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HANDBOOK 2018


TABLE OF CONTENTS WELCOME

Welcome to Kohawk Nation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Accessibility Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . back cover

FIRST-YEAR ESSENTIALS

First-Year Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 First-Year Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 First-Year Seminar Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7 Financial Aid & Business Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

ACADEMICS

Greetings from the Registrar’s Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Academic Areas of Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 The Natural & Mathematical Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 The Social Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 The Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 The Fine Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Additional Areas of Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Collateral Majors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Off-Campus Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Pre-Professional Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

CAMPUS SERVICES

Community is Important at Coe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Campus Civility Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Information Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residence Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residence Life Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 “Hello” from Residence Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Residence Hall FAQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 & 21 Catering and Meal Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 The Office of Diversity & Inclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Religious & Spiritual Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Coe Wellness Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Health Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Campus Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Parking Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Campus Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Stewart Memorial Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Learning Commons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Academic Achievement Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 The Speaking Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Tutoring Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 The Writing Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Center for Creativity and Careers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Work Study Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Community Engagement Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

OUTSIDE OF THE CLASSROOM

Leadership at Coe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Student Organizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32-35 Honorary Clubs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Coe Army ROTC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Greek Life at Coe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 & 37 Fitness Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Athletics and Recreation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

If you have any questions, comments or concerns regarding the 2018 New Student Orientation or the contents of this book, please feel free to email or call us at orientation@coe.edu or 319.399.8843.


Welcome to Kohawk Nation! WELCOME TO COE COLLEGE! We are thrilled to have you as part of our community. New Student Orientation is designed to help you make a smooth transition into life as a Kohawk. You will learn where to find what you need and how to manage all of the small details of student life on a residential campus. You will not find it difficult to learn your way around campus, to register for classes and (for those who are living on campus) to settle into the residence halls. But there are two dimensions of orientation that are even more important to us. First, we want to help our whole community understand and embrace Coe’s values: academic excellence, personal integrity and responsibility and a civil, inclusive campus climate. Second, we want to help you make connections with people — fellow students, faculty and staff. We know you need information about policies and practices, but in the long run, you will find that human relationships matter the most.

OTHER IMPORTANT NAMES

So we encourage you to ask questions and to tell us about yourself. We want to get to know you, and we want you to feel at home here. Welcome once again, and I look forward to seeing you around campus.

Erik Albinson

Vice President for Student Development

David Hayes Vice President for Advancement

Tom Hicks Dean of Students

Dave McInally President

Larry Lee Vice President for Facilities & Operations

Paula O'Loughlin

Provost and Dean of the Faculty

Julie Staker

Vice President for Admission & Marketing

Mike White

Executive Vice President

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FIRST-YEAR

Essentials

WELCOME TO ORIENTATION Orientation is a whirlwind of moving in, meeting new people, finding classes and joining the Kohawk family. We know you will arrive to campus in August with a lot of different feelings: apprehension, uncertainty and excitement. Our hope is that orientation will calm your nerves and strengthen your excitement. It will provide you opportunities to meet your classmates, your professors and the many Coe community members who will support you over the next four years...and you might even meet some of your best friends, too! You will ring the bell on August 18, officially starting your time at Coe College. Orientation will begin to introduce you to the many opportunities available during your time here at Coe, but it is up to you to make the most of it before you ring the bell again on graduation day. Coe makes it possible. You make it happen.

HAYLEY WALTON, Student Orientation Coordinator YOLANDA WEI, Student Orientation Coordinator LAURA VAN BUER, Director of Campus Life

MER: TION THROUGHOUT THE SUM FOR UPDATES AND INFORMA Coe College Orientation Check your Coe Email | @CoeOrientation @CoeOrientation | | Coe College Class of 2022 orientation@coe.edu |

319.399.8843

CAPS (COLLEGE ADJUSTMENT PEERS) College Adjustment Peers, or CAPs, are here to help with your transition to your new home at Coe for the next four years. Each CAP is assigned to a First-Year Seminar (FYS) class, with whom you’ll spend a lot of time throughout your first term at Coe. The CAPs' job starts before you get here. You will receive emails (check your Coe email) over the summer. You will meet them on your first day of orientation. They will even help you move in, if you need them to! They want to ensure your transition to college is an easy one because they remember what it was like... crazy, exciting and scary! They are here to help. All CAPs have been chosen to be CAPs because they are successful students, very involved on campus and enjoy working with new students. Their job is to make your transition to Coe as stress-free as possible! Their goal for Orientation is for everyone to have fun and meet a lot of new people. Once classes begin they will be checking in with you periodically. There will be study groups, fun activities and various off-campus opportunities through your CAP group and First-Year Experience. They are looking forward to welcoming you to the Coe family!

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THE FIRST-YEAR

Experience

THE FIRST-YEAR EXPERIENCE

ACADEMIC ADVISING

The First-Year Experience (FYE) is the beginning of your academic career and serves as your bridge out of high school and into college. The FYE is your introduction to the liberal arts, both inside and outside the classroom. Each First-Year Seminar class works directly with a College Adjustment Peer (a Coe student), a staff mentor, a librarian and a writing consultant who help students make connections to academic resources or student support services. The FYE is your introduction to what a liberal arts campus offers its students in academic and nonacademic support systems.

The role of the academic advisor is to acquaint students with their academic options at Coe and assist them in selecting courses that reflect individual interests and abilities. Advisors also help students create a four-year education plan that allows students to make connections between different areas of study, and between academic, co-curricular and nonacademic areas. FYS instructors serve as the primary academic advisors for first-year students in their respective sections. Students thus see their advisors frequently during their first term at Coe and have the opportunity to work closely with them in developing overall programs of study and long-range goals. After the first term, students may decide to choose departmental faculty for academic advising or they may continue to be advised by their FYS instructors. Students are free to speak at any time with professors in their major departments to answer specific questions regarding requirements and courses in those departments. Students may change advisors at any time upon request to the Registrar.

INTRODUCTION TO THE FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR After First-Year Seminar (FYS) placements have been made, your FYS instructor will contact you with more information about your course, including the summer reading she or he has selected. The first academic requirement you will fulfill as a student at Coe College is the successful completion of a First-Year Seminar. All incoming first-year students take an FYS, but the courses are by no means the same. Faculty are asked to create a nondepartmental course that introduces students to critical thinking in a multiple perspectives framework. First-Year Seminars are designed to help first-year students successfully transition into the new academic career that awaits them at Coe. Students will think, read, write, discuss and present extensively in each seminar, but the actual topics and assignments will vary significantly across the multiple sections.

FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR OPTIONS The list on the next few pages describes the FYS courses offered this fall. While each course is taught by a different full-time faculty member and will have different specific requirements, all FYS courses are an introduction to the liberal arts and share some common elements. Specifically, these courses are designed to introduce students to college-level study with emphasis on critical thinking, writing, speaking, doing research and information analysis. Therefore, it is by design that these courses do not count toward any major. Take time to review all of the varied offerings and select your top four. We will place you in one of your selections. You will find the FYS selection option in the list of mandatory forms. Please make this a priority so that we can match you with your professor in a timely fashion. Watch for an email from your Coe professor later in the summer welcoming you to your FYS class and Coe!

Each course is described in this booklet, as well as online at my.coe.edu. In your FYS, you and 14 or so other first-year students will begin your academic journey led by your FYS instructor. For at least the first year, your FYS instructor will also be your academic advisor, helping you navigate among majors, minors, general education requirements and other academic opportunities, in addition to helping you find the answers to virtually any Coe-related questions you might have. First-Year Seminars meet four days (Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday) a week at 11:00 AM.

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FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR

Course Descriptions

1. THE CULTURAL HISTORY OF PHYSICS Ugur Akgun, Physics

this analytical framework and applies it to fantasy sports decisions. We will first learn how popular basic and advanced statistics are calculated, what they represent and how they can be used for objective decision-making. We will discuss potential biases in decision-making drawing on work from the behavioral economics literature. We will then apply this approach to decisions in fantasy sports, particularly fantasy football. There will be a focus on programing in the statistical package 'R' and writing empirically backed analysis in an effective manner. We will read books such as "Moneyball," "Naked Statistics" and "Thinking Fast and Slow."

The historical triumphs of physics stand as points of reference for measuring the value of significant accomplishments in other cultural domains. In the course of history, the scientific research methods and the discoveries have become significant milestones of universal human culture, indeed often serving as a cultural driving force. In this course we will cover the historical development of scientific ideas, starting from Ancient Mesopotamia, Greece and Egypt. We will follow the progress of humans understanding nature in chronological order all the way to the current and future discoveries including the Higgs Boson, Dark Matter and Supersymmetry at the Large Hadron Collider.

