion but also more physical activity: in excess of 23,000 hours in Minneapolis just in 2012, according to the 2015 study. Additionally, a report on London’s massive bike-share system found injury rates for bike-share users were lower than those for regular cyclists. In the U.S., there has been one bike-share rider death in the system’s seven-year history. By contrast, roughly 700 cyclists die each year on America’s roads. (There is no known cause for that disparity.) According to the same London study, even when injury rates and pollution exposure were balanced against physical activity, bike shares have a modest but net positive effect on overall public health by virtue of the physical activity. And a recent study of New York’s Citi Bike program in BMJ’s journal Injury Prevention found that the city’s addition of bike lanes, crucial to Citi Bike’s success, increased lifespan even among nonusers because of the reduction in pollution. • Just for fun, here’s a fascinating animated map of bike-share trips in London:

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Article, Spring 2017 Ohio APA

It’s ... Neither continued from page 3

permitted and conditional uses, and parking and signage types. Include any additional regulations that address specific uses or extraordinary circumstances relative to a DPD.

Once you have established your city’s DPD’s and have named them to reflect their desired character, the next step is to map them. Mapping is important for determining whether you have created too many DPD’s and to conceptualize how the network of districts interacts with each other. You should aim for the least number of districts possible. Some adjustments may be necessary during this step.

The regulations for each DPD should generally fit on one page for most districts or at most two pages for more complex districts such as a downtown. Want to try it? Consider holding a DPD work session with your planning staff and with your planning commissioners. We have done it and are happy to help you lead one.

Once your city’s DPD’s are established, begin establishing the development regulations applicable to each DPD. The regulations should be tailored for each district to respect its desired existing development patterns and to promote new desired development patterns. This is not as daunting as it sounds. Each DPD need only contain regulations related to achieving a certain development pattern, such as building placement and orientation,

There is much more to come on DPD. We look forward to sharing this new methodology with you this year. Sean Suder is a Principal/Partner at Calfee Zoning. He can be reached at ssuder@calfee.com.

CoGo Bike Share: Planning Students Get Rolling on Expansion by William Plumley

part of a successful bike share network is in finding the right place for each station, even more so for integrating new communities and neighborhoods. The students, a mixture of nine undergraduates and seven graduates, began the semester with a two-pronged strategy. In the classroom, they have hosted guest speakers from the four cities involved as well as CoGo’s operator, Motivate. Meanwhile, each student studied an existing bike share network elsewhere in North America and compiled an assessment and accompanying presentation. With this knowledge at their disposal, they’ve now moved into the second phase of the process: in subgroups for each city, they are determining their strategies for station placement and how to make sure the end result is a contiguous network, well-connected with what’s already in place. This has included studying existing ridership and suggestions made by CoGo’s users, site visits, meetings with city officials, and appearances at area commission meetings.

S

tudents of the City & Regional Planning program of the Ohio State University’s Knowlton School of Architecture have begun an assessment of the upcoming expansion of Columbus’s bike share program. Their assignment in the spring semester studio is to take a comprehensive look at what makes a bike share system successful and use these findings to help the City and its closest neighbors in planning for the network’s growth now and in the future.

Ultimately, the students hope to deliver a list of top candidate sites for the twenty-six new stations, as well as a list of alternates that can double as a guide for future expansion as CoGo’s success in Central Ohio continues. While the involved cities get a curated list of locations that will allow them to move to implementation as quickly as possible once the funds are available, the students will benefit greatly as well.

Late last year, MORPC announced a $912,450 grant for the expansion of Columbus’s CoGo bike share system. Unique to this grant for the State of Ohio, of the twenty-six new stations, 13 of them will be placed in Columbus and the rest will be distributed between three other participating municipalities, the inner-ring suburbs of Bexley (four stations), Grandview Heights (four), and Upper Arlington (five). For these three communities, these will be their first stations, adding to Columbus’s existing network of fortysix.

By the end of the semester, in addition to the usual takeaways from their studios, they will have wisdom and

The grant will cover 80% of the costs of the new stations, while each city covers the balance. Possibly the most critical The Ohio Planner’s News

Bike Share continued on page 5

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Article, Spring 2017 Ohio APA

Bike Share continued from page 4

Their work can be followed at http://u.osu.edu/cogo or on their Twitter page, @CoGoExpand. They can be reached with questions and comments at CoGoExpand@ gmail.com.

experience in planning for a complex amenity that is very quickly becoming an integral part of American cities. Nearly 120 cities in the US have introduced bike share networks since 2008, and it’s something that visitors and new residents alike are starting to expect when arriving in a city for the first time. With the studio’s project due by the end of the semester in early May, the students are making swift progress with each week that passes.

William Plumley is an undergraduate student in the City & Regional Planning program at The Ohio State University. He can be reached at plumley.18@osu.edu.

Centerville Sets New Course for Shopping Center by Andrew Rodney, AICP

T

he City of Centerville is typical of many post-war boom suburbs. In a mere 30 year span, the City experienced a tremendous population explosion, growing from a sleepy village of 827 (1950) to a fullservice community of over 18,000 (1980). Neighborhoods seemingly sprouted from farm fields overnight, as did the commercial shopping centers to serve these new families. One such prominent shopping center was Centerville Place on South Main Street (aka State Route 48).

Therefore, its age and isolation limits the regional draw of the center, making it more heavily reliant on the local market for sustainability. That local market, however, though relatively affluent, is not anticipated to grow in population over the next five to ten years (as is the case for the Dayton region as a whole), thus placing additional pressure on the center to compete for a stagnant pool of available customers. Finally, continued growth in residential rooftops in nearby northern Warren County will undoubtedly lead to new commercial development further south along State Route 48.

Constructed in 1973, the Centerville Place Shopping Center includes over 153,000 square feet of leasable commercial retail space in the single-story strip center/ large parking field development pattern that was the soup de jour during this time period. The center was anchored by a former Kroger grocery store, itself consisting of 68,000 square feet or approximately 45% of the total available leasable square footage. This space has been vacant since 2011 when a new Kroger Marketplace – at the time the largest in the world – was constructed next door. Additionally, over 680 parking spaces serve the shopping center (the lot is rarely more than a ¼ full at any one time). Together, the shopping center, parking lot, and three outparcels (two banks and a fast food restaurant) include over 12 acres of impervious surface. An additional 13 acres located to the rear of the shopping center includes a stormwater detention pond and a roughly 40 foot tall mound of unconsolidated fill and development spoils.

With financial assistance from the Montgomery County Land Bank, the City hired The Kleingers Group and Market Metrics to develop a market-based future land use plan for the Centerville Place Shopping Center. The study found the center to be uncompetitive relative to the local market, containing far more retail space that can be supported. Furthermore, the age, condition, and layout of the Center restricts the potential to improve its long-term fortune through renovation. As a result, the Planning Study concluded the best course of action is to demolish the existing shopping center and replace it with a more traditional “town center” development, home to unique shopping and dining options to draw a more regional audience as well as over 300 new residential units to increase the local market population. The plan includes a central green, adjacent shops and eateries with patios, a stage for entertainment, decorative raised pavement, “fiesta” style lighting, and unique signage. With the Kroger Marketplace and other nearby retail amenities plus several local public facilities such as a library, municipal building, and a large public park with an amphitheater, every manner of good or service for daily needs is within a short 10-minute walk. This creates an ideal atmosphere to promote a walkable, livable environment for the Shopping Center continued on page 6

The competitiveness of the shopping center in the local commercial retail environment has slowly eroded over the decades with additional competition from new shopping meccas in southern Montgomery County. The shopping center also suffers from its remote location relative to the nearest interstate interchange (~2.5 miles). The Ohio Planner’s News

5

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Article, 04-06-2017 theChimes

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CoGo bike sharing coming to Bexley ! April 6, 2017 (http://cuchimes.com/04/2017/cogo-bike-sharing-coming-bexley/) " Heather Barr (http://cuchimes.com/author/hbarr/) # Campus News (http://cuchimes.com/category/news/campus-news/), Feature (http://cuchimes.com/category/feature/), Lifestyles (http://cuchimes.com/category/lifestyles/), Local News (http://cuchimes.com/category/news/local-news/), News (http://cuchimes.com/category/news/), Student Health (http://cuchimes.com/category/student-life/student-health/), Student Life (http://cuchimes.com/category/student-life/)

Several students at Ohio State University are working to bring bike sharing to the Bexley area as a new method of transportation for students. CoGo is a bike sharing company that has 46 individual stations in the Columbus area and over 300 bikes in its inventory. Bikes are kept at stations in prominent areas around town and can be rented by anyone who has purchased a membership. Memberships can be bought per day for $8, three days for $18, and an annual pass costs $75 dollars. According to Evan Hertzog, a student working on the project, CoGo has worked out options for university student group rates, although this has not been discussed yet.

