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Vol. 78, No. 10 NEWS BRIEFS JUMP WITH THE SKYHAWKS The Canadian SkyHawks are offering tandem sky dive jumps to Team March members, during the month of April. Participants must be less than six feet tall and 200 pounds or less; anyone 50 or older must be physically cleared to jump with a doctor’s note. If interested please email your name, age, height, weight, cell number, squadron and job title to Megan Crusher at megan.crusher.1@ us.af.mil. Slots and times are limited and on first-come-first serve basis; first-time jumpers with the team have priority. Jumps are subject to cancellation at the discretion of the SkyHawks. APPLY FOR FREE, ONLINE CCAF CREDIT Applications for the Air Force Culture and Language Center’s spring 2013 “Introduction to Culture” course will be accepted through Mar. 20. This free, online course fulfills three resident hours of either social science or program elective credit required for Community College of the Air Force degrees. The course runs from Mar. 28 through Jul. 3. Only enlisted active duty, reservists or Air National Guardsmen who are eligible to pursue a degree in the CCAF program may apply. More information is available at www.culture. af.mil/courses/ or by e-mailing afclc.enroll@us.af.mil. Use your smartphone to connect to the March Air Reserve Base official public website via the Microsoft tag app.

March Air Reserve Base, California

Friday, March 15, 2013

Connelly competitors cook for the trophy by SGT. Tracy Ellingsen 304 Sustainment Brigade public affairs

EL MONTE, Calif. — They are usually the first soldiers to wake up in the morning and the last to go to bed at night. They spend their days in hot kitchens and cold refrigerators, all so their fellow service members can enjoy a hot meal. Recently, one unit of Army cooks got its share of the glory. The 137th Quartermaster Company participated in the highest level of culinary competition in the Army, Saturday, March 2. “Only four Army Reserve units make it to the Department of the Army level of competition,” said Master Sgt. Keith Russ, one of the evaluators from the Joint Culinary Center of Excellence, who flew from Virginia to judge the competition. Unlike cooking competitions on television, the Connelly Competition is not held in a head-to-head style or on a movie set. Instead, a team of judges fly around the country over the course of many months to each participating unit’s location. The 137th was the last competitor in the Army Reserve category to be judged. Though the results will not be revealed until this summer, a mini awards ceremony was held giving recognition to deserving Soldiers. The competition is named for Phillip A. Connelly, who made many improvements to military food services in the first half of the 20th century. The competition is not based solely on taste and presentation of food. The participating units are also judged on sanitization, safety, command support, leadership and field set up.

U.S. Army photo / Sgt. Tracy Ellingsen

The 137th Quartermaster Company prepared a Chinese meal for the judges during the Connelly Competition held in El Monte, Calif., March 2. The menu included sweet and sour chicken, egg drop soup, Lyonnaise rice, vegetable stir fry, spring salad and yellow cake.

“We evaluate the whole tactical set up,” said Russ. “I was very impressed to see them take a park and turn it into a field site.” The 137th built their encampment in a park in South El Monte. The camouflage nets concealed their tents somewhat, but the aroma of freshly made Chinese food gave away their location. The judges instructed the units on which menu items to prepare; however, the 137th managed to find ways to add personal flourishes to their presentation. To add to the Asian atmosphere, the food service Soldiers added fortune cookies, chopsticks and Asian garnishes.

At the end of the day, the evaluators presented awards to the unit. They also presented an individual award to the Soldier they thought had the greatest impact on the culinary success of the unit. Staff Sgt. Gregory Sovick, 29, received the individual award. He not only served as non-commissioned officer in charge of the 137th’s set up, but is a qualified culinary specialist as well. While he appreciates the recognition, Sovick said the credit is not his alone. “All of the Soldiers deserve this recognition for their hard work.”

