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College of Education

FACULTY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES MANUAL

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August 17, 2009 Revised August 10, 2012 This manual has been prepared as guidelines for faculty of the College of Education. It contains UTB rules and regulations as well as internal policies and procedures of the College of Education that will provide information to faculty and other College members. The delineation of expectations of faculty members -- in terms of their rights, obligations, performance, and accountability are important to the College administration, faculty, and students. The Manual will be updated regularly according to University or COE changes on policy, rules and regulations related to faculty and other academic personnel.


T TA AB BL LE EO OFF C CO ON NT TE EN NT TSS

1. ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION AND ORGANIZATION 1.1

General Vision and Mission Statement .............................................. 1.1.1 General Vision ........................................................................... 1.1.1.1Vision Statement ........................................................... 1.1.1.2 Vision Summary .......................................................... 1.1.2 Mission Statement ...................................................................... 1.1.3 Goals............................................................................................ 1.1.4 Scope of Work ........................................................................... 1.1.5 Conceptual Framework and Strategic Plan ................................

1.2

Organization of the College ............................................................... 9 1.2.1 Duties and Responsibilities of the Dean ................................... 9 1.2.2 College Committees ................................................................. 10 1.2.2.1 Administrative Team Council .................................... 10 1.2.2.2 COE Personnel Committee ........................................ 10 1.2.2.3 Student Advisory Committee .................................... 11 1.2.2.4 Community Advisory Committee ............................. 13 1.2.2.5 COE Graduate Curriculum Committee ..................... 13 1.2.2.6 COE Undergraduate Committee ................................ 13 1.2.2.7 Other COE Committees ............................................. 14 1.2.3. Dean’s Office Units ................................................................ 14 1.2.3.1 Associate Dean ........................................................... 14 1.2.3.1.1 Office of Graduate Programs ...................... 15 1.2.3.1.2 Office of Institutional Effectiveness....…………….. 17

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1 1 1 1 2 3 4 5


1.2.4. Departments ............................................................................ 18 1.2.4.1 Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies ....... 18 1.2.4.2 Health and Human Performance ................................ 19 1.2.4.3 Language, Literacy and Intercultural Studies ........... 19 1.2.4.4 Teaching, Learning and Innovation ........................... 20 1.2.4.5 Duties and Responsibilities of the Chairperson ........ 20 1.2.4.6 Selection of Department Chairs & Program Directors 22 1.2.5 Centers and Units ..................................................................... 24 1.2.5.1 Center for Educational Development and Innovation 24 1.2.5.1.1 Office of Research and Grants .................. 25 1.2.5.2 Center for Early Childhood Studies .......................... 26 1.2.5.3 Community Counseling Clinic .................................. 26 1.2.5.4 Education Assessment Clinic .................................... 27 1.2.5.5 Office of Field Experience ......................................... 27 2. FACULTY DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 2.1

University Policy on Faculty Responsibilities .................................. 28

2.2

COE Faculty Performance Guidelines .............................................. 29 2.2.1 Guidelines for Teaching .......................................................... 31 2.2.2 Guidelines for Scholarship ...................................................... 34 2.2.3 Guidelines for Service ............................................................. 37 2.2.4 Variables in Making Personnel Action Decisions .................. 39

3. FACULTY DEVELOPMENT, TENURE AND PROMOTION 3.1

University Policy on Faculty Evaluation and Promotion ................. 42 3.1.1 Faculty Development Plan ....................................................... 42 3.1.2 Student Evaluation of Instruction ............................................ 43 3.1.3 Faculty Promotion ..................................................................... 44 3.1.4 Faculty Probation and the Granting of Tenure......................... 46

3.2

COE Personnel Actions for Tenure and Tenure Earning Faculty ..... 47 3.2.1 1st – 6th Year Renewal ............................................................. 49 3.2.2 Tenure and Post Tenure Review ............................................... 49 3.2.3 Promotion to Associate Professor or to Full Professor ........... 50 3.2.4 Faculty Merit ............................................................................ 50 3.2.5 Annual Workload Agreement .................................................. 52

3.3

COE Faculty Development ................................................................ 52 3.3.1 Faculty Mentorship…………………………………………… . .52 3.3.2 Faculty Development Funding ................................................ 53 3 .3.3 Course Release Request for Non Teaching Assignment…..… 55 3.3.4 Assignment and Management of Graduate Assistants ........... 56 ii


4. CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT 4.1

UTB Curriculum Development .......................................................... 59 4.1.1 Academic Program Review ..................................................... 59 4.1.2 Curriculum Changes ................................................................ 60

4.2

COE Curriculum Review Policies and Procedures ........................... 61 4.2.1 Procedures for Submitting Curriculum Proposals .................. 61 4.2.2 Submissions to COE Graduate or Undergraduate Committees 63

4.3

University Policies for Textbooks and Materials .............................. 65 4.3.1 Textbooks and Materials Prescribed for Student Use ............. 65 4.3.2 Acceptance of Money from Students ....................................... 66

5. HUMAN RESOURCES AND ADMINISTRATIVE ISSUES 5.1

Policy on Absences and Travel .......................................................... 67 5.1.1 Travel Procedures Summary ................................................... 67 5.1.2 Absences from Regular Duties and Classes ............................. 69 5.1.3 Policy on Absences for Academic Meetings .......................... 70 5.1.4 Policy on Sick Leave ............................................................... 71 5.1.5 University Policy for Leave of Absence ................................. 74

5.2

Other Issues and Services ................................................................... 77 5.2.1 Policy on Faculty External Employment ................................ 77 5.2.2 Summer Teaching ..................................................................... 79 5.2.3 Parking Permits and Phone Calls ............................................. 80 5.2.4 Requesting/Returning Keys and Electronic Entrance Cards .. 81 5.2.5 Obtaining Information/Computer Resources .......................... 82 5.2.6 Reserving a Classroom and Contacting the HR Department . 83 5.2.7 Faculty/Staff Identification Card .............................................. 84

6. ETHICAL STANDARDS AND ACADEMIC CITIZENSHIP 6.1

UTB Code of Conduct ........................................................................ 85 6.1.1 Code of Conduct ....................................................................... 85 6.1.2 Ethics Policy ............................................................................. 86

6.2

Code of Ethics and Standard Practices for Texas Educators ............ 87

6.3

College of Education Ethical Standards ............................................ 91 6.3.1 Teaching, Scholarly Work and Service in the COE ................ 91 6.3.2 Faculty Conflict Resolution/Grievance Procedures……….…. 93

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APPENDICES Appendix A Example of an Academic One-Year Work for Faculty Teaching Primarily Graduate Courses…………………………………………….. 95 Appendix B Example of an Academic One-Year Work for Faculty Teaching Primarily Undergraduate Courses……….………………….…………… 98 Appendix C Profiles of Faculty Responsibilities at Different Levels ................... 101 Faculty Teaching Primarily Graduate Doctoral Level Courses...……...….……...………...... 101 Faculty Teaching Primarily Undergraduate Courses…………………...…………………….. 102 Faculty Teaching load for Lecturers and Field–Based Teaching Specialists......……..……. 103 Appendix D Portfolio Format ………….……………….……..…….……..…...... 105 Appendix E Curriculum Vita Forma………………………...……..………………….……. 107 Appendix F Annual Workload Agreement Plan ………....................................... 108 Appendix G Form To Be Completed for Course Release Request ……………... 110 Appendix H Forms for Selection and Management of Graduate Assistants….. 112 Appendix I Sample Form for Application for Official Trave l…………………….. 116 Appendix J Form for Outside Employment Request ………………………………..…117 Appendix K Table of Contents of UTB HOP………………………..……………… 118 Appendix L Grading System Policy………... ………………………..…………….. 124 ACADEMIC CALENDARS FOR 2012-2013 Academic Year 2012-2013 Calendars.……..……..…………………………….. 125 Faculty Personnel Action Calendar…......……....………………..………………….. 127 University Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Calendar for 2012-2013……. 130 University Graduate Committee Calendar for 2012-2013……………….……...... 131 University Graduate Curriculum Action Request (CAR)………………………. 132 University Graduate Program Action Request (PAR)………………………….. 133

DIRECTORY OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Departments, Centers, Offices and other Academic Units……………….…….. 134 Faculty and Staff ………………………………………………………………... 135

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION FACULTY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES MANUAL 1. Academic Administration and Organization

GENERAL VISION AND MISSION STATEMENT

1.1.1 General Vision 1.1.1.1 Vision Statement The vision of the College of Education (COE) is to be consistently recognized as a fully accredited and internationally respected college in the areas of science, educational technology and intercultural studies. Our vision also includes becoming nationally and internationally recognized for preparing highly skilled teachers, counselors, administrators, educational researchers and professionals who excel in school environments as well as in other economic and service areas that require training, human resources development and lifelong learning. The COE’s teacher preparation programs will be central to the mission of the University and will have national prominence. It will be at the forefront in programs for English Language Learners and as well as through our teacher preparation, P-16 and life-long education initiatives and we will be a model for helping close the student achievement gap. All of these will require the COE to be noted for the quality of its graduates, the scholarship of its faculty, and the leadership and service they provide to the local, regional, national and international educational communities. 1.1.1.2 Vision Summary In summary, the vision of the COE is to be consistently recognized as a leading community that:  Develops collaborative, interdisciplinary, innovative teachers and leaders;  Engages in scholarly inquiry that transforms our educational practice in the priority areas of science, educational technology and intercultural studies; 1


 Enhances the human condition by fostering a dynamic learning community among faculty, students and communities across disciplines and agencies;  Reinforces reflective practice that cultivates a conscious analysis of values, assumptions, techniques, and strategies underlying best practice and the consequences such practice pos for people, their communities and environment; Generates strategic collaborative relationship with all stakeholders; and  Promotes social justice, tolerance and equity in an atmosphere where diversity and integrity are embedded in all our policies and practices. The vision of the College of Education is developed on the following VALUES: o o o o o o o o o

Learner centered education Academic excellence and integrity Outstanding teaching and service Scholarly research and professional leadership Integration of teaching, research, and service with differentiated assignments Individual and collective excellence Diversity, equity, and social justice Education of individuals across the life span Collegiality, collaboration and ethical behavior

1.1.2 Mission Statement The College of Education has a three-fold mission: 1. Prepare highly skilled professionals to assume roles and positions in teaching, research, educational leadership, and human development. 2. Provide undergraduate and graduate programs grounded in evidence-based on professional practice, collaboration, knowledge acquisition, reflective inquiry, pedagogical leadership and respect for the culturally and linguistically diverse learner. 3. Continuously assert ourselves as an integral part of local, state, national, and international scholarly networks and communities of practice that promote innovations and contributes to scientific, educational, economic, and social change. 2


1.1.3 Goals I.

Curricula that reflect sound theory and best practice.

II.

Students and graduates that are qualified and diverse.

III.

Faculty that are active in scholarly work and service.

IV.

Effective governance and organizational structure within an environment of open communication among students, faculty, administrators, staff, and community.

V.

Collaborative and mutually beneficial partnerships with UTB school districts and other organizations.

VI.

Enhanced visibility at local, state, national, and international dimensions.

colleges,

VII. Achievement of national and international accreditation and have continuous improvement of the College. The following are specific objectives of the College of Education: Teaching, Research and Innovation Engage faculty and students in research excellence and professional growth opportunities. Increase strong graduate programs that are professional and research oriented, and recruit high quality graduate students, nationally and internationally. Engage in intervention initiatives to promote student retention and graduation. Adhere to rigorous academic standards to produce highly qualified educators. Establish a process of continuous program evaluation and effectiveness. Expand lifelong learning and continuing education programs. Facilitate enhanced national and international visibility for the College of Education by infusing knowledge, skills, and dispositions of (inter) cultural and social foundations, human development, language, and technology into our teaching, research, and scholarly practice. Hold fast to excellence in dealing interactively with intercultural, multilingual and transnational issues.

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Infrastructure Create the infrastructure necessary for enhancing growth in the College of Education. Expand undergraduate and graduate degree opportunities that meet and respond to the needs of students. Develop the Center for Educational Development and Innovation that furthers the mission of The University and the College of Education. Seek state and national accreditations for College of Education programs. Seek professional accreditations for College of Education programs. Recruit and retain faculty who are recognized as leaders in their discipline. Keep pace with explosive growth of technology. External Relationships, Funding and Special Programs Create partnerships for synergistic results. Promote P-16 collaborative efforts with the surrounding community. Build a strong alumni base and program for the College of Education. Engage in service opportunities for students and faculty. Expand national and international activities. Seek innovative and creative external funding opportunities. Engage in research and grant funded partnerships with area school districts, enterprises and other community entities, local, national and international. 1.1.4 Scope of Work Building the future of the College based on present achievements. Developing a learning community centered on the learner and facilitated by the organizational culture of the College. Linking research to the needs of Lower Rio Grande Valley and Texas without ignoring national and international issues. Committing to continuous quality improvement of teacher preparation programs from early childhood to college teaching. Reinforcing present graduate studies and increasing strong graduate programs that are professional and research oriented, and recruiting high quality graduate students, nationally and internationally. Forging strong strategic alliances with public and private community organizations and enterprises. Facilitating enhanced national and international visibility for the 4


College of Education, mainly in areas of math and science education, language and literacy, intercultural studies and educational technology across different disciplines and specialties that already exist at the COE. Enhancing research support, program development and productivity. Reinforcing externally funded research, grants, contracts and external fellowships. Keeping pace with the explosive growth of technology. Fostering UTB cross- colleges and cross-departmental programs. Supporting faculty development, mentoring and academic citizenship. Committing to innovation and education quality. Holding fast to excellence in dealing interactively with intercultural, multicultural, multiethnic, multiracial, multilingual, multinational and transnational issues. Achieving NCATE accreditation and other professional and scientific endorsements. Establishing short, medium and long-range strategic planning as methodology to achieve College goals. 1.1.5 Conceptual Framework and Strategic Plan The College of Education (COE) has a long history of preparing professional personnel to meet the educational needs of Lower Rio Grande Valley and South Texas. Teachers, administrators, school counselors, special educators, bilingual teachers, educational technologists, kinesiologists, and exercise science specialists are prepared in the College's four departments. Among the over 50 programs, the College in cooperation with other colleges of The University offers 32 undergraduate programs, 14 master's degrees, and 4 doctoral specializations. UTB is part of the University of Texas System. Located in Brownsville next to Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico, UTB celebrated its 80th anniversary in 2006. The University of Texas at Brownsville has grown rapidly in recent years, attaining a student population in 2008-2009 of over 17,000. The COE is one of the University's six academic colleges is comprised of a diverse and international faculty. Because The University is located across the border with Mexico and on the Gulf of Mexico, the programs within the COE have access to the cultural and social richness that an international area provides. Students learn about the opportunities and complex challenges of urban and rural border settings and experiences, through theory, practice, and field experiences working with children and adults representing a host of ethnically and linguistically diverse backgrounds. 5


As a College seeking to attain national and international recognition for its high quality programs, faculty and administrators came together to assure a common mission and revitalized the goals. This overall process affirms the College's responsiveness to teaching, research and service. Thus, the vision for the College is to attain national and international recognition resulting from the successes of COE faculty and graduates in impacting teaching and learning positively, particularly with a focus on Spanish/English learning communities. To accomplish this, the College will maintain the capacity, through quality programs, faculty, and students, to meet the needs of Texas and beyond. Further, the College is guided by a medium and longrange strategic plan. The conceptual framework that guides curricula and programs in the College is oriented to build in each student strong theoretical foundations, to help future teachers to be educated rather than trained, to be capable of understanding the complexities of the organic society rather than just the reduction of people to human material. While we appreciate the students’ need to develop and to learn specific applied skills and methodologies, we acknowledge the dependent relationship between theory and practice; both should be interrelated. There is no applied scientific discipline if there is no discipline to apply. Further, oftentimes, very little learning is related to the dimensions, which require understanding of ourselves, of others, and of the world in which we live. In teacher education programs, for instance, we must combine the learning of methodologies, content information, competences, and skills in harmony with the core of education, which is learning to be. Besides these important social and cultural factors, we must evolve towards a society for learning based on the idea that all members are constantly learning, each being helped by the other. As teachers preparing teachers and education professionals, we must allow the learning community to create an environment in which students learn from the teacher, the teacher from the student, and everyone from each other. Centering education on the learner modifies the teacher’s role to one which is in harmony with future demands for a learner, a facilitator of learning and a helper in the affective development of people. More stress will be placed on such domains, which intrinsically relate education to hard sciences, psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics, history and philosophy, among others. In addition to mastering knowledge, thinking critically and being problem-solvers, educators will learn tolerance, ethical behavior, and aesthetic sensitivity. Education will be related to a multicultural, multiethnic, intercultural, and interdependent world, 6


in which education teaches human beings to foster sharing attitudes, to search for social equity and to develop compassion and solidarity for the suffering of the human race. It is necessary to have continuous needs assessment to lead an educational organization, such as the College of Education, in order to reduce subjectivity and avoid irreversible side effects in the process of decision-making. Institutional research by means of productivity calculations, accountability, benchmarking, quality/excellence assessments, continuous improvement efforts, all within a context of clearly defined norms and regulations, should be implemented as part of an effective and efficient managerial approach. The conceptual framework is based in four core concepts as central to our vision of professional educators and scholars: (a) interculturalism, (b) interrelatedness, (c) inquiry, and (d) pedagogical leadership. As a college of education, we believe these core concepts are the themes through which we organize and deliver the College's programs. These themes will help to assure that our faculty and graduates: Interculturalism Are sensitive to individual and cultural differences and have a complete understanding of the richness of diverse communities. Understand the importance of global connections, including biliteracy and multilingualism as tools for intercultural teaching, learning, and communication. Focus on cultural and social diversity contexts and the opportunities and challenges present in these contexts. Interrelatedness Collaborate with other professional educators, families, and communities. Are actively involved in professional and scholarly organizations and networks. Understand the importance of engaging in partnerships with schools and communities. Engage in interdisciplinary/cross-disciplinary activities to assure breadth and depth of perspective and knowledge. Apply ethical social behavior and professional ethical standards.

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Inquiry Actively inquire into educational dilemmas and problems to seek resolutions that benefit students. Engage in critical thinking about educational issues. Continuously reflect on their practice and refine practice to meet the changing needs of learners. Are actively involved in scholarship for the advancement of the field and related disciplines. Pedagogical leadership Know their content and use appropriate pedagogy to provide all students with the opportunity to learn. Experiment with pedagogical techniques and critically evaluate the results of their experimentation. Transform their own practice through continuous reflection and ongoing professional development and share this learning with others in the educational community. Advocate for all learners. Using these core concepts, faculty will organize curricula that are responsive to: (a) national standards such as NCATE, (b) the standards of the Texas Education Agency and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, (c) professional association standards, (d) the advisability of educational practice, and (e) professional ethical standards. Faculty deliver curricula (programs, courses, instructional modules and experiences) that develop professional educators able to (a) positively impact student learning, (b) collaborate with colleagues, (c) continue to develop professionally, and (d) work with families and the community. The College embraces performance accreditation and provides performance data and information to show that graduates of UTB’s education programs make a positive difference in the learning of others. This information is available through the College's offices of Institutional Effectiveness and Development and Teacher Preparation and Accountability. In order to accomplish the College mission and to achieve the seven goals outlined previously in section 1.1.3, departments and units in the College will be engaged in a year long process to identify objectives for each goal, major activities needed to achieve objectives for each goal, dates for completing activities, evaluation of 8


activities, persons responsible for activities, and the budget needed to achieve the goals. These components will come together in a college strategic plan aligned to the University Strategic Plan, and it will be available from the Office of the Dean by January 2013. 1.1 ORGANIZATION OF THE COLLEGE The College of Education is organized in four academic departments, one research center and the dean’s office. The College also includes other academic and administrative units assigned to it. (See COE Organizational Chart on page 12) 1.2.1 Duties and Responsibilities of the Dean According to the HOP, Section 7.5.3, pages 1-2, these are the duties and responsibilities of the Dean: 1. Coordinating the assessment and development of academic programs within the College; 2. Preparing and revising, as necessary, academic program plans for the College; 3. Promoting and serving as a model for teaching professional achievement and professional service; 4. Overseeing all personnel matters involving academic and non-academic employees including: recruiting, appointment, re-appointment; termination and dismissal; faculty evaluation, tenure, promotion and merit; and the preparation and approval(s) of faculty workload plans and long-range professional development plans; 5. Maintaining good working relationships with faculty and administration in all academic and non-academic areas; 6. Communicating effectively with various constituencies within the University, surrounding community and State regarding the College; 7. Maintaining effective communication between students, faculty and Chairs within the College and with other academic unit personnel; 8. Serving as a liaison with relevant professional associations and state and national regulatory and accrediting agencies; 9. Articulating University policy and procedures to members of the College; 10. Insuring that College policies and practices are consistent with those of the University; 11. Articulating the budgetary needs of the College and overseeing the allocation and expenditure of resources; 12. Coordinating the use of facilities assigned to the College; 9


13. Overseeing the preparation of class schedules and complying with institutional reporting requirements; 14. Maintaining student records; 15. Providing a system of advising; 16. Working with Chairs to encourage grant applications by faculty members and to prepare proposals for outside funding of special projects; and 17. Additional responsibilities as assigned by the Vice President for Academic Affairs or President. 1.2.2 College Committees 1.2.2.1 Administrative Team Council 1. Serves as an advisory collegiate administrative body to the Dean of the College of Education for planning, implementing decisions, and evaluating results of the College of Education. 2. Addresses academic issues related to the College and reviews present and future policies related to academic matters. 3. Addresses administrative and managerial issues for continuous improvement of the College of Education. 4. Serves as the COE strategic planning council. The Council shall consist of the Dean of the College of Education, the Associate Dean and the Department Chairpersons. The Administrative Team Council meets at least once a month. The Dean can call an Extended Administrative Team Meeting inviting the directors, coordinators and faculty from within the college. 1.2.2.2 COE Personnel Committee 1. Handles all personnel actions coming from Departments based on the personnel action calendar and the internal deadlines for the College. 2. Serves primarily to provide a faculty review of applications for promotion and tenure that furnishes a professional evaluation from a broader perspective than the departmental evaluation; and encourages departments and chairpersons to undertake their evaluations in a professional and fair manner. 3. Identifies programs, activities and guidelines to support faculty efforts toward scholarship work and academic citizenship. 4. Recommends guidelines for appropriate annual faculty evaluation appraisals and tenure and promotion decisions. 5. Serves as an advisory faculty committee to the Dean of the College of Education. 10


The Department Personnel Committees will be elected by secret ballot by all tenured and tenure-track faculty. The person receiving the maximum number of votes will serve as the chair of the departmental personnel committee and as that department’s representative to the College Personnel Committee. Candidates for personnel action and non-tenured members of the faculty should not serve on such committees. The Dean will appoint one additional member to the College Personnel Committee from tenured faculty within the College of Education or other University College or School, excluding chairs or faculty in administrative positions. Members of this Committee can only serve two continuous years. 1.2.2.3 Student Advisory Committee 1. Serves in advisory capacity so that the Dean hears students on a regular basis, to include: identifying issues needing solution, voice for students and student orientations. 2. Involves students in working on the COE Goals by including them on Committees and in various College activities. 3. Assures that there are open and continuing communications among students, faculty and staff. The Student Advisory committee shall consist of COE undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students and the Dean and Associate Dean of the College. The director of the Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Development will act as the permanent secretary of the committee. The Committee meets at least two times during the year.