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Article, 04-06-2017 theChimes

With a membership, a student would be able to use a bike for the allotted amount of time as long as the bike is checked into a station at least every 30 minutes. For example, a student with a three day membership would be able to borrow a bike from a station an unlimited number of times within the 72 hour window as long as the bike is checked into a station at least every 30 minutes. “CoGo provides a choice that is faster than walking, more adventurous than a taxicab, and better for the environment than driving, without users needing to worry about owning, maintaining, and storing their own bikes,” said Hertzog. The students bringing this service to Bexley are part group of 16 City & Regional Planning students from Ohio State. They’re working to bring 26 new CoGo stations to the Columbus area, with the funding for the project coming from the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission grant. Four of the proposed stations will be located in Bexley, and they will link with pre-existing CoGo locations that stretch into the main part of Columbus. Hertzog says students can use this new transportation system to bike along the Alum Creek trail or ride all the way to Downtown Columbus to visit Topiary Park and the Columbus Museum of Art. This would also be a green alternative to COTA transportation for students without a car. The locations of the stations has not yet been Þnalized, and CoGo wants to get residents of Bexley and students at Capital involved in choosing them. At the moment, the group has three locations that they feel would work well; near Bexley City Hall, near Johnson’s Ice Cream or East Gateway along Main Street, and Jeffrey Mansion. The locations must be accessible and close to the road and preferably near an intersection. The plan for expanding CoGo into Bexley has not yet been Þnalized, but the group has their Þnal presentation to the City of Bexley on April 18, and the Þnal report will be completed on April 20. The stations will most likely be installed sometime in 2018. If anyone has ideas for a location of a station or a comment or question, they are encouraged to email cogoexpand@gmail.com (mailto:cogoexpand@gmail.com).

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BREAKING NEWS

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Survey, Bexley Boards

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Survey, Grandview Heights Board (Senior Center)

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Survey, Grandview Heights Combined Results

THIRD AVENUE

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Survey, Upper Arlington Results

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Survey Results 13 - Kingsdale 12 - Library 9 - Lane Ave 8 - Thompson 6 - Mallway 5 - Reed 5 - Fancyburg 4 - Miller

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Agenda, 02-02-2017 Clintonville Area Commission

Clintonville Area Commission Meeting Agenda Thursday, February  2,  2017,  7-­9  pm     Whetstone  Library  Community  Meeting  Room   (all  times  are  approximate)  

Commissioners in attendance: David Vottero, Nancy Kuhel, Libby Wetherholt, Judy Minister, Matthew Cull, Randy Ketcham, Jason Meek, Chris Allwein, D Searcy Commissioner(s) absent and excused:

7:00 p.m. Call to order by Chair & introduction of commissioners 7:03 p.m. Consideration of prior meeting minutes – Commissioner Cull COMMITTEE REPORTS 7:05 p.m.

Community Update - Isom Nivins

7:15 p.m.

Treasurer’s report - Commissioner Meek

7:20 p.m.

Zoning and Variance Committee Report – Chair, Steve Hardwick

8:05 p.m.

Technology & Public Relations Committee – Commissioner Libby Wetherholt

8:10 p.m.

Clintonville Neighborhood Plan Review Committee – Chair, Justin Goodwin

8:20 p.m.

Election Committee – Chair, Ann Henkener COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION REPORTS

8:30 p.m.

CoGo Bike Sharing – Tyler Bender NEW BUSINESS

8:40 p.m.

Public Comments District Reports

8:55 p.m.

ADJOURN

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Agenda, 02-02-2017 Clintonville Area Commission

Upcoming Events: 2/8

Historic Buildings Committee

2/21

Neighborhood Plan Review Committee, 7:30 pm, Clinton Heights Lutheran Church

2/25

Clintonville Go Public Fundraiserâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Mozartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

2/28

Planning & Development Committee: 7 pm, Clinton Heights Lutheran Church Zoning & Variance: 7:30 pm, Clinton Heights Lutheran Church

3/2

Next CAC Meeting: 7 pm, Whetstone Library

3/7

Election Orientation for CAC Candidates, 6:30, Whetstone Library

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Agenda, 02-07-2017 Fifth by Northwest Area Commission

Fifth by Northwest Area Commission Meeting | Tuesday, February 7th, 2017 FEBRUARY AGENDA City of Columbus/Other Associations • Isom Nivins, City of Columbus, Department of Neighborhoods • Officer Steve Smith, City of Columbus Police Department, Fifth by Northwest Update • Jackie Yeoman, Department of Development, UIRF Projects • Tony Celebrezze, Assistant Director of Building Services • Knowlton School, City & Regional Planning Studio, Bike Share Program Research • 43212 Civic Association Zoning Presentations Zoning Chair, Commissioner McKibben • Grandview Café • Caddy’s Delight Virtual Golf Lounge • Your Pie • Dave Perry, Development lot at Fairview and Ida Public Comments Area Commission Business • Ratification of January Meeting Minutes - Commissioner LuPiba • Social Media/March Appointment – Commissioner Hofmaster • Treasurer transition – Commissioner Bean • Zoning Code Violations – Commissioner Colgan

Next Meeting: Tuesday, March 7th @ 7pm St. Luke’s

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Agenda, 02-21-2017 Grandview Heights City Council

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Agenda, 02-21-2017 Grandview Heights City Council

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Agenda, 03-07-2017 Bexley City Council

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Mee ng Agenda

Tuesday, March 7, 2017  5:45 p.m.      1)

Call to Order

2)

Roll Call of Members a.

3)

Pledge of Allegiance

Presenta ons/Special Guests:  The Ohio State University Regional Planning Transporta on Studio Course regarding CoGo Bike Share sta ons.  The Ohio State University students presented the informa on and op ons for the different sta ons to be used with CoGo.  CoGo uses kiosks for bike rentals.  This project will be 80% funded with a grant and is the first bike grant in Ohio.  Majority of riders are ages 30 ‐ 39.  You can use a credit card for 30 minutes and then return it to another sta on to return and you can have another bike at no cost ‐ so basically endless 30 minute sessions. Online maps available  and  poten al  loca ons  are  Capital  University,  City  Hall,  Johnson's  Ice  Cream,  the Public Library and Jeffrey Mansion are a few of the sugges ons.  You have to be at least 18 years old to par cipate.  "Mo vated", is the parent company that handles the maintenance of the bikes.  Mr. Dorman said the city's costs would be $36,000 minus any sponsorship we receive. The city owns the kiosks so we can always move or relocate them.  Projected input date would be January, 2018.

4)

Mayor Kessler’s Report  Mayor Kessler provided highlights from his report.  

2017‐03‐07 Mayor Council Update 5)

City A orney Fishel’s Report

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6)

Public Comments:  Items not listed on the Agenda.

7)

Consent Agenda: i.

Minutes of February 28th, 2017 City Council Mee ng 2‐28‐17 Council Minutes

8)

Safety and  Health  Commi ee  Reading  of  Ordinances  &  Mee ng  –  Richard  Sharp,  Chair (Steve Keyes and Mary Go esman, commi ee members) a.

Third Readings

b.

Second Readings

c.

First Readings

d.