Emergency Services Support Team volunteers needed by Robert J. Kaschak 452 Emergency Management technician

Seismic activity is no stranger to California, as we were reminded again, March 11, with two mid-morning tremors, initially measuring 5.1 mag-

nitudes, in the Anza and La Quinta areas. Although they were adjusted downward later in the day, the reminder of our vulnerability to such an event is always apparent. March Air Reserve Base is home to almost 8,500 personnel with a myriad of missions

that combine to make this a dynamic hub. A disastrous event occurring on the installation would have major ramifications depending on the timing of the incident. First responders would be quickly overwhelmed as they attempt to recover operations on the installation. Help

See EMERgENCY, page 2


March 15, 2013

THE

2

COMMENTARY

BEACON

Sequestration is here

Volume 78, Number 10

452 AMW Public Affairs

895 Baucom Ave. SE, #102 March ARB, CA 92518-2266 452amw.paworkflow@us.af.mil fax: 951-655-7343 phone: 951-655-4137 COMMANDER

Col. Samuel Mahaney PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER

Lt. Col. Donald Traud EDITOR

Darnell Gardner 452 AMW EDITORIAL STAFF Master Sgt. Linda Welz Tech. Sgt. Megan Crusher Staff Sgt. Joe Davidson Staff Sgt. Carrie Peasinger The Beacon is published by Aerotech News and Review. Aerotech is a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Air Force, under exclusive written contract with the 452nd Air Mobility Wing. This civilian enterprise Air Force newspaper is an authorized publication for employees and members of U.S. military services, retirees and family members. Contents are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense or the Department of the Air Force. The appearance of advertising in this newspaper, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement of the products or services by the Department of Defense, the Department of the Air Force or Aerotech News and Review, Inc. Everything advertised in this newspaper shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. Editorial content is edited, prepared and provided by the staff of the 452nd Air Mobility Wing Public Affairs office at March Air Reserve Base. All photographs in the Beacon are Air Force photos unless otherwise stated. For advertising, contact Aerotech directly at 877-247-9288.

Aerotech News and Review 456 East Ave. K-4, Suite 8 Lancaster, CA 93535 www.aerotechnews.com

www.march.afrc.af.mil

by Lt. Col. Michael Tatum 51 Comptroller Squadron

OSAN AIR BASE, South Korea — By now, most Americans are aware of America’s fiscal crisis. The national debt is at $16.5 trillion and rising. The fiscal crisis is driving the need for budget cuts across the federal government. The Defense Department makes up approximately 20 percent of the federal budget, so we should expect the DOD will have to make its fair share of budget reductions. So exactly, what is sequestration? Sequestration is part of the Budget Control Act of 2011 (Public Law 112-25). It is designed to balance the federal budget by introducing an automatic process of acrossthe-board budget cuts. Under sequestration, the DOD will see a seven percent reduction in its budget. These budget cuts will essentially be “peanut butter spread” across all of the accounts. When sequestration happens, the DOD budget process is essentially ignored and the budget cuts are laid in with no consideration of priorities. This means our DOD and Air Force leaders have little opportunity to provide input on where the budget is cut. Sequestration is happening and budget cuts must be made. The DOD and Air Force officials would prefer to make budget decisions based on the Planning, Programming, Budget, Execution and System, also

EMERgENCY

Continued from page 1 from local responders may take several days or longer, depending on the damage to the local area. National recovery participation will be phased in throughout the recovery stages; however, it may take several days, depending on the severity of the event. In essence, March ARB will be on its own for the initial part of the recovery process. As part of a concerted effort to minimize the backlash, Emergency Management has initiated a plan to form an Emergency

known as the corporate process. This system provides a more deliberative process for establishing priorities, making strategic budget decisions and documenting the rationale for those budget decisions. The PPBES process provides Air Force leaders with more influence on how these major budget reductions will impact Air Force operational capabilities. Based on my 15 years of budgeting experience, I would like to provide three suggestions to all Airmen on how they can assist our Air Force leaders with meeting our budget challenges. Know your wing’s mission and priorities Each Airman should understand how their job impacts the wing’s mission and where it fits in the commander’s priorities. Once you understand how your job affects the mission, you can communicate the impact of budget reductions in your job area more effectively. This is vital in ensuring decision makers have all of the information needed to make the correct budget decisions. Elevate funding shortfalls with mission impacts The most effective avenue for elevating funding shortfalls is by submitting an unfunded requirement submission to your squadron commander. Unfunded requirements allow you to identify a mission re-