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

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1.2.2.4 Community Advisory Committee 1. Provides input on the design, delivery and renewal of the College’s conceptual framework and programs. 2. Promotes and facilitates the research and service mission of the College of Education. 3. Reviews, discusses and recommends changes in undergraduate and graduate professional education programs in the College of Education. 4. Serves as a committee for external affairs; grants development; local, national and international educational relations; and COE community involvement. Members of this Committee will be persons outside of the University who work with or know firsthand the students and graduates of programs in the College of Education. The Committee will also include at least three relevant persons from school districts, community organizations and corporations, and the Dean of the College and the Associate Dean. The director of the Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Development will act as the permanent secretary of the committee. The Committee meets at least two times during the year. 1.2.2.5

COE Graduate Committee

The COE Graduate Committee is charged to review and recommend policies related to graduate programs, curriculum, and students. It will have a Subcommittee for Doctoral Programs in charge of reviewing and recommending policies related to doctoral programs, as well as establishing the appropriate relations with other graduate programs in the COE or in other Colleges. The Committee membership shall be made up of one faculty member with graduate status from each Department of the College of Education. They will be elected by secret ballot by all tenured and tenure-track faculty. The COE Director of the Office of Graduate Programs serves as an ex-officio member. The Committee will elect the chair from within its membership. The chair will be the representative to the University Graduate Committee. The Committee meets at least once per month during Fall and Spring semesters. Members of this Committee can only serve two continuous years. 1.2.2.6

COE Undergraduate Committee

The COE Undergraduate Curriculum Committee is charged to review and recommend policies related to teacher preparation and undergraduate programs, curriculum, and students. 13


The Committee Membership shall be made up of one faculty member from each Department of the College of Education. They will be elected by secret ballot by all tenured and tenure-track faculty. The COE Associate Dean will serve as an exofficio member of the Committee. The Committee will elect the chair from within its membership. The chair will be the representative to the University Undergraduate Committee. The Committee meets at least once per month during the Fall and Spring semesters. Members of this Committee can only serve two continuous years. 1.2.2.7

Other COE Committees

The College of Education will have ad-hoc committees according to its academic and administrative needs. Faculty and staff will serve on them as part of their service to the College and the University. Examples of such committees will be the College Technology Advisory Committee, College Field Experience Advisory Committee, etc. 1.2.3 Dean’s Office Units 1.2.3.1

Associate Dean

1. Assists the Dean of the College and direct the Office of Teacher Preparation and Accountability. 2. Creates, develops and maintains data, databases and student files needed for the preparation of State required compliance and accreditation reports. 3. Verifies and recommends all students filing for standard teaching certifications and professional level certificates. 4. Clears all students into the Texas Education Agency System enabling them to register for the appropriate certification test. 5. Provides data for University faculty relating to the performance of their students on the State certification test and for the preparation of their departmental assessment plans. 6. Serves as the contact point and prepare all required forms for the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board when new certification programs are developed or existing ones are revised. 7. Evaluates student transcripts and prepares deficiency plans. 8. Recommends students that have qualified for the issuance of probationary certificates. 14


9. Collaborates with academic and faculty advisors relating to program issues and concerns. 10.Works closely with the Alternative Certification and student teaching programs in reviewing problems related to admissions, transcript evaluations and student teaching waivers. 11.Provides academic advising for students on a regular basis. 12.Reviews all Program Action Requests (PAR’s), Curriculum Action Requests (CAR’s) and student portfolios that are requesting a waiver for their student teaching courses. 13.Oversees the COE tutoring program and the development of new tutoring materials. 14.Coordinates the Learner Mentoring Program for undergraduate and graduate students of the College. 15.Serves as the liaison with our 13 school districts and help to coordinate the development and meeting with the COE Advisory Board (Lower Rio Grande Valley Advisory Board). 16.Organizes and coordinates with TEA Onsite Visit and provide technical assistance to the Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Development and NCATE. 17.All other activities delegated by the Dean of the College 1.2.3.1.1

Office of Graduate Programs/ Doctoral Program Coordinator

This Office coordinates graduate programs in the College of Education by supporting COE academic departments, and it is the liaison with the Office of Graduate Studies of The University. The Office of Graduate Programs reports to the COE Dean and Associate Dean who are responsible for general policy making in COE graduate education, graduate faculty development, quality control, and assessment. The Office is administered by a coordinator position. This position was added when the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board approved the doctoral program in the summer of 2007. The Coordinator of the Office serves as an ex-officio member of the COE Graduate Curriculum Committee and chair of the Doctoral Program Committee. At the same time, the office coordinator in conjunction with the department chairs coordinates COE doctoral programs with the following general functions: Recruiting and selection of students Program development/Specialization(s) development 15


Student support/Advising and monitoring student progress Faculty support Budget and scholarly travel Policy development, assessment and evaluation Handbook/Catalog/Website Policy development Reports, Resources and Inventory Committee assignments Graduate Research/Teaching Assistants Support Accreditation (SACS) (NCATE) Both functions, the Office of Graduate Programs and Doctoral Program Coordinator can be assigned to the same person. Curriculum Development and Implementation Coordinate with faculty and chairs in the development and implementation of respective doctoral degrees Coordinate doctoral degree offerings with the Graduate Studies Office Coordinate selection of faculty teaching in the doctoral program with respective chairs Develop a calendar of course offerings for each doctoral degree offering Serve as a liaison to the graduate office for any revisions or inclusion of new program emphases to the current doctoral program in curriculum and instruction Serve as a liaison to the academic community and the public that promotes a positive image of the doctoral program Work continuously with graduate faculty teaching in the different doctoral specializations. Selection of Doctoral Students Coordinate media and outreach activities with the community at-large Coordinate the selection process for doctoral students wishing to enter the doctoral program Maintain up-to-date student records Coordinate internships and graduate assistantships

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Dissertation and Scholarship Coordinate Student Scholarship Opportunities Monitor Student Progress Advise At-Risk Doctoral Students Coordinate Dissertation Committees Oversee Comprehensive Examinations Oversee Dissertation Defenses Program Review Maintain records and report findings to the faculty, departments, chairs, dean, upper administration, and to Higher Education Coordinating Board on an annual basis Recommend and maintain budgets for doctoral program activities and resource needs Review Programs of Study Administrative Organization The doctoral coordinator will report to the Department Chair of Teaching Learning and Innovation and a doctoral administrative council consisting of each department chair coordinated by the Associate Dean of Education. This allows input from each of the doctoral areas since this is an interdisciplinary program. The secretary of the Teaching, Learning and Innovation Department will primarily provide the clerical service to the doctoral program. In addition, when needed, secretaries of Language, Literacy and Intercultural Studies and Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies will give their clerical support. 1.2.3.1.2

Office of Institutional Effectiveness

The Institutional Effectiveness and Development Office mission is to collect, organize, maintain, and analyze institutional and other data to support College decision making and management. The use of this information will be used for planning, assessment, and improvement in mission-critical areas-especially teaching and learning for institutional improvement, accreditation, annual reporting, and accountability to a range of key stakeholder groups. In addition, a major task of the office is to fully support the NCATE accreditation and the Executive Committee. Additionally, the office will coordinate student and community advisory committees and alumni activities through Lifelong and Learning, such as: 17


1. The major function of the Office of Lifelong Learning and Special Programs is to assist and coordinate collaboration between ISDs and UTB in P–16 Initiatives which include but are not limited to the areas of research, innovation and educational quality. Various colleges call upon this office to assist in communicating or at least begin the dialog between their department/division with the ISDs. These communications often lead to collaboration on grants and activities for students and faculty. 2. Coordination of COE Community relations, Continuing Education and Off-campus courses. Duties will entail budget preparation, coordination of faculty for off-campus courses with the departments in the College of Education, course sequences, management of facilities, and coordination of faculty research topics in the RGC, budget reconciliations, and account management. 3. The institute of Lifelong Learning will also coordinate the Professional Development of Education and In-service Teacher training in specialized programs during the entire year with major emphasis in the summer sessions. 1.2.4 Departments 1.2.4.1

Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies

The mission of the Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies is to prepare highly qualified professionals in the areas of Educational Leadership, Guidance and Counseling, Educational Psychology, Early Childhood Education, Child Care and Development, and Special Education. Commonalities across the diverse programs are a focus on developing leaders with strong collaborative, advocacy, and support skills, in addition to emphases placed on ethical behavior, social awareness, and preparing professionals to enact changes in the workplace and their surrounding community. The department is dedicated to meet the needs of the local and academic community and to prepare professionals to work with individuals from diverse backgrounds. 1. The department is comprised of 5 programs of study, a counseling clinic, and the academic support for the Center for Early Childhood Studies. 2. The department services the undergraduate and graduate core program of the COE in educational psychology and leadership studies. 3. The department houses all student programs of study, deficiency plans and works closely with the Graduate Office and the Certification office on issues 18


of graduate admissions, certification requests and registration issues with the Office of the Registrar. Essentially all administrative, financial, reporting, and clerical responsibilities of its 5 instructional programs and the Community Counseling Clinic are the responsibility of the department. 4. The department is responsible of the Center for Early Childhood Studies. Duties will require administrative coordination, budget preparation and supervision of activities. The academic planning and supervision will be done through the department. 1.2.4.2

Health and Human Performance

The mission of the Department of Health and Human Performance is to provide quality instruction that will enhance student achievement to meet the changing roles and expectations of professionals in the fields of health and human performance. The department is committed to developing professionals in the areas of physical education, health education, exercise science and wellness promotion. The department’s focus is teaching, research/scholarly activity, and service. 1. The department consists of five programs of study and serves to meet the needs for the activity element requirement in the General Education Core. 2. The department is responsible for administering the student recreation program and assists the Division of Student Affairs with the student intramurals program in the accommodation of facility needs. 3. The gym facilities consist of the REK Center, the main gym, the gym annex, the tennis courts, and the boathouse. A lab director is assigned to oversee the HHP lab. The director is in charge of the operation duties, ordering lab supplies and keeping inventory of the lab equipment. 1.2.4.3

Language, Literacy and Intercultural Studies

The mission of the Department of Language, Literacy, and Intercultural Studies is to prepare leaders to shape the educational policy and practice of the region and nation through rigorous academic programs. The graduate programs foster research and develop educators who serve as change agents and advocates for educational excellence and equity in language, literacy, and intercultural studies. The department also supports and guides undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral programs related to these fields. These are their primary functions: 1. Provides support in the areas of bilingual education, and second language education, and literacy in the preparation of undergraduate students who are 19


entering the teaching profession through either undergraduate programs or through alternative routes toward certification. 2. Provides support in the areas of social and cultural foundations of education for undergraduate and graduate students. 3. Develops programs in cultural and social foundations of education, intercultural and international studies, comparative and international education. 4. Supports the doctoral program concentrations in bilingual studies and literacy, and administering several graduate programs. 1.2.4.4

Teaching, Learning, and Innovation

The mission of the Department of Teaching, Learning and Innovation is to prepare leaders to shape the educational policy and practice of our region and nation through rigorous and comprehensive programs. The undergraduate programs provide the knowledge and skill foundations for those entering the teaching profession in classrooms with culturally and linguistically diverse learners. The graduate programs foster research and develop education leaders who serve as change agents and advocates for educational excellence and equity. The mission of the Teaching, Learning, and Innovation Department is to prepare early childhood through 12th grade teachers who will: Design instruction and assessment to promote student learning; Create a positive and productive classroom environment; Implement effective, responsive instruction and assessment; and, Fulfill professional roles and responsibilities. 1.2.4.5

Duties and Responsibilities of the Chairperson

The following describes the role and responsibilities of Department Chairs. This policy is neither exhaustive nor restrictive (HOP 7.5.2). 1. The Chair is the chief academic and administrative officer of the Department. The Chair of the Department reports to the Dean who may assign other responsibilities. 2. The Chair will hold and maintain faculty appointment with the concomitant faculty responsibilities. 3. The Chair provides leadership, service and vision to the department. Specifically the chair has responsibility for the following areas: a. Academic Standards and Departmental Vision 20


Promote monitor and implement departmental programs and maintain the academic standards of the discipline. Prepare the department for accreditation, assessment, program reviews and other accountability requirements. b. Departmental Governance Serve as a leader and advocate for improving the department including the development and implementation of long-range departmental programs, plans and goals. Conduct department meetings, establish, monitor and guide departmental committees. As appropriate, delegate department administrative responsibilities to individuals and committees. c. Curriculum and Instruction Lead the development and implementation of new and/or revised degrees and programs, assessment plans and program reviews. Provide oversight of all programs, and ensure compliance with state and federal programs and policies. d. Faculty and Staff Affairs Annually evaluate staff. Assist, coordinate and evaluate faculty teaching, professional development, intellectual contribution and service. Lead the recruitment of faculty members and serve as a mentor and role model for probationary faculty. Keep faculty members informed of institutional policies, plans, activities, goals and priorities. Assume a reasonable share of departmental teaching assignments. e. Professional Development Foster the development of each faculty member’s special talents and interests. Stimulate good teaching and faculty intellectual contribution. Promote diversity among faculty and the curriculum and serve as a role model for professional and personal development. f. Student Affairs Lead the development and implementation of plans to recruit, advise, mentor and retain Students. Mediate and solve student problems and provide professional referrals, as appropriate. Enforce academic requirements and regulations. g. External Affairs Serve as a liaison between the department and the administration. Initiate, coordinate, maintain and improve liaisons with external groups, agencies and institutions and constituencies. h. Budget and Resource Management Propose and administer department budgets and prepare monthly account reconciliations. Facilitate appropriate use of travel funds. Oversee equipment inventories and other related fiscal responsibilities. Seek outside funding and encourage faculty to submit proposals for contracts 21


and grants to government and private foundations. i. Operations Schedule classes and facilities. Maintain essential department records and equipment, including procurement, operations, maintenance and control of inventory. Respond to administration and ensure policy compliance. Monitor and contribute to development of library collection. Process departmental correspondence and requests for information. Coordinate the efforts of faculty and staff to ensure safe working conditions in laboratories, shops, classrooms and offices. The Chair will exercise due diligence. If the department cannot remedy a condition that is considered unsafe, the Chair will report the condition to the Dean or the appropriate safety officer. j. Internal Control Execute and manage a system of internal controls which provides reasonable assurance that operations are effective and efficient, assets are safeguarded, financial information is reliable and the department complies with applicable laws, regulations, policies and procedures. Chairs shall be provided with reasonable support on applicable laws and regulations and are expected to participate in all related training. 1.2.4.6

Guidelines for Selection of Department Chairs and Program Directors

1. These are the guidelines for selection of department chairs (HOP 7.5.1) a) If a department chair position becomes vacant, the dean shall consult with the full-time department voting faculty as set forth in HOP 7.4.2 and, when appropriate, with representatives of advisory boards, committees, or agencies, to determine minimum eligibility requirements for candidates for department chair, whether external candidates must be considered in addition to internal candidates, a calendar for the search, and whether the department will act as a committee of the whole or through a departmental search committee. The search committee may include members external to the department, who may not vote for the chair. When possible, chairs should be tenured. b) The full-time department voting faculty as set forth in HOP 7.4.2 shall review all candidates. The department's recommendation to the dean shall be based upon a vote of the department’s full-time faculty. The vote, in which all full-time voting department faculty shall participate, shall be by secret paper ballot. The dean shall then report the results to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, who shall make a recommendation to the President. The President shall then appoint the 22


department chair, which may or may not be the person recommended by the department. c) If the dean and the department fail to agree, the dean shall consult with the department concerning reservations about the department's recommendation and either proceed based upon a resolution of differences or ask the department to renew its search process. If the dean does not accept the recommendation of the department, the dean should recommend an interim chair to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, who should recommend appropriate action to the President. The President shall appoint interim chairs. If an interim department chair is appointed without a faculty vote, an election must be conducted within one calendar year. 2. The President may call for an election from time to time for recommendations concerning the appointment of a department chair. When an election is called, the department’s personnel committee, which is responsible for the election, will announce that nominations for department chair are being accepted. Faculty may nominate themselves or any willing, eligible faculty member. At least 10 working days must be allowed for nominations, and at least one additional week must be allowed for voting. A simple majority of those who participate in the election by submitting a ballot shall determine the winner. A run-off election of the top two candidates shall be conducted if no candidate receives a majority. After all votes have been cast, the personnel committee shall count the votes and report the results to the dean. The dean shall then report the results to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, who shall make a recommendation to the President. The President shall then appoint the department chair, which may or may not be the person recommended by the department. 3. Department chairs serve without fixed terms subject to the pleasure of the President. Full-time tenured and tenure-track faculty of each department shall evaluate their chair annually and shall inform the dean of their evaluation. The dean shall also annually review department chairs. 4. These are the guidelines for selection of academic program directors (within departments) a) The chair and/or the dean shall meet with the department's full-time faculty and agree upon specific procedures for the nomination and selection of candidates for academic program directors. b) The dean shall consult with the full-time department faculty and with appropriate representatives of advisory boards, committees and/or agencies to determine the minimum eligibility requirements for the 23


candidates; whether external candidates shall be considered; and a calendar for the search. When possible, academic program directors should be tenured. c) The full-time faculty shall review all candidates. The dean shall consult with faculty members to receive their recommendations. The dean shall also consult with the appropriate external representatives to receive their recommendations. d) After completing these consultations, the dean shall recommend the appointment of an academic program director to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The Vice President for Academic Affairs shall appoint the academic program directors. Academic program directors are subject to an annual evaluation. That process shall involve consultation by the chair and/or the dean, with the faculty in the department, and with the appropriate internal and external persons associated with the department or program. Academic program directors shall be appointed annually and serve at the pleasure of the dean. 1.2.5 Center and Units 1.2.5.1

Center for Educational Development and Innovation

The Center of Educational Development and Innovation is one of the University’s Center of Excellence. The Center promotes and conducts basic and applied research in education and related disciplines, and develops innovative and best educational practices in national and international contexts. The mission of the Center for Educational Development and Innovation (CEDI) is to achieve the perpetuation of innovation and practices throughout the educational continuum by focusing the energy, expertise, and desires of its community of students, families, scholars, and the society at large to develop a unique perspective that what is taught and learned evolve beyond the current boundaries of practice. The Center is intent on improving teaching at all levels through seamless and innovative models that deliver the most current content and instructional knowledge and skills. Special emphasis will be given to bilingual content education with prominence to the critical national shortage areas of mathematics and sciences. The Center will promote the integration of basic research, applied research, and best practices to develop master teaching to excel the teaching and learning process. The Center will study the various interrelationships between education, natural and social sciences, health, and ethics to use its findings to solve local issues and their extension to similar national and international socio-cultural contexts. 24


1.2.5.1.1

Office of Research and Grants

The Office of Research and Grants disseminates funding information, provides assistance with the processing of proposals, and assists with the negotiation of external agreements. It also assists with the development of the proposal narrative, budget, and provides minimal post-award activities. It also coordinates alumni activities and programs, student handbooks, Dean’s faculty awards/grants, visiting scholars COE initiatives and COE fundraising campaigns. These are specific activities of this Office: In regard to research and grants: Prepares grant proposal packets; submits Intent Notices; assists with securing external commitments; reviews grant proposal packets for institutional and funding agency requirements and compliance; collects demographic data and information; and assists with writing and/or proofreads grant proposals. Assists with budget development and reviews proposal budget for accuracy. Obtains institutional approval prior to submission; uploads and submits proposals electronically to funding agency; mails grant proposal packet to funding agency; prepares award packet for account setup; and reviews funding announcement for accuracy. Coordinates training on grants/contracts processes and responsibilities. Assists department chairs and the director of the Center for Educational Development and Innovation with project and budget oversight responsibilities. Maintains copies of all communications with University and external funding agencies; designs a budget template tailored to the approved budget; provides ongoing assistance with the timely reporting of time and effort and program reports; and provides budget forecasting, monitoring, and reviewing of reconciliation reports. Mentors the PI/PD on personnel hires and ensures that all expenditures are directly related to the project; monitors subcontracts for appropriate assignment; tracks cost share requirements; and coordinates the final financial and program close out with project staff and University office. In regard to faculty research projects to be funded by the College of Education: Identifies selection criteria, point system and calendar of activities. Identifies selection committee members for grants and awards. Administers Dean's grant and awards to support faculty research, teaching and service. Makes recommendations to the Dean of the College of Education. 25


In regard to fundraising campaign strategies Researches successful fundraising campaign strategies. Creates action plans outlining specific activities. Assists with the implementation. In regard to a visiting faculty program to strengthen academic research and diversity Researches successful visiting faculty programs. Identifies specific activities to foster development. Develops a process for identifying well-known scholars, nationally and internationally, as visiting professors or as faculty for a sabbatical fellowship program (VSFP) in the College of Education and implement it. Identifies selection criteria and rationale in coordination with academic programs. Establishes a strategic plan which will involved priority academic areas of development for COE. Establishes a budget and search for grants to sustain the VSFP. Creates calendar of activities for the Program. Facilitates process and assist visiting faculty. Makes recommendations to the Dean of the College of Education. 1.2.5.2

Center for Early Childhood Studies

The Center for Early Childhood Studies provides a high-quality pre-school for the community’s children and provides instructional support to the preparation of early childhood specialists. The mission of the Center for Early Childhood Studies is to serve as a model program that facilitates the preparation of early childhood professionals, act as a catalyst for quality care and education for children, their families and the community and to generate new knowledge through the study, observation and research of early childhood education. This hands-on laboratory offers education students real-life situations to practice teaching methods, multilingual development and the most current teaching strategies, as modeled by outstanding practitioners. 1.2.5.3

Community Counseling Clinic

The Clinic's mission is to promote and enhance the quality of life for the members of the community and to provide professional training for graduate students. The Clinic offers growth-enhancing experiences, as well as preventive and early treatment for developmental, emotional, and interpersonal difficulties. The Clinic also makes appropriate referrals when necessary 26


1.2.5.4

Education Assessment Clinic

The Education Assessment Clinic is composed of two main units: Special Education Testing and Evaluation, Testing and Skill Enhancement. The Special Education Testing Unit is used as the instructional support to the special education program that includes educational diagnosticians and behavioral specialists. The unit provides various stakeholders (i.e. our graduate and undergraduate students, children with disabilities and their parents, UTB students with disabilities, and faculty) for use in a variety of ways and specially to achieve best practice in special education assessment. It also serves the community and area school districts. The Evaluation, Testing and Skill Enhancement Unit provides the oversight, and organization for hiring tutoring personnel and resources needed for the final stages of academe, prior to state licensure and certification. It will enable the COE to prepare personnel and material needed for benchmark testing, evaluation and a variety of tutoring opportunities. This unit will be able to: 1) Provide support to all students in passing the TExES licensure exams, 2) Better identify and track students at risk for doing poorly on the TExES Exam, 3) Develop a comprehensive array of resources for preparation that follows students throughout their teacher preparation and lifelong learning skills, 4) Offer basic support services. 1.2.5.5

Office of Field Experience

Students enrolled in degree programs that lead to teacher certification are required to complete a comprehensive program of structured laboratory experiences. These will range from classroom observations to extensive classroom involvement as the student progresses through his or her program. Field experiences are designed to provide preservice teachers opportunities to work on school district campuses under the mentorship of master classroom teachers in ways that capture the strength of all students and provide opportunities to observe, practice and provide effective instructional practices and classroom management strategies to address and meet the academic needs that students present in their classrooms. This provides the pre- service students with ongoing, relevant field based experiences. This office is directed and administered by a faculty member in the College of Education. All placements for pre service teachers in area school district classrooms are handled through this office. 27


COLLEGE OF EDUCATION FACULTY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES MANUAL 2. Faculty Duties and Responsibilities 2.1 University Policy on Faculty Responsibilities According to HOP 7.3.1: A. The purpose of this policy is to identify the elements of faculty responsibilities and workload and direct the annual process by which each faculty member's workload is established. B. Faculty is subject to The University of Texas System minimum faculty teaching requirements for general academic institutions. C. Faculty responsibilities shall include: 1. Teaching. The normal teaching load (per semester) for faculty is 12 Lecture Hour Equivalents (LHE's) (8 undergraduate courses or 6 graduate courses per academic year, not including the summers). 2. Office Hours. Faculty will normally maintain a minimum of eight (8) office hours per week, three (3) of which may be by appointment. 3. Academic Advising. Each faculty member will normally carry an assigned share of advisees. 4. Scholarship/Professional Development. 5. Research/Performance. 6. Departmental/College/University Services. 7. Professionally Related Service to the Profession and the Discipline. 8. Professional Service to the Community. D. Mix of Responsibilities. For each faculty member, the mix of responsibilities between Teaching, Advising, Scholarship/Professional Development, Research/ Performance, and various forms of Service shall be determined in an annual conference between the faculty member, the Chair and the Dean. Variations in emphasis among responsibilities might, for example, include additional formal classroom teaching in place of research expectations, or in another case might include heightened emphasis upon professional development and reduced service activities. Many combinations are possible within the bounds of Departmental, School/College and University needs, and 28


individual strengths and interests. The annual conference will serve not only as a planning conference for the coming year but also as an assessment conference concerning accomplishments during the preceding year. E. After the joint conference and agreement by the faculty member, the Chair and the Dean, the plan will be approved by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. During the course of the year, a plan may be revised at the initiation of the faculty member and upon approval by the Chair and the Dean. F. The Joint Conference Procedure 1. Each Spring Semester a Faculty Workload Planning Calendar shall be published by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. 2. The Department Chair shall meet with all probationary and tenured faculty members during the Spring Semester of each year to develop the faculty member's instructional workload for the following year. 3. Following the meeting of the Department Chair with the probationary and tenured faculty member, the Dean, the Department Chair, and the faculty member shall meet in an Annual Planning Conference to determine the faculty member's instructional workload and mix of other responsibilities for the coming year and review the accomplishments of the preceding year. 4. The Faculty Workload Plan will be filed upon acceptance by the Dean and the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The plan may be amended at the request of the faculty member and the chair. 2.2 COE Faculty Performance Guidelines To date, faculty, personnel committees (department and College level), and administrators (department chairs and dean) have relied on the guidelines and criteria for making personnel action decisions that are established in the Handbook of Operating Procedures (HOP). HOP guidelines and criteria are quite general. In an effort to make personnel action decisions as objective as possible, guidelines establishing minimal expectations for achieving personnel actions are essential. This document provides guidelines for evaluating faculty performance for personnel actions. All decisions regarding tenure, promotion, and post tenure review must be in accordance with HOP policies. HOP policy 7.3.6 states, “Each Department in consultation with the Dean is responsible for the development of a formal statement of basic performance requirements for candidates to have met in order to be considered for tenure.� The following guidelines are intended to be used in making decisions regarding tenure, promotion, annual review for probationary faculty, and post-tenure 29


review. Department and College personnel committees need guidelines that provide consistent criteria for making decisions. By making expectations more transparent, these guidelines can assist both faculty members who are candidates for tenure, promotion, and post tenure review, and committees making decisions about candidates. These guidelines can also assist administrators (department chairs and the dean) in making decisions about personnel actions and in establishing annual workload expectations for individual faculty. Personnel committees must make decisions about faculty performance based upon whether or not individual faculty have met expectations as outlined in annual workload plans and agreed upon by the faculty member and her or his chair. Expectations established by faculty and put forth in these guidelines must be reflected in annual workload plans, created by individual faculty members, and approved by the department chair and ultimately the dean of the College of Education. Department chairs and the dean have an annual opportunity to provide specific feedback to probationary faculty on their performance, especially as it pertains to a pending tenure review. Like the department chairs and dean, personnel committees are charged with recommending annual renewal for probationary faculty. These guidelines provide an opportunity for peer review of individual faculty’s progression toward tenure review and promotion. Such guidelines assist personnel committees in making objective decisions about faculty performance and in providing relevant feedback to probationary faculty about their performance. The guidelines for each area (teaching, scholarship, and service) should be met at minimal levels for any candidate being considered for promotion, tenure, or post tenure review. However, according to HOP policy 7.3.1D, there may be a mix in responsibilities determined during the annual workload conference. For example, it might be agreed that a faculty member will carry out additional service activities and have a reduced teaching load for the following year. Any such decision regarding expectations for the three areas under review should be clearly stated in the workload document and agreed to by the faculty member, the department chair, and the dean. Workload documents should be included in candidate portfolios to assist personnel committees in making decisions regarding promotion, tenure, renewal, and post tenure reviews. Although a faculty member’s portfolio may show an unsatisfactory among teaching, scholarship, and tenure in any one year, the expectation would be that the three areas be in balance over several years. That is, over a six or seven year period the faculty member should have a balance of expectations for each of the three areas being reviewed. 30


Accordingly, when making decisions about promotion, tenure, renewal, or post tenure review, the personnel committee can apply the following set of expectations to all faculty members. If personnel committees are concerned that the portfolio for a particular probationary faculty member is unbalanced to the point that it may affect committee recommendation for tenure at a later date, it should be the responsibility of the committee to raise these concerns with administrators. The guidelines focus on expectations for teaching, service, and scholarship. Any decision regarding tenure, promotion, or post tenure review must be based on evidence of satisfactory teaching, service, and scholarship. Without a clear record of satisfactory performance in all three areas, no faculty member should be promoted or granted tenure. The following charts outline the benchmarks for each area. All faculty who receive compensation for additional work or course release will not be able to consider when applying for merit. Faculty members who choose to offer distance education courses will be compensated for both course design and development of a course, and/or teaching an online course will receive appropriate documentation for inclusion in their portfolios to be used as evidence of meritorious service, scholarship, or teaching as deemed appropriate by the Chair of each department. 2.2.1 Guidelines for Teaching The normal teaching load for faculty in the College of Education is as follows: 4 undergraduate classes or 3 graduate classes according to NCATE Standards. However, most faculty teach classes at different levels. In evaluating teaching, the personnel committee needs to take several factors into consideration, including the total LHEs, as defined by the University a faculty member is asked to teach, the number of different classes, the number of new preparations, and the number of students per class. In addition, the committee should consider whether classes are field-based or contain a significant service-learning component. In some cases, in the process of hiring, some faculty may have negotiated agreements on number of classes they would be expected to teach, and those agreements should be made evident to the personnel committee.