5. OPPOSING THE STATUS QUO: THEATRE AND FILM AS AGENTS OF CHANGE Dennis Barnett, Theatre Arts The primary interests of this class are the ways in which the theatre and the cinema are in dialogue with the society of which they are a part. Society is never static. Changes are always afoot. As the first hint of change occurs in a given society, it is usually reflected in that society’s arts. Furthermore, we often see that the change has been affected (i.e., accelerated, slowed down, derailed), in turn, by society’s responses to specific artistic endeavors. Much of this class involves reading plays and seeing films, and then discussing and writing about them. We will view these works from three different perspectives: historically (what change were these artifacts in dialogue with?), politically (what position does the work take in relation to the change?) and rhetorically (what choices did the artist make in order to make her/his position clear?). Ultimately, this class is about the intersection between great works of art and the cultures in which they were born.

2. MORE THAN CORN: EXPLORING STORIES FROM THE MIDWEST Kate Aspengren, Creative Writing The Midwest’s importance to agriculture is well known. But the open plains and crowded cities of the region have also made significant cultural contributions both in the United States and abroad. In this seminar, we’ll focus on the vast literary landscape of the Midwest as we read fiction, plays, memoir and poetry. This diverse group of Midwestern writers will include Louise Erdrich, Bill Bryson, Lorraine Hansberry and Ted Kooser. We’ll also look at the way other Midwestern stories are told in art, music and film. Are there themes and images that reoccur as we examine the various artistic contributions of the region? Is there a distinct Midwestern voice?

3. HISTORY OF SPORT IN THE UNITED STATES Larry Atwater, Physical Education | Section 1 Elaine Rydze, Physical Education | Section 2

6. AROUND THE WORLD Lisa Barnett, Sociology and Kent Herron, Mathematics

This course is designed to give students opportunities to strengthen vital scholarly skills: critical thinking, reading, speaking, researching and writing. Students will look at the history of sports in the United States from colonization to globalization. Some of the topics that will be investigated will be sport in Native American Cultures, the growth of modern sport, gender perspectives on sport and religious influences on sports. Students will be challenged to think critically about how sports have evolved in this country. The students will be asked to address difficult and controversial issues as they study sports and history. The course will draw attention to women, minorities, and the ethnic and religious groups that have a historical role in the construction of our sports culture.

Whether you are a world traveler or have never been more than a few miles from home, we are all explorers, curious about culture, place, art and rituals. In this course, we are going to journey into familiar cultures and also into those that may seem more alien to us by examining our own experiences and those of others. Our adventures will take place through reading, writing, discussion and popular culture, along with other forms of exploration.

7. THE VIETNAM WAR IN HISTORY, FICTION AND FILM Derek Buckaloo, History Rice paddies...and Rambo. The military draft...and the black stone of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Lyndon Johnson’s credibility...and U.S. invasions and wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, decades later. The Vietnam War remains one of the most controversial and contested events in recent American history, both because of the nature of the war itself and the ways in which it continues to surface in American politics and culture. In this course, we take on the war and its aftereffects, considering the way in which a complex event can be

4. FANALYTICS: FANTASY FOOTBALL ANALYTICS Ryan Baranowski, Economics Sports analytics has become extremely popular following the "Moneyball" revolution. This growing field uses a statistical and analytical framework to study decisions in sports. Fanalytics takes

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10. DEFUSING DANGEROUS DESIGN Ben Chihak, Psychology

seen, understood and filtered through many perspectives, including elements of popular culture like novels and films. We also look at the war from Vietnamese and American perspectives, both of which are, of course, varied. Through these studies, students learn much about the war and how it’s understood today, as well as about how to analyze and think critically about cultural products designed to make sense of the war, such as war memorials, political speeches, fictional writings and Hollywood movies. Through such critical engagement with a variety of ideas and "texts," students develop the ability to reason, to argue, to speak and to write, all crucial skills for continuing success at college and beyond. Readings include works of history and fiction; films will include Hollywood feature films, as well as documentaries.

As new technologies are developed for the consumer marketplace, there is immense pressure to be the first to deliver the next revolutionary product. However history shows us the benefits of technological advancement are often accompanied by unforeseen risks — particularly when designers fail to account for the capabilities and limitations of the end user. In this course we will use case studies and historical examples to investigate how poor design has affected the safety and usability of new technologies and how failure to design with the human in mind can lead to catastrophic outcomes. We will also identify modern-day examples of dangerous design and identify solutions likely to enhance safety and usability.

8. DOING GOOD John Chaimov, Foreign Language

11. FEAR: WHAT WE ARE AFRAID OF AND WHY Gavin Cross, Mathematics

Do you like to volunteer, but you don’t really know why? Or have you always been skeptical of volunteering, but you don’t really know why? This course invites students to deepen their understanding — philosophically, economically, sociologically, cross-culturally — of what it means to do good in the world. We'll explore a vocabulary that includes altruism, charity, development and social-justice work. We'll inquire into the ethics of doing good. We'll inspire our own activism by reading stories of contemporary social activists in New York Times human-rights columnist Nicholas Kristof's book "Half the Sky" and by meeting local citizens who work to improve their community. On the other hand, we'll discuss critiques of doing good by those who point to dependence and other unintended consequences. Beyond reading, of course, we'll actually spend some time doing good and use that as a springboard for reflecting on our personal motivations and assumed effects. If you're a volunteer or aspiring activist for social justice, this course will sharpen your selfawareness and energize you to make a wise impact.

We all fear something, whether it is spiders, small dark spaces or terrorists, to name just a few examples. Fear is one of our most powerful emotions. It can affect how we live our everyday lives. In this class we will delve into many issues involving fear such as: why humans fear, why we have a need to fear, why we fear things we should not and why we don’t fear things we should. We will see how fear is used in the political, business and entertainment industries. The class will be mainly discussion based. Students will work on group projects of their choosing. As with all First-Year Seminars the class will emphasize reading, writing, as well as visual and oral communication.

12. EXPLORING THE STORIES STATES TELL: MONUMENTS, MEMORIALS AND MUSEUMS Theresa Donofrio, Communication Studies At its most basic, the study of communication is the study of the processes through which people make meaning of their lives or, in this case, make meaning of the lives and deaths of generations past and present. This seminar utilizes this perspective on communication to ask questions such as: How do societies make meaning of loss? What is at stake in debates surrounding memorialization? How do monuments, memorials or museums make sense of the past? And why do people decide to visit places where mass deaths have occurred such as battlefields or concentration camps? This course adopts the perspective that these memorials matter, and they matter because of the stories these markers of the past tell about the identity of the society in the present. Students will read multiple scholarly perspectives on memory and memorialization, analyze visual and written texts and author critiques of memorials or similar artifacts.

9. FIRST, DO NO HARM Cassy Cozine, Biology The phrase First, Do No Harm is often considered the main ethical directive to which we hold medical practitioners and is commonly, although incorrectly, attributed to be part of the Hippocratic Oath. But what happens when medical research isn’t carried out with the subject’s best interest in mind? This seminar will examine several historical and contemporary cases involving breaches in medical and research ethics. Primarily using written and oral firstperson accounts of both the subjects and the practitioners we will discuss the historical, social, political and cultural influences and repercussions of these cases on not only the medical field but on society in general. Some cases likely to be examined and discussed are the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, The Monster Study (took place here in Iowa), Human Radiation Studies conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and GlaxoSmithKline’s exploitation of Hispanic and black children in New York’s state facilities in the early 2000s.

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13. RACE ON THE STAGE Deanna Downs, Theatre Arts

subject to the perspective of the photographer as well as the bias of the viewer. Finally we will examine the role of photography as a tool for social reform with discussions on the ethics of the acquisition, interpretation and dissemination of images. Readings will be from the text “Photography a Cultural History” by Mary Warner Marien.

Race. Who wants to talk about a difficult subject that can stir up varying emotions? So, let’s talk about race using a historical lens of popular entertainment! Race on the Stage is an introductory course to race, representation and its manifestation on the American theatre stage. We will read plays and articles, watch films and video and generate a lively dialogue around how different cultures have been represented throughout America’s entertainment history. We will crack open the myth of “race,” dissect and dismantle it. From Irish, Jewish, Italian, Arabian and Asian immigrants to African Americans and Native Americans we will explore how ideologies of race transformed how we view and represent the many cultures contained in America then and today. Students are exposed to key concepts such as the ideology of race, cultural representation, racialization and intersectionality that inform constructions race and the cultural milieu of American theatre.

17. Plato’s Philosophical Legacy Jeff Hoover, Philosophy Alfred North Whitehead famously pronounced all of western philosophy a “footnote” to Plato. While this seems an exaggeration, Plato is indeed a towering influence on our culture and values. Plato’s main concerns will also be ours for the semester: What is the origin and nature of the soul? How can we know “truth” independently of what we are told by our society? And, especially: What does the ideal society look like and who should run it? These and other themes that originate in Plato and carry through to our own day will be explored in readings from Plato and from more recent philosophical thinkers. A main focus in the course will be Plato’s vision of a utopian society, along with later responses by figures such as Thomas More and Karl Marx. This course will emphasize careful reading of texts, critical thinking and academic writing.