Services Support Team, referred to as ESST, to assist the base’s first responders during this type of event. This concept is similar to the civilian sector, which has the Civilian Emergency Response Team, or CERT. Currently, we have a handful of volunteers, but not enough should an event occur during peak hours of the duty day. We are asking for anyone who is willing to assist our responders during this crucial time, to please contact EM and become part of the March ESST team. Quarterly meeting and training will be conducted for volunteers, after which, a verification

quirement that has not been adequately funded. These unfunded requirements are prioritized at the wing level and then elevated to the major command for funding consideration. If you have questions about the unfunded requirements process, you can see your resource adviser or your wing budget officer. Be prudent when spending taxpayer dollars Last, but certainly not least, be a cost conscious user of government resources. You should treat the taxpayer’s dollars as though it is your family’s money. Do your part to conserve energy, for example, saving fuel and utilities. Also, be critical of new purchases for furniture or computers. Look for creative ways to save money, every dollar helps. The Air Force’s new vision statement, A Vision for the U.S. Air Force, states, “Every Airman should constantly look for smarter ways to do business.” Your ideas and creativity will make us a more efficient Air Force. My three suggestions are very basic, but can render huge benefits if Airmen commit to being part of the solution to the budget challenges. The Air Force needs help to ensure these budget cuts have the least amount of impact to the Air Force’s operational capabilities. America needs help to assist with solving the $16.5 trillion debt. I encourage all Airmen to be innovative and get engaged and be part of the solution.

process will be conducted for all who participate, to ensure they know what is expected and how the response process works. The ESST team will be looking for personnel who work on the base and are physically able and competent to assist without causing injury to themselves or the people they will be assisting. Having too many volunteers is not an issue, because volunteer availability will differ depending on work schedules and the availability of base personnel. There are no specialized skills or computer-based tests to complete and no recurring

Socialize!

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requirements other than caring for your fellow wingman and the installation we proudly call March ARB. Your support and commitment are what makes this installation special and viable. Please consider becoming a part of the recovery process and helping your first responders and fellow Airman. Let’s work together to provide the synergy necessary to save lives and protect vital assets during base recovery operations. If you interested in being a volunteer, contact the EM office at 951-655-3024 or email Bob Kaschak at Robert.Kaschak@us.af.mil.

Facebook.com/ TeamMarch


March 15, 2013

The Beacon

Betty ‘Tack’ Blake: Only surviving member of 1st WASP class by Randy Roughton Air Force News Service

FORT GEORGE G. MEADE, Md. — A young female U.S. Air Force pilot recently showed her 91-year-old guest the F-16 Fighting Falcon she flies at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz. During the tour, the pilot continually gave praise to “Tack” Blake, which was odd, because the guest was that very person – Betty “Tack” Blake. As the praises went on, Blake finally spoke up and asked the young pilot why she kept praising her, being right there. “Because you started it,” the pilot said. “If you hadn’t been successful, we wouldn’t be doing what we’re doing today.” Blake is believed to be the only living graduate of the first Women’s Air Force Service Pilot training class, during World War II. The class began with 38 women pilots on Nov. 16, 1942, but only 23 graduated on April 24, 1943. They were not known as WASPs until the merging of the Women’s Flying Training Detachment and Women’s Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron on Aug. 5, 1943. “We were an experiment,” said Blake, who now lives in Scottsdale, Ariz. “We were a guinea pig class, as they called us, because they didn’t think women could learn to fly military planes.” Blake began flying at the age of 14 in 1934 and became even more interested in airplanes when she met Amelia Ear-

hart at the University of Hawaii in January 1935. Earhart traveled to the islands in her quest to become the first pilot to fly solo across the Pacific Ocean, from Honolulu and Oakland, Calif., a total of 2,408 miles. Blake was the only child in the audience, so she was seated in the front row for Earhart’s speech. Afterward, Earhart sat beside Blake and invited her to the airport, to see the twinengine Beechcraft airplane that would be flown the following day. “She was very excited to know I was learning to fly,” Blake said. “She told me to keep going and do something exciting and show that women could fly. She had a lot of people fighting against her who didn’t think women could do it.”

Blake flew tourists around the Hawaiian Islands in an open-canopy biplane, near her hometown in Oahu, before the Pearl Harbor attack in 1941. She recalls the time as two different lives, before and after Dec. 7, 1941. The night before the attack, she was invited by Navy ensigns to the officers club to celebrate her 21st birthday. The next morning, she watched the attack from the balcony of her family home, on a hill above Pearl Harbor. “My family didn’t drink, so I’d never had a drink in my life,” Blake said. “My first taste of liquor was at my birthday party. The next morning, when Pearl Harbor happened, I was in bed with the worst hangover ever.”