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Teaching Sources of Evidence: Candidates for personnel actions in the College of Education must include student evaluations, reflections on teaching, and peer observations in their portfolios. Candidates must also include course syllabi and a report of grade distribution for each class, in addition to evidence of any teaching awards and unsolicited letters of support from students. Description: The College of Education expects each faculty member to prepare for classes and teach them effectively. In addition, faculty members are responsible for holding regular office hours, advising, recruiting, and retention of students. Graduate faculty involved in doctoral programs are responsible for chairing and serving on doctoral committees.

Gra

For promotion to Associate Professor, the candidate must demonstrate a substantive record of high quality teaching. The candidate’s record of teaching should be evaluated as substantive through ratings from the formal university instructor evaluations. Evaluations should be consistently ranked on average as B or better. Student comments should, on average, be positive. Reports of observations by peers should be consistently positive. Review of syllabi should demonstrate effective and thorough preparation for teaching as well as use of technology to enhance teaching. Faculty reflections on their teaching should indicate that faculty are responsive to student and peer evaluations as they plan and revise classes. The personnel committee will consider factors listed in the three categories below when determining recommendations for continuation, promotion, and tenure. While evidence of satisfactory teaching is demonstrated when candidate meets at least five of the listed criteria under Category 3. For promotion to Professor, the candidate must demonstrate a superior record of teaching. The candidate’s record of teaching should have been evaluated as superior through ratings from the formal university instructor evaluations. Evaluations should be consistently ranked at B or A. Student comments should, on average, be positive. Reports of observations by peers should be consistently positive. Review of syllabi should demonstrate effective and thorough preparation for teaching as well as use of technology to enhance teaching. Faculty reflections on their teaching should indicate that faculty are responsive to student and peer evaluations as they plan and revise classes. The personnel committee will consider factors listed in the three categories below when determining recommendations for continuation, promotion, and tenure. Evidence of superior teaching would come from all three categories. For Post Tenure Review, the candidate must demonstrate a continued superior record of teaching. The candidate’s record of teaching should have been evaluated as superior through ratings from the formal university instructor evaluations. Evaluations 32


should be consistently ranked at B or A. Student comments should, on average, be positive. Reports of observations by peers should be consistently positive. Review of syllabi should demonstrate effective and thorough preparation for teaching as well as use of technology to enhance teaching. Faculty reflections on their teaching should indicate that faculty are responsive to student and peer evaluations as they plan and revise classes. Evidence of continued superior teaching would come from all three categories. Category One

Category Two

Category Three

• Recognized teaching awards

• Creation of new courses

• Teaching load meats University Standards for COE

• Creation of new degree programs, including writing CARs and PARs

• Creation of a service learning program in the discipline

• Sustained innovative, peer evaluated teaching methodologies (Evidence as demonstrated via creation of lesson plans, course syllabi, delivery of instruction, evaluation of student performance, teaching skills and other approaches to innovation and equality)

• Strong student evaluations • Strong peer evaluations • Evidence of advising (e.g., maintaining a calendar, maintaining on-going log of advisees and advising activities) • Evidence of Participation, Recruitment and retention of students • Serving on dissertation committees • Chairing thesis committees • TExES and Comprehensive exam preparation • Participate in a professional development activity • Service learning components in courses • Evidence of sustained implementation of up-to-date curriculum

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2.2.2 Guidelines for Scholarship From this inception, The University of Texas at Brownsville has striven to place an ongoing and greater emphasis on research and scholarships. While teaching and service remain as essential responsibilities of faculty members, scholarship has become increasingly important in making decisions regarding tenure, promotion, and post tenure review. The importance of scholarship is shown in several ways. Potential for research and scholarship is now considered carefully in selecting new faculty. In addition, although the standard minimum teaching load is 12 lecture hour equivalents (LHEs) each semester (HOP policy), faculty at all levels are expected to achieve relevant scholarly work. Graduate faculty in typically teach fewer than 12 LHEs per semester, with the expectation that they will establish and maintain a research agenda beyond the minimum for all faculty and will conduct scholarly activities such as research, publishing scholarly works, graduate students’ mentoring and presenting their work at professional conferences to be an integral part of their annual workload expectations.

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Scholarship Sources of Evidence: Each faculty member in the College of Education must develop, maintain, and document a scholarly record of accomplishments of high quality. The following list of scholarly products, while not exhaustive, is indicative of the forms of scholarship faculty may use as evidence of their work. For promotion to Associate Professor, the candidate must demonstrate Description: The College of Education expects each faculty member to establish a sustained record of research and scholarship that contributes to the advancement of the knowledge base in their discipline. Each faculty member is expected to maintain an active, high quality scholarship record as evidenced by accomplishments that contribute to the continuing improvement of education. Teacher education scholars have a unique role to perform in informing educational policy in their various fields of specialty, in PreK- 12 education, and in community, adult, and occupational education. Thus, applied research that informs policy in these areas is valued equally with theoretical work. The diversity of issues the faculty investigates requires a broad range of research methods that

a substantive record of scholarship, considering both the quantity and the quality of the research and scholarly products. The candidate’s record of scholarship should include an average of one high quality product from Category One (below) each year. The Departments recognize the merit of diverse scholarly venues. Therefore, the candidate may also demonstrate scholarship through extensive and high quality work distributed across all three categories rather than a consistent record of scholarly work solely in Category One. For promotion to Professor, the candidate must demonstrate a superior record of scholarship evidenced by the attainment of national or international stature in the field. The candidate’s record of scholarship should include extensive and high quality work distributed primarily across Categories One and Two. The candidate should continue to show evidence of at least one high quality product in Categories One and Two each year. ___________________________________________________________ For Post Tenure Review, the candidate must demonstrate a continued superior record of scholarship. The candidate’s record of scholarship should include evidence of at least one high quality product on average each year distributed across Categories One and Two.

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include: experimental, quasi-experimental, descriptive, narrative, historical, analytic, and interpretive. Thus, research and scholarly products may take various forms: books, journal articles, chapters in books, policy documents, development reports, curriculum material and textbooks, and other forms.

W Gra

Category One

Category Two

Category Three

• Empirical Research reports

• 1st or 2nd author of refereed journal articles in journals with a regional or state circulation

• 3rd or 4th author of refereed journal articles in journals with a regional or state circulation

• Authored and edited scholarly books • 1st or 2nd author of refereed journal articles in journals with a national or international circulation • Scholarly book chapters • Invited articles for thematic issues of a journal

• 3rd or 4th author of refereed journal articles in journals with a national or international circulation •Presentations at national or international professional and scholarly peer review meetings • Colloquia at other universities and academic conference presentations

• Writing and being awarded a significant “research grant”

• Editor and Co-Author (one article or one chapter_ of scholarly journals and books

• Recognized research awards

• Government and agency publications

• Presentations at regional and state professional and scholarly meetings • Original curriculum products (e.g., CD ROM’s, videos, tests, clinical instruction documents, monographs) • Membership on review boards for professional associations • Book reviews or forwards • Published papers from conferences proceedings • Non-refereed professional publications • Revised editions of text books

• Reprints of articles in books of readings that are peer reviewed • Textbooks by recognized publishers

Please note - Writing and administering grants are important activities for faculty. Research grants provide research opportunities that lead to scholarly publications and presentations. Teacher training grants count as evidence of service.

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2.2.3 Guidelines for Service Service Sources of Evidence: Each faculty member in the College of Education must provide professional service in a variety of ways. The following list of service opportunities, while not exhaustive, is indicative of the different ways faculty can show evidence of professional service. For promotion to Associate Professor, the candidate must Description: The College of Education expects each faculty member to provide professional service in a variety of ways. Professional service is defined as sharing one’s professional expertise in a way that contributes to the establishment and/or maintenance of a variety of educationally-related organizations or institutions. Different venues for service include serving the University at the university-wide level, college level, and department level; serving professional organizations; and serving the broader community— international, national, state, and local. COE faculty recognize different levels of service, as outlined in this document. A combination of different

demonstrate a substantive record of service. The candidate’s record of service should include a variety of indicators of service. Several indicators of service at the Category 3 level should be included annually. Evidence of service at the Category 2 level should be included at some point during the candidate’s time at UTB. Category 1 service is clearly distinguished. Service in this category would be weighted at a significantly higher level than Category 3 indicators. Category 2 service would be weighed in between Category 1 and Category 3. In addition, faculty at the associate professor level should provide evidence that they have served as mentors for assistant professors, advising them on their teaching, service, and scholarship as well as advising them as to whether or not they should apply for promotion and tenure or exceptional merit. For promotion to Professor, the candidate must demonstrate a commitment to professional service. Evidence of multiple indicators from Categories 1, 2 and 3 are expected from the time the candidate achieved Associate Professor. In addition, faculty at the professor level should provide evidence that they have served as mentors for associate professors, advising them on their teaching, service, and scholarship as well as advising them as to whether or not they should apply for promotion and tenure or exceptional merit. For Post Tenure Review, the faculty member must demonstrate a continued record of service. The candidate’s record of service should include multiple indicators from Categories 1, 2 and 3 from the time the faculty member received tenure or since her or his previous post tenure review.

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kinds of service outlined at the Category 2 and 3 levels are expected of all faculty, while Category 1 service is considered distinguished service. Level of expertise and time commitment increases from Category 3 to Category 2 to Category 1.

Gra

Category One

Category Two

Category Three

• Chair of department of chairing a university-wide committee that requires extensive commitment

• Serving on university committees that requires extensive commitment

• Serving on a COE committee

• Serving on a federalor state-level government committee (such as a task force) • Holding an elected office for a national international or professional organization • Receiving a significant grant for teacher training and/or administering a teacher training grant • Implement a sustained service learning initiative related to the instructional program • Organizing a international or national conference • Tenuretrack/tenured faculty serving as deans, chairs, or equivalent within the COE • Serving in a governmental international organization that is related to education, science, or culture • Recognized service awards • Journal Editor

• Chairing a center, academic unit or committee that requires extensive commitment

• Chairing and/or serving on a department committee, including search committees

• Chairing a localeducation related government committee

• Serving on committees for state-wide professional organizations

• Holding an office for a state-wide professional organization

• Serving on a localeducation related government committee

• Editing a publication for a state-wide organization, such as a newsletter

• Providing pro bono training to school districts and other educational organizations

• Organizing a state conference • Serving as an outside reviewer for tenure and promotion candidates from other universities • Serving on accreditation reviews of other universities and professional/national/ international boards • Lead advisor to a COE student organization • Tenure-track/tenured faculty serving as program coordinators, laboratory directors, or equivalent within the COE • Serving on editorial advisory board or peer review of scholarly journals

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• Providing professionally-related service to the local, national, and international community • Recruiting candidates for new faculty positions • Participating in University and College of Education activities, such as research presentations by candidates for faculty positions and distinguished lecture series • Organizing a local/regional conference • Grant writing for COE or proposal reviews • Serve as a mentor for faculty


2.2.4 Variables in Making Personnel Action Decisions Personnel committees must consider multiple variables in making decisions for specific personnel actions. These include: Faculty rank—assistant professor, associate professor, full professor Faculty level—graduate and undergraduate—and teaching load Category level of work in the areas of teaching, scholarship, and service Workload expectations differ according to faculty rank (please see Appendices A & B). Faculty at the associate and full professor ranks would be expected to take on greater leadership roles than those at the assistant professor rank in each of the areas of teaching, scholarship, and service. Assistant professors should be expected to take on a variety of responsibilities in each area, with the understanding, given their relative lack of experience in academia, that it will take time to learn the various roles faculty are expected to assume. For example, new faculty should not be expected to chair important College committees nor should they be expected to take the lead in creating new programs of study. Assistant professors should be placed in positions where they can be mentored by associate and full professors. Likewise, faculty at the full professor rank would be expected to mentor those at the associate professor rank. To achieve the rank of full professor, faculty are expected to participate in the national arena of their profession. This should be evident in their service as officers or on committees at the national level of professional organizations. In addition, in order to achieve the rank of full professor, faculty are expected to have an established research agenda with multiple first or single-authored publications in peer reviewed journals. Faculty at the assistant professor rank would be expected to demonstrate clear movement toward a research agenda over the span of several years, as evidenced by their publication record. Personnel committees must take into consideration these differential expectations when considering personnel actions. Demands also differ according to faculty level (i.e. graduate and undergraduate levels) (please see Appendix C), although most faculty will teach students at different levels (e.g., a combination of master’s and undergraduate courses, a combination of doctoral, master’s and undergraduate courses or doctoral and undergraduate courses).

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For example, faculty who teach graduate level courses would be expected to spend considerable time preparing for classes and staying current in the field, to provide considerable feedback on student papers and other assignments, and to mentor graduate students along the path of research and scholarly presentation and publication. Given this role of mentorship, graduate level faculty teaching graduate course will be expected to demonstrate clear participation in the scholarly arena. Because of these demands, the standard teaching load for graduate faculty teaching only graduate courses will be a minimum of 9 credit hours per semester. In addition, graduate faculty chairing 4/5 dissertation committees will be assigned two graduate level classes and will receive one course equivalent for the dissertation committee assigned (3 credit hours per semester). Particularly critical in this duty is the student dissertation, which is the culmination and capstone of all aspects of graduate study including mastery of content, of methodology and the ability to apply that knowledge to problem solving and inquiry. Graduate faculty teaching at least one master level course is expected to lead students who have completed their undergraduate degree to a greater understanding of their specific educational discipline. This includes a greater understanding of the relationship between theory and practice, a broader knowledge of evidence based practices, and an increased skill in critically reading the literature of their discipline. Increased skill in professional writing and presentation is also expected at this level. The typical course load for graduate faculty teaching in a particular semester only is a minimum of 9 credit hours in addition to chairing up to six master theses. Faculty who teach undergraduate students are expected to provide them with opportunities to learn the knowledge and skill base necessary to enter into the teaching profession and effectively teach students at the K-12 level. Students are reading professional and scholarly literature and learning to write professionally for the first time. In addition, many are doing so in their second or additional language. Faculty who teach only undergraduate courses are expected to provide a variety of scaffolded experiences for students in preparation for entering the teaching field. Faculty who teach undergraduate courses are expected to teach a minimum of 12 credit hours per semester. There are other important variables to consider with teaching load. In addition to the number of courses and the level of courses taught, the total number of students taught should be considered. Some undergraduate courses may have 15 students while others may have 40. In addition, faculty who teach field-based courses may 40


spend considerable time on site with their students. Another consideration is the number of new courses a faculty member is teaching. New courses involve considerable preparation time. Finally, the number of different course preparations is also important to consider. Someone teaching four different courses would likely be spending considerably more time in course preparation than someone who is teaching two courses, with two different sections for each of those two courses. In addition to considering faculty rank and faculty level, personnel committees must consider the category level of work for each of the areas of teaching, scholarship, and service. These levels are listed as category 1, category 2, and category 3 levels of work for each of the areas (please see corresponding charts). Category 1 level work is considered the highest level, while category 3 work is considered the lowest level, generally the basic work required of all faculty. In the area of service, an example of category 1 work would be chairing a universitywide committee, whereas an example of category 3 work would be serving on an COE committee. An example of category 2 work would be serving on a universitywide committee or chairing a COE committee.

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION FACULTY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES MANUAL 3. Faculty Development, Tenure and Promotion 3.1 University Policy on Faculty Evaluation and Promotion 3.1.1 Faculty Development Plan The purpose of the planning activity is to structure a continuing dialogue that promotes congruence among individual professional career development goals, College needs, and the University's mission. The guidelines for the faculty development plan are: 1. All full-time probationary and tenured faculty members shall have a Faculty Development Plan. 2. The Faculty Development Plan is a multi-year plan for professional activity and growth, developed by the individual faculty member. The plan is developed by the faculty member and describes professional goals and objectives and plans to evaluate progress toward those objectives. The Faculty Development Plan is not a personnel action item nor a contract. It is the property of the individual faculty member. Plans may relate to more effectively meeting current responsibilities and preparing to undertake new or altered responsibilities. 3. For probationary members of the faculty, the Faculty Development Plan shall cover the probationary period and shall at the minimum cover a three to five year period. The Faculty Development Plan shall be reviewed and updated annually during the Spring Semester at the workload related meeting with the Chair and the Dean. 4. For tenured members of the faculty, the Faculty Development Plan shall cover a three to five year period and shall be updated at least every three years during the Spring semester at the workload related meeting with the Chair and the Dean. 5. The individual faculty member may alter the Faculty Development Plan as needed in discussion with the Chair and the Dean. 6. The Faculty Development Plan should be meaningfully related to the annual Faculty Workload Plan. 42


3.1.2 Student Evaluation of Instruction The purpose of student evaluation of instruction at The University of Texas at Brownsville is to serve as one of several sources to provide data for improvement of teaching and learning and for decisions regarding reappointment, tenure, promotion and merit salary increase. The student evaluation of instruction shall be viewed primarily as a developmental activity essential to providing the faculty member with information needed to improve teaching and learning as well as provide information for personnel action. This is the general policy: 1. Instruction in all courses/sections shall be evaluated. Instruction shall be evaluated by students through the use of the student evaluation survey coordinated by the Director of Academic Assessment and Evaluation. Based on mutual agreement between the Chair and faculty member, tenured faculty may use alternative methods of evaluation in up to one-half of the courses/sections during the year in lieu of the survey instrument. Additional methods of evaluation may be used by all faculty members. 2. Student evaluation of instruction shall be coordinated by the Director of Academic Assessment and Evaluation. The Director shall support the development of additional methods for evaluating instruction. 3. The student evaluation of instruction survey instrument shall consist of a core set of questions common to all instructional evaluation instruments. Additionally, faculty may select items particular to their own classes and teaching situations from a menu provided by the Director of Academic Assessment and Evaluation. Finally, faculty may construct their own items for inclusion in their student evaluations. 4. The summary results of student evaluation of instruction shall be returned directly to tenured members of the faculty. The results of student evaluation of instruction for probationary, non-tenure track and part-time instructors shall initially be returned to the Department Chair who shall share the results with the instructor. The Chair retains results on nontenure track and part-time faculty and returns results to probationary faculty. In all cases, the summary of results of student evaluation of instruction shall be sent to the library by the Director of Assessment and Evaluation as a file to meet the need of public records inquiries. 5. The results of evaluation of instruction of all courses/sections taught shall be available for the Spring Faculty Workload and Responsibilities Conference. In this meeting, each faculty member shall present and discuss the evaluation of instruction of all courses/sections taught since the last annual Faculty Responsibilities and Workload Conference. 43


3.1.3 Faculty Promotion A. All full-time tenure-track and tenured faculty are eligible for promotion. UTB shall recognize the following ranking system: Academic Rank a. Professor b. Associate Professor c. Assistant Professor d. Instructor Technical Rank a. Master Technical Instructor b. Associate Master Technical Instructor c. Assistant Master Technical Instructor d. Technical Instructor B. Faculty Promotion. 1. Academic Ranks: a. The maximum period of probationary faculty service in non-tenured status as Instructor, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor or Professor or any combination of those ranks shall be 7 years. b. Promotion from Instructor to Assistant Professor has no minimum time requirement but will normally follow upon the completion of a terminal degree in field. c. Normally a person appointed to the rank of Assistant Professor will serve a minimum period of 5 years prior to consideration for promotion to Associate Professor, and a person appointed to the rank of Associate Professor will normally serve a period of 7 years before consideration for promotion to the rank of Professor. d. Promotion to the ranks of Associate Professor and Professor normally requires a terminal degree in field. It is expected that the criteria for award of tenure and the professional performance expectations for promotion to Associate Professor, especially the standards of scholarship, will be substantially the same. e. Promotion to the ranks of Assistant Professor, Associate Professor and Professor requires exemplary performance of the duties outlined in the policy on Faculty Responsibilities and Workload. While emphasis among the responsibilities may vary, promotion recognizes excellence in the pursuit of those responsibilities. 44


2. Technical Ranks (for faculty teaching in programs leading to an Associate degree or an Occupational Technical certificate): a. The maximum period of probationary faculty service in non-tenured status as Technical Instructor, Assistant Master Technical Instructor, Associate Master Technical Instructor, or Master Technical Instructor or any combination of those ranks shall be 7 years. b. Promotion from Technical Instructor to Assistant Master Technical Instructor has no minimum time requirement but does require an Associate Degree. c. Normally a person promoted to the rank of Associate Master Technical Instructor will have served a minimum period of 5 years and hold a Bachelor's Degree. It is expected that the criteria for award of tenure and the professional expectations for promotion to Associate Master Technical Instructor will be substantially the same. d. Normally a person promoted to the rank of Master Technical Instructor will have served a period of 7 years and hold a Master's degree. e. Promotion to the ranks of Assistant Master Technical Instructor, Associate Master Technical Instructor, and Master Technical Instructor, requires exemplary performance of the duties outlined in the policy on Faculty Responsibilities and Workload. While emphasis among those responsibilities may vary, promotion recognizes excellence in the pursuit of those responsibilities. C. Faculty promotion will be based upon evidence derived from the following: 1. A portfolio developed by the faculty member. 2. Materials related to the merit process. 3. Material associated with the annual evaluation based upon faculty responsibilities. D. Evaluation and recommendation for promotion shall proceed through both administrative and collegial channels, which will function as parallel activities. Collegial 1. Departmental Recommendation 2. College Recommendations Administrative 1. Chair's Recommendation 2. Dean's Recommendation 3. Vice President for Academic Affairs 4. President 5. Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 6. U.T. Board of Regents 45


E. The Faculty Promotion system shall follow established time lines, review levels and procedures. F. Subject to available funds, a faculty promotion shall normally include a salary increment. G. This policy and related procedures shall be subject to periodic review. 3.1.4 Faculty Probation and the Granting of Tenure A. Tenure 1. Tenure is a faculty status that assures that the faculty will be able to perform their professional institutional responsibilities without the fear of arbitrary dismissal. Tenure provides an employment framework that reinforces academic freedom and promotes a professional climate conducive to the success of the University in fulfilling its mission. 2. The decision to award tenure is the result of a collegial and administrative review of the candidate's performance, including teaching excellence, professional achievement and service. This review is conducted by a Departmental faculty committee, the Department Chair, a College faculty committee, the Dean, the Vice President for Academic Affairs, and the President. 3. Each Department in consultation with the Dean is responsible for the development of a formal statement of basic performance requirements for candidates to have met in order to be considered for tenure. Not meeting these basic performance requirements shall lead to a terminal contract. Academic tenure shall be awarded only to individuals who have clearly demonstrated excellence in meeting professional responsibilities as determined by their unique mix of teaching, service and research and who show promise of making significant contributions to the University for the remainder of their careers. Technical tenure shall be awarded only to individuals who have clearly demonstrated excellence in meeting professional responsibilities as determined by their unique mix of teaching and service and who show promise of making significant contributions to the University for the remainder of their careers. B. Probationary Period 1. The purpose of a probationary period is to allow reasonable time for faculty members to establish their academic performance and for academic evaluations to be made concerning the productivity and promise of probationary faculty. The granting of tenure is a deliberate act taken after considered evaluation of the appointee's past performance and potential for future performance. 46


2. The maximum period of probationary service in full-time tenure-track status in any academic rank or any combination of ranks shall be seven years. The minimum number of years of probationary service in full-time status in any academic rank or any combination of ranks shall be established at the time of employment. A faculty member who is serving the final academic year of the probationary period shall, upon completion of the final tenure evaluation, either be awarded tenure, which shall become effective at the beginning of the next academic year, or be notified that the subsequent year will be the terminal year of employment. Failure to act either by a probationary faculty member or by the University cannot lead to automatic tenure. Tenure status may only be granted by positive action by the Board of Regents based upon evaluation of the probationary faculty member. C. Timeline The faculty tenure procedure shall follow established time lines, review levels and procedures, and documentation based upon approved University policies. 3.2 COE Personnel Actions for Tenure and Tenure Earning Faculty The following personnel actions are a continuation of 2.2 COE Faculty Performance Guidelines, and Faculty Development Plan and Workloads of this Manual. There are six different personnel actions that affect tenured and tenure-track faculty. 1st-6th year renewal Tenure Promotion to Associate Professor Promotion to Full Professor Post tenure review Faculty Merit In addition to these six actions, faculty must submit an annual workload plan that is agreed to by the department chair and dean of the College of Education. Personnel Committees (department and school level) are not directly a part of the workload agreement process; however, including workload agreements in personnel action portfolios is necessary so that personnel committees can understand the agreed upon workload when making personnel action decisions. With the noted exception of the Annual Workload Agreement (see Appendix F), portfolios (sometimes referred to as binders or folders) should include five major sections (please see Appendix D for format): Curriculum Vita (CV) (please see Appendix E for suggested format) 47