Tabled Ordinances

e.

Old Business

f.

New Business

g.

Safety Commi ee Reports: Richard Sharp, Chair i.

Lawrence Rinehart, Chief of Police 2017‐03‐07 Chief Council Update

h. 9)

Liaison Reports: Police Advisory Commi ee, Capital University & Trinity, SBNA

Finance Commi ee  Reading  of  Ordinances  &  Mee ngs  –  Deneese  Owen,  Chair  (Richard Sharp, and Lori Ann Feibel commi ee members) a.

Third Readings: i.

Ordinance 04‐17  to  create  any  Agency  Fund  designated  the  396  N.  Cassady Avenue Environmental cleanup fund to record the grant money received by the City for the sole purpose of making disbursements to the contractors comple ng the project authorized by this grant and to unappropriate $490,163 included in the  original  budget  in  the  grants  department,  introduced  by  Ms.  Owen (Introduced on 2/14/17) Ordinance 4‐17 Agency Fund N. Cassady

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ii.

Ordinance 05‐17 to authorize and direct the Mayor and the Auditor to enter into a five‐year employment contract with Lawrence Lee Rinehart as Chief of Police effec ve April 30, 2017, Introduced by Ms. Owen (Introduced on 2/14/17) Ordinance  05‐17 Chief Contract )rdinance 05‐17 Exhibit Chief Employment Agreement

b.

Second Readings

c.

First Readings

d.

Tabled Ordinances

e.

Old Business

f.

New Business

g.

Finance Commi ee Reports: Deneese Owen, Chair i.

h.

Bill Harvey, Auditor & Beecher Hale, Finance Director

Liaison Reports: Civil Service, Friends of the Drexel, Chamber of Commerce and CIC

10) Zoning, Development, and Judiciary Commi ee Reading of Ordinances & Mee ng – Steve Keyes, Chair (Deneese Owen and Troy Markham, commi ee members) a.

Third Readings

b.

Second Readings

c.

First Readings

d.

Tabled Ordinances

e.

Old Business

f.

New Business

g.

Zoning and Judiciary Commi ee Report ‐ Steve Keyes, Chair ‐ Not present.

h.

Liaison Reports: Planning/BZA, Bexley Library, St. Charles

11) Recrea on and Parks Commi ee Reading of Ordinances & Mee ng–Troy Markham, Chair (Deneese Owen and Mary Go esman, commi ee members) http://bexley.granicus.com/GeneratedAgendaViewer.php?view_id=2&clip_id=696

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a.

Third Readings

b.

Second Readings

c.

First Readings

d.

Tabled Ordinances

e.

Old Business

f.

New Business

g.

Recrea on and Parks Report i.

Troy Markham, Chair

ii.

Recrea on and Parks Director, Mike Price City Council Update ‐ 3‐7‐17

h.

Liaison Reports: Tree and Public Gardens, Alum Creek Corridor, Recrea on Board

12) Service and  Environmental  Commi ee  Reading  of  Ordinances  &  Mee ng  –  Mary Go esman, Chair (Lori Ann Feibel and Troy Markham, commi ee members) a.

Third Readings: i.

Ordinance 06‐17  to  amend  the  City  of  Bexley’s  current  contract  with  the American Founda on of State County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) as it relates  to  the  posi on  of  Equipment  Operator,  introduced  by  Ms.  Go esman (Introduced on 2‐14‐17)  Ms.  Go esman  said  this  allows  for  an  Equip.  Operator  1  to  advance  to  Equip. Operator 2 and move up the ladder. Ordinance 06‐17 Amendment to AFSCME Ordinance  06‐17  Exhibit  Equipment  Operator  Memorandum  of  Understanding (MOU) 2.14.17 Ordinance 06‐17 Appendix A

b.

Second Readings

c.

First Readings

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d.

Tabled Ordinances

e.

Old Business

f.

New Business

g.

Service Commi ee Report: Mary Go esman, Chair i.

Bill Dorman, Service Director Department of Public Service City Council Update (3.7.17) Final

h.

Liaison Reports:  Heritage  House/JCC,  Bexley  Ac vi es  Commi ee,  Board  of  Health, Jewish Family Services.  April 22nd will be the Board of Health mee ng.  The JCC is having a job fair on April 1st for employers looking to hire employees at Easton.  The JCC Gala with be April 1st and will have delicious food and dancing.

13) Strategic Commi ee Reading of Ordinances & Mee ngs – Lori Ann Feibel, Chair (Richard Sharp and Steve Keyes, commi ee members) a.

Third Readings

b.

Second Readings

c.

First Readings: i.

Resolu on 03‐17  iden fying  the  Jeffrey  Mansion  Expansion  Project  as  a  City ini a ve  supported  by  Bexley  City  Council  as  one  of  Council’s  primary  2017 goals, introduced by Ms. Feibel (Introduced on 3‐7‐17) Resolu on 03‐17 Suppor ng Rec Expansion Resolu on 03‐17 Jeffrey Mansion Exhibit

d.

Tabled Ordinances

e.

Old Business

f.

New Business

g.

Strategic Commi ee Reports:  Lori Ann Feibel, Chair

h.

Liaison Reports: CSG and Historical Society 

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Tomorrow is Woman's Day ‐ CSG will be having their breakfast with a great speaker.  CSG  will  be  having  their  Spring  break  next  week.    Bexley  Historical  Society  ‐  Sunday from noon to 3 ‐ "Reflec ons on Bexley" sharing their memories and reflec ons. 14) President’s Report – Tim Madison

a.

Old Business

b.

New Business

c.

President’s Liaison  Report:  Bexley  Educa on  Founda on,  Bexley  Community Founda on,  Bexley  Celebra ons  Associa on,  Board  of  Educa on,  Bexley  Eastmoor Berwick Realtors Associa on  Mr. Madison said the Quarterly mee ng with the school, library and recrea on will be held April 12th at noon.  He reminded everyone that due to Spring Break, there will be a three week break between our mee ngs.

15) Good and Welfare 16) Old Business 17) New Business 18) Adjourn

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Agenda, 04-03-2017 Grandview Heights City Council

CITY OF GRANDVIEW HEIGHTS, OHIO CITY COUNCIL MEETING MONDAY, APRIL 3, 2017

NOTICE

There will be a City of Grandview Heights Council meeting on Monday, April 3, 2017 at 7:00 p.m. in Council Chambers, 1016 Grandview Avenue AGENDA

Call to Order /Pledge of Allegiance

Roll Call

Approval of Proceedings: 1) Regular Meeting of March 6, 2017

Council Appointment: Board of Zoning Appeals

Presentation – CoGo Update

 

Comments from Visitors Department Heads Report: 1) Police Department 2) Fire Department

Council Reports           

Finance Planning and Administration Recreation, Services and Public Facilities Safety Communications & Technology Economic Development School Liaison Chamber COTA MORPC Real Estate Ad-Hoc

Mayor’s Report

Director of Administration/Economic Development Report

Director of Finance Report

04032017 City Council

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Agenda, 04-03-2017 Grandview Heights City Council

City Attorney Report

Old Business: 1. Ord. 2017-07: An Ordinance to establish parking management districts and guidelines for operations of such districts within the City of Grandview Heights, Ohio. Pending Second Reading. Assigned to Economic Development Committee 3/6/2017

New Business: 1. Res. 03-2017: A Resolution to waive the provisions of Section 529.07(b)3 of the Codified Ordinances for the Tour de Grandview Cycling Classic Event on June 16, 2017. 2. Res. 04-2017: A Resolution to waive the provisions of Section 529.07(b)3 of the Codified Ordinances for the Tri-Village Chamber Partnership Digfest event on June 17, 2017. 3. Res. 05-2017: A Resolution declaring April as Fair Housing Month in Grandview Heights, Ohio. 4. Ord. 2017-08: An Ordinance Appropriating Monies Received from a Charitable Donation from the Dr. Tom Williams Foundation for the improvement of Memorial Park. 5. Ord. 2017-09: An Ordinance authorizing the Mayor and Director of Finance to enter into an Agreement for Salaries and Benefits with the Capital City Lodge #9 of the Fraternal Order of Police, and declaring it an emergency.