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“My younger brothers woke me up — we all went to the balcony and watched Japanese planes coming over the mountain, headed towards the ocean. When the planes went over us, they looked like AT-6 Texans, but they were actually Japanese Mitsubishi A6-M Zeroes. They had big orange suns painted on the bottom of their wings. Then, we saw them as they started diving toward the ocean in front of us. Their machine guns started going off and you could see the bullets hitting the water and bouncing up.” “We had been having so much fun before Pearl Harbor. We were having fun every night and suddenly it stopped,” remembered Blake. Two ensigns that Blake dated were killed at Pearl Harbor and a third, Robert Tackaberry, who became her first husband several months later, would have died if her father had not intervened. He had invited him to spend the night after the party, so his daughter would not have to drive him back to his ship at night. “It saved his life,” Blake said. “His cabin on the U.S.S. California was below the water line and they dropped a bomb right in the water beside the ship. His roommate was asleep, and it killed him. So my father always reminded my future husband he’d saved his life.” Blake, who worked at Pearl Harbor as a secretary before she married Tackaberry, moved to the East Coast when he See BLAKE, page 6


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March 15, 2013

Ceremonial swearing-in set for Defense Secretary by Donna Miles and Jim Garamone American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON, D.C. — A ceremonial swearing-in for the new Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel took place at the Pentagon March 14, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little announced. Hagel already has been baptized by fire during his first weeks on the job: facing sequestration immediately after his arrival, an eventful visit to Afghanistan and a litany of challenges. Hagel began work Feb. 27, taking his oath of office from Director of Administration and Management, Michael L. Rhodes, in a small ceremony. Two days later, across-the-board sequestration spending cuts triggered and the Secretary suddenly led an organization that has to cut $46 billion by the end of the fiscal year and a civilian workforce facing furloughs. The Secretary wasted no time going to see service members in the combat zone, leaving March 7, for Afghanistan. Meetings with troops, North Atlantic Treaty Organization commanders and Afghan President Hamid Karzai, packed the three-day trip. After returning to Washington D.C., Hagel was in the throes of another busy week, addressing veterans issues, the rebalance

toward the Asia-Pacific region and ongoing budget and strategy issues, Little said. He added, Hagel joined President Barack Obama for a meeting with the Sultan of Brunei Hassanal Bolkiah. Little praised Brunei’s role, chairing the Association of South East Asian Nations Defense Ministers Meeting-Plus, noting Hagel’s interest in strengthening the U.S.Brunei relationship. “The secretary looks forward to strengthening this important relationship as we continue to deepen our engagement in a strategically vital Asia Pacific region,” he said. Later this week, Hagel will focus on budget and strategy issues when he hosts his first quarterly meeting of DOD’s civilian and military leadership, Little said. In addition, Hagel met with Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric K. Shinseki. It was Hagel’s first meeting with the VA chief since he took office, but they are old friends, Little said. The two have known each other for more than a decade, he added and both served in the 9th Infantry Division during their respective combat tours in Vietnam. Hagel is eager to continue the progress being made on the many issues that affect the lives of service members and veterans, Little said.

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March 15, 2013

The Beacon

5

Read Across America: Dr. Seuss National Reading Day by Darnell Gardner 452 AMW public affairs

Approximately 35 Airmen from March Air Reserve Base participated in the 15th annual Read Across America Day program, at the John F. Kennedy Elementary school and four other local schools, March 1. Each member was assigned to several classrooms for a “celebration of reading,” in which they read their favorite children’s book and cast votes for the “Best Door” contest. This reading motivation and awareness program was first organized by the National Education Association in 1997 and held its first event on March 2, 1998. It was designed to promote reading among all ages and to encourage community engagement with the school system. Local professionals, parents

and university students from around the Inland Empire joined in to impress upon the importance of reading and to send the message that it could also be fun. Read Across America, coincides with the birthday of Dr. Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss, acclaimed children’s book author and favorite among schools and children across America.

U.S. Air Force photos / Darnell Gardner

Staff Sgt. Joshua Tovar, 452d Aerial Port Support Flight said, “As members of the military we are in a unique position to make a positive impact on the youth and children in our community and it is important that we do so.” LEFT: “This is not my first year volunteering for the Read Across America program,” said Senior Master Sgt. Tammy Haro, 752d Medical Squadron. “I come back year after year because I truly appreciate the value of reading and how it helps our kids grow into positive adults — plus, I think I get more enjoyment out of it than the kids. They did a great job decorating their doors — I couldn’t pick just one.”