14. THE BIG BANG: THE STORY OF US Firdevs Duru, Physics In this course we will look for answers to very fundamental questions about the beginnings of the universe and life on our planet: How did everything start? What is the universe made of? What is life? How did it start? We will start with the Big Bang and go all the way to the formation of humans on Earth. Our aim is to give unified and comprehensive explanations from the largescale universe to the elementary particles from which all material substance is composed. We will cover the origins of space, time, energy, mass and light, the formation of stars, galaxies and planets. We will also study the formation of life from smallest microorganism to Homo sapiens.

18. CLIMATE JUSTICE/SOCIAL JUSTICE Joyce Janca-Aji, Foreign Language How are climate and environmental justice issues inseparable from social justice issues? As weather systems and climate patterns change, as the Arctic melts and sea waters rise, we are faced with unprecedented challenges to our social, political and economic structures with historically oppressed populations, people of color, marginalized and economically disadvantaged communities and nations being the most vulnerable.

15. THRIVE Sara Farrell, Psychology

What examples from past and present can provide models or directions for building a sustainable future? What work is currently being done now? How can we get beyond a sense of hopelessness or despair and actively engage to work effectively for positive change based in a deep understanding of human and animal rights? Through films, selected readings, guest speakers, interviews and activism, this multidisciplinary course focuses on the social and environmental possibilities inherent in the ethics of interconnection.

What does it mean to thrive? What factors determine an individual’s psychological resilience? In this course, we will use various psychological theories (including broaden-and-build theory, selfdetermination theory and mindset theory) as lenses to critically examine the human experience of psychological growth and thriving. Course readings will cover topics such as motivation, personal meaning, positive emotion, strengths-use, mindfulness and authenticity.

19. KNOW YOURSELF, KNOW YOUR WORTH Chris Johnson, Teacher Education

16. PHOTOGRAPHY: THROUGH A CULTURAL LENS Lucy Goodson, Art

Individuals have meanings they apply to themselves in various roles ranging from family member, employee or member of a community organization. Racial identity is identification with a particular group or as one’s racial group membership. Racial identity places individuals in various groups based on physical features. People possess multiple identities and occupy multiple roles, yet members of society share the meanings of these identities. This course seeks to explain the specific meanings that individuals attach to their multiple identities. We will explore the seminal piece "Know Yourself," by the great philosopher Aubrey Drake Graham.

We take and observe photographic images every day. The nature of how we interpret those images has changed throughout the history of photography. In this course we will examine the place that photography can hold as a science, an art form or a tool to affect social change. At its advent, photography was considered to be a technical tool for science. How and why did it become an expressive art form? Considering photographs in ethnographic studies, we will question if the photograph represents an inherent truth, or if it is

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20. CHEW ON THIS Scout Kelly, Psychology

is the only leadership that is going to matter in the 21st century. If a person cannot lead himself/herself, he/she then will be led by other people. This course will discuss the art and science of personal leadership. Students will study various contemporary theories of leadership and read stories and case studies on this subject. The objective of the course is to help students have an awareness and understanding of the keys to successful self-leadership. With these keys, students will be able to develop themselves to become great leaders.

Our relationship to food is a complex one. We eat to fuel our bodies, but at various times, we might also eat to simply enjoy the pleasure of it, to socialize, to experience different cultures or to make ourselves feel better. Sometimes we eat without even realizing it! In this course, we will apply multiple disciplinary perspectives as we explore our relationship to food. We’ll examine questions like, how and why have “ideal bodies” changed throughout history? What are the causes and consequences of obesity? Why do diets usually fail? How do we decide what healthy eating is, and how can we promote healthier eating in our societies, our communities and our own lives?

24. FROM BACH TO BEYONCÉ: A STUDY OF MUSIC AND CULTURE Loralee Songer, Music

21. ADVERTISING, SOCIETY AND SELF Rob Kuennen, Business Administration

This course will be an in-depth look at musical styles and influences from 1600 to today. Artists who will be featured include, but are not limited to, Bach, Nina Simone, Billie Holiday, Debussy, Taylor Swift, NWA, Green Day, Wagner, Michael Jackson, Eminem, Pharrell Williams, Kayne West and John Cage.

This course will explore the cultural history of advertising in the United States through the lens of consumer culture theory. Students will learn how advertising has evolved from a simple communication medium to an ideological form that plays an important role in constructing our shared understanding of reality. In addition, students will reflect on the extent to which their own marketplace behaviors shape their respective identities and communicate information about themselves to the outside world.

25. SURPRISE! EXPLORING THE UNEXPECTED IN VISUAL ART AND FILM Josh Thorud, Art How do visual art and film build shock, suspense and anticipation? What kinds of expectations do we have when approaching artworks and films? How can we shatter them? Through art and film analysis, screenwriting and art creation, this class will examine the idea of narrative in art and film, especially focusing on anticipation and disruption. Suspense comes in many forms, from the complexity of Alfred Hitchcock to the simplicity of a glass sitting too close to the edge of a table. From the jump scares in contemporary horror films to surprises in digital art, animation, sculpture and more, we will explore the unexpected in new and exciting ways. Students will closely examine works of visual and cinematic art to find underlying narrative structures and use these experiences to develop works of their own.

22. CONFRONTING A PAINFUL PAST: TRUTH COMMISSIONS AROUND THE WORLD Kim Lanegran, Political Science Emerging from a period of civil war or authoritarian rule, a society often stands at a crossroads. What should be done about the painful past? To live together peacefully, must people forget about murders, exploitation and hatred? Or, must the past be confronted and acknowledged? Should the guilty be punished or forgiven? Will exhuming the past, dead bodies and all, lead to renewed hatred or to reconciliation? Many countries establish truth commissions to investigate and report on past crimes. Often amnesty is offered to human rights violators in exchange for information about atrocities. The hope is that truth commissions will uncover truth about the past and facilitate reconciliation and healing among individuals and within society.

26. SOCIAL JUSTICE IN THE CITY Drew Westberg, Economics This course is focused on issues of justice in the city. Cedar Rapids will be our laboratory. We will explore issues of race, economics, politics, history, identity and space, all through the lens of justice. Students will engage these issues through readings, in-class discussions, meetings with local officials and residents, and their own personal explorations of this city. This is a class about policy, about people and about making the places we call home of better service to us all.

This seminar examines the challenges of confronting, understanding and redressing past atrocities through truth commissions. Studying East Timor, Kenya, Sierra Leone and South Africa, we will read dramas, government reports, memoirs and social science scholarship.

23. PERSONAL LEADERSHIP Vinh Nguyen, Business Administration Great leaders are first and foremost great at leading themselves. Personal leadership is the leadership of the self and this is the foundation of successful leadership. Peter Drucker, the well-known expert and founder of modern management, said self-leadership

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FINANCIAL AID

and BUSINESS OFFICE

WORK STUDY PROCEDURE

During the second part of June, College Work Study (CWS) information will be emailed to all incoming students who have been awarded and accepted work study. The email will include instructions on (1) how to apply for a work study position through Handshake, (2) a link to the CWS Policy & Procedure Manual for Students & Supervisors and (3) information about required payroll forms. **THERE WILL BE AN INFORMATIONAL SESSION REGARDING WORK STUDY DURING ORIENTATION.**

PAYROLL FORMS

Once you arrive on campus you must submit payroll forms and provide required documents listed on the Federal I-9 to the payroll forms table or the Business Office. These forms are available under My Orientation on my.coe.edu or coe.edu/ studentpayroll. DO NOT send payroll forms in the mail.

AUG UST 18

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JULY 31

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AUG UST 1

Fall pay men t due for term and

AUG UST 22

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OCT OB ER 10

to be issu ed issu ed. CWS pay will cont inue Firs t CWS pay roll chec ks are long as as year c emi acad ugh out the on the 10th of each mon th thro s. date due the by time shee ts are subm itted

JAN UARY 10

mon thly pay men t plan s.*

Spri ng term pay men t due for

term and mon thly pay men t plan

*You have the option to enroll in a per-term payment plan (one payment per term) or the monthly payment plan (five payments per term). More information can be found in the 18-19 Financial Aid Handbook (www.coe.edu/educational-costs-1819).

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s.*


ACADEMICS GREETINGS FROM THE REGISTRAR’S OFFICE Coe provides a liberal arts foundation of the highest quality for students completing its bachelor’s degree programs. In completing the college curriculum, students gain experience in several broad areas of study. While students have extensive freedom in choosing courses relevant to their individual goals, they are guaranteed exposure to the full spectrum of the liberal arts.