Comments from Council Members

Other Business: 1. Transfer of Liquor Permit to Candle Lab Ltd, 1253 Grandview Avenue from Dance Plus Ballroom Inc., 1255 Grandview Avenue (D1; D2; D3 and D6) 2. Executive session: Pursuant to O.R.C. 121.22(G) (4) Preparing for, conducting, or reviewing negotiations or bargaining sessions with public employees concerning their compensation or other terms and conditions of their employment.

Adjournment AGENDA SUBJECT TO CHANGE!

04032017 City Council

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Agenda, 04-17-2017 Upper Arlington City Council

MISSION STATEMENT

The City of Upper Arlington is committed to providing superior services to all who live and work in the community. The work of the City is founded on responsible and responsive public participation, elected leadership and professional staffing.

COUNCIL CONFERENCE SESSION AGENDA 4/17/2017 7:30 PM MUNICIPAL SERVICES CENTER LOWER LEVEL MEETING ROOM 3600 TREMONT ROAD

AGENDA REPORTS/PRESENTATIONS/DISCUSSION ITEMS 1.

Centennial Committee Update

2.

Bike Share Presentation

3.

Solid Waste Update

4.

March Finance Report & Finance Report for First Quarter

5.

City Manager Update LEGISLATIVE AND/OR ADMINISTRATIVE ITEMS

6.

Proposed Legislation - To Amend C.O. Chapter 149, Civil Service, by Enacting C.O. ยง149.19, Criminal Background Inquiry, Relative to the Administrative Code

7.

Proposed Legislation - To Authorize the City Manager to Enter Into an Economic Development Incentive Agreement with Upper Arlington Veterinary Hospital for a Job Creation Incentive

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Agenda, 04-17-2017 Upper Arlington City Council

8.

Proposed Legislation - To Authorize the City Manager to Enter Into Contract with Insight Pipe Contracting, LLC for Sanitary Sewer Inspection and Cleaning

9.

Proposed Legislation - To Authorize the City Manager to Amend the Contract with LOTH for Office Furniture. COUNCIL LIAISON REPORT ADJOURNMENT

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Resolution, 09-12-2016 Upper Arlington

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Resolution, 09-12-2016 Upper Arlington

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Resolution, 09-12-2016 Upper Arlington

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Resolution, 09-12-2016 Upper Arlington

268


Emails from the Public

From: Chacha Harden <charlotte43221@hotmail.com> Subject: La Chatelaine Bikeshare Program Date: April 11, 2017 at 12:30:05 PM EDT To: “cogoexpand@gmail.com” <cogoexpand@gmail.com> Bonjour OSU CoGo Team We are super excited that you would like to expand to us in West Lane avenue! We hire a ton of OSU students and we know this would be a great asset to our community! We would love to support your efforts and if you would like we can even discuss placing your bikes on our property if the hotel or sidewalk there doesn’t work out. Any expansion to the Worthington High St sector? We could even work on something right out front our store there in Worthington. Keep up the great work and contact us anytime! Merci Charlotte Harden, CEO Stan Wielezynski, President La Chatelaine 614.488.1911 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------To Whom This May Concern, My name is David Marlow and I am a student in the City & Regional Planning program at The Ohio State University. I am currently working with 15 other colleagues on a project to locate 26 new bike share (CoGo) stations in Columbus, Upper Arlington, Grandview Heights, and Bexley. A presentation to the CoGo advisory board and to the City of Columbus will be held on April 18th at 5:30. We are considering a station located near the intersection of Northwest Blvd & Chambers Road, so we thought this might be of interest. I would like to inform you of this exciting effort and to also provide a link to our project website https://u.osu.edu/cogo/ where you can keep track of the progress being made in the pursuit to make this dream a reality. Please let me know of any questions you might have about this potential station, or CoGo in general. Have a great day! David Marlow City & Regional Planning The Ohio State University | Knowlton School of Architecture marlow.70@osu.edu (937) 679-6929 From: Todd Mills <todd@acretogo.com> Sent: Thursday, April 6, 2017 9:31 PM

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Emails from the Public

To: Marlow, David M. Subject: Re: CoGo Bike Station Expansion Hi David, That’s great. Please let me know if I can be of any help as you continue with your planning. Cheers, Todd Mills ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------From: Chris Taylor <ctaylor@ualibrary.org> Subject: GoGo Bike Share system expansion Date: April 11, 2017 at 2:44:57 PM EDT To: cogoexpand@gmail.com Dear OSU GoGo Expansion Team, I was very excited to get your letter to learn that you are considering a station near our Library. We are very supportive of this idea. Sincerely, Chris ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------From: Heritage Apartments Property Manager <herpropmgr@villagegreen.com> Subject: CoGo expansion Date: April 11, 2017 at 9:10:00 AM EDT To: “cogoexpand@gmail.com” <cogoexpand@gmail.com> Good morning, I manage an apartment community on the corner of North Star Rd and Northwest Blvd, and am curious about the expansion. Where in the Upper Arlington area are you proposing a new station? Thanks, Mike Carr | Property Manager | Heritage Apartments 1361 Presidential Dr. | Columbus, Ohio 43212 (O) 614.486.5232 | (F) 614.486.4051| (E) herpropmgr@villagegreen.com | explore www.RentHeritage.com

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Emails from the Public

Hello Mr. Carr, We are proposing seven different CoGo bike stations be placed within a one mile radius of the Heritage Apartments. Three of which are located in Upper Arlington: Northwest Blvd & North Star, Mallway Park, and the Shops On Lane Avenue. Another three stations will be placed in 5th by Northwest (City of Columbus): Chambers Rd & Northwest Blvd, 5th Ave & Northwest Blvd, and 5th Ave & Norton Ave. The last station placed within one mile is located in Grandview Heights: 2nd Ave & Grandview Ave. I hope this information helps and here is the link to our website https://u.osu.edu/cogo/ where you can keep yourself updated on the process being made. Have a great day! David Marlow City & Regional Planning The Ohio State University | Knowlton School of Architecture marlow.70@osu.edu (937) 679-6929 From: Heritage Apartments Property Manager <herpropmgr@villagegreen.com> Sent: Wednesday, April 12, 2017 10:14 AM To: Marlow, David M. Subject: RE: CoGo expansion Wow, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exciting... Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure our residents would make good use of them (especially the Northwest/NorthStar and Northwest/Chambers locations). Thanks again David, Mike Carr | Property Manager | Heritage Apartments 1361 Presidential Dr. | Columbus, Ohio 43212 (O) 614.486.5232 | (F) 614.486.4051| (E) herpropmgr@villagegreen.com | explore www.RentHeritage.com

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Twitter Account, Tweets 1/8

Text: Another great article this time from @TheChimesNews at @Capital_U!! https://t.co/3zS9rZFzYy Screen Name: @CogoExpand Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/850113765056159749 Text: Cool infographic from @BikeLeague showing what makes a bike friendly community https://t.co/0S6QroQz9s Screen Name: @CogoExpand Retweet Count: 1 Favorite Count: 4 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/846867576747671552 Text: RT @yaybikes: Bike the Cbus neighborhood tour is 10! VIP registration is open. Save until March 31st. #letsride https://t.co/uBMPU3CEWd Screen Name: @CogoExpand Retweet Count: 6 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/846793132347981827 Text: Check out the simple process of installing a cogo station @CityofUA @GrandviewOhio @BexleyMayor https://t.co/TsAkrljsZ9 Screen Name: @CogoExpand