Teaching Scholarship Service Workload Agreements (please see Appendix F for format) Within this structure, there are various ways faculty members can format their portfolios. Faculty members should try to organize their portfolios in such a way that assists members of the portfolio committees, chairs, and the Dean to easily find materials. Each section of the CV (i.e. Teaching, Scholarship, Service) can serve as a table of contents for the corresponding sections of the portfolio, and tabs/flags allow the reader to turn directly to supporting material. Supporting materials (e.g., summary of student evaluations for teaching, peer reviews, sample of publication for scholarship, certificates for service) should be included in each of the Teaching, Scholarship, and Service sections of the Portfolio. Each workload agreement for the years being considered for the personnel action should be included in the Workload Agreement section of the Portfolio. Including the Workload Agreements assists the reader in making appropriate decisions about whether or not a faculty member has met expectations for a specific personnel action. Portfolios are reviewed by the Department Personnel Committee, the COE Personnel Committee, the Chair, and the Dean. Each submits a separate decision about the portfolios. Portfolios submitted for tenure, promotion (for associate professor and full professor), and faculty merit must include a brief letter of intent to the Chair, Dean, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. This must be submitted in May of the academic year preceding the year of consideration. In addition, a detailed letter of intent (no longer than two pages) must be included with the portfolio. This letter should include a list of previous actions and should specifically define the intent of the submission and provide an overview of the most pertinent information to be considered in the portfolio. For instance, if the portfolio is to be reviewed for exceptional merit, the faculty member should define the area(s) of meritorious performance. The department secretary is responsible for providing faculty with a binder (folder) and dividers. Any faculty member seeking any personnel action, including workload plans, must submit three (3) peer reviews (one from assigned mentor, and two (2) from faculty members randomly selected, one from the department and the other from a different department within the College.) The peer review must include recommended professional development as appropriate. In addition, faculty members seeking tenure or change in rank must also submit three letters of support (one letter from outside the College, and two (2) letters from colleagues of other institutions of higher education (national or international). 48


Post tenure review will include 3 letters of recommendation from institutional colleagues and 3 letters from colleagues in other institutions of higher education (national or international). All these peer reviews and letters must be submitted to the Dean by the reviews. 3.2.1 1st – 6th Year Renewal Each tenure-track faculty member must submit a portfolio that will be reviewed to determine renewal for the next academic year. This is a separate portfolio from the one that must be submitted for the Workload Agreement and will be reviewed by the Personnel Committees, the chair, and the dean. (Please see the annual personnel action calendar for deadlines for submittal.) Deadlines for both first- and second-year faculty are in the fall semester. Third- through sixth-year faculty have an early spring semester deadline. Given that first year faculty will be submitting their portfolio in their first semester of employment, only a curriculum vita that includes current teaching assignment, committee assignments, research interests, presentation proposals and publications submitted (if any during the first semester), and any other service involvement is submitted. 3.2.2 Tenure and Post Tenure Review Tenure is described in Section 7.3.6 of the HOP which is presented in section 3.1.4 of this Manual. Faculty members typically apply for tenure in their 7th year of service. A brief letter of intent should be submitted to the dean in May of the candidate’s 5th year of service. Portfolios will be submitted in the fall of the 6th year and a decision will be made before the beginning of the 7th year. The Curriculum Vita should include each year of service at UTB. In regard to post tenure review, faculty must submit a portfolio every five years after the last personnel action. If a faculty applies and receives faculty merit, then they have 5 years from that time to the next review. Portfolios should include material from each of the five previous years since tenure was granted. The minimum requirements which are established for obtaining tenure are the same as those to obtain post tenure status, especially in terms of scholarship productivity. If the faculty does not meet the requirements established in this COE handbook, they may have a developmental plan to reach the goals during the 5 year period including the current year(s) in which the plan was developed (developmental plans cannot be more than 2 years). In any case, the post tenure review will follow the Board of Regents and the UT-System Policy. 49


3.2.3 Promotion Promotion from assistant professor to associate professor is typically applied for at the same time as submittal for tenure; however, this may not be true for all faculty (e.g., if a faculty member is hired as an associate professor without tenure). If applying for associate professor, the Curriculum Vita should include each year of service at UTB. Promotion from associate professor to full professor typically occurs no sooner than 5 years from the time of promotion to associate professor. If applying for full professor, the CV should include each year of service at UTB since the rank of associate professor was achieved. 3.2.4 Faculty Merit According to the HOP (Section 7.3.4), Faculty Merit is based upon faculty performance. A. UTB has a two-tiered system for the evaluation of faculty merit. The merit system evaluates and rewards faculty for achievement in the performance of their responsibilities and workload based upon established faculty evaluation procedures. B. The determination of meritorious service may result in an increase in the annual salary base of faculty. Faculty holding only an administrative appointment are not eligible for the faculty merit process. Department Chairs are eligible for the merit process. All other non-tenure track faculty (i.e., part-time, adjunct, teaching assistants, term contract holders, etc.) are not eligible for the faculty merit process. C. Two types of merit for faculty will be recognized 1. Merit: Evaluation for a faculty merit salary increase will take place as part of the annual professional planning/evaluation process each Spring and shall involve the faculty member, the Chair, and the Dean. Merit evaluation is tied to the performance of faculty responsibilities and workload as defined by University policies. 2. Evaluation for exceptional merit increase is initiated by the individual faculty member. It is based upon performance at an exemplary level in at least one area of responsibility, according to the criteria for exceptional performance established by the relevant department, and on meritorious performance in the other area(s). It involves a written statement identifying the specific area(s) in which exemplary performance was achieved, and is documented by a portfolio developed by the individual faculty member. Only accomplishments since the last successful personnel action may be included in the portfolio. 50


b. Evaluation for merit of faculty will be made in competition with other faculty, and recommendations will normally be made by department and College committees, chairs, and administrators. c. Faculty, including chairs, who are themselves applying for faculty merit shall not participate in evaluation of faculty merit applications either at the department or the College/School level. d. Applications for faculty merit shall not be made simultaneously with applications for tenure and/or promotion. e. Applications for faculty merit may be made simultaneously with applications for post-tenure review. D. The merit evaluation systems shall follow established time lines, review levels and procedures. E. The salary increases associated with this merit evaluation system are subject to fund availability, Regents’ Rules and policies, and state law. Faculty may submit a portfolio for consideration of Faculty Merit every year. Material in the portfolio should cover only the years since the last successful personnel action taken. These actions include tenure, promotion, post tenure review, and previous recognition for merit. A statement of intent must be included that succinctly provides an overview of why the faculty member believes she or he is deserving of merit. This letter should be no longer than two pages. Faculty should not submit for merit the same year they submit for tenure and promotion, as the maximum raise in salary per year can be only 10%, which will be covered with tenure (5%) and promotion (5%). Merit is defined as activities that go beyond the expectations of the faculty duties and responsibilities and for which the faculty member often does not receive compensation or release time. Merit will be recommended only for that faculty that “amply exceeds� academic standard accomplishments that are established in the COE Faculty Performance Guidelines of this Manual, section 2.2. Some examples of extraordinary work are publishing beyond the basic requirements within the guidelines; designing and teaching a sustained professional development initiative (e.g., institutes, courses, workshop series, or equivalent); organizing and conducting camps; distinction in service learning initiatives; teaching on-line/hybrid courses; and significant acquisition of external funds. Note: New policy on this subject is been updated by the University. At the present time, only one type of merit is considered. (March 2011)

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3.2.5 Annual workload agreement All tenured and tenure-track personnel are required to submit an Annual Workload Agreement portfolio. The Workload Agreement is a plan of professional goals for the upcoming year, (fall, spring, and summer) agreed upon by the faculty member and her or his chair (See section 2.1 of this Manual). The conference where this agreement is reviewed also provides an opportunity to review the previous year’s workload agreement. Also included in the agreement is a long-term (5 year) plan. Personnel committees are not directly involved in the annual workload agreement. Inclusion of the workload agreement in personnel action portfolios is for the purpose of assisting the personnel committees to make decisions based on the expectations established between faculty member and chair/dean as outlined in the Workload Agreement. Only the chair and dean review the workload portfolio. Tenured faculty can waive the meeting with the dean if they wish, unless the dean requests a meeting. Workload meetings are scheduled with the chair in the spring semester. However, new faculty must schedule a meeting with the mentor, department chair, and Dean during the first four weeks of their appointment. A format for the Workload Agreement is included as Appendix F. 3.3 COE Faculty Development 3.3.1 Faculty Mentorship Mentorship is a dynamic process of providing guidance and counseling for mentees at all stages in their academic careers and is intended to be a useful way of helping new faculty members adjust to their new environment. Mentoring requires building a mutually rewarding relationship, proactive participation in the different aspects of the mentee’s academic and professional life, assessment of short- term as well as long-term goals and continuous evaluation and reevaluation of goals and achievements. In the College of Education the mentorship program helps the mentee to establish an agenda for working toward her/his professional development goals and provides the necessary support to achieve his/her goals and gain insight into the realities of building an successful academic career. 3.3.1.1 Responsibility of the Mentor/Mentee The department chair is responsible for assigning the faculty mentors. The mentor (senior faculty member) is to be appointed during the first two weeks of the semester and should contact the new faculty member as soon as possible and then meet with the 52


new faculty member on a regular basis. The mentor should provide informal advice to the new faculty member on aspects of teaching, scholarly, service, committee work, university office operations and personnel etc. Often the greatest assistance a mentor can provide is simply the identification of which staff one should approach for which task. The mentor should treat all interactions and discussions in confidence. The term of the appointment for the faculty mentor to serve is one year (maximum of one additional year) with rotation to occur at the end of each year assignment. The mentor is expected to attend the mentee’s workload conference. When a mentor successfully completes the mentoring of four mentees, personnel action requests can include this as a part of service to the university. At the end of each semester a written reflective evaluation is to be completed and given to the department chair, mentee, and the dean of the College of Education. All new faculty are assigned mentors through their fifth year of employment in the College of Education. A request for a new mentor may be made by the mentee to their department chair if the need arises. A mentee with a joint appointment in the University can be assigned mentors from each department to share the duties of mentoring the faculty member. 3.3.2 Faculty Development Funding The College of Education is committed to the continuing professional development of its faculty. This is the only way that faculty can adapt to changes in their disciplines, shifting institutional priorities, and the new challenges from our various learners. Historically, professional development support has meant travel money to scholarly meetings, but its definition has now been expanded to include activities and support materials that facilitate improvements in research, teaching, and service to the educational community. Professional development support for new faculty in year one (tenured and tenure-track) will be negotiated by that faculty member and the Dean during initial contract discussions. The purpose of the individualized negotiations is to ensure, especially for appointments at the assistant professor level, that faculty begin their careers at UTB with enough support to put their careers on a trajectory of success. After the initial appointment, each tenured and tenure-track faculty member will be allocated a “minimum base� dollar amount for professional development, according to the department availability of funds. Additional monies may be allocated by the department chair. Under the current guidelines for UTB budgeting, it is not possible to carryover this money from one fiscal year to the next, but the capability to do so would constitute a long-term objective for the College. 53


To promote dissemination of research, the scholarship of teaching, and the activities associated with nationally visible service, each tenured and tenure-track faculty member may be allocated additional money based on availability of funds, if they are actively engaged in presenting papers and/or serving as officers of a nationally-recognized scholarly association. It is not possible to inventory all conceivable and legitimate applications of professional development funds. Below are some examples of what would and would not qualify for the appropriate use of such funds. The final determination of what constitutes a legitimate use of the money rests with department chairs, though a chair may appoint a faculty committee to develop departmental policy in this area. Expenditures from the allocated “minimum base� that qualify for Professional Development: Travel for presentations and scholarly meetings participation. Technology aids (web servers, scanners, digital cameras, multi-media equipment), if not covered by other funding Computer software (project management, statistical analysis.) Continuing professional education (support for courses required for relicensure or re-certification.) Scholarly books. As one can see, there are a number of things that would qualify under this expanded notion of professional development. However, there are some state-mandated restrictions within this framework. For example, while professional development funds may be applied for continuing professional education in the pursuit of re-licensure or recertification, they may not be used to pay for a license or certification renewal. Nor may such funds be used to cover the costs associated for belonging to or becoming a member of a learned society or organization. These latter two examples reflect prohibitions of using state funds for personal benefit. Two qualifying questions will help determine the legitimacy of any professional development request: (1) Will the user of such funds improve your performance as a researcher, instructor, or service leader? (If so, go to question #2) (2) Is it likely that the perception will be that you are using these funds for some personal benefit or gain? (If so, think of another use for these funds). If in doubt, seek guidance from your department chair.

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3.3.3 Course Release Request to Pursue Non Teaching Assignments 1. Submit the completed request to your department chair for review and approval (See Form in appendix G). 2. Faculty members who were granted a course release in the previous semester need to include [with the new request] documentation showing completion of the project(s) for which release time was granted. 3. Completion date (stated above) refers to deliverables, a completed written document. Work in progress or process is not a “deliverable.� 4. A request for course release time, once approved, becomes part of faculty workload and will be included in the annual evaluation. No course overloads should be given to a faculty that is granted a course release. 5. Faculty are expected to do research as part of their regular load. Research projects for which course release is considered are those that go beyond the established performance guidelines, section 2.2. Release is granted on a semester basis and renewal is contingent upon successful completion. 6. A faculty member has one calendar year to finish up a research project starting from the beginning of the semester in which the course release was granted. For example, if a faculty member receives a course release for the spring 2013 starting January 2013, then the faculty should complete the research project within one year, i.e., by January 2014. Table 1 below illustrates the course release application and research completion deadlines for the years 2012-2016. 7. For equity purposes, a faculty member who was not able to deliver the completed research or project by the deadline will be scheduled to teach a full load of courses plus the release time granted for the following semester from the targeted date of completion.

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Table 1: Course Release Application and Research Completion Deadlines, 2012-2016 If you are applying for a course release for the Spring semester starting Jan. 1st, 2013 Fall semester starting Sep. 1st, 201 3 Spring semester starting Jan. 1st, 2014 Fall semester starting Sep. 1st, 2014 Spring semester starting Jan. 1st, 2015 Fall semester starting Sep. 1st, 2015

… then the application … and the research deadline is completion deadline is st Sep. 1 , 2012 Jan. 1st, 2014 Jan. 1st, 2013

Sep. 1st, 2014

Sep. 1st, 2013

Jan. 1st, 2015

Jan. 1st, 2014

Sep. 1st, 2015

Sep. 1st, 2014

Jan. 1st, 2016

Jan. 1st, 2015

Sep. 1st, 2016

3.3.4. Assignment and Management of Graduate Assistants This document contains the procedures governing the selection and management of graduate assistants in the College of Education. These procedures do not supersede the UTB “Policies and Procedures Pertaining to Graduate Assistantships.” 3.3.4.1 Oversight The Associate Dean of the College of Education, the Director of the Office of Graduate Programs and the respective department chair oversee the selection and management of their respective graduate assistants at the College. 3.3.4.2 Selection The graduate research assistants will be selected by the respective department chair or the Director of Graduate Programs in consultation with the faculty. Although the UTB selection criteria are used, the College’s specific professional needs should be taken into account. 56


3.3.4.3 Management a. Once selected, each graduate assistant should submit his/her work schedule at the beginning of every semester (see Appendix H for the work schedule form). b. Each graduate assistant should sign-in and sign-out on the sign-in sheet every working day (see Appendix H for the sign-in sheet). c. Each graduate assistant will be assigned to faculty member(s) to do specific task(s) within an approved specific number of hours—graduate assistant is required to work a maximum of 20 hours per week in the fall and spring semesters. d. The secretary of the respective office will keep a daily log and work schedule of all graduate assistants reporting time. 3.3.4.4 Faculty a. The faculty members will be asked to submit a form indicating their research support needs and the estimated hours required to the respective department chair or the Director of the Office of Graduate Programs (see Appendix H for the faculty research support request form). b. The respective department chair and the Director of the Office of Graduate Programs will assign graduate assistants to faculty members based on the following considerations: 1. Skills/knowledge of graduate assistant that are related to the specific research needs of the requesting faculty member(s). 2. Number of projects submitted, scheduling of projects among requesting faculty members, and availability of graduate assistants. c. The faculty member will submit to the respective department chair an evaluation sheet in which he/she rates the work of the graduate student assigned to him/her (see Appendix H for the faculty evaluation sheet). A copy of this evaluation will be submitted to the Director of Graduate Programs. 3.3.4.5 Evaluation a. Retention of graduate assistants will be determined based on the following: 1. Evaluation by the supervising faculty, which is based on the completion of tasks, professional commitment, communication, and work ethic. 2. Respective department chair or Director of Graduate Programs evaluations.

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b. The evaluation will be conducted every semester. 3. The evaluation results will be shared with each graduate assistant in a meeting called by the respective department chair or Director of Graduate Programs. c. They will provide performance feedback. The evaluation form will be kept in a file in the Graduate Program Director’s office. d. For assessment purposes, each exiting graduate assistant will be asked in an exit interview to evaluate the graduate assistantship.

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION FACULTY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES MANUAL 4. Curriculum Development

4.1 UTB Curriculum Development 4.1.1 Academic Program Review According o HOP 7.6.3, the purpose of this policy is to provide for a regular review of each academic department's programs, resources, activities, educational goals, student accomplishments, and student learning outcomes at least once every six years. Departmental program review is necessary for improvement of program quality and the evaluation of program effectiveness. The process of program review is: 1. Academic departments shall participate in a program review at least once every six years. 2. The Vice President for Academic Affairs shall maintain a calendar for program reviews. 3. A program review conducted in conjunction with external accreditation or review activities shall substitute for the regular program review when appropriate. 4. The faculty of a department shall plan its program review in consultation with the dean of the college or school. 5. The program review shall normally cover program curriculum, student learning outcomes, the assessment of these outcomes, student accomplishments, and program quality and effectiveness within the context of the University’s mission. 6. The program review shall contain standard program statistics provided by the Office of Institutional Research and Planning, may contain data focused on mutually agreed upon topics with the dean, or may contain data appropriate to external accrediting review activities. 7. Assessment reports and results, including learning outcomes statements based on program assessments performed every two years, will form the content of the program review. 8. The program review and recommendations shall be forwarded for review to a Review Committee of faculty members external to the college or school including representation from the University Undergraduate Curriculum Committee and the Graduate Committee. 59


9. The Review Committee shall submit its report to the Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs and/or the Dean of Graduate Studies. 10. The Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs and/or the Dean of Graduate Studies, the college/school dean, and the chair of the Review Committee shall meet together with the department faculty to review the program review and finalize the recommendations. 11. The Review Committee submits a final report with recommendations to the Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs and/or the Dean of Graduate Studies and the Vice President for Academic Affairs. 12. Upon acceptance of the report and recommendations by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the review process shall be complete and the recommendations shall be placed in an action plan. 13. The final report and copy of the program review are forwarded to the Office of Institutional Effectiveness for monitoring progress towards compliance. 4.1.2 Curriculum Changes 1. Curriculum changes refer to any additions, deletions and/or revisions to the curriculum. Course changes, new programs, degrees, or majors are all curriculum changes. 2. Course changes, additions/deletions and revisions, normally originate with the Department faculty and are routed through the Departmental Curriculum Committee and the Department Chair to the School/College Dean and the School/College Curriculum Committee. The Dean forwards recommended changes to the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs and the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee/Graduate Committee to the Vice President for Academic Affairs for final approval. 3. After on-campus development, new degrees or programs will be sent by the President through the Academic Affairs for review in the Office of the Chancellor when those programs are at the baccalaureate or graduate levels. New baccalaureate and graduate level programs will be approved only by the Board of Regents. In both cases, proposals will be forwarded to the Coordinating Board by U.T. System Administration.

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The general procedures for on-campus curriculum changes according to HOP 7.6.3 are: 1. Curriculum change requests normally originate at the Departmental level. 2. Copies of the curriculum change request, prepared in the appropriate format, must be completed, and, after approval by the Department Curriculum Committee and by the Department Chair, submitted to the Dean. 3. The Chair and Dean shall present the proposed change to the College/School Curriculum Committee for evaluation and action. The Dean shall then review and act on the proposal. 4. Approved requests for change shall be presented by the Dean and Chair to the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee or the Graduate Committee, as appropriate, for their evaluation and action. After action at the University Committee level, curriculum change request forms will be reviewed and acted on by the Vice President for Academic Affairs and where necessary prepared for appropriate external approval processes. All new courses must be submitted to the Coordinating Board for approval by the Commissioner. 4.2 COE Curriculum Review Policies 4.2.1 Procedures for Submitting Curriculum Proposals There are deadlines imposed by the University Undergraduate and Graduate Curriculum Committees and based on the time it takes for courses and programs to go through the approval process and be placed in the official list of University courses. As a result, course and program proposals for spring and summer semesters must be submitted by the beginning of the term before they are to be listed, and course and program proposals for the fall semester must be submitted by the end of the spring term. The table that follows is generic. Every fall, the Chairperson of the University Curriculum Committee places a specific calendar of submission dates for the given academic year. This calendar cannot be altered.

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COE Generic Calendar for Submitting Curriculum Proposals Term course/program to be offered New courses/programs:

Proposal must be submitted by

Fall semester:

First Wednesday in October

Spring semester:

First Wednesday in February

Summer semester:

First Wednesday in February

Course/program changes:

Same as new courses or programs

COE Undergraduate and Graduate Curriculum Committees hold regularly scheduled meetings on the first Wednesday of each month during the academic year (September through April). Additional meetings of COE Undergraduate and Graduate Curriculum Committees may be scheduled as needed. Public hearings sponsored by COE Undergraduate and Graduate Curriculum Committees may be scheduled as needed. Announcements of additional meetings and public hearings will be posted in the College and sent to all faculty by e-mail. How COE Curriculum Proposals Move through the Approval Process A. Steps for Submitting a Proposal to COE Curriculum Committees 1. Complete the forms and accompanying documentation as specified in the University Curriculum Committees. 2. Notify Chairperson of COE Undergraduate Committee (COEUC) or COE Graduate Committee (COEGC) no later than noon of the day preceding the relevant meeting of such Committees so that your intent to present a curriculum document can be noted on the agenda. 3. One original paper copy plus one second original saved as PDF. 4. Attend the meetings of COEUC or COEGC to present your proposal and answer any questions. 5. If the proposal is approved, make sure that the Chair of the Committee and the Associate Dean and/or the Director of the Office of Graduate Programs both sign the original. 62


6. Make 1 copy of the signed original. One of these is for your records; one is to be kept by the Chairperson of the Curriculum Committee; one is for the Department Chairperson; and 1 copy are to be taken to the Dean for his/her approval and other appropriate signatures and to be sent to the University Undergraduate or Graduate Committee to be considered and approved by them. 7. If the proposal was approved with corrections/changes, make these, get the required signatures, and then bring the original to the office of the Chairperson of COEUC or COEGC no later than 5:00 p.m. on the docketing date that the University Undergraduate or Graduate Committees meets. This will guarantee that the proposal can still be included in their agenda. 8. If the proposal is for a new course or a course change, it will be published in the Bulletin/Agenda of the appropriate University Curriculum Committee. The Bulletin includes the date and time that the University Curriculum Committee will meet to decide on the courses listed in the Bulletin. If there is any possibility of a challenge, the faculty member(s) who submitted the original proposal should plan to attend the meeting of the University Curriculum Committee. The Chairperson of the COE appropriate Curriculum Committee will also represent your proposal in normal circumstances. 9. Once the proposed course(s) has received approval by the respective University Curriculum Committee, it is forwarded to the Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost for signature and subsequent submission to the appropriate external approval agency. 10. It is recommended that faculty submitting course proposals monitor the status of the proposals through the approval process. This involves checking the Curriculum Bulletin (placed in the mailboxes of all faculty) and the minutes of the University Graduate or Undergraduate Committee (also placed in faculty mailboxes). 4.2.2 Submissions to COE Graduate or Undergraduate Committees 4.2.2.1 Curriculum Forms Any faculty member wishing to: 1. Create a new course 2. Revise an existing course 3. Revise an existing program 4. Create a totally new program 63


may do so by submitting the appropriate curriculum forms to COE Graduate or Undergraduate Committees for review. Forms for new courses and for course changes can be acquired from the Office of the Dean. Program revision forms are created using the procedures outlined later in this section. 4.2.2.2 Curriculum Syllabus All new course forms must be attached to a COE Curriculum Syllabus. This is a document containing all elements required by the University and COE/NCATE Standards. (See a template from your Department). 4.2.2.3 Calendar for Submitting Proposals At the beginning of the academic year, the COE Curriculum Committees post the year's calendar for submitting curriculum proposals to the University Curriculum Committees. The calendar is posted on the COE Intranet website. Faculty members must check the calendar for exact dates of meetings of the COE Curriculum Committees and deadlines for submitting proposals to meet University Curriculum Committees, catalog and scheduling deadlines. Proposals submitted after the dates on the calendar will not make the next catalog or schedule of classes. As a general rule of thumb, faculty can use the following as a general guideline for making deadlines: 1. To get proposals approved to be included in the fall schedule of classes, proposals must be reviewed by the COE and University Curriculum Committees no later than the first week of October prior to the year of implementation. Therefore, any such proposals must be submitted to Dean’s Office for the October meeting, the first Wednesday in October. 2. To get proposals approved to be included in the summer schedule of classes, proposals must be reviewed by the COE and University Curriculum Committees no later than the first week of February prior to the year of implementation. Therefore, any such proposals must be submitted to Dean’s Office for the March meeting, the first Wednesday in March. 3. To get proposals approved to be included in the spring schedule of classes, proposals must be reviewed by the COE and University Curriculum Committees no later than the first week of February prior to the year of implementation. Therefore, any such proposals must be submitted to Dean’s Office for the March meeting, the first Wednesday in March. (Proposals for implementation in the fall semester must be submitted earlier than for the 64


other two terms because the University Curriculum Committees do not meet in the summer semester.) 4. To get any course/program changes included in the next University catalog, all curriculum approval steps must be completed by the end of April. 4.3 University Policies for Textbooks and Materials 4.3.1 Textbooks and Materials Prescribed for Student Use The University general policy and procedures establish the following four general points: 1. The individual instructor or the Department should have wide discretion in the choice of materials to be used in the courses offered by the Department. However, frequent changes in the textbooks prescribed should be discouraged and should be made only for cogent reasons. 2. Although the authorship of books, outlines, manuals and similar materials by members of the staff should be encouraged, the prescribed use of these for students is a responsibility that goes beyond that of the individual author. Where practicable and equitable, the charge for outlines, syllabi, and similar materials prescribed for the use of students should be borne by the instructional department concerned. Whenever a charge is authorized for locally copied materials, the price should be as low as possible, consistent with the payment of a fair and reasonable royalty to the author(s). 3. Any proposed change in the textbook of any course within one year from the date of first adoption shall be approved by the Department Chair having jurisdiction, and a statement of the authorization, with reasons therefore, shall be transmitted to the Dean. 4. Textbooks, notebooks, manuals, or other materials for the use of students, written or prepared by a member of the faculty, shall not be prescribed for the use of students or sold to such students until such books, notes, manuals, or materials shall have been approved with reasons stated, by the Department Chair, the Dean(s) concerned, and transmitted to the President for approval. All such requests shall indicate the proposed prices and profits, and their authorization shall be effective only to the end of the fiscal year (August 31) for which such approval has been given. 65


4.3.2 Acceptance of Money From Students There are restrictions to accepting money from students: 1. Members of teaching staffs, without prior and special approval of the Board of Regents, shall not collect from students any fees or charges to be expended for institutional purposes and shall not sell to students books, notes, or similar supplies. 2. A member of the faculty or staff of the rank of Instructor/Technical Instructor or above may not accept pay for extra instruction or teaching of students registered at The University of Texas at Brownsville. 3. With written approval by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, Teaching Assistants, and other like instructional employees below the rank of an Instructor, may accept pay from students for extra-class instruction or coaching but only in courses or sections of courses with which they have no instructional connection. Written approval from the Department Chair of the Department in which the course is offered and appropriate Dean must be granted prior to accepting pay from students for extra-class instruction or coaching.