Most courses carry one course credit at Coe and ordinarily, students take four course credits per term. Three course credits or more are considered full time. You will need to average four credits per term in order to graduate in four years. Our office is here to help you with academic matters and make sure you get through your Coe experience on time! Along your way, you’ll be in contact with us about:

Graduation requirements at Coe College provide a foundation for coping intelligently, effectively and responsibly with the complex and changing conditions of life in modern society. As such, graduates must complete the following basic core groups: »» »» »» »» »»

»» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »»

First-Year Experience Writing Emphasis courses General Education requirements that include liberal arts selections in the four divisional areas (Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Social Sciences, Humanities, Fine Arts) and Diverse Cultural Perspectives courses Academic Practicum Major

Applying to graduate Changing faculty advisors Course schedule Declaring your major Dropping or adding a course Education verification GPA questions Honors thesis Loan deferments

»» Method of grading (Letter or S/U) »» Off-campus courses »» Petitions for missed deadlines and catalog exceptions »» Registration »» Transcripts »» Transfer work »» VA benefits

To begin your Coe experience, you will pick out your schedule with your advisor. We will help you register for those classes either over the summer or during orientation, if you haven’t yet registered. You can utilize the Coe bookstore — ­­ bkstr.com/coestore — to help find and purchase your books over the summer or during orientation. Here is a quick look at some of the important dates that correspond to our office: AUGUST 21: Registration changes can be made for those who registered during the spring or summer AUGUST 22: Classes begin

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AUGUST 28: Last day to add courses AUGUST 28: Last day to drop courses (without a drop showing on your transcript)


Academic

AREAS OF STUDY It’s OK if you come to Coe without knowing your major or future career plans. The liberal arts curriculum at Coe is intended to give you many opportunities to open a wide variety of doors. At Coe, you take courses in the humanities, fine arts, social sciences and natural sciences. Taking general education courses starts your course work for one or more majors. If you are interested in a profession or career in medicine, architecture, engineering or law, visit with your advisor about the best course of study for you.

AREAS OF STUDY (MAJORS) FOR B.A. »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »»

Accounting, Managerial Accounting, Public African American Studies American Studies Art Art History Asian Studies Biology Business Administration Chemistry Communication Studies Computer Science Economics Elementary Education

COLLATERAL MAJORS »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »»

Biochemistry Creative Writing Environmental Science Environmental Studies Gender and Sexuality Studies Molecular Biology Neuroscience Organizational Science Public Relations

»» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »»

English Film Studies French French Studies General Science German German Studies History Interdisciplinary Studies International Business International Economics International Studies Literature Mathematics

»» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »»

Music Philosophy Physical Education Physics Political Science Psychology Religion Social & Criminal Justice Sociology Spanish Spanish Studies Theatre Arts Writing (Rhetoric)

AREAS OF STUDY (MAJORS) FOR B. M. »» »» »» »» »»

Keyboard or Instrumental Performance Vocal Performance Composition Instrumental Music Education Vocal Music Education

AREAS OF STUDY (MAJORS) FOR B.S.N. »» Nursing

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NATURAL BIOLOGY

and MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES GENERAL SCIENCE

Due to the strength of Coe’s program, more than two-thirds of biology graduates go on to graduate and medical schools. The goal of the Coe Biology Department is for each student to learn and apply the underlying principles and mechanism governing genes, cells, organisms, populations and landscapes, while developing intellectual skills used in the experimental process. A molecular biology collateral major is a consideration for students who are interested in finding technical positions in academia or industry after graduation.

Coe recommends most students interested in science pursue a major in biology, chemistry or physics. Related collateral major options include biochemistry, environmental science and neuroscience. However, the general science major may be useful to students whose scientific interests do not fit well within a single discipline. The food science, pharmaceutical, biophysical and agricultural sciences areas are examples of such cross-disciplinary interests. Combined with a major in English or collateral major in writing, general science is excellent preparation for a writing career in science or technology. In addition, general science can be an appropriate major for students who intend to teach science at the secondary school level. When combined with other majors or minors, a degree in general science can be excellent preparation for careers in law, business and public relations.

CHEMISTRY

Due to the small classes, outstanding faculty and personal attention, a degree in chemistry from Coe allows students to pursue a wide variety of opportunities. Coe chemistry students also have the opportunity to use state-of-the-art instrumentation in both courses and in research, such as a 300 MHz FTNMR, a Raman microscope, an atomic force microscope, ion chromatographs, dye lasers, Schlenk lines and more! A collateral major in biochemistry is available for students interested in research in that specific area.

PHYSICS

Individualized learning and personal attention from faculty are hallmarks of Coe’s physics program, leading to highly successful students. As a Coe physics major, you’ll be encouraged to conduct individual research, working one-on-one with a professor on advanced projects. The Physics Department is recognized worldwide for faculty-student research that has been conducted on the properties of glass. Coe physics majors travel to present research and attend conferences, with recent destinations including Italy, Brazil and England. The department provides comprehensive and balanced training for a variety of future endeavors, including teaching, graduate work, industrial research and broadening their liberal arts education.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

Coe’s computer science program is designed to prepare students for careers in industry and to provide a solid theoretical foundation for students interested in attending graduate school. The Department of Mathematical Sciences offers both a major and minor concentration in computer science. Many computer science students gain experience through internships with Cedar Rapids businesses and research opportunities on and off campus.

MATHEMATICS

Coe’s mathematics program is designed to prepare students for a range of careers in business, industry or teaching, and also to provide a solid theoretical foundation for students interested in attending graduate school. The Department of Mathematical Sciences offers both a major and minor concentration in mathematics. A growing number of our best students are participating in summer REU (Research Experience for Undergraduates) programs to get a taste of what original work in the mathematical sciences is like.

ADDITIONAL SCIENCE-RELATED MAJORS ARE LISTED UNDER THE COLLATERAL MAJORS HEADING ON PAGE 16.

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SOCIAL SCIENCES ECONOMICS

PSYCHOLOGY

The economics major at Coe is designed to develop competence in the discipline of economics and to prepare students for graduate study in economics, business, industrial relations or law. Coe offers over 20 different economics courses to better prepare students for challenging graduate programs. Economics majors often engage in joint research with faculty members as part of the Spellman Summer Research Program. After graduation, economics majors typically either enter graduate programs or find jobs in finance, business or government.

Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and mental processes — the basis for both a field of scientific knowledge and of professional application. The psychology program at Coe is centered on a traditional, scientific approach to the discipline. Both research experience and hands-on internship placements in community centers and businesses are important aspects of the psychology program at Coe. Upon graduation, many psychology graduates enter careers related to their interests in psychology, particularly in the fields of counseling, human services and personnel work in business and industry. Graduate and professional study in the field is also a popular option among our graduates: about 50 percent of our students enter graduate or professional programs of study within five years. Coe maintains an active chapter of Psi Chi, the national honor society for psychology students, and also a Psychology Club that sponsors a wide variety of student activities throughout the academic year. Student-faculty research is also an activity that many psychology majors enjoy as part of their work at Coe.

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

International economics majors intending to do graduate work in international studies or intending to pursue a career with a governmental or nongovernmental agency are strongly encouraged to consider a minor or major in political science or one of the international studies tracks to complement the international economics major. Students are also encouraged to work closely with a member of the department to select complementary general education courses.

SOCIAL & CRIMINAL JUSTICE

This program offers students an opportunity to immerse themselves in an interdisciplinary major that draws from Coe's rich tradition in the liberal arts, as well as the pre-professional opportunities at the college. While looking at the different facets of justice, students will also address issues housed within the field of criminal justice studies. Examining the local and global aspect of this major, students will study social and criminal justice initiatives within the Cedar Rapids community in comparison to the human rights and comparative justice initiatives worldwide. With a required practicum and interdisciplinary engagement, the SCJ program demonstrates for students how a multiplicity of voices and viewpoints can help shape new ideas about the impact of social justice initiatives upon the criminal justice systems and the foundations of individual and collective community engagement.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

The Coe political science curriculum emphasizes the understanding of politics as a worldwide phenomenon. In an age of instant media coverage and global markets, students need and want to learn about the main similarities and differences between their government and others. The department provides excellent opportunities and strong encouragement for off-campus programs, internships and independent study. Coe political science graduates have gone on to successful careers in law, business, teaching, government, journalism and many other areas of private and public service.

SOCIOLOGY

Sociology is one of the disciplines that strives to understand human behavior and the social forces that shape it. By offering a range of courses examining major social institutions, units and processes, the sociology program at Coe provides skills that enable students to explain the influences social factors have on their lives. A degree in sociology prepares graduates for a variety of careers, from teaching to law to social service professions.

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HUMANITIES COMMUNICATION STUDIES

history and legacy of colonialism, the conditions that create or resolve poverty, and relations between the Global South and North. International relations combines theoretical approaches to and empirical knowledge of state and nonstate actors, power and international structures.

A degree in communication studies is based on the centuries old studies of language and rhetoric, and how they could be used as tools to benefit each of us. These ancient teachings of Greek and Roman philosophers are the basis for many modern societies and form the core of studies in communication, linguistics, archeology, religion, philosophy, art history, fine arts, sociology, psychology and law. Here, in the United States, and at Coe College, most communication studies programs sprouted from speech and theatre departments and out of social sciences.