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Twitter Account, Tweets 2/8

Retweet Count: 2 Favorite Count: 2 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/844544539062931457 Text: We are back from spring break and met with the Franklin Park Conservatory today to discuss possible locations! #bikeshare Screen Name: @CogoExpand Favorite Count: 1 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/844280391909478401 Text: @11W they should check out our website! We’re expanding Bikeshare around Cbus! They can ride to the WHAC! Screen Name: @CogoExpand Favorite Count: 1 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a In Reply To: @11W In Reply To Status Id: 840575880128790529 URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/840581923797893120 Text: Where should bike share stations be in Bexley? We’re working with @BexleyMayor to gather public input—share yours a… https://t.co/nYZkUqXOIA Screen Name: @CogoExpand

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Twitter Account, Tweets 3/8

Favorite Count: 2 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/840003937000402944 Text: Big thanks to @ThisWeekNews https://t.co/sPBdFGSqbI Screen Name: @CogoExpand Retweet Count: 2 Favorite Count: 2 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/839657873634385920 Text: Another article from This Week News with a focus on Upper Arlington!@CityofUA https://t.co/uCaRPShSrC Screen Name: @CogoExpand Retweet Count: 2 Favorite Count: 2 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/837412312625590278 Text: RT @chadgibsonUA: CoGo grant a good fit with local initiatives https://t.co/xyVEhF06Hk @CogoExpand @CoGoBikeShare @CityofUA Screen Name: @CogoExpand Retweet Count: 1 Name: CoGo Expand

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Twitter Account, Tweets 4/8

Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/837411318298722306 Text: We met with the University Area Commission tonight! Suggest a location at https://t.co/ zTvT5D0qP2 Screen Name: @CogoExpand Favorite Count: 1 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/837115811928092672 Text: RT @chadgibsonUA: Thanks @CoGoBikeShare! Initial recommendations for Cbus station locations being presented on March 9th at 5:30 at Knowltoâ&#x20AC;¦ Screen Name: @CogoExpand Retweet Count: 2 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/836739869602885637 Text: CoGo mentioned our project on their website, check it out and follow along with our progress! @CoGoBikeShare https://t.co/kDqbbDv6uk Screen Name: @CogoExpand Favorite Count: 1 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49

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Twitter Account, Tweets 5/8

Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/836736649811869697 Text: RT @CoGoBikeShare: The best way to explore Columbus is by bike! Check out our Popular Rides and Local Recommendations > https://t.co/xh7Guâ&#x20AC;¦ Screen Name: @CogoExpand Retweet Count: 5 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/834922514627375104 Text: We met yesterday with @GrandviewOhio and @CityofUA city councils to further introduce our project and ideas moving forward! Screen Name: @CogoExpand Retweet Count: 2 Favorite Count: 5 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/834915403474284544 Text: ThisWeek Community News in Clintonville wrote an article on our project. Check it out here! https://t.co/Wvw0K28BP7 Screen Name: @CogoExpand Favorite Count: 1 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23

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Twitter Account, Tweets 6/8

Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/834914857082310657 Text: RT @GrandviewOhio: Students at @OhioState w/ @CogoExpand are working w/ us to recommend 26 new @CoGoBikeShare station locations. More: httpâ&#x20AC;¦ Screen Name: @CogoExpand Retweet Count: 3 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/834244708260073472 Text: Let us know where you want bike share stations in Columbus, @GrandviewOhio, @ CityofUA, and @BexleyMayor on this map! https://t.co/zTvT5D0qP2 Screen Name: @CogoExpand Retweet Count: 3 Favorite Count: 2 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/832363083569971203 Text: We are talking with a CoGo Advisory Panel today, should be an informative meeting! Screen Name: @CogoExpand Favorite Count: 1 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system.

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Twitter Account, Tweets 7/8

Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/831946106078711809 Text: Check out our blog post on the meeting with the Clintonville Area Commission on our website! https://t.co/GT8pNmJ73y Screen Name: @CogoExpand Favorite Count: 1 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/831671487245516801 Text: Catch us at the Fifth by Northwest Area Commission meeting tonight! Screen Name: @CogoExpand Favorite Count: 1 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/829108241086939141 Text: Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got business cards! https://t.co/QED45hYKu9 Screen Name: @CogoExpand Favorite Count: 1 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/829104933312069632 Text: We are meeting with the Clintonville Area Commission tonight, should be an informative for our work moving forward!

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Twitter Account, Tweets 8/8

Screen Name: @CogoExpand Favorite Count: 1 Name: CoGo Expand Location: Columbus, OH Lang: en Followers Count: 49 Friends Count: 326 Statuses Count: 23 Description: OSU planning students working on site recommendations for additions to the bike share system. Website: https://t.co/U2ZQZBNy0a URL: https://www.twitter.com/CogoExpand/status/827299471130259457 Compiled using twDocs.com.

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Bike Share Location Online Survey

Rationale

x

Close to two parks with little parking I believe next to the parking garage off Goodale would work best. It is close to bike paths. It could be marketed as a place to park then take the bikes to OSU games on campus or down to the Short North, places where parking are at a premium. Also, parking here and taking the bikes down to ComFest would be a beneficial use. I chose this location because I think it would be a nice compliment to the station at the Giant Eagle on 3rd. Also, this is a heavily trafficked area with the food/shops and bus stops. There are many people from other neighborhoods that get dropped here to visit/work on 5th ave or in Downtown Grandview. This area is becoming very popular with limited parking available. Suggesting this general area; not this specific corner. The pool is likely to become even more popular and the intersection of Northwest and Goodale will serve existing community members and new Grandview Yards residents alike. Destination for coffee shop and restaurants. Close to Grandview yard/hotels... Can connect to Columbus via Trail and Grandview Ave Connect Grandview Ave to Yard & rest of system Connect to New Nationwide and Giant Eagle

It's a city park a block or two from the new Camp Chase Trail. Osu needs cogo. Likely users connected to a regional system. Closer to my home. Put stations close to where people live. Franklin Park. Put stations close to where people live and where they want to go. near Tommy's Diner

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-83.03902794 -83.02373398

39.9755308 39.97476001

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39.98850137

-83.044103

39.98874301

-83.02917082

39.97442703

-83.04496849 -83.02558739

39.98339297 39.97460791

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39.98370063 39.98374996 39.98194138

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39.98495675

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39.94647627

-82.9845335

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40.00404832

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39.96264036 39.96371294

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39.95939585


Bike Share Location Online Survey

COTA's route #2 along East Main St is their busiest route and having bikes available at the edge of Bexley is a great place to catch both higher income people living in Bexley while also providing an addition transportation option for lower income residents in nearby communities. Easy access to Brevoort Park, Weiland's Market, and is a natural extension north on U.S. 23. With proposals for traffic calming and bike lanes on Indianola, CoGo would be remiss not to come to Brevoort Park.

-82.9245939

39.95671188

-83.00074885

40.0365443

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Grandview Heights (Ohio) Public Library is a top destination -83.049832 in the community in between the Grandview Avenue commercial corridor and a dense residential neighborhood There's a large fitness center in a urban mixed-use redevel- -83.02715 opment with lots of nearby apartments, offices and restaurants. Close to the Columbus bikeway network and downtown Columbus On both bus routes (at bus stop on corner of 1st and Hope) -83.04039318 and heavily traveled / centrally located in heart of Grandview residential district. This section of 1st Ave is highly visible with pedestrian traffic it would not make as much sense to locate the station at the bottom of the 1st Ave hill (corner of 1st/Oxley or corner of 1st/Northwest) -- so the next best place along 1st Ave would be either this location or the corner of 1st/Virginia. I assume there will already be a stop located close to either the Library or the corner of Grandview Ave and 1st Ave. " going to both school areas, and is physically located uphill" from both the Yard and the 1st Ave business district. Since it is more difficult to pedal bicycles uphill -83.02591998

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New pool will attract people. Location is in between buck -83.040342 park ball field, wyman woods , and new bike trails. New bike trail is being installed at some point along Goodale contacting all the bike trails together. The kingsdale shopping center is a central location in Upper -83.058358 Arlington, there are bus stops near by and the High School is close if a student should need it.