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION FACULTY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES MANUAL 5. Human Resources and Administrative Issues 5.1 Policy on Absences and Travel 5.1.1 Travel Procedures Summary It is the purpose of this document to provide a comprehensive explanation of the requirements for (1) obtaining authorization to travel; (2) making claims for reimbursement; and (3) computing reimbursable expenses according to university policy, state rules and regulations, federal rules and regulations and Internal Revenue Service’s Guidelines, as appropriate. WHAT TO DO

WHEN TO DO IT

1. Obtain approval for travel by completing an "Application for Official Travel" form and routing it through the appropriate department account manager.

At least (30) days prior to departure.

2. When the application is approved with appropriate signature, the traveler phones faxes reservation or request, (car, hotel, rental, etc.) to the official university travel agency.

At least twenty (20) days prior to departure.

3. Traveler sends the application and, if applicable, a complete requisition for registration fees or deposits for conferences or seminars to the travel coordinator in the Purchasing Office. The university procurement card may Be used for registration fees and deposits. Note: The state will reimburse out-of-state travel only if approved in advance.

At least (21) days prior to departure.

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4. The travel coordinator will order tickets and contact the traveler when tickets are ready for pick-up in the Purchasing Office.

At least ten (10) days prior to departure.

5. The traveler will pay for all expenses out of Personal resources. The university does not allow travel advances from state appropriated or local funds. Exceptions must be true emergencies, be in the best interest of the university, and approved by the University President. The traveler must keep all required receipts. A logbook of expenses is advisable when traveling out-of-state or for several days (extended periods).

During travel.

6. The traveler must complete a "Travel Voucher" to claim reimbursement. Separate vouchers should be used for each separate "Application for Official Travel". Required receipts to be submitted include: lodging, transportation, miscellaneous expenses, and, if applicable, the original passenger receipt from the airline ticket.

Within five (5) working days after completion of trip.

A. Accountability If the steps of the travel procedures are not followed, the reimbursement may be delayed or may be denied. Reimbursement checks take at least 10-15 days after correct reimbursement documentation has been submitted to the Purchasing Office. B. Additional Information These travel procedures pertain to university employees and prospective employees. The following publications supplement these procedures. The State of Texas Travel Allowance Guide (Controller); Texas State Travel Directory (General Services Commission); Travel-N-Texas Updates (General Services Commission); Car Expenses (Internal Revenue Service); Federal Travel Regulations (General Services Administration). As is made clear in the “Application for Official Travel Form�, faculty members engaging in official travel must arrange to have their missed classes covered by other faculty members. (See Appendix I.) REVISE HOP on Travel and ask your Department secretary for additional requirements. 68


5.1.2 Absences from Regular Duties and Classes Authorization for any member of the faculty to be absent from usual and regular duties will be granted only under the following conditions: 1. When such absence is on state business, and 2. When appropriate provisions are made to carry on the duties of the absent person without additional expense to the institution; or 3. In the case of military leave, not to exceed 15 working days each year. Authorization For Absences From Assigned Classes: 1. A faculty member who is unable to meet classes on the day and hour scheduled for reasons other than illness, conferences or professional meetings must secure prior authorization from the Department Chair, Dean, and the Vice President for Academic Affairs. 2. When advance notice is not possible, it is the responsibility of the faculty member to inform the Department Chair immediately of the impending absence. The Department Chair shall have the responsibility to make arrangements for the assigned classes and other duties. University policies and procedures concerning approved absences include the following: 1. Leave of Absence Without Pay 2. Sick Leave 3. Employee Leave - Other Leaves With Pay a. Jury duty leave, b. Appearances as a witness, c. Death in the family, d. National Guard duty, e. Military reserve training, and f. Volunteer firefighter training. 4. Absences for Conferences and Professional Meetings (Academic Affairs)

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5.1.3 Policy on Absences for Academic Meetings The following policy and procedures are adopted to provide for the uniform treatment of requests by faculty and staff in Academic Affairs to be absent from their assigned duties to attend conferences and professional meetings. 1. The University of Texas at Brownsville may authorize absences for members of the faculty and staff to attend conferences and professional meetings when such attendance will enhance the prestige (and/or development) of the University, contribute to personal professional development and/or lead to the advancement of knowledge in their professional field. 2. Absences from the employee’s academic or administrative unit under these conditions are not considered as a leave of absence, but rather a part of the individual’s regular activities. Authorization: 1. Request for such absences should be initiated at least ten working days in advance of the date of departure. The request shall normally be approved in the following sequence: Department Chair, Dean/Director of the respective College/School and Vice President for Academic Affairs. 2. Absences involving travel to foreign countries other than Canada and Mexico require prior approval by the President and the Governor of Texas. Such a request for foreign travel must be submitted sixty days prior to departure. 3. Absences for conferences and professional meetings normally should be scheduled to avoid being absent from the University during critical periods of operation. The registration period at the beginning of a semester and the final examination period at the end of a semester are examples of critical periods of operation. 4. Reimbursement of travel and expenses incurred in attending conferences and professional meetings shall be governed by University policy and procedure providing for approved travel. 5. Authorization to be absent from assigned duties must be obtained whether or not reimbursement for travel is expected. 6. Absences from assigned duties shall be unauthorized unless granted in accordance with this document or any University policies and procedures providing for leave.

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5.1.4 Policy on Sick Leave The purpose of this policy is to set forth rules governing employee sick leave. 5.1.4.1 Applicability and Review This policy applies to all regular employees. A regular employee is one who is employed to work at least 20 hours per week for a period of at least four and onehalf months, excluding students employed in positions, which require student status as a condition for employment. 5.1.4.2 Sick Leave Accrual and Carry Forward 1. Regular full-time employees earn sick leave at the rate of 8 hours per month or fraction of a month of employment. Regular part-time employees earn sick leave in the same proportion as their FTE%. 2. Sick leave earned but not taken in one fiscal year shall be carried forward to the next fiscal year without limit. 5.1.4.3 Statement of Sick Leave Accrual Balances 1. An employee listing showing each employee's sick leave balance shall be sent to each account manager in September, January, and May of each fiscal year. This report shall be prepared and sent by the Human Resources Office. 2. A statement of each employee's accrual balance is also included in each employee's statement of earnings (pay stub). Each employee is responsible for bringing alleged discrepancies to the attention of the Human Resources Office. 5.1.4.4 Intra-University and Inter-Agency Transfers of Sick Leave 1. An employee's sick leave balance is not affected by intra-agency transfers. The department to which the employee transfers must accept the employee's sick leave balance. 2. Employees who transfer to The University of Texas at Brownsville from another State agency without break in employment may transfer their sick leave balances. The University must accept liability for the employee's sick leave balances.

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5.1.4.5 Sick Leave Settlements (Death of Employee Only) 1. The estate of an employee who dies while employed by the University shall be paid 1/2 of the deceased employee's unused sick leave up to 336 hours, provided that the employee was continually employed with the State for at least six (6) months at the time of death. 2. Except in cases in which the business of the University would be substantially disrupted, sick leave settlements will be paid from the account in which the deceased employee last worked. 5.1.4.6 Taking Sick Leave 1. An employee may take sick leave when sickness, injury, pregnancy or confinement prevent the employee's performance of duty or when the employee is needed to care and assist a member of his immediate family who is actually ill. In this context, immediate family is defined as those individuals related by kinship, adoption, marriage or foster children who are so certified by the Department of Human Services who are living in the same household or if not in the same household are totally dependent upon the employee for personal care or services on a continuing basis. 2. An employee who must be absent from work because of illness shall notify his/her supervisor or cause him/her to be notified at the earliest practicable time. 5.1.4.7 Proof of Illness 1. Proof of illness is not normally required for absences of three working days or less, however, the University reserves the right to require proof of illness for any absence regardless of duration. 2. Proof of illness is required for all absences of more than three continuous working days. Proof of illness shall be in the form of a doctor's certification stating the cause or nature of the illness, or some other written statement of the facts concerning the illness which is acceptable to the employee's supervisor. 3. If available at the time the time cards or absence reports are prepared, the proof of illness should be attached to the appropriate time report and submitted to the payroll department, otherwise, it should be submitted as soon as practicable thereafter.

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5.1.4.8 Reporting Sick Leave - Staff Employees 1. Sick leave taken by exempt staff/nonexempt classified and administrative staff is reported on the University's Staff Absence Report form. 2. Sick leave taken by non-exempt employees is also recorded on The University of Texas at Brownsville Time Card. Instructions for reporting an absence is explained on the Time Card. 5.1.4.9 Reporting Sick Leave - Faculty Employees 1. Sick leave taken by faculty employees is reported on The University of Texas at Brownsville Faculty Absence Report which is prepared by the department head or his or her designee. 2. It is the department head's responsibility to require faculty employees within his or her department to report sick leave even though no classes were missed if the absence occurred during the normal workday of regular employees. 3. The amount of sick leave shall not exceed 40 hours per week and shall be determined according to the following guidelines. In situations not covered by these guidelines, the department head shall determine an appropriate amount to charge based on the FTE attributable to the time missed. 4. If a faculty employee's class schedule is evenly distributed between Monday, Wednesday, and Friday (MWF) and Tuesday and Thursday (TT), he or she should charge 4 hours of sick leave for each session missed up to a maximum of 8 hours each day. 5. If a faculty employee's classes are more heavily concentrated in MWF or TT (e.g. three or more classes on MWF and only one class on TT), he or she should charge 4 hours of sick leave for each session missed up to a maximum of 12 hours in the days of greater concentration. 6. A faculty employee whose class schedule includes night classes which meet only once each week, should charge 8 hours of sick leave for each session missed. 5.1.4.10 Review This policy and procedure shall be reviewed annually by the Vice President of Academic Affairs and the Director of Human Resources, by June 15th.

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5.1.5 University Policy for Leave of Absence 5.1.5.1 Faculty Developmental Leave With Pay 1. This type of leave is designed to enable faculty members to engage in professional practice designed to add to their knowledge or to the body of knowledge in their discipline; to study, conduct research and write; to prepare for performance; and to engage in other activities appropriate to his or her discipline. 2. Upon recommendation of the President and approval of the Board of Regents, fulltime faculty who have been employed by The University of Texas at Brownsville for at least two consecutive academic years at half regular salary or for half an academic year at full regular salary. A faculty member who has been granted a developmental leave shall not be eligible for consideration for a subsequent paid leave until seven (7) years of full-time service have elapsed. 3. No more than four percent of The University of Texas at Brownsville faculty members may be on faculty developmental leave at any one time. The University goal is to have approximately three percent of the faculty on development leave. 4. Faculty developmental leave will be provided on a funds available basis. 5.1.5.2 Leave of Absence Without Pay 1 A leave of absence without pay for up to one year may be granted to a faculty member by the President for the purpose of study, research, travel, service engagement in professional practice and/or personal reasons. 2. A faculty member shall become eligible for a leave without pay after three (3) years at The University of Texas at Brownsville. Time in service as a part-time faculty member shall not be counted toward leave of absence without pay eligibility. 3. A leave of absence without pay shall not be granted initially for longer than the end of the fiscal year in which the leave begins. A second consecutive year of leave of absence without pay requires the approval of the Board of Regents and will only be granted under unusual circumstances, such as military service, reasons of health, continued graduate study, or public service that reflects favorably on the University and enhances an individual's ability to make subsequent contributions to the University. 4. For tenure-track probationary faculty, a leave of absence without pay shall neither count as credit toward time in the probationary period nor constitute a break in service. 74


5.1.5.3 Leave With Pay An employee will be granted leave with pay under the following circumstances: 1. Death of Immediate Family The death of an employee's spouse, or the death of an employee's or spouse's parent, brother, sister, grandparent, grandchild, or child. The leave shall be for not more than three (3) working days unless the President determines that the circumstances justify a longer period of time. 2. Jury Service When summoned for jury service, the period of leave shall be for those work days, or work hours during a work day, that the employee is required to be in attendance for the jury selection process and for jury service, if selected. The employee's immediate supervisor must be provided a copy of the jury summons and, if selected, proof that the employee served on a jury. Any fee payable in connection with a jury summons or jury service may be retained by the employee. 3. Appearance as a Witness a) A period of leave shall be granted when an employee is called to appear in an official capacity as a witness in a court proceeding or a legislative investigation, provided that no witness fee is received for such appearance. Mileage and per diem for expenses incurred in appearing as an official witness may be accepted if no claim for such expense is made against the State. The period of leave shall include the time reasonably necessary to prepare for such appearances as well as the time actually spent in the proceeding or investigation. b) If an appearance as a witness in a court proceeding or a legislative investigation is not in an official capacity but to testify from personal knowledge or as an expert concerning matters at issue in the proceeding or investigation, the preparation for such appearance and the appearance must be during a period that the employee is on vacation or leave without pay. 4. Voting When the employee is unable to vote either before or after work hours, a reasonable time shall be authorized during work hours to permit the employee to vote. 5. Blind Employee Training Employees who are blind within the meaning of Section 91.002(2), Texas Human Resources Code, will be provided not more than ten (10) work days in a fiscal year to attend a training program to acquaint the employee with a seeing-eye dog that will be used by the employee. 75


6. Foster Parents Employees who are the foster parent of a child under the conservatorship of the Department of Human Services are entitled to time off on work days to attend meetings with Department of Human Services personnel regarding the foster child, or to attend an Admission, Review and Dismissal meeting with school district personnel regarding the foster child. 5.1.5.4 Military Leave Leave with pay will be permitted pursuant to State and federal laws. 5.1.5.5 Emergency Leave with Pay The President may grant an emergency leave with pay upon determining that the facts and circumstances presented by the employee justify such leave. 5.1.5.6 Other Absences 1. Absences for conferences and professional meetings are not considered leaves of absence, but part of a faculty member's regular activities. Permission for these absences shall be granted in accordance with established procedures. 2. Absence for illness is covered by general University personnel policies and procedures. 5.1.5.7 Accrual of Sick Leave Faculty members will continue to accrue sick leave during any period of leave with pay. 5.1.5.8 COE Addendum on Leave with Pay (sabbatical leave): 1. Department Chairs are expected to ensure that the number of faculty absent on academic leave does not exceed what is appropriate to the Department's size and needs and that the entitlement to Sabbatical Leave is given precedence over other types of absence. To aid Chairs with planning ahead and to integrate requests for sabbatical leave and buy-out, it is recommended that members of academic staff should normally give at least 12 months' notice to their Chairs/Director of their intention to apply for sabbatical leave - i.e. 12 months' notice in advance of the beginning of the academic semester in which the leave will occur, not the date of 76


commencement of the leave itself. Staff should comply with any departmental deadlines for leave applications that may be in place. The precise timing of sabbatical leave depends on the possibility of making satisfactory arrangements for the work of faculty on sabbatical leave to be carried on by their colleagues as part of their work in the College. It is generally expected that colleagues will cover the duties of faculty on sabbatical leave (overload funds will be available) but it is accepted that the expertise of the member on leave will not necessarily be replicated within the department and that in these circumstances replacement expertise will have to be bought in. In these circumstances the Chair may request allocation of replacement instructional funds. 2. By the end of the eight weeks following their return to the College, recipients of sabbatical leaves must file written accounts of their sabbatical activities and accomplishments with their Chair/Director, Dean, and the Vice-President for Academic Affairs. These reports must be accompanied with satisfactory evidences and should detail sabbatical activities, deviations from the approved proposal, related accomplishments, and any comments or suggestions. Such reports will become a permanent part of the faculty record. If the faculty member fails to present satisfactory evidence that the plan for the leave of absence with pay was fully completed with, then "the faculty member shall forfeit all benefits" (salary, etc.) to which the faculty member would otherwise have been entitled under the conditions of the leave. 3. A faculty member who accepts leave with pay agrees as a condition to return to University duties for at least two academic years or the equivalent following the leave. If the faculty member fails to return to employment, the University shall forfeit all benefits to which the employee would otherwise have been entitled under the conditions of the leave. If illness or disability prevents return to service, such illness or disability is subject to verification by the University. 5.2 Other Issues and Services 5.2.1 Policy on Faculty External Employment It is the purpose of this policy to provide guidelines for outside faculty employment. Outside employment is construed as any activity performed by a member of the faculty, other than fulfilling employment obligations at The University of Texas at Brownsville, for which remuneration is received. (See Appendix J). 1. Members of the faculty are not discouraged from accepting appointments of consultative or advisory capacity with governmental agencies, industry, or other 77


educational institutions when such activity results in the development and improvement of professional skill through the application of those skills in practice in non-academic setting. 2. Members of the faculty are cautioned against accepting regular employment outside The University of Texas at Brownsville which might detract from their professional involvement and development or which might detract from their abilities to meet their professional duties and responsibilities. 3. Conflict of interest with employment obligations at The University of Texas at Brownsville must be avoided in all instances of outside employment. 4. Any outside employment which may intrude upon the academic functions of teaching, scholarly activities, and service to the institution is prohibited. 5. No faculty member shall be employed in any outside work or activity or receive from an outside source a regular fee or salary until a description of the nature and extent of the employment has been filed and approved. Any proposed outside employment involving continuing and repetitive activities must be approved in advance by the faculty member’s Chair, Dean, and the Vice President for Academic Affairs and the President. Any proposed outside employment which involves activities of a non-continuing and non-repetitive nature, such as consultation activities, must be approved in advance by the faculty or staff member’s Chair, Dean and the Vice President for Academic Affairs. 6. Even in the case of members of the faculty specifically engaged only in residence work, there exists an obligation, usually intermittent, to furnish expert knowledge and counsel for public benefit free of charge, provided that the meeting of this obligation by a faculty member does not interfere with his or her regular duties, and provided further that in meeting this obligation a faculty or staff member on full-time duty shall avoid undue competition with legitimate private agency 7. No member of the faculty engaged in outside remunerative activities shall use in connection therewith the official stationary of The University of Texas at Brownsville, or give as a business address any building or Department of The University. 8. No member of the faculty shall accept employment or any position of responsibility if the discharge of such employment or responsibility will be antagonistic to the interest of the State of Texas or the System or any of the component institutions. 9. Every member of the faculty who gives professional opinions must protect the System and/or The University of Texas at Brownsville against the use of such opinions for advertising purposes. That is, when the faculty member does work in a private capacity, the faculty member must make it clear to those who employ him or her that the work is unofficial and that the name of the System and/or The University of Texas at Brownsville is not in any way to be 78


connected with the faculty member's name, exception being made of the name of the author attached to books, pamphlets, articles in periodicals and firm, tapes and/or software. 10. No member of the faculty shall accept pay from a private person or other party for work of a routine character, which involves the use of property owned by The University of Texas at Brownsville, unless advance permission has been obtained from the Vice President for Academic Affairs and provision has been made for compensation to the University. 5.2.2 Summer Teaching This document from HOP is to state the University policy regarding summer school employment for faculty with nine-month appointments. 5.2.2.1 Employment 1. A faculty member employed on a nine-month contract has neither a contractual right nor an obligation to teach summer school. 2. Summer school employment may be offered to qualified faculty members. Teaching assignments will be based on the nature of the subject matter involved, needs of the Department and students, and available resources. 3. Part-time faculty may be recommended by the chair for summer school employment as follows: a. When the department chair determines that no full-time faculty member has the special expertise required to teach the course b. When no qualified full-time faculty member is available to teach the course. c. When the qualified full-time faculty member is needed more to teach another course. 4. Normally faculty will teach no more than two courses a summer. 5.2.2.2 Summer Salaries For full-time faculty, the salary for teaching up to six credit hours or its equivalent shall be one-thirty-sixth of the nine-month salary per credit hour with a cap of $2,000 per credit hour for Assistant Professor, Instructors, Assistant Master Technical Instructors and Lecturer; $2,500 per credit hour for Associate Professor, Associate Master Technical Instructors and Senior Lecturers; and $3,000 per credit hour for full professors and Master Technical Instructors. The total for six credit hours or its 79


equivalent is not to exceed $12,000, 15,000, and 18,000 respectively. Courses taught beyond the first six hours will be compensated at the part-time instructor rate. Faculty teaching classes in the long summer session will receive additional compensation 5.2.2.3 Scheduling 1. Programmatic and student needs shall determine each department’s summer courses schedule. Courses should have sufficient enrollment to be offered and taught. Each department is responsible for scheduling such summer courses. 2. In general, a full-time faculty member shall not be given multiple teaching assignments if such assignments prevent another qualified faculty member from teaching in at least one summer session. 3. Courses should have sufficient enrollment to be taught. 5.2.2.4 Faculty Summer Responsibilities Shall Include: 1. Office Hours. Faculty will normally maintain a minimum of two (2) office hours per week for each three (3) hour course taught during the session in which he or she is teaching. 2. Academic Advising. Each full-time faculty member will normally carry an assigned share of advisees during the session in which he or she is teaching. 5.2.3 Parking Permits and Phone Calls For obtaining a parking permit, please visit the following website: http://www.utb.edu/ba/police/Parking/Pages/Permits.aspx for details. If you are eligible for a handicap parking permit, your permit is free. For obtaining a 4-digit long distance authorization code Download an Equipment Service Request Form from the following website: https://team.utb.edu/sites/helpdesk/Knowledge%20Base/VoIP%20Telephone%20Syste m.aspx . Under ‘Description of work to be done’, fill in your request for a pin number for making work related long distance calls from your office telephone. Hand this in to your department chairperson for approval. These are the procedures for making a phone call from your office - To another extension on campus: enter the four digit extension number only.

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- To a local area number: enter a “9” to get an outside dial tone; enter the 7 digit phone number - To a local plus (local long distance, i.e., Valley) number: enter a “*5”; enter the 7 digit phone number. - To a long distance number: enter a “9” to get an outside dial tone; enter a “1” to indicate a long distance call; enter the area code of the number you are calling; enter the 7 digit phone number; after a 2 second pause, enter your 4 digit long distance authorization code. 5.2.4 Requesting/Returning Keys and Electronic Entrance Cards 1. To obtain the necessary keys and electronic entrance cards for the office, hallway, or lab, contact your departmental secretary with a formal request. The following link will give access to the key request form: http://wtce.utb.edu/proc_forms.htm. 5.2.4.1 Requesting Keys & Electronic Entrance Cards: 1. Go to your departmental secretary and request keys and electronic entrance cards for access to hallways, offices, or computer labs. 2. The departmental secretary shall submit the request to the Physical Plant of the University. The issuance of keys and electronic entrance cards usually takes about 2 weeks. 3. Faculty must adhere to the terms and conditions stated in their policy statement. This is a confirmation form that must be signed upon receiving keys and electronic entrance cards. 5.2.4.2 Returning Keys & Electronic Entrance Cards: In the event you leave the COE, all your keys and electronic entrance cards must be returned to your departmental secretary who will forward them to Physical Plant. If you loose a University key you need to report the lost to the Campus Police in order to get a replacement.

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5.2.5 Obtaining Information/Computer Resources 5.2.5.1 Work orders to Information Resources 1. In the event of a malfunction (computer, email, phone, etc.), notify the Information Resources Department via e-mail (helpdesk@utb.edu) or by phone (882-HELP), or 2. Have your departmental secretary submit a work order to the Information Resources Department with a brief description of the problem. 5.2.5.2 E-mail accounts and Web accounts Visit the website http://ir.utb.edu/support.html and go to the subsection ‘Activate your email Faculty/Staff’ for the electronic form with which to request an email account. For a web account (your own webpage), go to the subsection ‘Web account request Faculty/Staff’. 5.2.5.3 Software 1. The information resources department will not provide you with software that is not available in the department. Special purchases of software are generally not possible due to budget constraints. It may be possible to make such purchases only under rare circumstance such as when the costs are shared between your department and the Information Resources Department. In most cases, it is up to your departments to purchase necessary software. 2. Usage of certain software such as SPSS requires the reservation of a classroom-lab in the library because these may be installed in but a limited number of computers on campus. 5.2.5.4 Software Licensing All software in UTB’s computers must be used in accordance with applicable software licenses: 1. The University of Texas at Brownsville will provide a sufficient number of cost-effective, licensed copies of core business software to enable faculty and staff to perform their work in an expedient and effective manner. 2. Systems administrators have the right to remove software from The University of Texas at Brownsville computers for cause. For example, if a user is unable to 82


show proof of license, or if the software is not required for university business purposes and causes problems on the university owned computer. 3. All responsible departments or entities will periodically audit all computers to inventory all installed software. 4. All University of Texas at Brownsville departments are responsible for the accurate accounting of software purchased by the department and must ensure that the installation of the software complies with the license agreement of the software. For audit purposes, departments must maintain proof of purchase and/or original installation media for each software package. 5.2.5.5 Internet Use The University of Texas at Brownsville network Users must adhere to prudent and responsible Internet practices to mitigate risks associated with the Internet. The following practices are required: 1. 2.

3. 4. 5.

Software and operating systems utilizing the university network are expected to be kept updated and to have features that enhance network security enabled. Content on all University of Texas at Brownsville departmental Web sites must relate to university business, research, service, and/or academics and must be approved by the appropriate department or entity publishing the information. Purchases for The University of Texas at Brownsville handled via the Internet are subject to The University of Texas at Brownsville procurement rules. Personal commercial advertising must not be posted on University of Texas at Brownsville Web sites. All confidential, personally identifiable, protected health information, certain financial data, or certain student data transmitted over any network must be encrypted.