LITERATURE

The literature major includes all areas of language and literature taught at Coe. Not limited to any particular language or culture, the major explores what literature is, what forms it takes, some of the possible approaches to its study and the various ways literature relates to other human activities and disciplines. Students are required to do work in a foreign language. Because the value of reading a work in its original language is recognized, students are strongly advised to take as many courses in a foreign language as possible. They may also take courses in foreign literature in translation, English and American literature, creative writing and linguistics for credit toward the major.

ENGLISH

The English program at Coe offers students opportunities to develop critical thinking and communications skills that are used in most areas of work and professional training. Coursework in the English Department hones students’ abilities to think and write analytically. We do this through close study of literary works, both as art forms and as documents of history, culture and behavior. The creative writing program, which offers a minor and a collateral major, focuses on reading and writing fiction, poetry and drama.

PHILOSOPHY

Philosophy is the rational, critical inquiry into fundamental questions of human existence. As such, it involves examining the nature of knowledge, reality, human existence, ethics and social and political structures. For just about any area of human inquiry, such as mathematics, science, religion, law, art, etc. there is a branch of philosophy devoted to the critical study of the fundamental assumptions of that area of inquiry. For instance, in the philosophy of religion the philosopher asks what religion is and what is the nature of religious experience or in the philosophy of science she might ask what is the nature of science and how does it differ from other areas of intellectual inquiry.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

The approach to languages at Coe is integrated and comprehensive. When you study German, Spanish or French at Coe, you not only become culturally literate in the language, but also the poetry, music, food, geography, painting and customs of another people. You are then better able to understand your place in your own culture. The knowledge of a foreign language is a valuable resource in today’s world. Through the on-campus curriculum and study abroad opportunities, Coe grads have gone on to language-related careers in government, teaching, international banking, radio and television.

RELIGION

Studying religion allows one to explore the ways in which people from across time and cultures have conceived of the world, including the nature of the universe, the relationship and responsibilities of humans to each other and to the natural world, the movement of forces beyond immediate and physical apprehension and the ultimate destiny of humanity. The study of religion allows one to approach these questions from a number of different perspectives, including history, literature, philosophy, art and archaeology, anthropology and sociology. By examining the dynamics of religious expression, one is inquiring into the nature of the sacred, the history of culture and the way people live in and engage with the world today.

If you have background in Spanish and are considering taking a Spanish course, you must complete the placement test for Spanish. If you are considering taking French or German, we recommend that you take the appropriate placement test for that language. If possible, please complete your placement test before you begin orientation. For further information, please contact Monica Fuertes-Arboix, Spanish (mfuertes@coe.edu), Joyce Janca-Aji, French (jjanca@coe.edu) or John Chaimov, German (jchaimov@coe.edu).

HISTORY

The History Department offers a wide variety of courses that both fulfill general education requirements and satisfy the interests of history majors. Students may take general survey courses in Western Civilization and United States history, as well as specialized courses in European history, including the Classical World, Asian history, Latin American history and United States history. History majors at Coe have gone on to successful careers in many fields, including law, foreign service, journalism, teaching, museum work, publishing and corporate business.

WRITING (RHETORIC)

The writing major in rhetoric enables students to develop the personal and professional writing skills necessary for virtually any profession. While the writing major does not require a second major, the flexible design of the curriculum makes it possible for all students to complete a second major in another field. The department’s 24 writing courses include opportunities for working in multiple print and digital genres, including creative nonfiction (nature writing, memoir, personal essays, travel literature), professional writing, technical writing, journalism, blogs and websites. Students can include in their major English Department creative writing courses in poetry, fiction and script writing. A writing minor is also available.

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

International studies majors select one of the following tracks: the Global South, international relations or global cultural studies. The Global South examines the characteristics of regions in what has come to be called the “Global South,” especially Latin America, Africa and Asia. It investigates how the evolution of these regions relates to social, political and economic systems. Students are introduced to a variety of disciplinary and theoretical approaches to the study of international development; graduates better understand the

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FINE ARTS ART & ART HISTORY

MUSIC THEORY

SUMMER THEORY PREPARATION Music majors, particularly those planning a career in music education, need to be prepared for Music Theory I in order to keep on a four-year track. Students with no previous theory education will want to spend time before fall term becoming acquainted with the basics of music theory. A good resource is "The Complete Book of Scales, Chords, Arpeggios and Cadences" by Palmer, Manus and Lethco.

A major in art or art history is designed to provide a foundation in theory and practice. Students focus on making and meaning, and gain an understanding of visual and contextual history and analysis. In studying the formal, technical and conceptual aspects of art and art history, students learn to communicate effectively to broad and diverse audiences.

THEATRE ARTS

The theatre arts program is designed to provide a balance between academic and experiential learning for all interested students. The goal is to offer opportunities for student participation in all aspects of theatre, on stage and in the classroom, and to enrich the cultural and academic life of the college.

MUSIC THEORY PLACEMENT TEST Students considering music theory or composition courses as an elective or as a major or minor in music must take the Music Theory Placement Test during orientation or a summer registration day. Test results will determine the music theory level in which the student should enroll.

CHORAL MUSIC

MUSIC LESSONS

CONCERT CHOIR* A 50-60 voice mixed select ensemble that sings a cappella or accompanied by keyboard, small ensemble or full orchestra. The choir performs both on and off campus and tours regularly.

Private lessons for all instruments and voice are available to Coe students during fall and spring terms. A supplemental fee is charged for one-hour or half-hour lessons and students receive college credit. Students may take a combination of these fractional credit courses (lessons and ensembles) each term. Students should contact the Music Office at o-music@coe.edu or 319.399.8521 for further information.

CHORALE* A 30-40 voice ensemble. A highlight of the Chorale’s season is the annual Christmas Convocation performance and Christmas Vespers services of Lessons and Carols. The Chorale also gives several other performances each year, both on and off campus.

FILM STUDIES

SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA* The Orchestra performs selections from the symphonic repertoire of the 18th through the 21st centuries in both full orchestra and string orchestra formats. The ensemble may also perform works that feature soloists or combine with the Concert Choir to present masterworks.

The interdisciplinary major of film studies explores all aspects of film and digital production. Film studies is a 10-course major blending content and expertise from three disciplines: art, English/creative writing and theatre arts. Courses range from the more theoretical aspects of film to the hands-on production process in a variety of formats. A sampling of course offerings include filmmaking, animation, film history and analysis, acting, lighting, scene and costume design, photography, digital art and film topics. The major is designed to offer experience in the art of visual storytelling.

CONCERT BAND* This group performs some of the great band repertoire of the 20th and 21st centuries, as well as selected transcriptions of orchestral repertoire. Each year a well-known composer spends a residency with the band, presenting a concert as part of the annual Festival of Bands.

Coe’s film studies major is structured to explore film as an art form that informs and entertains. Clearly, film production is moving into the digital domain, and Coe is prepared to follow these exciting advancements while still respecting time-honored production methods and values. An additional advantage to majoring in film at Coe is the availability of film internships.

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC

JAZZ ENSEMBLE This ensemble performs several times each term. Coe brings a number of jazz professionals on campus for several days to work with the Coe jazz students and to perform with them at the Jazz Summit annually. *Students with music scholarships will be assigned to one of these ensembles to satisfy participation requirements.

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ADDITIONAL AREAS OF STUDY AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

The African American studies major offers students the opportunity to study African American culture through an interdisciplinary approach. Students take courses in areas such as history, literature and sociology in order to gain a more complete understanding of the major figures and movements that helped define the culture. Students who pursue a degree in African American studies at Coe have the opportunity to work with instructors with a range of expertise on topics and issues regarding the African American experience. African American studies play a key role in the college’s efforts to provide students opportunities to build good foundations of understanding and coping in our complex world and growing multicultural society.

AMERICAN STUDIES

The American studies program at Coe offers students a broad understanding of American culture by exploring America’s rich and unique diversity as well as the aspects that unite Americans as a people and a nation. Students seeking experiences and studies that are not easily contained within a single discipline might find the interdisciplinary nature of American studies appealing. American studies is similar to other disciplines in the humanities in that it develops the student’s ability to think critically and to articulate those ideas effectively in writing. The program stresses the strong liberal arts experience that broadens intellectual horizons while providing sound preparation for a successful career in desired fields. At Coe, students who pursue a degree in American studies have the opportunity to work with instructors across disciplines who are knowledgeable and passionate about their field of study. The program affords students the flexibility to tailor most of their coursework around their specific interests in American culture while learning to synthesize a variety of sources into a coherent idea(s). Students are also encouraged to integrate resources available in the larger Cedar Rapids community into their plans of study.