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March 15, 2013

BLAKE

Continued from page 3 was reassigned to a ship in Erie, Penn. A couple of years later, she was selected for the first women’s pilot training class in Houston, Texas, near Ellington Field. Unlike the casual way women pilots are regarded today, Blake recalls a much different attitude during World War II. However, she had an advantage her fellow classmates did not. She was already accustomed to getting along with men from growing up with two brothers in a neighborhood filled with boys. “I got along fine with them because I’d grown up with boys,” Blake said. “I knew how to joke, spit through my teeth and crack my jaws with them. That was very fortunate for me because some of the girls would break out in tears if a boy made a crack about them. I just joked back. They were always my pals.” “But a lot of the men were not happy having the women fly the same planes they were flying. They watched us like hawks and if we did anything wrong, it was back at our base before we could get back.” After completing training, the graduates from the first class were given their choice of assignment and job. Blake chose ferry command at Long Beach, Calif., because she figured she would be able to fly home to Honolulu. She never got the opportunity, but met her second husband, who was also assigned to Long Beach. Blake was part of a group of pilots who shuttled aircraft from factories to sites where they could be sent overseas. There was some discussion of using WASP pilots as co-pilots for overseas flights, but the war in Europe ended before it could happen. “So, I didn’t get checked out in as many planes that I wanted to, because they brought all the men pilots back from the war and didn’t need us anymore,” she said. “They gave us three days’ notice, and it was, ‘Goodbye, girls.’” Blake ferried about 35 aircraft models, in addition to the AT-6 and others she flew in during training. However, one airplane remains her favorite even today. “The P-51 Mustang was definitely my favorite,” she said. “Whenever one goes overhead and there are still a few of them flying around, I hear that sound and instantly know it’s a P-51. It was reliable. I liked the engine and I just felt safer in it than anything else.” Blake recently attended a funeral for the only other living graduate from the first WASP class, who also lived in the Phoenix area. The class of 1943, that was the source of the young Luke AFB pilot’s gratitude, is now down to just one. “Now I’m the only one left, and I hope I’m here for a while,” Blake said.

www.march.afrc.af.mil

Sequestration pinch includes tuition assistance suspension by Amaani Lyle American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Though budget woes led the Army, Marine Corps and Air Force to suspend their tuition assistance programs and the Navy continues to consider its options, the program is important to the Defense Department and to service members, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said. “The program enables the professional and personal development of our service members and facilitates their transition to the civilian workforce,” Little said at a Pentagon news conference. The press secretary placed the blame on a “sequestration” mechanism in budget law that kicked in March 1, triggering across-the-board spending cuts that Pentagon officials repeatedly had warned would harm the nation’s military readiness. “Let me be clear: we’re here because of sequestration,” he said. “If sequestration were averted, we may be facing a different set of choices on these and other programs.” Last week, Little said, the Defense Department’s comptroller issued guidance suggesting the services consider significant reductions in funding tuition assistance applicants, effective immedi-

ately, for the duration of the current fiscal year, which ends Sept. 30. “We’re in a period of terrible budget uncertainty,” Little said. “This department is making multiple decisions that aren’t exactly to our liking, but we are having to swallow bitter pills, not because we want to pop them, but because we’re forced to make some very tough decisions.” Such decisions, Little explained, are the “unfortunate outcomes” of budgetary uncertainty and the need to ensure the availability of necessary resources to respond to crises around the world. “We’re walking soberly into the sequester period,” Little said, before relating Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel’s direction on the matter. “His very clear instructions have been for us to, in a very calm, cool and collected manner, deal with the hand we’ve been dealt and it’s an unfortunate hand,” Little said. Little maintained that DOD officials have been transparent, both within the department and with the American people, about sequestration’s consequences. “We’ve been very clear about impacts to readiness and the services are making decisions on a broad range of programs,” Little said. “It should come as no surprise to anyone that these kinds of decisions are coming down the pike.”