5.2.6 Reserving a Classroom and Contacting the HR Department Contact your Department secretary to reserve a University classroom. COE Conference rooms are not designated for classroom use. They only serve for departmental meetings, faculty committee meetings, faculty presentations and other special events. Keys are only available at the Dean’s Office and should be reserved in advance during office hours. The Dean’s Conference room can only be used if all other COE conference rooms are not available. 83


To contact the University’s Human Resources Department: Phone: (956) 882-8205 Fax: (956) 882-7476 Internet: http://www.utb.edu/ba/hr/Pages/default.aspx The Human Resources Department provides the support system that enables recruitment of qualified faculty, administrators, and staff as well as providing for their compensation, benefits and training in order that they have the support services necessary to carry out their responsibilities. 5.2.7 Faculty/Staff Identification Card Each faculty and staff member is required to have a University identification card bearing his/her picture and employee number. Full-time, part-time, and retired faculty and staff may obtain the identification cards at the library. Faculty and staff may be required to present a University identification card on campus or at University-sponsored functions.

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION FACULTY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES MANUAL 6. Ethical Standards and Academic Citizenship

6.1 UTB Code of Conduct The purpose of the UTB Code of Conduct is to communicate an expectation of ethical conduct to all UTB employees. Responsibility for ethical conduct is a personal responsibility and every employee will be held accountable for his or her conduct. The Code of Conduct is a framework within which all employees are expected to operate. Although the Code of Conduct addresses a number of specific issues, it should not be regarded as a comprehensive listing of compliance issues. Instead, the Code of Conduct should be regarded as a guiding principle that applies to everything that we do. 6.1.1 Code of Conduct Conflicts of Interests: Officers, faculty, and employees (collectively “employees�) of The University of Texas at Brownsville may not have a direct or indirect interest, financial or otherwise, that is in conflict with the proper discharge of their duties. Potential conflicts of interest must be disclosed. Adherence to Law: Employees shall adhere to applicable laws, rules, regulations, and policies of governmental and institutional authorities. The failure to do so will be grounds for disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment. Gifts: No employee shall accept or solicit any gift, favor, or service that might reasonably appear to influence the employee in the discharge of duties. (Making or receiving gifts, including honoraria, may constitute a criminal offense under certain circumstances.) Confidential Information: No employee shall disclose confidential information or use such information for his or her personal benefit.

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Self-Dealing: No employee shall transact any business in an official capacity with any business entity of which the employee is an officer, agent, or member, or in which the employee owns a substantial interest. Personal Investments: No employee shall make personal investments that could reasonably be expected to create a conflict between the employee's private interest and the public interest. Outside Employment: No employee shall accept other outside or dual employment or compensation that could reasonably be expected to impair the employee's independence of judgment in the performance of the employee's public duties. (Outside employment is further limited by other policies, laws, and regulations that are in the preceding section of this Manual). Sexual Harassment and Misconduct: Sexual misconduct and sexual harassment are unacceptable behaviors. Such unacceptable behavior includes verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature. Incidents of sexual misconduct or sexual harassment should be reported to the office charged with reviewing such complaints where the incident occurred. The above policy is summarized from Part One, Chapter III, Section 4.8, Regents' Rules and Regulations. 6.1.2 Ethics Policy 1. Officers, faculty, and employees of UTB may not have a direct or indirect interest, financial, or otherwise of any nature that is in conflict with the proper discharge of the officer’s or employee’s duties. 2. Officers, faculty, and employees shall timely furnish such written disclosures as may be required by state and federal authorities or by System requirement. 3. All officers, faculty, and employees shall adhere to the laws, rules, regulations and policies of applicable governmental and institutional authorities and the following standards of conduct. The failure to do so may be grounds for disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment. 4. No employee shall accept or solicit any gift, favor, or service that might reasonably tend to influence the employee in the discharge of his or her official duties or that the employee knows or should know is being offered with the intent to influence his or her official conduct. 86


5. No employee shall intentionally or knowingly solicit, accept, or agree to accept any benefit for having exercised his or her official powers or performed his or her official duties in favor of another. 6. No employee shall accept employment or engage in any business or professional activity that the employee might reasonably expect would require or induce the employee to disclose confidential information acquired by reason of his or her official position. 7. No employee shall disclose confidential information gained by reason of his or her official position or otherwise use such information for his or her personal gain or benefit. 8. No employee shall transact any business in his or her official capacity with any business entity of which the employee is an officer, agent, or member, or which the employee owns a substantial interest. 9. No employee shall make personal investments that could reasonably be expected to create a substantial conflict between the employee’s private interest and the public interest. 10.No employee shall accept other employment or compensation that could reasonably be expected to impair the employee’s independence of judgment in the performance of the employee’s public duties. 11.Sexual Harassment and Misconduct: The educational and working environments of the System and its component institutions should be free from inappropriate conduct of a sexual nature. Sexual misconduct and sexual harassment are unprofessional and acceptable. UTB shall adopt policies prohibiting sexual harassment and sexual misconduct and procedures for review of complaints. These policies and procedures shall be reviewed by the Executive Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs or the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, as appropriate, and shall be published in the Handbook of Operating Procedures of each component. Specific questions about the ethics policy should be directed to your supervisor, Ethics Officer, or compliance hotline, as appropriate. 6.2 Code of Ethics and Standard Practices for Texas Educators Statement of Purpose The Texas educator shall comply with standard practices and ethical conduct toward students, professional colleagues, school officials, parents, and members 87


of the community and shall safeguard academic freedom. The Texas educator, in maintaining the dignity of the profession, shall respect and obey the law, demonstrate personal integrity, and exemplify honesty. The Texas educator, in exemplifying ethical relations with colleagues, shall extend just and equitable treatment to all members of the profession. The Texas educator, in accepting a position of public trust, shall measure success by the progress of each student toward realization of his or her potential as an effective citizen. The Texas educator, in fulfilling responsibilities in the community, shall cooperate with parents and others to improve the public schools of the community. 1. Professional Ethical Conduct, Practices and Performance. Standard 1.1. The educator shall not intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly engage in deceptive practices regarding official policies of the school district, educational institution, educator preparation program, the Texas Education Agency, or the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) and its certification process. Standard 1.2. The educator shall not knowingly misappropriate, divert, or use monies, personnel, property, or equipment committed to his or her charge for personal gain or advantage. Standard 1.3. The educator shall not submit fraudulent requests for reimbursement, expenses, or pay. Standard 1.4. The educator shall not use institutional or professional privileges for personal or partisan advantage. Standard 1.5. The educator shall neither accept nor offer gratuities, gifts, or favors that impair professional judgment or to obtain special advantage. This standard shall not restrict the acceptance of gifts or tokens offered and accepted openly from students, parents of students, or other persons or organizations in recognition or appreciation of service. Standard 1.6. The educator shall not falsify records, or direct or coerce others to do so. Standard 1.7. The educator shall comply with state regulations, written local school board policies, and other state and federal laws. 88


Standard 1.8. The educator shall apply for, accept, offer, or assign a position or a responsibility on the basis of professional qualifications. Standard 1.9. The educator shall not make threats of violence against school district employees, school board members, students, or parents of students. Standard 1.10. The educator shall be of good moral character and be worthy to instruct or supervise the youth of this state. Standard 1.11. The educator shall not intentionally or knowingly misrepresent his or her employment history, criminal history, and/or disciplinary record when applying for subsequent employment. Standard 1.12. The educator shall refrain from the illegal use or distribution of controlled substances and/or abuse of prescription drugs and toxic inhalants. Standard 1.13. The educator shall not consume alcoholic beverages on school property or during school activities when students are present. 2. Ethical Conduct Toward Professional Colleagues. Standard 2.1. The educator shall not reveal confidential health or personnel information concerning colleagues unless disclosure serves lawful professional purposes or is required by law. Standard 2.2. The educator shall not harm others by knowingly making false statements about a colleague or the school system. Standard 2.3. The educator shall adhere to written local school board policies and state and federal laws regarding the hiring, evaluation, and dismissal of personnel. Standard 2.4. The educator shall not interfere with a colleague's exercise of political, professional, or citizenship rights and responsibilities. Standard 2.5. The educator shall not discriminate against or coerce a colleague on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, age, gender, disability, family status, or sexual orientation. 89


Standard 2.6. The educator shall not use coercive means or promise of special treatment in order to influence professional decisions or colleagues. Standard 2.7. The educator shall not retaliate against any individual who has filed a complaint with the SBEC or who provides information for a disciplinary investigation or proceeding under this chapter. 3. Ethical Conduct Toward Students. Standard 3.1. The educator shall not reveal confidential information concerning students unless disclosure serves lawful professional purposes or is required by law. Standard 3.2. The educator shall not intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly treat a student or minor in a manner that adversely affects or endangers the learning, physical health, mental health, or safety of the student or minor. Standard 3.3. The educator shall not intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly misrepresent facts regarding a student. Standard 3.4. The educator shall not exclude a student from participation in a program, deny benefits to a student, or grant an advantage to a student on the basis of race, color, gender, disability, national origin, religion, family status, or sexual orientation. Standard 3.5. The educator shall not intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly engage in physical mistreatment, neglect, or abuse of a student or minor. Standard 3.6. The educator shall not solicit or engage in sexual conduct or a romantic relationship with a student or minor. Standard 3.7. The educator shall not furnish alcohol or illegal/unauthorized drugs to any person under 21 years of age unless the educator is a parent or guardian of that child or knowingly allow any person under 21 years of age unless the educator is a parent or guardian of that child to consume alcohol or illegal/unauthorized drugs in the presence of the educator. Standard 3.8. The educator shall maintain appropriate professional educator-student relationships and boundaries based on a reasonably prudent educator standard.

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Standard 3.9. The educator shall refrain from inappropriate communication with a student or minor, including, but not limited to, electronic communication such as cell phone, text messaging, email, instant messaging, blogging, or other social network communication. Factors that may be considered in assessing whether the communication is inappropriate include, but are not limited to: (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi)

the nature, purpose, timing, and amount of the communication; the subject matter of the communication; whether the communication was made openly or the educator attempted to conceal the communication; whether the communication could be reasonably interpreted as soliciting sexual contact or a romantic relationship; whether the communication was sexually explicit; and whether the communication involved discussion(s) of the physical or sexual attractiveness or the sexual history, activities, preferences, or fantasies of either the educator or the student. 6.3 College of Education Ethical Standards

6.3.1 Teaching, Scholarly Work and Service in the College of Education "As teachers, the professors encourage the free pursuit of learning of their students. They hold before them the best scholarly standards of their discipline. Professors demonstrate respect for students as individuals and adhere to their proper roles as intellectual guides and counselors. Professors make every reasonable effort to foster honest academic conduct and to assure that their evaluations of students reflect each student’s true merit. They respect the confidential nature of the relationship between professor and student. They avoid any exploitation, harassment, or discriminatory treatment of students. They acknowledge significant academic or scholarly assistance from them. They protect their academic freedom." (American Association of University Professors Statement, 1966; Revised, 1987.) As educational professionals, ethics, integrity and honesty characterize our actions. We actively participate in the transmission and advancement of knowledge through teaching, research and service. While we carry out our obligations within legal regulations and internal policies of the University and the College of Education, we realize that our behavior must also be governed by reasonable expectations of our students, colleagues, and the community that we serve. In particular: 91


One of our primary responsibilities is to educate our students or learners and to prepare them for lifelong learning, which is imperative for a successful career and for learning to be. Thus, we: Provide learners with a class environment free from bias and cultural prejudice; Interact with them professionally; assess them in a high reliable manner; Provide them with prompt feedback on their achievements; Contribute to their cognitive, affective, physical and ethical development; Provide mentorship for educational and professional achievement; Serve as role models of teacher conduct. Our colleagues, including our administrative support staff, are essential to our development and mission. Thus, we: Treat each other with respect and are open to other viewpoints; Agree to disagree and be polite Value and protect intellectual work; Encourage all our colleagues to engage in positive and respectful behavior toward one another; Refrain from malicious gossip about our colleagues; Support a professional work environment for our colleagues; Promote academic citizenship and cooperative behavior. We support the administrators who are committed to our lifelong professional and personal development. Thus, we: Provide prompt and honest feedback to their initiatives; Work with them to accomplish the College’s mission and goals; Treat then with professionalism; Evaluate their performance in a fair and non-capricious manner. We support our community-at-large. Thus, we: Provide it with programs that are relevant, accessible and high quality; Devote to participatory governance, human dignity, tolerance and respect for the environment; Promote College social responsibility by engaging in community work, service learning, civic engagement; Serve for a College of Education Sustainability future; Promote good citizenship by participating in volunteer work.

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The integrity of the faculty-student relationship is the foundation of the University’s educational mission. This relationship vests considerable trust in the faculty member, who, in turn, bears authority and accountability as mentor, educator, and evaluator. The unequal institutional power inherent in this relationship heightens the vulnerability of the student and the potential for coercion. The pedagogical relationship between faculty member and student must be protected from influences or activities that can interfere with learning consistent with the goals and ideals of the University. Whenever a faculty member is responsible for academic supervision of a student, a personal relationship between them of a romantic or sexual nature, even if consensual, is inappropriate. Any such relationship jeopardizes the integrity of the educational process. (University of California at Berkeley Code of Conduct.) These are some examples of unacceptable conduct: 1. Failure to meet the responsibilities of instruction, including: a) Arbitrary denial of access to instruction; b) Significant intrusion of material unrelated to the course; c) Significant failure to adhere, without legitimate reason, to the rules of the faculty in the conduct of courses, to meet class, to keep office hours, or to hold examinations as scheduled; d) Evaluation of student work by criteria not directly reflective of course performance; e) Undue and unexcused delay in evaluating student work. 2. Discrimination, including harassment, against a student on political grounds, or for reasons of race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, ethnic origin, national origin, ancestry, marital status, medical condition, status as a covered veteran, or, within the limits imposed by law or University regulations, because of age or citizenship or for other arbitrary or personal reasons. 3. Violation of the University policy, including the pertinent guidelines, applying to nondiscrimination against students or learners on the basis of disability. 6.3.2 Faculty Conflict Resolution/Grievance Procedure The faculty grievance procedure is intended to provide a method for resolving complaints of faculty arising out of the employment relationship in a timely, efficient and equitable manner, without prejudice, discrimination, or malice toward the person initiating the action. 93


The complaints of all faculty members may be considered under this policy. There is an informal procedure by which the faculty member shall orally present the complaint to the Department Chair or administrative equivalent or other administrator who made the decision or took the action that is the subject of the complaint for discussion, consideration and resolution within ten (10) work days from the date the faculty member is notified of the decision or action. The person to whom the complaint is presented must respond orally or in writing within ten (10) work days after the receipt of the complaint. The faculty member also has the option of contacting the Academic Senate appointed faculty ombudsman for conflict resolution or mediation. The Formal Faculty Grievance Procedures listed below are an abbreviated version of the complete Formal Faculty Grievance Procedures. The detailed Formal Faculty Grievance Procedures may be found in their entirety in the HOP Section 7.7.7. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Procedures for submitting a complaint in writing to the Department Chair. Procedures for a written appeal to the Department Chair. Procedures for appealing in writing to the Vice President of Academic Affairs. Procedures for appealing to a Special Hearing Tribunal. Special Hearing Tribunal procedures and findings. Submission of Special Hearing Tribunal written findings on the material facts and a recommendation to the President. 7. President reviews the official record and recommendations and makes a decision on the grievance and notifies all parties of the President’s decision. 8. The President’s decision and ruling is final.

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Appendix


COLLEGE OF EDUCATION FACULTY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES MANUAL Appendices Appendix A: Example of an Academic One-Year Work for Faculty Teaching Primarily Graduate Courses (Minimum Performance) For an Assistant Professor seeking Tenure and Promotion to Associate Professor or for a Tenured Associate Professor seeking Positive Post-Tenure Review COE Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies The University of Texas at Brownsville

TEACHING FALL 2012 SPED 6305: Measurement and Test Interpretation SPED 6306: Selected Topics in Special Education: Behavior Management SPED 6309: Diagnosing Academic Problems SPRING 2013 SPED 6301: Psychology of the Exceptional Child SPED 6302: Educating Children with Learning and Behavior Problems SPED 6303: The Bilingual Child with Special Needs SSUMMER 2013 SPED 6301: Psychology of the Exceptional Child (Summer I) SPED 6309: Diagnosing Academic Problems (Summer II) SPED 6303: The Bilingual Child with Special Needs (Long Summer) Office Hours A minimum of five hours scheduled A minimum of three hours by appointment Advising Advisor for approximately 40 undergraduate special education students. Advisor for approximately 30 graduate special education students. 95


Program Development Revised undergraduate program to reflect new state standards. Recruitment and Retention Attended two student recruitment visits. Contacted past undergraduate students to recruit them to graduate programs. TExES Preparation Analyzed benchmark scores and prescribed a program of study for each student. Conducted group and individual preparation sessions prior to the benchmark. Comprehensive Exam Preparation Provided feedback on practice questions. Conducted preparation sessions prior to exam. Professional Development 2008, March 24-27. American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting. New York. 2008, February 29. National Association for Chicana and Chicano Studies Tejas Regional Conference. McAllen, TX. 2007, October 14. Workshop on reading strategies for English language learners. Higher Education Collaborative. Austin, TX. SCHOLARSHIP Publications Journal Articles García, A., & Doe, J. (in press). Resource room teachers’ perspectives about inclusion. Learning Disabilities Forum. Newsletter Articles Doe, J. (2008). The special educators’ role in response-to-intervention models of instruction. Texas Council for Exceptional Children Newsletter. Textbook Supplements Doe, J. (2008). Companion Website and chapter PowerPoint presentations for Title of Book. Publisher.

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Presentations Doe, J., & Martin, J. (2008, April 4). Special education referral practices in one border community. The Council for Exceptional Children Annual International Convention. New York. Doe, J. (2008, June 23). Nondiscriminatory assessment practices for L2 learners suspected of having learning disabilities. Texas Council for Exceptional Children. Houston, TX. Doe, J., & GarcĂ­a, A. (2008, April 13). Early signs of learning disabilities in pre-K children. 10th Annual Binational Conference. Brownsville, TX. Current Research Mitchell, M., Doe, J., & Williams, K. (2008). Curriculum-based measures of writing validated with English language learners with learning disabilities. This study involves the use of multiple CBMs in writing to assess English language learners identified as having learning disabilities. Criterion-related validity of the measures will be determined by correlating results with broader measures of writing that have previously been validated. SERVICE To the Profession Reviewer for a professional journal Service on a state organization committee To the University Disability Services Advisory Committee Undergraduate Curriculum Committee To the College of Education Undergraduate Curriculum Committee To the Department Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Search committees for faculty positions To the Community Served on planning committee for the BISD/UTB joint Annual Parent Conference Served on BISD committee on prereferral intervention processes Volunteered for BISD Buddy Fun Meet 97


Appendix B: Example of an Academic One-Year Work for Faculty Teaching Primarily Undergraduate Courses (Minimum Performance) For an Assistant Professor seeking Promotion to Associate Professor COE Department of Health and Human Performance The University of Texas at Brownsville

Current Assignment I taught 4 courses during the spring 2012 semester involving 100 undergraduate students, 2 courses during the summer I session involving 40 students, and 4 classes in the fall semester involving 100 students. I also continued to develop a summer camp program on the UTB campus in order to develop civic engagement opportunities for HHP student majors. Teaching FALL 2012 KINE 3302.60 – Kine. Curriculum for Elem. School Students KINEU 2255.61 – Health & Motor Development KINE 3301.60 – Psychology of Sport KINE 3356.60 – Motor Development

(25 Students) (25 Students) (25 Students) (25 Students)

SPRING 2013 KINEU 2304.60 – Outdoor Education KINE 4356.60 – Motor Development

(20 Students) (20 Students)

SUMMER 2013 KINE 4356.60 – Motor Development (Summer I) KINEU 2255.60 – Health & Motor Development (Summer II) KINE 3356.60 – Motor Development (Long Summer) Materials Developed developed homework packet for KINE 3302 continued to revise TExES review packet develop a study/lab packet for students in KINE 4356

(25 Students) (25 Students) (25 students)

Program Development Continue to revise and implement annual summer camp program, and increase involvement of HHP majors in the instruction of camp participants. 98


Scholarship Presentations Doe, J. (2008). National Conference Presentation (e.g., school district, private school, parent organization, UTB COE conference, etc.) Doe, J. (2008). State Professional Conference Publication (Research Article) Doe, J., and Smith, M. (2008). Publication in refereed journal; e.g., Applied Research in Coaching and Athletics Annual. Current Research Smith, M. and Doe, J. (2008), Understanding the importance of practice on FITNESSGRAM performance. To be submitted in the Journal of the Texas Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance (TAHPERD). Doe, J. and Jones, S. (2008). Using Homework in Physical Education. To be submitted to The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance. Service To the Department Served on search committee for faculty positions Served department personnel committee Served on department curriculum and graduate program planning committee Served on department committee reviewing plans for the new building

To the College of Education COE Personnel Committee COE Anniversary Celebration Committee To the University University Athletic Academic Committee REK Advisory Council To the Profession Served (and continue to serve) as a reviewer for a professional journal (Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science) Chair of the Outdoor Education section of TAHPERD 99


Served as a member of the Research Consortium of my National Professional Organization To The Community Provided an informative lecture dealing with physical fitness and autism to the Parent’s of children attending the “We-Smile” program in the B.I.S.D. Provided the following professional development 8hr workshop: Brownsville ISD Physical Educators (Summer 2008) – Understanding and Implementing the New State Mandates for Physical Education Grants and Funding Procured $5000 College of Education grant for research project Currently seeking foundation funding for research project

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Appendix C: Profiles of Faculty Responsibilities at Different Levels Faculty Teaching Primarily Graduate Doctoral Level Courses Although most faculty members teach a mix of levels (undergraduate and graduate), the following profile outlines what might be considered typical for someone teaching at least three doctoral courses in a particular semester. Teaching those doctoral courses would involve considerable preparation as well as reading papers to help students develop higher levels of academic writing. Teaching doctoral students also involves a great deal of individual advising. To the degree possible, graduate faculty teaching primarily doctoral courses should find opportunities to involve students in their research and present and/or publish with them. In order to teach doctoral students well, faculty need to be not only current in their field but interdisciplinary up to date. It will be expected that graduate faculty involved in doctoral programs would present at conferences and publish scholarly articles, chapters, and books on a regular basis since graduate faculty should have a national reputation. In the area of service, graduate faculty would be expected to be involved with national organizations. They might also serve as outside evaluators for tenure and promotion of faculty from other institutions. Graduate faculty teaching only graduate courses are also expected to serve on department and College level committees and engage in a variety of other service opportunities where appropriate. All graduate faculty teaching primarily graduate courses should be members of the doctoral committee and should be involved in selecting and advising students for the master and doctoral programs. Finally, such faculty will chair and serve on master thesis dissertation committees. Also, it is desirable that graduate faculty teach an undergraduate course periodically to practice higher education teaching at all levels and to benefit undergraduate students with his or her expertise. In addition, graduate faculty teaching primarily master courses are charged with the task of providing opportunities to graduate students to expand their knowledge and skill base, as well as to providing opportunities for students to explore and challenge their beliefs about effective education of diverse students and their beliefs about current systems and how to advocate for change. Master’s level students have completed their initial studies of their specific field culminating in their undergraduate degree. Most Master’s students are working in the field and have some experience from which to draw when studying a more specific area in their field for their Master’s program. Faculty brings to light connections between theory and practice in a way that would be more difficult for undergraduate students to understand, given undergraduate students’ relative lack of classroom 101


experience. To some degree, graduate faculty teaching mainly in doctoral programs, graduate faculty also help master students bridge the gap between practice and theory. In other words, they provide their students with opportunities to conduct research (often action research) that contributes to the theoretical base. Students should be expected to receive a broader knowledge and skill base in regard to evidence-based practices. Graduate faculty work to improve the quality of their students’ critical reading, writing, and presentation skills. A primary goal of Master’s programs is to improve the level of discourse to a higher level of professionalism. Faculty involved in this graduate level advise their students about potential programs of study and help them schedule courses to complete their program in a timely manner. Another major responsibility is to prepare their students for comprehensive exams and state certification exams, where appropriate, and to mentor those students who select a thesis option in lieu of comprehensive exams. Graduate faculty assists in the preparation and administration of the comprehensive exams and other academic related matters. In order to provide their students with knowledge of best practices, graduate faculty engaged in master level courses must stay current in the field by attending conferences, reading professional literature, and engaging in the scholarly discourse of research, presentation, and publication. In addition, they should maintain membership in and participate, on occasion, in national and state level professional organizations. Graduate faculty teaching are also expected to serve on department and College level committees and engage in a variety of other service opportunities where appropriate. Faculty Teaching Primarily Undergraduate Courses Although most faculty members teach a mix of levels (undergraduate and graduate), the following profile outlines what might be considered typical for someone teaching at least four undergraduate courses. Faculty teaching primarily undergraduate courses provide prospective teachers with initial opportunities to explore the broader field of education in addition to the specific field they choose to enter. A broad array of knowledge and skills must be explored to prepare preservice teachers with the minimal standards necessary to enter into the teaching profession. Faculty provide their students with scaffolded experiences via instruction and class assignments necessary to grasp the various roles and responsibilities of teachers, including legal mandates, and to understand a variety of research-based best practices in assessment and instruction. Undergraduate students need many practical experiences to prepare them for initial entry into the classroom as in-service teachers. Classroom management skills, including instructional and behavior management skills, are an essential aspect of 102


undergraduate education curricula. Faculty at this level will typically provide instruction and feedback to more students than faculty teaching graduate courses, although the expectations for time committed to course preparation, individual mentoring and advising, and degree of feedback are typically thought to be less than at the graduate level (as expectations for time commitment at the Master’s level are typically thought to be less than at the Doctoral level). The number of students per course and the time commitment varies, as some courses are field based and others involve new preparation. Advising at the undergraduate level varies from program to program, but undergraduate faculty are expected to assist College of Education advisers in guiding their students to proper course selection and a timely completion of their program. Undergraduate faculty also must stay current in the field in order to teach the foundation of minimal knowledge and skills needed by their students. Faculty stay current by reading professional literature, attending conferences and workshops, and engaging in scholarly opportunities such as research, publication, and presentation. In addition, they should maintain membership in and participate, on occasion, in national and state level professional organizations. Undergraduate faculty are also expected to serve on department and College level committees and engage in a variety of other service opportunities where appropriate. Faculty teaching field-based courses may be given a reduced course load (See the following responsibilities). Faculty Teaching load for Lecturers and Field-Based Teaching Specialists Although most faculty members teach a mix of levels (undergraduate and graduate), the following profile outlines what might be considered typical for lecturers, field based teaching specialists and tenure/tenure track faculty. Several of the courses required of students pursuing a career in education require students to complete a significant portion of their coursework on area public school campuses. These activities require a variety of situations of field-work including classroom observations, working with public school students in small groups under the supervision of both the public school mentor teacher and the lecturer or field based teaching specialist from the university. The following are activities and responsibilities of lecturers/ field-based teaching specialists and tenure/ tenure track faculty: (1) design and implement academic lessons and presentations, (2) provide evaluation and feedback through classroom assessments and benchmark testing, (3) implement classroom teaching strategies, (4) plan and implement classroom management techniques. Additional instructional activities and responsibilities include: (1) develop curricular materials, (2) design and develop evaluation instruments and tutoring materials, (3) organize workshops, tutoring, seminars, orientations, and conferences, (4) develop materials for student in cooperation with 103


teachers/interns, (5) plan and develop student learning outcomes and strategic goals for the instructional program, (6) establish relationships with area school districts to select campuses and mentor teachers to ensure appropriate and meaningful placement for field-based students/student teachers, (7) organize and maintain appropriate documents required by the Texas Education Agency for accreditation, (8) provide academic advising to establish high expectations and selection of appropriate courses to ensure the completion of their program in a timely manner, (9) establish working relationships to coordinate the implementation and assessment of the field-based and student teaching components with other faculty, district mentors, university supervisors, and administrators, (10) work a total of forty hours per week. Finally, lecturers/field-based teaching specialists and tenure/ tenure track faculty in addition to their responsibilities, must stay current by reading professional literature, attending conferences and workshops, and engaging in scholarly opportunities. In addition they should maintain membership in various national and state level professional organizations.