ASIAN STUDIES

The Asian studies major is designed to acquaint students with the great cultures and societies of Asia, focusing primarily those of China and Japan. The major is interdisciplinary and requires the students take courses in the areas of art history, history, literature and religion, and suggests they also take courses in economics, music and political science. Travel and intensive study in the region is also an integral part of Coe’s Asian studies program.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

In the business major at Coe, students are able to take a wide variety of creative and challenging management, marketing, finance and business law courses. Coe’s unmatched liberal arts program gives students an advantage in today’s ever-changing and internationally competitive business world. Beyond the classroom, the student-run Investment Fund, Spellman Summer Research Program, Law Club, internships and special projects give students opportunities to pursue their interests and develop skills. Coe business graduates find success in a wide range of careers and graduate degree programs.

ACCOUNTING

Accounting majors benefit from Coe’s strong liberal arts curriculum, which provides students with the general education background recommended by employers and state accountancy boards. Students majoring in accounting have two degree options: the managerial accounting major or the public accounting major. The Certified Public Accounting (CPA) exam pass rate for Coe’s accounting graduates has historically exceeded the national average. Accounting majors find jobs in public accounting firms and in accounting positions within business organizations.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Students majoring in international business are required to take a core curriculum of business administration courses. In addition, students will take International Finance, International Business Management, Advanced Topics Marketing: Non-Western Perspectives and other related courses. Please refer to the business administration description for more details.

NURSING

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing program allows students to become engaged in learning in an academic environment, based upon a foundation of learning in the liberal arts. The highest quality professional education is achieved through hands-on nursing experiences in clinical sites, one-on-ones with a registered nurse preceptor. Small class size allows for individualized student attention in both the classroom and skills laboratory. St. Luke’s and Mercy Hospitals are located within walking distances of the college. Other clinical sites are also used in Cedar Rapids and Iowa City. Last year's first-time licensure pass rates for Coe BSN graduates was 100 percent.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

The physical education program enables students to earn a major in physical education for teacher certification, a coaching endorsement, a coaching authorization and a Teacher Health Certification endorsement. Students may also pursue a degree in physical education fitness development with an emphasis from the Strength and Conditioning Group and/or Health and Wellness Group. Sports management is a popular interdisciplinary major.

TEACHER EDUCATION

Offering an elementary education major and teaching endorsements in 25 different secondary level subjects, the Coe College Teacher Education Department believes that competent teachers are passionate about learning, appreciate diverse learners’ needs and experiences and possess skills related to positively influencing the learning of all students. The Teacher Education Department provides a curriculum that supports students to grow to become the teachers of the future. Education majors have access to teaching and observation experiences in over 30 elementary schools, plus numerous middle and high schools in the Cedar Rapids area.

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COLLATERAL MAJORS Coe also offers the following interdisciplinary collateral majors, which require a student to satisfy the requirements of a major from the previous list in addition to the selected collateral major.

BIOCHEMISTRY

NEUROSCIENCE

This is an excellent course of study for students who wish to pursue careers in the health professions as well as those wishing to continue their studies in graduate school. An interdisciplinary program that emphasizes a deep knowledge of chemistry in addition to familiarity with the tools of molecular biology, it also requires the completion of a major in chemistry.

Neuroscience is an interdisciplinary field dedicated to understanding the brain and nervous system. Scientific work in this area is guided by biology, chemistry and psychology, and also includes contributions from other disciplines such as physics, computer science, mathematics and medicine. The neuroscience collateral major at Coe requires a major in biology, chemistry or psychology and provides students with a solid foundation for graduate study in neurosciencerelated programs, medicine and health-related careers. The courses in the neuroscience major provide an interdisciplinary approach to understanding how the nervous system regulates physiological, cognitive and behavioral processes in human and nonhuman animals. The neuroscience major is designed to instill curiosity about the complex processes at the molecular, cellular and organismal levels of organization. Coe’s neuroscience program is supported by a strong core faculty who are formally trained in neuroscience. Neuroscience majors have the opportunity to do original and important neuroscience research projects ranging from the molecular to behavioral levels of organization, to gain hands-on experience with many of the instruments and techniques used by contemporary neuroscientists and to present their research at regional and national conferences.

CREATIVE WRITING

Offered by the English Department, the creative writing collateral major focuses on writing works of fiction, poetry and scripts. Creative writing at Coe focuses on the workshop method, which emphasizes writing and peerreviewing student-authored texts and culminates in the Manuscript Workshop in the senior year in which students thoroughly revise and polish a unified manuscript, typically a collection of short stories, a novel, a collection of poems, a collection of one-act plays or a full-length play.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Coe’s environmental science program is designed to prepare students for successful careers in the field by giving students significant depth in both chemistry and biology. The challenges of developing bioremediation techniques for hazardous waste sites, of understanding the biogeochemistry of nutrient-enriched streams or of forecasting the effects of land-use changes on natural systems demand a deep knowledge of the sciences. Students who undertake the environmental science program will have opportunities to apply the knowledge they acquire in the classroom and laboratory to the type of complex challenges they will face after they leave Coe.

ORGANIZATIONAL SCIENCE

Organizational science focuses its study on how people behave within organizations. As such, Coe’s organizational science major is designed to acquaint students with human behavior in organizations from both theoretical and applied perspectives. The program aims to prepare students to carry out various human resources, organizational development, customer service and institutional research functions in a variety of organizational settings. It also prepares students for graduate study in the fields of industrial/organizational (I/O) psychology, human resources, law, quantitative methods, management and other similar fields. Required courses in quantitative methods form the core of the major, complemented by required and elective coursework on relevant topics within the disciplines of psychology and business administration that are central to the field. An internship or research experience is also required. The core of the typical organizational science curriculum centers on methodology, statistical analysis of organizational processes and outcomes, and an emphasis on problem-solving. Students majoring in organizational science at Coe must also complete a major in psychology.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

The environmental studies major at Coe is a collateral, interdisciplinary program that requires students to study environmental issues using techniques and perspectives derived from a variety of academic disciplines. At its core, environmental studies critically evaluates humanity’s interaction with the natural environment. For students looking to develop knowledge and expertise in this growing field, Coe has created a dynamic, cutting-edge program. Featuring faculty from at least six separate departments, this major is truly a liberal arts experience. Coe’s program combines courses from science (with a particular emphasis on ecology and chemistry); policy (economics, law and politics); and the humanities (philosophy/ethics, rhetoric and history).

PUBLIC RELATIONS

GENDER AND SEXUALITY STUDIES

The public relations collateral major at Coe is intended for students who wish to develop skills to prepare for a career in public relations and communication fields. It integrates coursework in business administration, professional writing, graphic arts and other relevant fields. Public relations internships are readily available for students in the Cedar Rapids area. Some majors spend a term enrolled in off-campus programs working with advertising agencies or publishing houses in New York or Chicago.

The aim of the collateral major in gender studies is to provide a framework for examining gender in societies. The focus of the work is on the experiences of women and men of various races, classes and cultures in history, society, science and the arts.

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

Recommended for students who are interested in finding technical positions in academia or industry after graduation or those planning to pursue a graduate program in molecular biology, cell biology or microbiology, the molecular biology major requires the completion of a major in biology.

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OFF-CAMPUS STUDY Study abroad is a great way to expand your horizons and gain new experiences in a completely different environment. Coe College sponsors exchange programs to England, France, Korea, Germany, Sweden, Spain, Ghana, Quebec and Japan, and through its affiliation with the Associated Colleges of the Midwest (ACM) and other providers, Coe can send students to study virtually anywhere in the world! Coe’s Asia Term spends spring term in Thailand, Vietnam and Cambodia under the leadership of a Coe faculty member. Recent faculty-led May Term study trips have taken students to Iceland, Serbia, England, Germany, Italy, Ireland, Spain, Vietnam and many other locales. There are also internship opportunities within the United States through terms in New York City, Washington, D.C. and Chicago. For students seeking a wilderness learning adventure, Coe offers four-week-long summer classes in biology and environmental studies at its Wilderness Field Station near the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness in extreme Northern Minnesota. Regardless of your specific aims, Coe encourages and works to fulfill any off-campus ambition students have. Contact John Chaimov, Associate Professor of German and Director of Off-Campus Study at 319.399.8594 for more information or visit www.coe.edu/offcampus.

PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS PRE-ARCHITECTURE

PRE-LAW

PROGRAM DIRECTOR: JENNIFER ROGERS

PROGRAM DIRECTOR: JOSH CHRISTENSEN

For most careers in architecture, students will need to complete a Master of Architecture degree following their B.A. at Coe. To prepare for successful application into these programs, students should complete a series of courses selected in consultation with an Art and Art History Department advisor, in addition to the courses completed for the major.

There is no prescribed curriculum for students intending to enter law school after graduation. Law schools report that their most successful students are those who have acquired a broad academic background, developed a capacity for logical analysis and mastered the ability to write clearly. Study in one or several of a variety of disciplines will prepare students to undertake legal training. Students interested in law should consult their department advisor and the pre-law program director.