Doctor: Substance abuse research progresses by Terri Moon Cronk American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON D.C. — Defense Department officials are developing research-based methods to curb substance abuse among service members, their families and veterans, a senior DOD medical official said, March 11. Dr. Michael E. Kilpatrick, deputy director for force health protection and readiness programs in the office of the deputy assistant secretary of defense for force health protection and readiness, spoke as part of a congressional series on Capitol Hill. The briefing was sponsored by the National Institute of Drug Abuse, which supports research on substance abuse and associated mental health problems among active-duty members, their families and veterans. Kilpatrick, who spent 25 years as a Navy physician, outlined some of the research that looks promising for those who battle substance abuse in addition to mental health issues. His years of research and clinical care made him realize that “the more we do, the more we need to do,” he said. The doctor noted the major advances of saving lives with top-notch U.S. military medicine in war zones. “We’re doing a great job with those physical See ABUSE, page 9


The The Beacon Beacon

The doctor is in: Resolve to get fit every day by Brig. Gen. W Bryan Gamble, M.D. TRICARE activities

Getting fit is not just a popular New Year’s resolution; it is something we need to think about every day. Fitness is critical to the readiness, mental and physical health and productivity of our service members, but it is just as beneficial to those who are not in uniform. Today is a perfect time for you and your family to start a regular exercise program and embrace the benefits of being physically fit. Staying physically fit can reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other diseases, and regular activity will help you lose and maintain a healthy weight. Before starting an exercise program, be sure to check in with your primary care provider. Visiting your provider is an important step to take if you are pregnant, or if you have medical problems, such as heart disease. Your provider will help determine the right amount of activity for you based on your personal condition. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend 30 minutes of daily physical activity for adults and 60

minutes for children. Many everyday activities provide opportunities for being more active. Daily doses of activity include walking, cycling or skating to work or school, parking the car further from your destination, taking stairs instead of elevators and taking exercise breaks instead of cigarette or coffee breaks. Remember, some physical activity is better than none and adults who participate in any amount of physical activity gain some health benefits. Set realistic goals and stay on track by planning a step-by-step approach, setting specific targets and keeping track of daily achievements. These steps can help ensure you reach your goals. You can learn more about how to get fit at www.tricare.mil/healthyliving. Another great resource is the “Let’s Move” program, led by First Lady Michelle Obama and endorsed by the Department of Defense. The focus is to help kids be more active, eat better and grow up healthy. For more information visit www.letsmove.gov. It’s never too late to begin an exercise program so please join in taking the first step to healthier living.

Thrift Savings Plan officials warn against unsanctioned app WASHINGTON, D.C. — A free iPhone app for the Thrift Savings Plan, available at the Apple App Store could pose a security risk, program officials warned. A notice on the Thrift Savings Plan website says the “TSP Funds” app, which asks participants for their account login information, is not sanctioned. “This app is not being offered through the TSP and officials do not recommend using this application to access your account,” the notice says. “Providing this information could result in a security

risk to your account.” The Thrift Savings Plan is a retirement savings and investment plan for federal employees and members of the uniformed services, including the Ready Reserve. It was established by Congress in the Federal Employees’ Retirement System Act of 1986 and offers the same types of savings and tax benefits that many private corporations offer their employees under 401(k) plans. (Courtesy of American Forces Press Service)

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Military relief organizations and emergency financial help SecDef directs review Military oneSource

Sometimes the challenges of life, especially satisfying financial responsibilities during the current fiscal crisis, can become overwhelming. Fortunately, military relief organizations exist to help service members and their families, in every branch of the military, in times of financial emergency. Depending on the circumstances, these organizations can provide interest-free loans, grants, or a combination of loans and grants. The information below will help you understand the kinds of financial emergencies that can be covered and how to apply for financial assistance. About military relief organizations Military relief organizations are private, nonprofit organizations (one for each Service) that help service members and their families with certain emergency fi-

Write for

nancial needs. They provide financial help in the form of interest-free loans, grants, or a combination of loans and grants. Military relief organizations also sponsor tuition-assistance programs for service members and certain family members. Some offer other special programs such as financial counseling. You can find out more on the individual relief organization website. Help with financial emergencies Most loans and grants from military relief organizations are for one-time financial emergencies such as for rent, utilities, vehicle repair, certain medical and dental expenses, emergency travel and funeral expenses. Each organization limits the kinds of financial expenses it will cover. For example, fines and legal expenses, the purchase of a home or vehicle, and other nonessentials are not covered.