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Appendix D: Portfolio Format (Basic) A suggested format for the Curriculum Vita (the first section of the portfolio) is included below. The part of the CV that corresponds with each of the sections of Teaching, Scholarship, and Service can be included at the beginning of these sections, serving as a table of contents for each section. Following this, a philosophical/personal statement for each section (Teaching, Scholarship, and Service) is customary. Finally, supporting materials should be included for each section. Section 1: Complete Curriculum Vita (for the period of time pertaining to the personnel action) Section 2: Teaching CV portion covering Teaching Philosophical/personal statement re: Teaching Supporting documentation o Peer observations o A summary of student evaluations o Documentation of teaching awards Section 3: Scholarship CV portion covering Scholarship Philosophical/personal statement re: Scholarship Supporting documentation o For presentations, a copy of the first page of conference proceedings and the page that lists the presentation o For publications, a sample of work (e.g., article manuscripts); faculty should not include every complete publication, but may wish to include one complete publication and the first two pages and the last two pages (Conclusion section) of additional publications Section 4: Service CV portion covering Service Philosophical/personal statement re: Service Supporting documentation o Certificates of participation and thank you letters, if received Section 5: Workload Agreements (see Appendix F for format) 105


It is very important that you pay close attention to the compiling of your portfolio. It does make a difference how you preset yourself in your portfolio binder. At a minimum, your binder should include the following: 1. A complete and up-to-date CV 2. A letter to the Dean and the committees summarizing your key accomplishments since your last submission in each of the areas: Teaching, Scholarship, and Service. 3. A philosophy statement at the beginning of each of the three sections. 4. The charts required by the COE handbook carefully and thoughtfully completed following the guidelines you find on pages 32-33, 35-36 and 3738. These must be included. 5. If your workload agreement includes a course release, this should be mentioned in your summary letter and documented in the binder. 6. Support documentation of scholarship. You need only include first and last pages of journal articles and book chapters. The pages of the journal should clearly show what the journal and issue is on a footer or header. Include a title page of a book if a book chapter. Newsletters also need to show at least the first and last pages of the contribution and information about the publications. 7. Pages from conference booklets with your presentations highlighted 8. Only critical e-mail or regular mail correspondence such as notification that an article has been accepted (but not yet published) or an e-mail thanking you for some service contribution.

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Appendix E: Curriculum Vita Format (Basic) The following outline is intended to serve as a guideline for the Curriculum Vita. APA format should be followed. I. Degrees (Doctorate, Master’s, Bachelor’s) II. Employment history (academic and professional) III. Teaching responsibilities a. Courses taught b. Program (and curriculum) development c. Advising d. Personnel management (recruitment and retention) e. Dissertation and/or Thesis committees f. TExES and Comprehensive Exam preparation g. Professional Development IV. Scholarship a. Publications (listed chronologically beginning with the most recent) i. Books (authored and edited) ii. Chapters contributed to books iii. Journal articles: (1) Peer reviewed, and (2) Non peer reviewed iv. Monographs v. Newsletter contributions vi. Unpublished manuscripts b. Presentations (these can be outlined by the level of the conference, as below, or listed continuously) (listed chronologically beginning with the most recent) i. International and National ii. State iii. Local c. Grants (provide an explanation of responsibilities for grants) d. Ongoing Research (provide a brief explanation of research projects) e. Paid and Unpaid Workshops V. Service a. Service to the profession b. Service to the Institution i. University committees ii. College of Education committees iii. Department committees c. Service to the community

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Appendix F: Annual Workload Agreement Plan The Annual Workload Agreement plan contains the following: Workload Agreement presented at the previous year’s workload conference CV for the previous calendar year (fall, spring, and summer semesters) Workload Agreement for the current calendar year (fall, spring and summer semesters) Student evaluations—a summary for each semester and/or course (fall, spring and summer of previous year) Peer observations—non-tenured faculty should include a minimum of 1 observation per semester 2 and 5 year plans Other supporting documentation (e.g., conference proposals, acceptance letters) Workload Agreement Format The Annual Workload Agreement format includes a section for teaching, scholarship, and service. Following is the required format. I. Teaching a. Course load i. Spring of current year (list courses beneath this heading) ii. Fall of upcoming school year (list courses beneath this heading) b. Office hours—8 hours per week i. 5 hours scheduled ii. 3 hours by appointment c. Academic Advising/retention i. Undergraduate advising ii. Graduate advising d. Program Development/Recruitment (list goals/duties beneath this heading) e. TExES Preparation (list goals/duties beneath this heading) f. Evaluation (list different kinds of evaluations for your teaching; for example, student evaluations and peer observations) g. Professional Development (list goals beneath this heading) II. Scholarship (list scholarship goals beneath this heading) III. Service 108


a. Professional Service (list service beneath this heading) b. Institutional Service/Committees i. University (list committees/service) ii. College of Education (list committees/service) iii. Department (list committees/service c. Community Service (list service beneath this heading) Medium (2 year plan) and Long-Range Development Plan (5 year plan) format The Annual Workload Agreement portfolio includes a five-year plan of goals for the faculty member. The format for this plan is: I. Teaching—the faculty member should list a variety of long-range goals that he or she believes will improve his or her teaching. (Included in this will be goals to improve skills as an instructor, program development goals, and professional development goals.) II. Scholarship—the faculty member should list long-range goals for scholarly outcomes. This should include goals for publication (e.g., submit X manuscripts per year for publication in peer reviewed educational journals) and presentation. III. Service—the faculty member should list long-range goals for service to the profession, Institution, and community.

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Appendix G: Form To Be Completed for Course Release Request

College of Education Course Release Form Faculty Name: ________________________ Rank: _______________________________ Tenured: _________ Tenure-Track: _______ Request is for: ___ Fall ______ Year ___ Spring ______ Year ___ Summer ______ Year

Policy on course release is based on UTB regulations and in the COE Faculty Policies and Procedures Manual, Faculty Development 3.3.2 and other regulations that are applicable. [Approved request is contingent upon sufficient course coverage in the department]

Information needed: Describe the project/s for which you are requesting a course release. Explain the link between the project(s) and maintaining currency in your teaching area. Identify the grant goals or publication target of your research study, i.e., name of t he national/international conference, refereed scholarly or practitioner journal article, book, etc. (Please attach appropriate documentation)

Start date:

Completion date:

Faculty Signature: ____________________

Approved______

_______

Not Approved ______

Department Chair

Approved______

Date: ___________

Date ____________

Not Approved ______

Dean College of Education

Date ______________

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Course Release If requesting a course release, describe the project(s) intent.

Explain the link between the project/s and maintaining currency in your teaching area.

Identify the grant goals or publication target of your research study, i.e., name of the national/international conference, refereed scholarly or practitioner journal article, book, etc. (Please attach appropriate documentation)

According to the College of Education Faculty Policies and Procedures Manual, under 3.3.2 COE Faculty Development, pg, 53. For equity purposes, a faculty member who was not able to deliver the completed research or project by the deadline will be scheduled to teach a full load of course plus the release time granted for the following semester from the targeted date of completion.

Faculty Signature

Date

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Appendix H: Forms for Selection and Management of Graduate Assistants The University of Texas at Brownsville College of Education Graduate Assistants Sign-In Sheet

Name

Sign In

Sign Out

112

Sign In

Sign Out


The University of Texas at Brownsville College of Education Graduate Assistants Work Schedule First Name

Last Name

Monday

Tuesday

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Wednesday

Thursday

Friday


The University of Texas at Brownsville College of Education Graduate Assistants FACULTY RESEARCH SUPPORT REQUEST Semester________ Year______ Faculty name:__________________________________________________ Contact numbers: Phone:___________ Email:______________________________ Specify your research support needs: _______________________________________________________________

Estimated total number of hours needed to complete the task(s) by the graduate assistant: _______________ Faculty signature:________________________________ Date: _____________________ Please submit this form to the Director of the Office of Graduate Programs (Space below to be filled out by the Office of Graduate Programs)

Name of graduate assistant assigned: _____________________________________________ Tasks assigned and number of hours needed:________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Signature of the Director or Dept. Chair:____________________________ Date: ____

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The University of Texas at Brownsville College of Education PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF GRADUATE ASSISTANTS Semester______ Year_______ Faculty name: _______________________________________________________ Name of graduate assistant: __________________________________________ Nature of research assignment: __________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ Date of employment at COE: ______________________ Graduate Program_________ Number of years in the program: ________ Faculty: Based on the criteria below, please use your professional judgment and rate the graduate assistant assigned to you. Excellent Very Good Poor Good Completes tasks and assignments in timely fashion Is professional in interacting with faculty and staff Has effective communication skills Attends work on a regular and scheduled basis Overall performance Comments: _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ Signature of the supervising faculty: __________________________ Date: ________ Concurrence of Department Chair or Director of the Office of Graduate Programs (concurs or does not concur and reasons) (Write on another page, if needed):

Department Chair _______________________________________________ or, Graduate Program Office Director___________________________________

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Appendix I: Sample Form for Application for Official Travel

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Appendix J: Form for Outside Employment Request

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Appendix K: Table of Contents of UTB Handbook of Operating Procedures (HOP) In compliance with the Rules and Regulations of The University of Texas (UT) System Board of Regents, The University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) has prepared rules and regulations for the governance of the University in the form of the UTB Handbook of Operating Procedures (HOP) Policies. These rules and regulations are subject to the approval of the UT System Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, and they should not conflict with any part of the UT System Board of Regents’ Rules and Regulations. If a conflict arises between any provision in the UTB HOP Policies and any provision in the UT System Board of Regents’ Rules and Regulations, the provision in the UT System Board of Regents’ Rules and Regulations will take precedence. Provisions within the UTB HOP Policies are periodically modified by UTB. Any proposal to create or revise a provision in the UTB HOP Policies must first be submitted through the appropriate council and/or administrative reviews, and receive approval from the UT System Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. The UTB Business Affairs Division records the appropriate review channel and division for each policy, and tracks the off-campus processing of the policies. Once policy modifications have been approved by all appropriate channels, a campus-wide email will be sent by the UTB Business Affairs Division to all faculty and staff, notifying them of the changes. A copy of the UT System Board of Regents’ Rules and Regulations is available for review and/or copying in the following locations: offices of the deans and colleges, the vice presidents, the President, the University library, and online at http://www.utsystem.edu/bor/rules.htm/. 
 A copy of the UTB HOP Policies is available online at http://www.utb.edu/ba/HOP/. For further information regarding UTB HOP Policies, please contact the UTB Business Affairs Division at (956) 882-8240. 1 2 3

4. 5.

History of The University of Texas at Brownsville in Partnership with Texas Southmost College The University of Texas at Brownsville Mission Statement, Philosophy Statement and Partnership Statement (as approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board) Non-Discrimination Policies 3.1 Non-Discrimination Policy 3.2 AIDS, HIV, and HBV (or Hepatitis B) 3.3 Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct 3.5 Consensual Relationships 3.6 Sexual Offense 3.10 Accommodations for Individuals with Disabilities Not Available on the Web Administration 5.1 President 5.1.1 Administrative Authority and Responsibility of the President 5.1.2 Organization of the President's Office 5.1.4 Administrative and Non-Academic Committees and Councils 5.1.5 The University of Texas at Brownsville Audit Charter 5.1.6 Policies and Procedures Internal Audit Committee UTB 5.2 Vice President for Academic Affairs 5.2.1 Purpose and Responsibilities/Vice President for Academic Affairs 5.2.2 Organization of the Academic Affairs Office 5.2.4 Academic University Committees and Councils 5.2.5 Academic Strategic Planning Committee 5.2.6 University Computing and Technology Committee 5.2.7 Sponsored Programs Committee 5.2.8 Institutional Review Board (IRB - Human Subjects)

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5.3

5.4 5.5 5.6

5.7 5.8

5.9

5.10

5.11

6

5.2.9 Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee 5.2.10 Undergraduate Curriculum Committee 5.2.11 Graduate Committee 5.2.12 Biological, Chemical, and Radiation Safety (BCRS) Committee Vice President for Business Affairs 5.3.1 Purpose and Responsibilities/Vice President for Business Affairs 5.3.2 Organization of the Business Affairs Division Provost 5.4.1 Purpose and Responsibilities/Provost Vice President for Institutional Advancement 5.5.1 Purpose and Responsibilities/Vice President for Institutional Advancement Vice President for Student Affairs 5.6.1 Purpose and Responsibilities/Vice President for Student Affairs 5.6.2 Organization of the Student Affairs Division 5.6.4 Responsibilities/Organization of the Director of Athletics Partnership Committees 5.7.1 Partnership Committees Vice President for Partnership Affairs 5.8.1 Purpose and Responsibilities/Vice President for Partnership Affairs 5.8.2 Organization of the Partnership Affairs Division Vice President for External Affairs 5.9.1 Purpose and Responsibilities/Vice President for External Affairs 5.9.2 Organization of the Division of External Affairs Chief Information Officer 5.10.1 Purpose and Responsibilities/Chief Information Officer 5.10.2 Organization of the Information Technology Services Division Vice President for Research 5.11.1 Purpose and Responsibility/ Vice President for Research 5.11.2 Organization of the Research Division 5.11.3 University Research Council 5.11.4 Research Centers and Institutes

Students 6.1 Student Financial Assistance Policies 6.1.1 Emergency Tuition and Fees Loan 6.1.2 Texas Public Educational Grants 6.1.4 Competitive Academic Scholarships 6.1.5 Options to Pay Tuition and Mandatory Fees by Installment 6.1.7 Financial Aid Office Application Process, Policies and Procedures 6.1.9 Collection of Tuition 6.2 Academic Rights and Responsibilities 6.2.1 Academic Standards and Student Records Committee 6.2.2 Satisfactory Academic Progress 6.2.3 Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 6.2.4 Excused Student Absences 6.2.5 Student Identification Cards 6.2.6 Compliance with Federal Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act 6.2.7 Student Health Services 6.2.8 Student Grievances 6.3 Student Conduct 6.4 Student Discipline 6.4.1 Disciplinary Code 6.4.2 Disciplinary Hearing and Appeals Procedure 6.5 Campus Life and Student Organizations 6.5.1 Recognition and Approval of Student Organizations 6.5.2 Policy on Student Sponsored Activities 6.5.3 Student Service Fee Advisory Committee

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6.5.5 6.5.6 6.5.8 7

Student Organization Statement of Policy Student Publications Policy for Newspaper Distribution on Campus

Faculty 7.1 Recruitment 7.1.1 Recruitment and Hiring of Faculty 7.1.2 Appointment of Consultants 7.2 Appointments 7.2.1 Academic Titles 7.2.2 Graduate Faculty 7.2.3 Appointment of Adjunct Faculty 7.2.4 Emeritus Faculty 7.3 Planning, Development Evaluation, Tenure, Promotion and Merit 7.3.1 Faculty Responsibilities and Workload 7.3.2 Faculty Development Plan 7.3.3 Student Evaluation of Instruction 7.3.4 Faculty Merit 7.3.5 Faculty Promotion 7.3.6 Faculty Probation and the Granting of Tenure 7.3.7 The University of Texas at Brownsville Academic Senate Constitution 7.4 Faculty Employment Policies 7.4.1 Academic Freedom/Responsibility 7.4.2 The Greater Duties of a Member of the Teaching Staff 7.4.3 Faculty Classroom Responsibilities 7.4.4 Summer School Employment 7.4.5 Absences from Regular Duties and Classes 7.4.6 Absences for Conferences and Professional Meetings (Academic Affairs) 7.4.7 Leave of Absence 7.4.8 Faculty Outside Employment 7.4.9 Faculty Files 7.4.10 Commencement 7.4.11 Oral English Proficiency for Teaching Personnel 7.4.13 Academic Budget and Finance Review Committee 7.4.15 Faculty Service on Outside Boards 7.5 Selection Role and Evaluation of Deans and Chairs 7.5.1 Selection of Department Chairs and Academic Program Directors 7.5.2 Role and Responsibilities of Department Chairs 7.5.3 The Dean of a College/School 7.5.4 Procedure for Selection of Academic Deans 7.5.5 Evaluation and Development of Academic Administrators 7.5.6 Centers and Institutes 7.6 Curriculum and Programs 7.6.1 Academic Program Review 7.6.3 Curriculum Changes 7.6.4 Short Course Guidelines 7.6.5 Special Admission Category for Non-Degree Students 7.6.6 Acceptance of Money from Students 7.6.7 Textbooks and Other Materials Prescribed for Student Use 7.7 Resignation, Retirement, Non-Reappointment, Termination and Grievances 7.7.1 Faculty Resignation/Retirement 7.7.2 Non-Reappointment of a Non-Tenured, Tenure-Track Faculty Member 7.7.3 Termination of Employment of a Faculty Member for Good Cause 7.7.4 Termination of Employment of a Faculty Member Due To Financial Exigency 7.7.5 Misconduct in Research and Creative Activities 7.7.6 Policy and Procedures for promoting Objectivity in Research by Managing, Reducing

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8

9

10

or Eliminating Conflicts of Interest 7.7.7 Faculty Grievance Procedure 7.7.8 Periodic Comprehensive Performance Evaluation of Tenured Faculty 7.7.9 Compensation for Teaching Continuing Education Courses 7.7.10 Full-time Staff Teaching Academic or Technical Courses 7.7.11 Extension of Tenure Track Probationary Period The University of Texas at Brownsville Compensation Policies 8.1 Classified Personnel Pay Plan 8.2 Employment Policies 8.2.2 Working Hours and Rest Periods 8.2.3 Personnel Files 8.2.4 Personnel Record Changes 8.2.5 Longevity and Hazardous Duty Pay 8.2.6 Prior State Service and Interagency Transfers 8.2.7 Time Records, Paycheck, Payday 8.2.8 Staff Outside Employment 8.2.9 Termination of Employment and Re-Employment 8.2.10 Grievance Policy 8.2.11 Discipline and Dismissal of Employees 8.2.12 Non-Academic Personnel Attending University Courses 8.2.14 Progressive Discipline 8.2.15 Employee Service Recognition Awards 8.2.17 Family and Medical Leave Act 8.2.18 Staff Senate of The University of Texas at Brownsville 8.2.19 Probationary Period 8.2.20 Staff Exceptional Merit Award System for UTB/TSC 8.2.21 Drugs and Alcohol Policy 8.2.22 Policy on Drug and Alcohol Testing (Certain Holders of Commercial Drivers' Licenses) 8.2.23 Consulting and Professional Service 8.2.24 Fraudulent or Dishonest Activities 8.2.25 Criminal Background Checks For Security Sensitive Positions 8.2.26 Hiring of Foreign Nationals 8.2.27 Overtime 8.3 Absences, Leaves and Holidays 8.3.2 Sick Leave 8.3.3 Sick Leave Pool 8.3.6 Holidays 8.3.7 Hiring Procedures 8.3.8 Promotion and Transfer Procedure 8.3.9 Reduction in Force 8.3.11 Return to Work Program University Benefits 9.1 Retirement 9.2 Athletic Events at The University of Texas at Brownsville General Policies and Procedures 10.1 Regents General Policy Statements 10.1.1 Board Authority and Delegation 10.1.2 Authority of Institutional Documents 10.1.3 Appointment of Relatives - The Nepotism Rule 10.1.4 Official Name, Logos, Seals and Colors 10.1.5 Official Report Copies for Institutional Research 10.1.6 Texas Public Information Act 10.1.7 Rules of Conduct Pertaining to the Confidentiality of Social Security Numbers 10.1.8 Conflicts of Interest 10.2 University (State) Property 10.2.1 Use of University-Owned Property and Equipment

121


10.3

10.4

10.5

10.6

10.7

10.8

10.9

10.2.2 Accountability and Responsibility for State Property 10.2.3 University Property - Loss or Damage 10.2.4 Movable Equipment Acquired Under Grants from the Federal Government 10.2.5 Inventories 10.2.6 UTB Facilities Use Policy 10.2.7 Records Management and Retention 10.2.8 Sale of University Property (Surplus Equipment and Supplies) 10.2.9 The University of Texas at Brownsville-Capitalized Assets Inventory Control System 10.2.10 Liability of Property Loss 10.2.11 Change in Agency Head or Property Manager 10.2.12 Distribution of Agency Head or Property Manager 10.2.13 Information Security Statement 10.2.14 Computer Use Resources Policy 10.2.15 Policy for the Use and Protection of Information Resources 10.2.16 Statement of Operating Policy Pertaining to Video Conference Taping 10.2.17 Statement of Operating Policy Pertaining to Non-Disclosure of Video Conference Information 10.2.18 U-T- Brownsville Policy on Naming of Buildings and other Facilities 10.2.21 Data Classification Purchasing 10.3.1 General Responsibilities of the Director of Purchasing 10.3.2 Centralized Purchasing Policy 10.3.3 Purchasing Procedure Summary 10.3.4 Detailed Purchasing Procedure 10.3.5 Departmental Purchase Requisition 10.3.6 Receiving and Invoices 10.3.7 Vendor Protest/Dispute Resolution 10.3.8 Petty Cash, Change Funds, and Cash Handling Policy 10.3.9 The Use of University Name for Procurement/Purchasing from Employees 10.3.10 The Use of University Leased-Rented Property and Equipment 10.3.11 Cutoff of Fund Encumbrances at End of Fiscal Year 10.3.12 State of Texas Purchasing Card Program 10.3.13 Receiving of Equipment, Supplies and Invoices 10.3.14 Correspondence with Vendors and State General Services Commission 10.3.15 State of Texas Travel Credit Card Program Sponsored Activities 10.4.1 Non-Budgeted, Revenue-Producing Activities 10.4.2 Grants and Contracts Funds Received 10.4.3 Effort Certification on Sponsored Programs 10.4.4 Cost Sharing 10.4.5 Cost Transfer to Grant Accounts 10.4.7 Export Control Travel 10.5.1 Travel Policy 10.5.2 Business Expenses Policy Vacation and Other Leaves 10.6.1 Annual Leave 10.6.3 Employee Leave Without Pay 10.6.4 Employee Leave With Pay Fiscal 10.7.1 Budget Policy/Fiscal Accountability 10.7.2 Banking and Investment Relationship Gifts and Grants 10.8.1 External Nonprofit Corporations 10.8.2 Soliciting, Accepting and Processing Gifts and Grants from Private Philanthropic Sources 10.8.3 University Endowment Policy University Environment Policies

122


11

12 13

10.9.1 Soliciting on Campus 10.9.2 Environmental Health and Safety Office 10.9.3 Campus Environmental Health and Safety Program 10.9.4 Parking and Traffic Regulations 10.9.7 Policy and Procedure for the Environmental and Fire Life Safety Evaluations for Acquisition of Real State 10.9.8 Public Information Procedures and Guidelines in Event of Emergency or Critical Incident 10.9.9 UTB/TSC Emergency Evacuation of Campus 10.9.10 Alcohol Beverages on Campus Policy 10.9.11 Tobacco-Free Campus 10.10 Patents and Copyrights 10.10.1 Intellectual Property 10.10.2 Photocopying Copyrighted Materials 10.11 Recognition of Faculty and Staff Organizations University Services 11.1 Physical Plant Services 11.2 Keys 11.3 Telephone Services 11.3.1 University Telephone Service/General Information 11.3.2 Telephone Service/Directory Information 11.3.3 Telephone Service/Procurement Procedures 11.3.4 Telephone Charges/Billing 11.3.5 UTB/TSC Wireless Phone Policy 11.4 University Mail Service 11.5 University Library and Academic Computing 11.6 Other University Services 11.6.1 Employee Identification Cards 11.6.2 Lost and Found Not Available on the Web Affirmative Action Plan of The University of Texas at Brownsville 13.1 Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action Statement 13.2 Affirmative Action Policy 13.3 Responsibility for Implementation 13.5 Work Force Analysis 13.6 Utilization Analysis 13.7 Establishment of Goals and Timetables 13.8 Monitoring and Reporting of Affirmative Action Plan 13.9 Policy Statements 13.12 Plans to Address Areas of Deficiencies

123


Appendix L: Grading System Policy Grade

Grade Explanation

Grade Points

A+ A A-

98-100 93-97.9 90-92.9

4.00 4.00 3.67

B+ B B-

87-89.9 83-86.9 80-82.9

3.33 3.00 2.67

C+ C C-

77-79.9 73-76.9 70-72.9

2.33 2.00 1.67

D+ D D-

67-69.9 63-66.9 60-62.9

1.33 1.00 0.67

F Au I IM P CR

0.00

NR

Failure Audit Incomplete Incomplete military Pass Advanced Placement and CLEP credit only No Grade Reported

S

Satisfactory

U

Unsatisfactory

W WC WM WS

Withdrawal Withdrawal due to casualty Withdrawal, military Withdrawal, excluded from Academic Progress

Impact on GPA

Not used in computing GPA Not used in computing GPA Not used in computing GPA Not used in computing GPA Not used in computing GPA Not used in computing GPA (Office of the Registrar use only) Not used in computing GPA (Non-course based remediation only) Not used in computing GPA (Non-course based remediation only) Not used in computing GPA Not used in computing GPA Not used in computing GPA Not used in computing GPA (Office of the Registrar use only)

Grades are awarded in courses in which students are officially enrolled after the official record date. The deadline to withdraw is specified in the Academic Calendar for each semester or term. After the deadline to drop with a grade of a W has passed, students may not be awarded a W as a final grade. 124


COLLEGE OF EDUCATION FACULTY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES MANUAL Academic Calendar Fall 2012 through Summer 2013

125


COLLEGE OF EDUCATION FACULTY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES MANUAL Academic Calendar Fall 2012 through Summer 2013

126


127


128


129


THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT BROWNSVILLE & TEXAS SOUTHMOST COLLEGE

Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Calendar 2012-2013

Important Dates Last date to submit program or course changes *Planning sessions for 2013-2014

January 17 February 14

Catalog Deadlines: December -Policy review and revision with OGC

Submission Procedures Please submit original documents to the Office of Academic Affairs on the docketing date before 5:00 pm. Contact Monica Garcia at (956) 882-6551 for any questions.