HEALTH PROFESSIONS PROGRAM DIRECTOR: PAUL STORER Coe’s program for those interested in the health professions, such as medicine and dentistry, is a flexible one based on the requirements of the health professions’ schools. Students interested in a health profession usually major in one of the sciences, but all majors offered by the college are acceptable.

THE VINEYARDS AT TUSCANY'S VILLA LE CORTI ARE AMONG THE SIGHTS STUDENTS HAVE EXPLORED AS PART OF THEIR STUDIES ABROAD.

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CAMPUS SERVICES COMMUNITY IS IMPORTANT AT COE

MAKING COE A PLACE TO CALL HOME

Creating an environment where learning extends beyond the classroom and all members are treated with dignity and respect are the foundations of the development of this community. In an unbiased, collegial atmosphere where ideas are shared freely, it is important that we be open-minded and at times agree to disagree. This ensures you are in a place where learning can thrive.

I encourage you to be proactive in making Coe your home. Join a club. Go out for an athletic team. Sing in a choir. Check out Greek life. Write for the Cosmos. Join your Hall Council. Be a Resident Assistant, College Adjustment Peer or a Peer Minister. Join the Student Activities Committee, run for Student Senate or find a great place to study. Your Coe experience extends beyond the classroom and will be deeply enriched by the co-curricular activities you choose. Like generations of Coe students before you, your participation outside the classroom will leave the Coe community a better place than you found it.

One of the key aspects setting Coe College apart from the other residential liberal arts colleges is the importance and value placed upon the development of community. Students, faculty, staff, as well as alumni, parents and outside constituents, recognize that Coe College has a “community” second to none.

Creating a “home away from home” is an essential element of a successful college experience. Coe College provides endless opportunities to create that home and to positively impact your own development as well as the greater Coe community.

There is an idea about home that says “home is where the heart is.” I am betting, like me, after your first year at Coe, you too, will be a Kohawk at heart. ERIK ALBINSON Vice President for Student Development

Following is the Campus Civility Statement, which was developed by students at Coe. Read and embrace it because it is what we adhere to as members of the Coe College community.

CAMPUS CIVILITY STATEMENT This statement was written by students in order to address standards of civility and respect within the Coe College community. This statement is a living document and is intended to evolve over time. We, the members of the Coe College community, expect our campus climate to be safe, mutually supportive, academically encouraging, equitable and accepting of all its members.

IN ADDITION: »» »» »» »» »» »» »»

We acknowledge and encourage the academic experience to extend beyond the classroom into our living environment. We expect a campus free of incidents that create a hostile living environment. We expect a healthy and responsible attitude to accompany all social gatherings. Intoxication will not be an excuse for incidents that occur while under the influence. We expect that diversity of opinion will be encouraged and respected — students should be able to disagree without being disagreeable. Everyone has the right to be respected for their individuality. The members of our campus community shall respect the rights of other persons regardless of their actual or perceived age, color, creed, able-bodiness, neurodiversity, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, race, religion, sex or sexual orientation.

The Coe community is made up of individuals who model these standards and hold each other accountable. In order for the community to encompass the goals outlined above, each individual is responsible and accountable for their own actions and words.

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY From wireless residence halls to electronic classrooms, Coe offers its students a number of opportunities to keep you connected both on and off campus. If you choose to bring your own PC or Mac, you may connect to the network from the convenience of your room by using an Ethernet connection or going wireless. The computer facilities at Coe consist of:

»» »» »» »» »» »»

Over 3,000 computer ports on campus Full internet services within all campus buildings Wireless internet service throughout the campus buildings, residence halls, athletic facilities and open areas 250 computers available for student use located throughout campus buildings Web print services allow students to send documents from their devices to college printers Stream2 provides free entertainment and sports programming on your mobile devices

HOW CAN STUDENTS CONTACT THE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT?

IS ANTI-VIRUS SOFTWARE AVAILABLE THROUGH THE SCHOOL?

Place a SchoolDude work order (link available on my.coe.edu), call 319.399.8877, email o-computer@coe.edu or stop by our office — Voorhees Hall — main level. Information Technology is open from 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM Monday–Friday. For help with your room’s internet connection call 319.399.8877 or email the department.

Yes, you can pick up an anti–virus CD for a $1 deposit or download free anti– virus software from the Coe website.

HOW DO STUDENTS CHECK COEMAIL (EMAIL)? Your email address consists of your first initial, middle initial and full last name, followed by @coe.edu. Your default password is coe + your Student ID number (coe0123456). You can access your account from the main www.coe.edu web page, from my.coe.edu or in any browser that shows google.com.

HOW CAN STUDENTS BACK UP THEIR WORK? Students can access a personal storage area within their Coe email account. From on or away from campus, your CoeMail account, powered by Google GSuite for Education allows unlimited cloud-computing storage.

ARE THERE PRINTERS AVAILABLE ON CAMPUS? Yes, there are printers in all computer labs on campus. Each semester, students are allowed 750 pages of print (single side) with additional printing costing $5 for 100 pages. Color printing is available in the Learning Commons. You are charged four pages from your printing account for every color page printed (per side). Go to www.print.coe.edu to check your print balance or to use the web print feature.

WHAT IS CABLE TV AND STREAMING LIKE? We have over 80 HD TV channels including international channels. NOTE: Your TV must have QAM Tuner in it to work on campus. We also offer Stream 2 - IPTV. This service allows you to stream 80 of the channels on your phone, tablet or laptop when connected to the campus wireless network.

RESIDENCE LIFE As a residential college, Coe recognizes that creating the right living environment is essential to providing a superior educational opportunity. More than 70 percent of your four years at Coe will be spent outside the classroom, making it an important part of your overall college experience. Please spend some time reading the following material to better prepare yourself for your transition into college and to answer any questions you may have about your future at Coe.

new skills and make friends. Your introduction to the Residence Life staff will likely come in the form of your Resident Assistant, or RA. Each residence hall floor has its own RA, a resourceful upper-class student who has been specially trained to make your transition to college life as easy as possible. Coe’s RAs are supported by a staff of six Assistant Area Coordinators (AACs) and three Area Coordinators (ACs). AACs are upper-class students whose primary responsibility is to assist the Area Coordinators with the daily administration of the Residence Hall. ACs are professional staff members who supervise the student staff, provide personal counseling, administer residence hall policies and deal with emergencies/crisis situations. Coe’s dynamic ACs make it a point to stay in touch with students on a daily basis.

Coe is committed to making your transition from living at home to residential life at college as smooth as possible. The Coe Residence Life staff is responsible for ensuring a safe, healthy living environment. More importantly, the Residence Life staff will create opportunities for you to get involved, learn

RESIDENCE LIFE SENIOR STAFF Voorhees AAC: Breanna Moore Murray AAC: Briana Gipson Greene AAC: Corbin Faidley Armstrong/Douglas AAC: Stephen Presti Apartment AACs: Hayley Luna & Kaylee Skweres

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RESIDENCE LIFE HELLO, KOHAWKS!

KRISTA KRONSTEIN

DIRECTOR OF RESIDENCE LIFE

I support all students living in the residence halls, apartments and houses here at Coe. I also supervise the Area Coordinators and work with all RAs throughout campus. My staff and I are so excited to have you join us on campus in August! There is so much in store for you here at Coe, and we hope that you’ll let us be a part of your community of support during the year. Each of you will have a Resident Assistant (RA) living on your floor who is there to support you and your floormates through your transition into college life. They’ll ensure your floor is a safe space and will plan events to create a positive environment and community on the floor. We’ll also provide larger first-year programming throughout the year designed to connect all 400+ of you and help you explore all of the wonderful opportunities waiting for you here. We encourage you to attend these events and get to know your RAs! We’re all here because we love helping first-year students through this transition. This is a blank slate for you, and we would love to walk alongside you through it all. If you ever need anything or have any questions, shoot me an email at kkronstein@coe.edu and let’s setup a time to chat!

RESIDENCE HALLS F.A.Q.'S WHAT TYPE OF FURNITURE IS PROVIDED IN EACH ROOM?

WHAT SIZE REFRIGERATOR CAN I PUT IN MY ROOM?

All rooms have a bed, desk, desk chair, dresser and closet for each student.

Each resident may bring a refrigerator no more than 4 cubic feet in capacity.

DOES COE COLLEGE COVER DAMAGE/THEFT TO ANY OF MY PERSONAL ITEMS?

WHAT SIZE MATTRESS WILL I HAVE?

The college strongly advises each student to keep his or her room locked and to obtain insurance that covers personal belongings. The college accepts no responsibility for damage or loss of individual property for any reason.

ARE ALL ROOMS AIR-CONDITIONED? Yes.

Your mattress will be an extra long twin (39” x 80”).

CAN THE FURNITURE IN MY ROOM BE MOVED AROUND WITHIN MY ROOM? In Voorhees Hall, Greene Hall and some rooms in Armstrong/Douglas Hall and Murray Hall there is modular furniture so every piece is movable. Within the other spaces the furniture is built into the room and is not movable.