Relief organizations by Service ➤ Army Emergency Relief. Information is available on their website at www. aerhq.org or by calling 1-866-878-6378. If there is no military installation of any type within fifty miles of your location, AER has a support agreement with the American Red Cross to assist Soldiers and their families. ➤ Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society. Visit the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society website or call 1-703-696-4904. ➤ Air Force Aid Society. For details, visit their website at www.nmcrs.org or call 1-800-769-8951. If there is no nearby emergency relief organization for your Service branch, one of the other military relief organizations can help process your request on behalf of your Service’s relief organization. If no military relief organizations are nearby, the local Red Cross chapter can also process your request. To find your local chapter, visit www.redcross.org.

The Beacon newspaper is looking for Team March members who are interested in writing.

Contact Darnell Gardner, The Beacon editor, at darnell.gardner.1@us.af.mil or 951-655-7687

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of Distinguished Warfare Medal

by Amaani Lyle American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON, D.C. — In light of recent discussions concerning the new Distinguished Warfare Medal and its order of precedence relative to other military decorations, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has ordered a review of the award, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said. Little said, Hagel directed Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to conduct the review and expects to make a decision about the medal’s fate after assessing the findings. “Secretary Hagel consulted with the chairman, the Joint Chiefs and the service secretaries and knows that the decision to establish the medal was carefully and thoroughly analyzed within the Department of Defense,” Little said. Opponents of the medal question the hierarchy of technology-driven warfare See MEDAL, page 9


March 15, 2013

The Beacon MEDAL

Continued from page 8 such as unmanned aerial vehicles, unmanned underwater vehicles, missile defense and cyber capabilities, as the operators may not be anywhere near a combat zone. “Production of the medal has stopped,” Little said, adding there are so far no nominations for it, allowing time

to make a final decision. Little noted that the secretary has a long history of involvement and membership with veteran service organizations, including a stint as head of the USO. “He’s heard their concerns, he’s heard the concerns of others and he believes that it’s prudent to take into account those concerns and conduct this review,” Little said. “His style as a leader is to be decisive and also to be a ready listener.”

Sexual Assault Reporting options If you are sexually assaulted, make sure you understand your reporting choices:

Restricted Report • Confidential • NO police or Chain of Command involvement • Victim MUST first contact: – Sexual Assault Response Coordinator or Victim Advocate – Healthcare professional – Chaplain

* Restricted option is not guaranteed if others not listed above know about the incident; Never delay necessary emergency medical care.

Victim support top priority

Unrestricted Report • Information shared on “Need to Know” basis only • Investigation initiated • Response Team will be notified – Medical and Law Enforcement Team – SARC, Victim Advocate – Chain of Command * Once unrestricted, report can never be restricted

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Call the SARC Hotline first to discuss your choice March ARB 24 Hour SAPR Reporting Hotline 951-655-7272

452AMWVA44-101 DATE OPR: 452AMW/CCK PRESCRIBED BY: AFI36-6001-3.1.7 CERTIFIED BY: 452AMW/CCE(LTC DAWN R. DESHEFY) RELEASABILITY: THERE IS NO RELEASABILITY RESTRICTION ON THIS PUBLICATION

ABUSE

Continued from page 6 wounds,” he said, but he added that Defense Department officials want to focus on the invisible wounds of war and know much more needs to be done. “We recognize there are tremendous stressors and going to war in itself is a stressor,” Kilpatrick said. “Not knowing what the outcome is going to be, not knowing exactly when you’ll be back or what’s happening to your loved ones while you’re gone are stressors.” Studies and research have shown that the act of going to war, even without engaging in combat, is a tremendous stressor, he added. Several programs are underway in DOD to help battle substance abuse and mental health issues and the Army and Marine Corps have begun resilience training for that reason, he said. “We try to get service members to understand what their strengths are,” Kilpatrick said. “What did they grow up with? What were the strengths that got them to the Army or the Marine Corps? And how do they build on those strengths to develop even better coping skills to withstand the stressors that come with the military?” To detect mental health and sub-

the

9

stance abuse problems, Kilpatrick said, every service member goes through a health assessment after deployment, followed by yearly assessments. The Army, he added, does health assessments in the combat theater every year. “In each of those assessments, there are questions about mental health, about post-traumatic stress disorder, suicide ideation and depression,” Kilpatrick said, noting assessments also include questions about alcohol and tobacco use. “We find a very high rate of people who respond that they think they’re having trouble with alcohol,” he said. A presidential executive order requires DOD and the Veterans Affairs and Health and Human Services departments to work together to provide mental health services, suicide prevention information and substance abuse treatment, Kilpatrick said. All the departments will operate on the same programs to treat mental health and substance abuse issues, with common language and nomenclature, he added. “That way, there is a single network and not three or four independent systems,” he noted. “As we look at strategies over the next three to four years, we’ll look at how to improve. It’s been an exciting step forward.”