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39.98203301

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Bike Share Location Online Survey

Third Hand Bicycle Co-op helps community members to get on two wheels by offering free shop use and expert help! We also sell bikes, so some folks might want to ride up to check out bikes! The adjacent hotel wants a bike share station as an amenity; visibility is great (along W. Lane Ave) and the right-of-way width is more than adequate for a station. Whole Foods is right across the street and brings in people from outside the immediate area. There is an existing station at Lane Ave and Olentangy River Road. There is a new shared-use path along Kinnear Road as well, with many more bike infrastructure improvements to come! Proximity to Frank Fetch Park as well as restaurants and bars near E. Beck and Mohawk. This area is not served by CoGo and it is a huge tourist and resident area. Thank you. It's next to the busiest Target in the city, right at the COTA stop where the bus waits. Where else near OSU Campus can you shop for clothes, groceries, dorm furniture and electronics at one time? It's in the middle of the Lennox Town Center instead of at one end. It's easier to bike directly there than walk from Giant Eagle Market District on 3rd. It is close to the Grandview Library and the shops on Grandview Blvd. It gives more options for those at Buckeye Village and University Village than just their circulator buses. It is within cycling distance to Kingsdale Center and the Upper Arlington Library. It is within walking distance to Riverside Hospital, allowing people to visit those at the hospital within their own schedule and still get back to the core of the city. The Upper Arlington Public Library is one of the largest libraries in the County. Since Columbus Metropolitan Library and the UAPL share their collections as part of the Central Library Consortium, they don't duplicate items. Thus, I end up as often at the UAPL to find something that Columbus does not have. The UAPL has as large of a video collection (and the DVD/BlueRay extras/deleted scenes don't end up on Netflix usually.) Right next to the 24 hour Giant Eagle and the Park & Ride

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Near Whetstone, the largest branch library in Columbus, and close to the Olentangy Bike Trail Close to Half-Price Books, Whole Paycheck, Roll Bike shop and the western end of the OSU Campus Area Bus Service circulator loop on Carmack.

-83.01961107 40.04122949

-82.99217829 39.95163167 -83.02708942 39.9928538

-83.04501463 39.98183245 -83.02579059 40.02024525

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-83.05761749 40.02043468

-83.05212785 40.00681752 -83.04683853 40.00695311

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Bike Share Location Online Survey

Access to bike trails and commuting possibilities to downtown

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The Clintonville neighborhood currently does not have access to the COGO bike share system. A station in mid-Clintonville would allow for commuting to Campus, Italian Village, or the Short North via High Street, the bike lanes on Summit and 4th, or the bike trail in under 30 minutes, and downtown in under 60. It would also allow COGO users to access the many wonderful shops and restaurants in Clintonville.

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-83.02066553 40.06544174 North end of CABS East Residental Loop

-83.00013859 40.01499799

It's easier to walk beside a laundry basket on top a bike to the laundrymat on the corner than it is to carry it several blocks by hand. Easy access to the string of bars and late-night pizza up the street too. There's a coding bootcamp a few doors down too. It's next to Metro High School, close to TechElevator, the Commons on Kinnear apartments and the Morehouse Hospital Annex shuttle stop. It's close enough to link up with Upper Arlington stations. It's right on the Beekman Park one mile multi-use loop, so people can use bikes to do laps without needing to bring their own. It's right at public restrooms with picnic shelter and water fountain. It would make it easier to get to the closest DMV branch to get replacement state IDs, the closest 24-hour FedExOffice to OSU Campus, Tensuke Market and MicroCenter (to fix smashed laptops or other electronics). Laps on the Antrim Park path, allows people to ride most of the Olentangy River bike path (the path with the highest usage on the Central Ohio Greenways map) all the way past downtown to the Scioto Audubon Park

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-82.91567046 40.05304833 At the north end of the future Indianola bike lanes, near the Park and Ride Near the south end of the future Indianola bike lanes

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I'd like to try the Market to Market annual ride (North Market to Hills Market) up the Olentangy River Bike Path on a CoGo

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Bike Share Location Online Survey

This would make it easier to bike across the bridge (a straight -83.05018324 40.04944095 path down Highland Drive) to Whetstone Library instead of dealing with all the traffic. It connects two areas that are traditionally isolated by Olentangy River and allowing them a simpler route to get to High Street, which has more regular bus routes. It's also next to shops like Penzey's (since I doubt Upper Arlington would want to put a station so far north on Highland Drive itself) Next to Upper Arlington Library Lane Road Branch, 2 miles to -83.07123524 40.04073468 Kingsdale, 3 miles to Carriage Place Walmart, 3 miles to Whetstone Library -82.95742173 39.96528373 near Wild Goose Creative, Rumba Cafe, Used Kids Records, Studio 614, 10 minute walk to MAPFRE Stadium, Aldi groceries Whetstone Library, Whetstone Community Center (via the Olentangy Bikepath) Located between multiple parks in Grandview and near many biking trails. Grandview has plans to extend the current bike trails down Goodale Blvd in front of the pool. C Ray Buck Park, next to the pool, would also be a great location. A station on the south side of Grandview would mesh perfectly with the stations all ready located in Grandview. The new renovated pool will bring a lot of people to the area. Whetstone Recreation Center & Whetstone Library

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Visiting Riverside Hospital requires either waiting for the awkward infrequent bus that runs every hour or walking all the way down N Broadway from the frequent High Street buses. Even a station on the Olentangy River Bikepath would make for a much shorter walk to Riverside. Como Park

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Pierce Field and Luck Brothers

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Bike between work at Kingsdale to classes on OSU Campus. Giant Eagle Kingsdale is open 24 hours, so 3rd shift workers don't have a bus to get to and from work (and parking on campus is too expensive for many students). CoGo at Kingsdale would save a lot of money for students working there. Riding back to Campus from the bars at night is cheaper than Uber Lennox shops, bus stop, movies, closer to West Campus

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Bike from West Campus or laps on the track

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Bike Share Location Online Survey

Micro Center!

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Graceland shops

-83.02050728 40.06543147

It's on the Olentangy bike path, next to the bridge over Route -83.03168941 40.04707787 315 and the sporting fields of Whetstone High School. If there were stations in the neighborhood across the river, students could ride home and people could come back to the sports fields to watch (or play) games. It would also be useful for the other communities further south to use Whetstone Library and the community center via the Olentangy bike path. The CRC (Clintonville Beachwold Community Resource Cen-83.01539133 40.02747067 ter) is a widely used social network center with very minimal parking. Putting a station out front would help transport more volunteers for the kids programs from farther neighborhoods as well as seniors for the senior programs and food pantry volunteers/recipients. Near the local Elementary & Middle schools, a local swimming -83.0611803 39.99890071 pool and a cluster of shops

285


Upper Arlington Online Survey Results

Comments Please don't forget the residents who live north of Fishinger! Bike racks at Thompson Park and Sunny 95 Park as well as the shopping Center at Henderson should be considered. Tremont Center "North Star & Northwest Blvd intersection Shops at Lane Avenue Tremont Center Kingsdale Center Main Library" Please note all the locations on the map. I picked Mallway on Arlington, Shops at Lane, Tremont Library, Kingsdale, Fire Station 72, Lane Rd Library. I feel all those places are good, central locations that would make it easy to ride around Upper Arlington from north to south. "Suggestions with respect to bike sharing include: 1. Most population dense areas 2. Public spaces or just outside public spaces to increase accessibility 3. W/i miles of the bike paths that connect to downtown public spaces like Scioto greenway, Nationwide arena, etc. While it's great to explore ways to increase access to bikes as an alternative mode of transportation, our current system for use of these bikes is lacking. Cyclists without bike lanes share roads with drivers less prepared with respect to spacing. They often do so at their own peril - against traffic and without helmets. Additionally, cyclists on sidewalks (which are not currently wide enough to adequately share space) increase unsafe conditions for both the biker and walker/runner. While I'm incredibly excited about this initiative, it seems short-sighted to not simultaneously explore how residents will use these bikes in a way that is safe to them and drivers, pedestrians, etc. " "Kingsdale Tremont Center " "Mallway Tremont Thompson Fancyburg Sunny"

286


Upper Arlington Online Survey Results

"Lane Road Library Fancyburg Park Kroger on Henderson Commercial area on 33/Fishinger (by Daily Growler or other side by the Post Office)" I agree that adding options to parks north of Fishinger is a good idea. It would be great to get them in Kenny Center or at the Starbucks on Henderson, but those places are a long way from Fancybug, and Henderson is such a barrier to biking that they may not be feasible at this time. Bikes are a nuisance and programs like GoGo should not be adopted.