130


THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT BROWNSVILLE & TEXAS SOUTHMOST COLLEGE

Graduate Committee Calendar 2013-2014 Event/Item

Date

Time

Place

Labor Day Holiday

September 3, 2012

Docketing Date*

September 4, 2012

5:00 p.m.

Graduate Office

Graduate Committee

September 17, 2012

2:00 p.m.

SETB 3rd floor

Supplemental Date for Submitting CAR’s

October 15-October 31

to Coordinating Board Docketing Date*

October 1, 2012

5:00 p.m.

Graduate Office

Graduate Committee

October 15, 2012

2:00 p.m.

SETB 3rd floor

Docketing Date*

November 5, 2012

5:00 p.m.

Graduate Office

Graduate Committee

November 19, 2012

2:00 p.m.

SETB 3rd floor

Docketing Date*

December 3, 2012

5:00 p.m.

Graduate Office

Graduate Committee

December 10, 2012

2:00 p.m.

SETB 3rd floor

Docketing Date*

January 7, 2013

5:00 p.m.

Graduate Office

Martin Luther King Holiday

January 21, 2013

Graduate Committee

January 28, 2013

2:00 p.m.

SETB 3rd floor

Docketing Date*

February 4, 2013

5:00 p.m.

Graduate Office

Graduate Committee

February 18, 2013

2:00 p.m.

SETB 3rd floor

Docketing Date*

March 4, 2013

5:00 p.m.

Graduate Office

Spring Break Holiday

March 11-2013-March 16, 2013

Graduate Committee

March 18, 2013

2:00 p.m.

SETB 3rd floor

Docketing Date*

April 1, 2013

5:00 p.m.

Graduate Office

Graduate Committee

April 15, 2013

2:00 p.m.

SETB 3rd floor

CAR submissions to Coordinating Board

April 1-May 31

Docketing Date*

May 6, 2013

5:00 p.m.

Graduate Office

Graduate Committee

May 13, 2013

2:00 p.m.

SETB 3rd floor

1. The Graduate Committee meets every third Monday of the month at 2:00. 2. All Curriculum Action Requests and all other agenda items must be into the Graduate Office (University

Boulevard Classroom

Building 1.202) by the * deadline dates listed above. Please supply one original and 14 copies. 3. Please note: All Program Action Requests must go through two readings at the Graduate Committee level. 4. Additional meetings may be called as needed by the Graduate Committee 5. Please note that all meetings are open to all faculty & they are invited to attend and participate in the discussion.

131


132


133


COLLEGE OF EDUCATION DEPARTMENTS, CENTERS, OFFICES, AND OTHER ACADEMIC UNITS College of Education Reception

Office

Phone Number

Fax Number

EDBC 1.102

882-7466

882-5705

Office

Phone Number

Fax Number

Dean

EDBC 2.306

882-7220

882-7431

Associate Dean/Certification Officer

EDBC 1.102

882-5706

882-5721

Administrative Assistant

EDBC 2.306

882-7220

882-7431

Office

Phone Number

Fax Number

EDBC 2.208

882-7678

882-7593

REK 2.610

882-8290

882-7348

Language, Literacy, and Intercultural Studies

EDBC 1.308

882-8979

882-8929

Teaching, Learning, and Innovation

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

Reception and Information Dean's Office

Departments Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies Health and Human Performance

Office

Phone Number

Fax Number

Center for Early Childhood Studies

Center, Offices and other Academic Units

CECS Bldg.

882-8238

882-8822

Center for Educational Development and Innovation

EDBC 2.306

882-7220

882-7431

COE Office of Graduate Programs

EDBC 1.314

882-5769

882-8929

Community Counseling Clinic

EDBC1.210

882-7792

882-7593

Education Assessment Clinic

EDBC 1.212

882-7675

882-7593

REK 2.630

882-7236

882-7348

Office of Continuous Improvement and NCATE

EDBC 2.228

882-7262

882-7431

Office of Research, Grants, and Development

EDBC 1.102

882-5722

882-7847

Program of Early College High School

EDBC 2.306

882-7219

882-7431

Program of P-16 Initiatives

EDBC 2.306

882-7219

882-7431

ITEC-G10

882-4245

882-4236

RGECC

882-8238

882-8822

REK 2.610

882-8290

882-7348

Unit of Teacher Preparation and Accountability

EDBC 1.102

882-5706

882-5721

Unit of Field Experience/Student Teaching Program

EDBC 1.102

882-5703

882-5705

Health and Human Performance Lab

Program of Transition to Teaching Through Technology Raul J. Guerra Early Childhood Center REK Center/Instructional Area

134


COLLEGE OF EDUCATION FACULTY AND STAFF

Faculty and Staff

Office

Phone

Fax

Abarca, Rosa Child Care Specialties  RJGECC

RJGECC

882-7878

882-8822

rosa.abarca@utb.edu

Abrego, Jesus "Chuey" Associate Professor  EPLS

EDBC 2.224

882-7655

882-7593

chuey.abrego@utb.edu

Abrego, Michelle Associate Professor  EPLS

EDBC 2.212

882-7677

882-7593

michelle.abrego@utb.edu

Aguilar-Diaz, Krishtel Adjunct Professor  LLIS

EDBC 1.308

882-8979

882-8929

krishtel.aguilar1@utb.edu

Alaniz, Rogelio Adjunct Professor  HHP

REK 2.610

882-8290

882-7348

ralaniz@bisd.us

Alvarado, Melissa, Assistant Professor  EPLS

EDBC 1.210A

882-7880

882-8929

melissa.alvarado@utb.edu

Arevalo, Rosalina Academic Advisor  TPA

EDBC 1.102H

882-5720

882-5721

rosalina.arevalo@utb.edu

Balaguero, Daniel Adjunct Professor  HHP

REK 2.610

882-7386

882-7348

daniel.balaguero@utb.edu

Becker, Robert J. Adjunct Professor  LLIS

EDBC 1.308

882-8979

882-8929

robert.becker@utb.edu

Brogdon, Gayle L. Assoc. Dean/Assoc. Prof.  HHP/CERT

EDBC 1.102EA

882-5706

882-5721

gayle.brogdon@utb.edu

Bussert-Webb, Kathy Associate Professor  LLIS

EDBC 1.114

882-7595

882-8929

kathy.bussertwebb@utb.edu

Butler, Janice Associate Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.310

882-6713

882-8929

janice.butler@utb.edu

Canales, Daniela Administrative Clerk II  LLIS

EDBC 1.308

882-8979

882-8929

daniela.canales@utb.edu

Canales, Lourdes Child Care Specialist  CECS

CECS

882-7274

882-8822

lourdes.canales@utb.edu

Cano, Jaime Lecturer  EPLS

EDBC 2.216

882-5704

882-7593

Jaime.cano@utb.edu

Castillo, Hector Director  IED

EDBC 2.110

882-8950

882-7847

hector.castillo@utb.edu

Cavazos, Irma Administrative Clerk I  CECS

CECS

882-7247

882-8822

irma.cavazos2@utb.edu

Cavazos, Lionel Javier Assistant Professor  EPLS

EDBC 1.108

882-5709

882-7593

Lionel.cavazos@utb.edu

Chamberlain, Steve Associate Professor  EPLS

EDBC 2.120

882-7675

882-7593

steve.chamberlain@utb.edu

Charles, Amalia Early Childhood Teacher  CECS

CECS

882-7274

882-8822

amalia.charles1@utb.edu

Chavez, Juan Adjunct Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-8979

882-8929

jch65@yahoo.com

Coello, Alejandra Child Care Specialist  RJGECC

RJGECC

882-8238

882-8822

alejandra.coello1@utb.edu

Conatser, Phillip Associate Professor  HHP

REK 2.650

882-5701

882-7348

phillip.conatser@utb.edu

Corbeil, Rene Associate Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.318

882-7540

882-8929

rene.corbeil@utb.edu

Cortez-Castro, Diana Adjunct Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

diana.cortezcastro1@utb.edu

Cortina, Ramon Computer User Service Specialist  CERT

EDBC 1.102

882-5749

882-5721

ramon.cortina@utb.edu

Cortinas, Miguel Adjunct Professor  HHP

REK 2.610

882-8290

882-7348

mrcortinas@bisd.us

Crosslin, Mathew Adjunct Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

mcrosslin@gmail.com

Cuellar, Mary Helen Administrative Assistant  CERT

EDBC 1.102E

882-5706

882-5721

mary.cuellar@utb.edu

Cuellar, Sandra Child Care Specialist  CECS

CECS

882-7247

882-8822

sandra.cuellar@utb.edu

Curtis, Mary Associate Professor  EPLS

EDBC 2.130

882-7673

882-7593

mary.curtis@utb.edu

De la Cruz, Coral Secretary II  STP

EDBC 1.102H

882-5700

882-5705

coral.delacruz@utb.edu

135

Email


Faculty and Staff

Office

Phone

Fax

Diaz, Leticia Master Technical Instr.  EPLS

CECS 119

882-8889

882-8822

leticia.diaz@utb.edu

Deaton, Elizabeth Adjunct Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

elizabeth_deaton@yahoo.com

Diaz, Maria E. Lecturer  TLI

EDBC 2.312

882-7268

882-8929

maria.diaz36@utb.edu

Dominguez, Denise Adjunct Professor  EPLS

EDBC 2.208

882-7678

882-7593

domingde@sbcglobal.net

Dorantes-Reyes, Kayla Secretary II  CEDI/OD

EDBC 2.306

882-7219

882-7431

kayla.dorantes1@utb.edu

Duarte, Georgianna Professor  EPLS

EDBC 2.104

882-5710

882-8929

georgianna.duarte@utb.edu

Escotet, Miguel Angel Professor and Dean – OD/LLIS

EDBC 2.306E

882-7220

882-7431

miguel.escotet@utb.edu

Esparza, Lupita Secretary I  OD

EDBC 2.306

882-5730

882-7431

lupita.esparza@utb.edu

Espinoza, Catalina Child Care Assistant  CECS

CECS

882-7247

882-8822

catalina.espinoza1@utb.edu

Evans, Maria Adjunct Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

mevans.utb.edu@gmail.com

Flores, David Property Inventory Supervisor  HHP

REK 2.610

882-8913

882-7348

david.flores@utb.edu

Flores, Gilberto Adjunct Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

cloudrider7777@juno.com

Flores, Mary Ann Adjunct Professor  LLIS

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

maaflores@bisd.us

Freeman, David Professor & Dept. Chair  LLIS

EDBC 1.308A

882-5724

882-8929

david.freeman@utb.edu

Freeman, Yvonne Professor  LLIS

EDBC 1.120

882-5725

882-8929

yvonne.freeman@utb.edu

Fuentes, Angelica Assistant Master Tech. Instr.  LLIS

Cortez 107

882-7821

882-8929

angelica.Fuentes@utb.edu

Garcia, Gregorio Assistant Professor  TLI

EDBC 2.320

882-7262

882-8929

gregorio.garcia@utb.edu

Garcia, Jaime H. Associate Professor  EPLS

EDBC 2.118

882-7343

882-7593

jaime.h.garcia@utb.edu

Garcia-Caceres, Carmen FBTS/Director  LLIS/

EDBC 1.102B

882-5703

882-4236

carmen.garciacaceres@utb.edu

Garcia, Juan O. Lecturer EPLS

EDBC 2.226

882-7343

882-7593

juan.o.garcia@utb.edu

Garcia, Julia Child Care Specialist  RJGECC

RJGECC

882-8238

882-8822

julia.garcia@utb.edu

Garcia, Keren Child Care Assistant  RJGECC

RJGECC

882-7878

882-8822

keren.garcia@utb.edu

Garcia, Renata Child Care Assistant  RJGECC

RJGECC

882-8238

882-8822

renata.garcia1@utb.edu

Garrett, Robin Lecturer  TLI

EDBC 1.102

882-5764

882-5705

robin.garrett@utb.edu

Garza, Cecilia G. Adjunct Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-8979

882-8929

chelagarza@aol.com

Garza, Gonzalo Lecturer  HHP

REK 2.636

882-5734

882-7348

gonzalo.garza@utb.edu

Garza, Irene Receptionist & Administrative Clerk I  TLI/CERT

EDBC 1.102

882-7466

882-5705

irene.garza@utb.edu

Garza, Sylvia Child Care Specialist  RJGECC

RJGECC

882-8238

882-8822

sylvia.garza@utb.edu

Gawenda, Peter B. Associate Professor/ Program Coordinator OGP

EDBC 1.314

885-5769

882-7733

peter.gawenda@utb.edu

Gonzalez, Dora Cook  CECS

CECS

882-7247

882-8822

dora.gonzalez@utb.edu

Hart, Susan Associate Professor  HHP

REK 2.648

882-7269

882-7348

susan.hart@utb.edu

Hernandez, Maria Cook  RJGECC

RJGECC

882-8238

882-8822

maria.hernandez@utb.edu

Herrera, Alberto J. Assistant Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.328

882-6902

882-8929

alberto.j.herrera@utb.edu

Hinton, Kip Austin Assistant Professor  LLIS

EDBC 1.124

882-8847

882-8929

kip.hinton@utb.edu

Huerta, Deborah Assistant Professor  COLLEGE OF SMT

MRCS 260

882-3874

882-3874

deborah.huerta@utb.edu

Infante-Garcia, Norma Administrative Service Manager  OD

EDBC 2.306D

882-7220

882-7431

norma.garcia@utb.edu

136

Email


Faculty and Staff

Office

Phone

Fax

James, Eric Assistant Professor  HHP

REK 2.638

882-5994

882-7348

eric.james@utb.edu

Japp, Katherine Adjunct Professor  HHP

REK 2.610

882-8290

882-7348

kmjapp@yahoo.com

Jaramillo, Leticia Academic Advisor  TPA

EDBC 1.102D

882-7955

882-7521

leticia.jaramillo@utb.edu

Jewett, Laura Assistant Professor  TLI

EDBC 2.310

882-8269

882-8929

laura.jewett@utb.edu

Jones, Irma Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.528

882-7125

882-8929

irma.jones@utb.edu

Jones, Leslie Associate Master Tech. Instr.  LLIS

Cortez 102

882-7683

882-8929

leslie.jones@utb.edu

Juarez, David Adjunct Professor  LLIS

EDBC 1.308

882-8979

882-8929

david.juarez1@utb.edu

Karabulut, Murat Assistant Professor  HHP

REK 2.630

882-7236

882-7348

murat.karabulut@utb.edu

Lara, Ana Lidia Administrative Clerk I  REGCC

RJGECC

882-8238

882-8822

ana.lara5@utb.edu

Lara, Rosalba Child Care Assistant  RJGECC

RJGECC

882-8238

882-8822

rosalva.lara1@utb.edu

Larraga, Hector Adjunct Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

hlarraga@lfcisd.us

Leal, Alfredo Jr. Adjunct Professor  HHP

REK 2.632

882-7237

882-7348

jose.leal@utb.edu

Leal, Alma G. Professor  EPLS

EDBC 1.110

882-7672

882-7593

alma.g.leal@utb.edu

Ledingham, Christopher Assistant Professor  HHP

REK 2.652

882-5756

882-7348

christopher.ledingham@utb.edu

Lerma, Eunice Assistant Professor  EPLS

EDBC 1.106

882-5850

882-7593

Eunice.lerma@utb.edu

Lire-Caldwell, Gilda Adjunct Professor  LLIS

EDBC 1.308

882-8979

882-8929

gliregamez@hotmail.com

Livas, Annette Adjunct Professor  HHP

REK 2.610

882-8290

882-7348

annette.livas@utb.edu

Loff, Jack Assistant Professor  HHP

REK 2.618

882-6509

882-7348

jack.loff@utb.edu

Lorenz, Rose Adjunct Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

rslorenz@aol.com

Lu, Ming-Tsan Pierre Assistant Professor  TLI

EDBC 2.308

882-7674

882-8929

mingtsan.lu@utb.edu

Mares, Julieta Child Care Specialist  RJGECC

RJGECC

882-8238

882-8822

julieta.mares1@utb.edu

Martinez, Janet Field Based Teaching Specialist  TLI

EDBC 1.320

882-5715

882-8929

janet.martinez@utb.edu

Martinez, Sara Adjunct Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

Saramtz3@sbcglobal.net

Mata, Zelma Associate Professor & Dept. Chair  HHP

REK 2.610A

882-8291

882-7348

zelma.mata@utb.edu

McArthur, Kerry Assistant Professor  LLIS

EDBC 1.128

882-5717

882-8929

kerry.mcarthur@utb.edu

McElroy, Arnold Adjunct Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

admcelroy@dennymax.com

Mercuri, Sandra Associate Professor  LLIS

EDBC 1.112

882-5842

882-8929

sandra.mercuri@utb.edu

Monreal, Janie Secretary II  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

sanjuana.monreal@utb.edu

Moran, Robert Lecturer  HHP

REK 2.614

882-5991

882-7348

robert.moran@utb.edu

Morgan, Bobbette Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.302

882-7965

882-8929

bobbette.morgan@utb.edu

Mujica, Bertha Secretary II  HHP

REK 2.610

882-8290

882-7348

bertha.mujica@utb.edu

Muraira, Nora Cook  CECS Murillo, Sandra Adjunct Faculty  TLI Musanti, Sandra Assistant Professor  LLIS

CECS EDBC 1.308 EDBC 1.126

882-7247 882-7421 882-5738

882-8822 882-8929 882-8929

nora.muraira@utb.edu sandra.murillo@utb.edu sandra.musanti@utb.edu

Nava, Marisela Center Manager  CECS

RJGECC

882-8887

882-8822

marisela.nava@utb.edu

137

Email


Faculty and Staff

Office

Phone

Fax

Niño, Rebecca Secretary II  RJGECC

RJGECC

882-7878

882-8822

rebeca.cervantes35@utb.edu

O’Conner, Brendan H. Assistant Professor  LLIS Olague, Arturo Adjunct Professor  HHP

EDBC 1.124 REK 2.610

882-5713 882-8290

882-8929 882-7348

brendan.oconner@utb.edu arturo.olague@utb.edu

Ortiz, Mario A. Adjunct Professor EPLS Overton, Terry Professor  EPLS

EDBC 2.208 EDBC 2.116

882-7678 882-7855

882-7593 882-6678

mario.ortiz1@utb.edu terry.overton@utb.edu

Pan, Cheng Chang "Sam" Associate Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.306

882-7805

882-8929

sam.pan@utb.edu

Paula, Parson Professor  LLIS

EDBC 2.106

882-7473

882-8929

paula.parson@utb.edu

Peña, Sylvia Professor Emeritus  LLIS

EDBC 2.306

882-7220

882-7431

sylvia.c.pena@utb.edu

Peña, Herman Assistant Master Technical Instr.  LLIS

Cortez 105

882-7822

882-8929

herman.pena@utb.edu

Perez, Maria Eugenia Assistant Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

meperez@sitiosw.com

Perez, Nelson Administrative Clerk I  HHP

REK 2.610

882-5997

882-8929

nelson.perez@utb.edu

Permenter, F. Nelson Adjunct Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

pernavy@att.net

Petty, Lori Assistant Professor  TLI

EDBC 2.326

882-7423

882-8929

lori.petty@utb.edu

Prause, Catherine Adjunct Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

catheirne.prause@utb.edu

Ramirez, Reynaldo Associate Professor/ Dept. Chair  TLI

EDBC 1.308B

882-7255

882-8929

reynaldo.ramirez@utb.edu

Ready, Arlene Associate Master Technical Instr.  LLIS

Cortez 104

882-7824

882-8929

alrene.ready@utb.edu

Rivas, Olivia Professor/ Dept. Chair  EPLS

EDBC 2.208A

882-7660

882-7593

olivia.rivas@utb.edu

Rodriguez, Alma D. Assistant Professor  LLIS

EDBC 1.118

882-7657

882-8929

alma.rodriguez@utb.edu

Rodriguez, Ignacio Faculty Associate  CEDI

EDBC 1.102C

882-7848

882-7847

Ignacio.rodiguez@utb.edu

Rodriguez, Jaime Adjunct Professor  HHP

REK 2.610

882-8290

882-7348

jaime.rodriguez@utb.edu

Rodriguez, Martin Adjunct Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

martin.rodriguez@utb.edu

Rodriguez-Garcia, Ana L. Assistant Professor  EPLS

CECS 120

882-5841

882-7593

ana.rodriguezgarcia@utb.edu

Rosenberg, Graciela Professor  LLIS

EDBC 1.116

882-7961

882-8929

graciela.rosenberg@utb.edu

Saucedo, Olga Food Service Supervisor  CECS

CECS

882-7247

882-8822

olga.saucedo@utb.edu

Shefelbine, Janet Associate Professor  EPLS

EDBC 2.214

882-7592

882-7593

janet.shefelbine@utb.edu

Shoop, Stephen Adjunct Professor  TLI

Eidmen Hall 101- A

882-5788

882-7348

stephen.shoop@utb.edu

Sierra, Ivonne Office Supervisor CESC

CESC

882-7274

882-8822

ivonne.sierra@utb.edu

Snelson, Stanley Associate Master Technical  LLIS

Education 33

882-5873

882-8929

Stanley.snelson@utb.edu

Sotomayor, Ana Academic Advisor  TPA

EDBC 1.102D

882-8869

882-5721

ana.sotomayor@utb.edu

Sullivan, Michael Associate Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.306

882-7668

882-8929

mike.sullivan@utb.edu

Sutterby, John A. Associate Professor  EPLS

EDBC 2.128

882-5714

882-8929

john.sutterby@utb.edu

Tapia, Alma G. Secretary II  OFE

EDBC 1.102

882-7850

882-8929

alma.tapia@utb.edu

Telese, James Professor  LLIS

EDBC 1.326

882-7669

882-8929

james.telese@utb.edu

Tipton, Prisci Office Director  CEDI

EDBC 1.102C

882-5722

882-7847

prisci.tipton@utb.edu

Torres, Yolando Adjunt Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

yolanda.torres@utb.edu

Trenfield, Sally Adjunct Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

sally.trenfield@utb.edu

Treviño, Yessica Child Care Assistant  RJGECC

RJGECC

882-8238

882-8822

yessica.trevino47@utb.edu

138

Email


Faculty and Staff

Office

Phone

Fax

Trujillo, Jackie Secretary II  EPLS

EDBC 2.208

882-7678

882-7593

jackie.trujillo@utb.edu

Valdes-Corbeil, Maria E. Assistant Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.316

882-4200

882-8929

mariaelena.corbeil@utb.edu

Valdez, Yokebed Child Care Assistant  RJGECC

RJGECC

882-8238

882-8822

yokebed.castro1@utb.edu

Valencia, Gustavo Adjunct Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

gustavo.valencia@utb.edu

Vallado, Andres N. Associate Professor  EPLS

EDBC 2.210

882-7670

882-7593

andres.n.vallado@utb.edu

Varberlow, Sonja Field Based Teaching Specialist  TLI

EDBC 2.314

882-8986

882-8929

sonja.varbelow@utb.edu

Vasquez, Aidee Adjunct Professor  EPLS

EDBC 2.208

882-7678

882-7593

aivasquez@bisd.us

Vasquez, Luis Adjunct Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

luis.vazquez10@utb.edu

Viren, Vejoya Associate Professor  EPLS

CECS 104

882-8886

882-8822

vejoya.viren@utb.edu

Villa, Erika Child Care Assistant RJGECC

RJGECC

882-8238

882-8822

erika.villa10@utb.edu

Walton, Judith D. Professor Emerita  HHP

REK 2.612

882-8290

882-7348

judith.walton@utb.edu

Ward, Hsuying Assistant Professor  EPLS

EDBC 2.122

882-5707

882-7593

hsuying.ward@utb.edu

Wells, Lori Adjunct Professor  LLIS/TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-8979

882-8929

lori.wells40@utb.edu

Whittenberg, James F. Adjunct Professor  EPLS

EDBC 2.208

882-7678

882-7593

james.whittenberg10@utb.edu

Williams-Santa Ana, Zulema Adjunct Professor  TLI

EDBC 1.308

882-7421

882-8929

zulema_williams@hotmail.com

Yniesta, Mike Adjunct Professor  HHP

REK 2.610

882-8290

882-7348

yniesta@bisd.us

Yznaga, Selma D. Associate Professor  EPLS

EDBC 1.108

882-7855

882-7593

selma.yznaga@utb.edu

Zhang, Zhidong Assistant Professor  TLI

EDBC 2.304

882-5723

882-8929

zhidong.zhang@utb.edu

CECS CEDI CERT COE CCC EDBC EAC EPLS HHP IED ITEC LLIS OD OGP RGECC REK TPA TLI TTT UBCB OFE PB

Center for Early Childhood Studies Center for Educational Development and Innovation Certification Office College of Education Community Counseling Clinic Education and Business Complex Education Assessment Clinic Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies Health and Human Performance Office Institutional Effectiveness and Development International Technology, Education, and Commerce Language, Literacy, and Intercultural Studies Office of the Dean Office of Graduate Programs Raul Guerra Early Childhood Center Recreation, Education, and Kinesiology Center Teacher Preparation and Accountability Teaching, Learning, and Innovation Transition to Teaching Through Technology University Boulevard Classroom Building Office of Field Experience/Student Teaching Program Post Baccalaureate

139

Email


coe_faculty_policies_and_procedures_manual___feb._