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March 15, 2013

www.march.afrc.af.mil NEWS BRIEFS

PARTICIPATE IN 2013 SALUTE TO VETERANS PARADE The 8th annual Salute to Veterans parade will take place Saturday, Apr. 20, beginning at 10 a.m., in downtown Riverside, Calif. The parade staging area will be located in the lower parking lots of Riverside City College and the parade route will be the same as previous years. Participants can register via website at asalutetoveterans.com, or mail registration form to 6322 La Sierra Ave., Riverside, Calif. 92505. The deadline for entry is Mar. 22. For more information, call 951-687-1175 or email sixdog1175@aol.com. TRANSITION ASSISTANCE PROgRAM SLOTS AVAILABLE Los Angeles Air Force Base will conduct Fiscal Year 2013 TAP classes for interested military and family members. The following dates are available: Apr. 8–12 May 13–17 Jun. 10–14 Jul. 15–19 Aug. 12–16 Sept. 16–20 Reservists will not be reimbursed for travel or per diem. To make reservations, call 310-653-5428.

SINgLE AIRMAN’S PROgRAM SCHEDULE The following free trip, sponsored by the Airmen & Family Readiness Center, is open to all base personnel, although priority will be given to single Airmen: •  Mar. 16, Day skiing at Wrightwood  (Gabriel mountains) For more information, contact Outdoor Recreation at 951-655-2816. 452D FM OFFERS DTS LAB Financial Management will conduct DTS computer labs every Unit Training Assembly, from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. in Building 466. The lab is for any member who has DTS issues or requires assistance with completing their voucher. For more information, contact John Florence at 951-655-5260 or email john.florence@us.af.mil. WEIgHT WATCHERS MEETS AT NEW LOCATION All March employees, friends and family members are invited to attend a Weight Watchers meeting any Thursday, noon, at Bldg. 317, first floor, to learn how the program works. Physical address of building is 2250 Dekay

Ave. Current members include civilian, military, men and women. Group members also pair up for walking and other fitness-related activities. Healthy living is easy with this group! For more information, call Linda Welz at 951-6552862 or email linda.welz@us.af.mil. REgISTER TO ATTEND YELLOW RIBBON EVENTS Registration is now open for 2013 Yellow Ribbon events. The events will provide programs, resources, referrals and services to minimize stress on families during all phases of deployment. The following upcoming events are now open for registration: •  Mar.  22–24,  San  Diego,  Calif.  (wait list only) •  Apr. 19–21, Denver, Colo. •  Apr. 26–28 Orlando, Fla. For more information, contact SMSgt. Jo Carrillo at 951-655-2571 or email josephine.carrillo@us.af.mil. SAFETY ADVISORY CONTINUED Drivers and pedestrians traveling near the Air Traffic Control Tower, Bldg. 1220, should proceed with caution due

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to the construction of the new tower. In addition, the gate entering the Flightline at Base Ops (F18) is now closed. All personnel needing access will still sign in at Base Ops, then enter the Flightline through the gate at Security Forces (Bldg. 470). The gate will be closed for approximately one year.

Life Safety Tip of the Week

BBQs/Grilling ➤ Cook only outdoors ➤ Move away from decking or eaves ➤ If applicable, use only charcoal lighter fluid, never gasoline ➤ Keep grill clean by removing grease or fats after each use Points of Contact Harold Sterne, Asst. Chief, x5001 John Martin, Inspector, x3073 Tim Williams, Inspector, x2161


March 15, 2013

The Beacon

11

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March 15, 2013

www.march.afrc.af.mil

SNAPSHOTS | WHAT WE DO

U.S. Army photos / Sgt. Tracy Ellingsen

The renovation of the March Inn is nearing completion. All major construction projects on the outside are finished, though there are still some minor upgrades on the inside that are being worked. After passing inspection, new furniture will be moved in and the inn’s 25 newly-renovated rooms will be ready for the first overnight guests, since construction began in February 2011.

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