The Fancyburg and Thompson Park areas are a must. Would be nice to get the residents north of Fishinger and south of McCoy as well. "Tremont Center Kingsdale Mallway Kroger/starbucks on Henderson"

287


Bike Share Stakeholders

Name Jeanine Hummer Shelby Croft Ashley Hofmaster News Desk Ben Kessler Bill Dorman Debbie Maynard Evan Weese Tom Knox Brian Ball Doug Buchanan Kevin Parks Derek Wurst Kristin Edwards Alex Smith Brad Westall Frank Williams Jackie Yeoman Kevin Wheeler Nicholas Sanna Randy Bowman Steve Campbell Michael Dalby Kristen Schmidt Michael Bradley Scott Ulrich Dean Narciso Kimball Perry Rick Rouan Garry Clarke Pat Bowman Ray DeGraw Andrew Overbeck Chris Hermann William Murdock

Bike Share Stakeholders and Media Organization

Email

UA Atty 10TV 5XNW ABC6 & FOX 28 Bexley Bexley Bexley Biz First Biz First Business First Business First Clintonville News COGO COGO Columbus Columbus Columbus Columbus Columbus Columbus Columbus Columbus Columbus Chamber Columbus Monthly COTA CPH Dispatch Dispatch Dispatch Franklin Park Consv. Grandview Grandview MKSK MKSK MORPC

jhummer@uaoh.net shelby.croft@10tv.com amhofmaster@gmail.com news@wsyx6.com bkessler@bexley.org bdorman@bexley.org dmaynard@bexley.org eweese@bizjournals.com tknox@bizjournals.com bball@bizjournals.com dbuchanan@bizjournals.com kparks@thisweeknews.com derekwurst@motivateco.com kristinedwards@motivateco.com alexsmith7997@gmail.com BRWestall@Columbus.gov FDWilliams@columbus.gov jeyeoman@columbus.gov KJWheeler@Columbus.gov NJSanna@columbus.gov RJBowman@columbus.gov cscampbell@columbus.gov michael_dalby@columbus.org kschmidt@columbusmonthly.com BradleyML@cota.com STUlrich@columbus.gov dnarciso@dispatch.com kperry@dispatch.com rrouan@dispatch.com gclarke@fpconservatory.org PBowman@grandviewheights.org rdegraw@grandviewheights.org aoverbeck@mkskstudios.com chermann@mkskstudios.com wmurdock@morpc.org

288


Bike Share Stakeholders

News Desk Kyle Ezell Rachel Kleit Michael Cadwell Keith Myers News Desk Lisa Proctor Michelle Alan Froman Emma Speight Jackie Thiel Debbie Johnson Nate Ellis Shyla Nott Yay Bikes Margaret Cooley Kathleen Bailey

NBC4 OSU CRP OSU CRP OSU KSA OSU Physical Planning The Lantern This Week Tri-Village Chamber Tri-Village News UA Comm Affairs UA Engineer UA Mayor UA News WOSU YAY! Bikes Near East AC- planning Near East AC- chair

289

stories@nbc4i.com ezell.5@osu.edu kleit.1@osu.edu cadwell.1@osu.edu kmyers@campuspartners.org lanternnewsroom@gmail.com lproctor@thisweeknews.com michelle@chamberpartnership.org afroman@thisweeknews.com espeight@uaoh.net jthiel@uaoh.net djohnson@uaoh.net nellis@thisweeknews.com shyla.nott@wosu.org info@yaybikes.com margcool@gmail.com kathleendbailey@hotmail.com


CoGo Expansion Business Adresses

Business Name

Johnson's Real Ice Cream Anthony Thomas Chocolates First Choice Physical Therapy Christine's Garden Alterations with Love Bexley Area Chamber of Commerce Bexley Public Library Bexley Pizza Plus Rubino's Pizza Market District Express Michael Price, Director of Recreation and Parks, City of Bexley Bexley House Apartment Homes Franklin Park Conservatory OSU Hospital east MLK Jr. Library Yellow Brick Pizza Olde Towne Tavern Camelot Cellars Tuttle Park Recreation Center Kroger Giant Eagle O'Reilly's Pub The View on Fifth Buffalo Wild Wings Bar 145 The Meridian Northwest Carryout Chipotle Mexican Grill Grandview Village Apartments Heritage Apartments Acre Cup O Joe Coffee House Lavash Cafe Stauf's Coffee Roasters

Address

City, ST, ZIP

2877 E Broad St 1777 E Broad Street 181 Taylor Avenue 1600 E Long St 892 Oak St. 889 Oak St. 901 Oak St. 240 W Oakland Ave 1375 Chambers Rd 2801 N. High St 2822 N High St 1005 W 5th Ave 968 W 5th Ave 955 W 5th Ave 1401 Aschinger Blvd 1281 W 5th Ave 1298 W 5th Ave 1400 Chesapeake Ave 1361 Presidential Dr 2700 N High St 2990 N High St 2985 N High St 1277 Grandview Ave

Bexley Ohio, 43209 Columbus, OH 43203 Columbus, OH 43203 Columbus, OH 43203 Columbus, OH 43205 Columbus, OH 43205 Columbus, OH 43205 Columbus, OH 43201 Columbus, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43202 Columbus, OH 43202 Columbus, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43202 Columbus, OH 43202 Columbus, OH 43202 Grandview Heights, OH 43212

2728 East Main Street 2729 East Main St 2736 E Main St 2733 E. Main St. 2731 E Main St 2770 E Main St., #5 2411 E Main St 2651 E. Main St. 2643 E. Main St. 2250 E. Main St. 165 North Parkview Avenue

290

Bexley, OH 43209 Bexley, OH 43209 Bexley, OH 43209 Bexley Ohio, 43209 Bexley Ohio, 43209 Bexley Ohio, 43209 Bexley, Ohio 43209 Bexley Ohio, 43209 Bexley Ohio, 43209 Bexley Ohio, 43209 Bexley Ohio, 43209


CoGo Expansion Business Addresses

Grandview Theater and Drafthouse

1247 Grandview Ave

Grandview Dental Care

1220 Grandview Ave

Village Squire Barber Shop

1245 Grandview Ave

Grandview Animal Clinic

1510 W 1st Ave

Grandview Heights Public Library

1685 W 1st Ave

La Tavola

1664 W 1st Ave

Krema Nut Co Marshall's Restaurant Luck Bros' Coffee House

1000 Goodale Blvd 1105 W 1st Ave 1101 W 1st Ave

Red Hook Grill

1223 Goodale Blvd

Thread on Grandview Spencer Research Hofbrauhaus Columbus Hyatt Place Columbus Eddie George's Grille 27 Open Door Art Studio The Butcher & Grocer

1285 Grandview Ave 1290 Grandview Ave 800 Goodale Blvd 795 Yard St 775 Yard St 1050 Goodale Blvd 1089 W 1st Ave

Grandview Heights Parks & Recreation

1515 Goodale Blvd

Brainstorm Media, Inc. Navigator Management Partners Grandview Christian Assembly

1423 Goodale Blvd 1400 Goodale Blvd 1240 Oakland Ave

Olentangy Village Akada Hair Salon Spagio Old Bag of Nails Ford & Associates M+A Architects Hilton Homewood Suites

2907 N High St 1635 W 1st Ave 1295 Grandview Ave 1099 W 1st Ave 1500 W 1st Ave 775 Yard St 1576 West Lane Ave

291

Grandview Heights, OH 43212 Grandview Heights, OH 43212 Grandview Heights, OH 43212 Grandview Heights, OH 43212 Grandview Heights, OH 43212 Grandview Heights, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Grandview, OH 43212 Grandview Heights, OH 43212 Grandview Heights, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Grandview Heights, OH 43212 Grandview Heights, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Grandview Heights, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43202 Columbus, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Columbus, OH 43212 Upper Arlington, OH 43221


CoGo Expansion Business Addresses

Whole Foods

1555 West Lane Ave

La Chatelaine

1550 West Lane Ave

Huffman's Market

2140 Tremont Center

Houlihan's

3150 Tremont Rd

Graeter's Ice Cream

1534 West Lane Ave

Huntington Bank

3061 Kingsdale Center

Giant Eagle

3061 Kingsdale Center

Kroger

1955 West Henderson Rd

UA Main Library - Tremont

2800 Tremont Rd

Roll Upper Arlington

1510 West Lane Ave

292

Upper Arlington, OH 43221 Upper Arlington, OH 43221 Upper Arlington, OH 43221 Upper Arlington, OH 43221 Upper Arlington, OH 43221 Upper Arlington, OH 43221 Upper Arlington, OH 43221 Upper Arlington, OH 43220 Upper Arlington, OH 43221 Upper Arlington, OH 43221


City

System Name

Number Price of Price Number Smart Year Discount of Annual of Daily of Bikes Bike Opened Programs Stations Membership Pass

Denver, CO

Denver B-Cycle

88

700

No

2010

$135.00

$9.00

Yes, $10 annual pass

Montreal, Qubec

bixi

460

5,200

No

2014

$89.00

$5.00

Yes

Nashville, TN

B-Cycle

29

225

No

2012

$50.00

$5.00

No

Minneapolis, MN

Nice Ride

190

1,700

No

2010

$75.00

$4.00

No

Portland, OR

BikeTown

100

1,000

Yes

2016

$144.00

$12.00

No

Cincinnati, OH

Red Bike

56

440

Yes

2014

$80.00

$8.00

No

Indianapolis, IN

Pacers

26

250

Yes

2014

$80.00

$8.00

No

Chicago, IL

Divvy

576

5,837

No

2013

$99.00

$9.95

Yes (Income based)

San Antonio, TX

B-Cycle

58

500

Yes

2011

$100.00

$12.00

No

Los Angeles, CA

Metro Bike Share

65

1,000

No

2016

$40.00

$3.50 per 30 min

Yes (Income based)

Cleveland, OH

UH Bikes

30

250

Yes

2016

$180.00 (Basic monthly x 12)

$3.50 per 30 min

No

Madison, WI

Madison B-Cycle

38

350

No

2011

$65.00

$6.00

Yes (college students/ staff, businesses, non-profits)

Austin, TX

Austin B-Cycle

50

400

No

2013

$80.00

$12.00

Yes (income based)

Washington, DC

Capital Bikeshare 430

3,500

Yes

2008

$85.00

$8.00

Yes (income based)

293


Bike Share System

Transit Payment Integration

2015 or 2016 Rides

Number of Sponsors

Siting Critera

Check-in Intervals

Winter Closure

30 min; 60 min for annual

No

30 min; 45 min for subscribers

Yes

No

363,000 (2015)

Yes

4,099,829 (2016)

6

Nashville Downtown Partnership No

TBD

10

Tourist stops, festivals, downtown business core

60 min

No

Public Bike System Company

Yes

432,271 (2016)

10

Near food businesses, destinations, employment centers

30 min; 60 min for subscribers

Yes

Motivate

No

~320,000 (2016)

1

Visibility, commercial hubs, near bikeway, low speed streets

30 min; 10 cents per min after

No

B-Cycle

No

102,000 (2015)

4

B-Cycle

No

116,067 (2015)

2

30 min

30 min, 3160 min ($2), 61-90 mins ($6), 91+ ($8 per add'l 30 mins) No

B-cycle Public Bike System Company

1

Motivate

No

~333,000 (2016)

8

B-Cycle

No

TBD

12

Bicycle Transit Systems

Yes

107,805 (2016)

0

Social Bicycles

No

TBD

1

Near Transit stops/stations

No No

No Community resources, transit stations, cultrual hubs, employment centers, visibility, accessibility

University and civic buildings, convention/tourist locations, attractions, shopping corridors

Pay-As-YouGo (30 min)

No

Pay-As-YouGo (30 min)

No

30/60 min

Yes

B-Cycle

No

101,339 (2015)

2

B-Cycle

No

200,000+ (2016)

13

60 min

No

Motivate

No

4

30 min

No

294


Seattle, WA

Pronto

54

500

No

2014

$95.00 - $10.00 $8.00

No

Pittsburgh, PA

Healthy Ride

50

500

Yes

2015

$144 (Basic monthly x 12)

$2.00 per 30 min

No

Boston, MA

Hubway

180

1,600

No

2011

$85.00

$6.00

Yes $5 (income based)(60 minute ride and helmet included)

New York, NY

citi bike

600

10,000

Yes

2013

$163.00

$12.00

Yes (Income based)

Charlotte, NC

Charlotte B-Cycle

24

200

No

2012

$65.00

$8.00

$15 for students

2014

$15.00 per month for 60 minutes a day

$7.00 hourly

$25.00 for students for 6 months

Phoenix, Mesa, and Tempe, AZ

GRID

69

900

Yes

295


Motivate

Pittsburgh Bike Share, Inc.

No

140,000 (2015)

6

No

90,000+ (2015)

29

Motivate

No

1,270,000 + (2016)

14

Motivate

No

13,826,342 (2016) 8

B-Cycle

No

~58,000 (2016)

Social Bicycles

No

N/A Population/Employment density; bike/ped/transit infrastructure; public input; multiple existing station connections; max 1,300 ft. apart

Pay-As-YouGo (30/60 mins)

No

30 minutes

Partial

30min/45min for members No

10 30-60 minutes, or pay as you go

9

296


References DeMaio, P. (2009). Bike-sharing: History, impacts, models of provision, and future. Journal of Public Transportation, 12(4), 41-56. Retrieved from http://bike.cofc.edu/bike-share-program/history%20of%20bike%20sharing. pdf Columbus - Text 1. https://ntl.bts.gov/lib/51000/51900/51965/VT-2013-06.pdf 2. https://ralphbu.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/virginia-tech-capital-bikeshare-studio-report-2013-final.pdf 3. http://gppreview.com/2014/04/07/beyond-urban-planning-the-economics-of-capital-bikeshare/ 4. https://www.itdp.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/ITDP_Bike_Share_Planning_Guide.pdf Columbus - Pictures 5. http://8impact.com/ 6. https://www.smgov.net/departments/council/agendas/2014/20141111/s2014111108-A-1.pdf Upper Arlington - Text 7. http://www.uaoh.net/egov/documents/1365446064_389221.pdf 8. http://www.uaoh.net/egov/documents/1260461570_95764.pdf 9. http://www.uaoh.net/egov/apps/document/center.egov?view=item;id=3534 10. http://www.uaoh.net/egov/apps/document/center.egov?view=item;id=1463 11. http://www.uaoh.net/category/subcategory.php?categoryid=11 12. http://www.uaschools.org/ 13. http://www.uaoh.net/egov/apps/document/center.egov?view=item&id=339 14. https://chamberpartnership.org/ Upper Arlington - Pictures 15. http://www.uaoh.net/egov/documents/1429706536_26022.pdf Bexley All data taken from United States Census Bureau Grandview Heights 16. https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/index.xhtml 17. https://www.grandviewheights.org/DocumentCenter 18. https://www.google.com/maps/place/Grandview+Heights,+OH/@39.9799346,-83.0484087,15z/data=!3m1! 4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x88388e507deb25df:0x81fe3b87af4a007b!8m2!3d39.9797863!4d-83.0407403 19. http://twdocs.com/

297

Cogoexpand2017  

A project completed by OSU City and Regional Planning Students.

Cogoexpand2017  

A project completed by OSU City and Regional Planning Students.

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