WHAT SIZE CARPET SHOULD I BRING? A 12’ x 14’ carpet fits most rooms.

HOUSING PLACEMENT

WHAT SHOULD I BRING WITH ME? »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »»

All housing placement information will be posted in Residence by Symplicity — http://coe-residence.symplicity.com — you will receive a welcome email via your Coe email address when it becomes available. After you have received your housing placement, you can access the Coe College website to see a photo of a sample room with the dimensions. This information will be available at www.coe.edu/campuslife/housing/ roomdimensions

MOVE-IN New students move into the residence halls on Saturday, August 18, between 7:00 - 11:00 AM. Be sure to check your mail in August for the move-in map. When you arrive on campus, you will see signs directing you to a staging area for your residence hall. Once at your residence hall, you will pick up your room key and then check in to your new home!

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Microwave* Personal items Computer and Ethernet network cord (though the buildings are wireless) Calculator Shower caddy and shower shoes Linens and towels Alarm clock Picture frames Dry erase board Stackable crates Stereo* TV/DVD/Blu-ray player* Refrigerator* Futon/couch*

*Note: You might want to confer with your roommate(s) about these items.


THE FOLLOWING COMMON ITEMS ARE NOT ALLOWED WITHIN THE RESIDENCE HALLS*:

BREAK HOUSING Coe College residence halls and apartments close during winter and spring breaks. All residents are required to vacate the halls within 24 hours of their last class or final exam. A limited number of spaces in one of the residence halls may be provided for international students and students with essential campus jobs at an additional weekly rate.

»» Halogen lamps »» Extension cords (surge protectors are permitted) »» Private exterior antennas or satellite dishes »» Hot plates or other cooking devices with exposed heating elements »» Candles, candle burners or incense »» With the exception of fish, pets are not permitted

LAUNDRY FACILITIES Each residence hall provides washers and dryers for your convenience. In Armstrong/Douglas Hall, Greene Hall and Murray Hall the facilities are located on the bottom floor of the residence hall. In Voorhees Hall they are located on various floors. Unlimited laundry use is included in your housing costs.

SMOKING POLICY

*Please note there are other items that may not be allowed.

In accordance with Iowa law, Coe College’s campus and buildings are smoke free.

CATERING & MEAL PLANS

The “U” is a modern dining facility located on the lower level of Gage Memorial Union. “The Caf,” as most students commonly refer to it, is catered by Sodexo Food Service. Sodexo takes wellness and nutrition seriously and has a corporate dietician who ensures Coe’s students are offered a wholesome and healthy diet. The Mindful (www.mindful.sodexo.com) program offers a variety of healthful menu selections, including low-fat, vegetarian, vegan and traditional menu items, along with numerous cuisines for those with special dietary needs. From self-serve buffet-style programs in The “U” to our retail dining site, Charlie’s P.U.B., Sodexo delivers innovative menu choices made from fresh ingredients and prepared by our talented staff under the direction of our executive chef.

FEATURING: »» »» »» »» »» »»

Cook-to-order entree stations that allow students to customize pre-selected menu items and more. Our made-to-order salad entree or deli sandwich station Fresh-baked bread Tantalizingly healthy grab-and-go options and portable meals at our Smart Market and Convenience Store located in Charlie’s P.U.B. Familiar, high-quality options from brands such as Starbucks and Grill 155. Simple Servings, our newest resident dining option provides safe and appetizing food choices for our customers with food allergies (nuts, tree nuts, eggs, milk, fish, shellfish, soybeans and wheat ), and is also gluten free. You can view all our offerings on our website coecatering.catertrax.com.

CATERING

Shoestring Catering is a low-cost, no-frills segment of our Flavours Catering brand. It provides popular food items for ordering for any student or student group. It allows students to customize their dining experience outside the normal cafeteria setting, treat themselves and/or others to a special meal, anytime they would like. Offerings include (but are not limited to) pizza, sandwiches, munchie foods and healthy choices.

CHARLIE’S COFFEE SHOP (P.U.B.) Attached to Gage Memorial Union, the coffee shop offers a comfortable environment for students to study, hang out with friends, watch TV or catch live music and other forms of entertainment provided by the Student Activities Committee. Charlie’s is proud to serve Starbucks coffee, Island Oasis smoothies and also offers a dining alternative through Grill 155. Additionally, Charlie’s offers a convenience store and Smart Market (Grab-N-Go). Students may use cash, credit or debit cards and Coe Cash for all items sold in Charlie’s. A large patio outdoors makes it easy for students to enjoy the weather.

BASIC MEAL PLAN:

TRADITIONAL MEAL PLAN:

STANDARD MEAL PLAN:

ULTIMATE MEAL PLAN:

Choose 11 of the 20 offered meals per week plus get $100 Coe Cash per term. For students who want maximum flexibility with an off-campus job, student teaching or internship.

Offers 3 meals per day for students with no Sunday breakfast. Meant for the student who is a hearty eater or an athlete, with a regular schedule and is on campus most weekends. Includes $25 Coe Cash per term.

Choose 16 of the 20 offered meals per week plus receive $75 Coe Cash per term. For students who don’t have early classes. Most Coe students select this plan.

Offers the most options for students. This plan initially offers every meal available per term AND it offers you the option of converting meals into Coe Cash two times per term. Perfect for students’ changing needs as they find their niche in campus life.

11 Meal Plan

20 Meal Plan

16 Meal Plan

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175 Flex plan

(Not available to first-year students.)


THE OFFICE OF DIVERSITY

and INCLUSION

OUR MISSION: The Office of Diversity and Inclusion works hard to ensure all students at Coe feel like they belong so that students will flourish and succeed. To this end, and in partnership with faculty and all of our colleagues at the college, we commit to creating meaningful opportunities to learn, providing welcoming spaces to live and socialize, and offering thoughtful and informed support and guidance when needed. Specific areas of focus include racial/ethnic diversity, religious and spiritual life, LGBTQAI+ inclusion and internationalization. At Coe each student matters and your experience at Coe is important to us. If at any point you have questions, needs or concerns, please know that we are here for you. We will be your friend, advocate, mentor and greatest encourager.

THE STUDENTS WE SERVE AND OUR AREAS OF FOCUS: The Office of Diversity & Inclusion is comprised of Erik Albinson (Vice President for Student Development and Senior Diversity Officer), Steven Shelby (Multicultural Coordinator), Peter Gerlach (Director of International Affairs) and the College Chaplain (Melea White). While we work closely with LGBTQAI+ students, multicultural students, international students and student allies, it is our goal to foster an environment where ALL Kohawks will thrive in an inclusive learning environment. If you are interested in getting involved with Coe’s diversity and inclusion efforts, please stop by the Student Development Office in Upper Gage and speak with our team.

A FEW OF OUR PROGRAMS, INITIATIVES AND CAMPUS SPACES: » First-year Coehort Intercultural Orientation and Program connects students who come from underrepresented groups with upper

class student leaders. » OUTreach: A peer mentoring program serving the LGBTQAI+ student population » Fall International Club Cultural Show & Spring International Banquet » MLK, Jr. Annual Conference and Celebration & Spring Diversity Conference » Alternative spring break trips and local service opportunities » Social Justice and Bystander Training » Passover Seder Dinner, Christmas Convocation and interfaith dialogue » James H. Randall Intercultural Center: This large space includes plenty of seating and study areas, a computer lab, a full kitchen and A/V technology. Staffed by students, this space seeks to welcome students from all backgrounds and to serve as a space where there is a strong sense of belonging. » The Queer Resource Center: This suite serves as a comfortable gathering space for our LGBTQAI+ student population and as a resource center for all who wish to learn more about sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression. » Reflection Room: This space serves as a location for students to practice individual prayer or meet with others for group prayer sessions. The recent addition of a massage chair has made this space quite popular.

All of our offices are located in the Student Development Office in Upper Gage.

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RELIGIOUS

and SPIRITUAL LIFE

Religious and spiritual life at Coe is fun, meaningful and full of people who care about one another. We embrace every single person who comes our way as we seek to be a safe and comfortable place where students grow in their faith, learn about other belief systems and enjoy a welcoming community. Some of us know exactly what we believe, others have lots of questions and still others are struggling. No matter what, you will find a place here, you will fit in and we cannot wait to meet you.

THERE ARE MANY AVENUES FOR STUDENTS AT COE TO INTEGRATE THEIR SPIRITUALITY INTO THEIR COLLEGE EXPERIENCE: PEER MINISTRY — Student leadership development program for students

RETREATS AND CONFERENCES — Occasional retreats and

interested in serving as peer mentors and for those students considering vocational ministry and other helping professions.

conferences occur throughout the year.

RELIGIOUS STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS — At Coe there are several

interested in finding a local religious community are invited to visit with the college chaplain who will make some recommendations to fit individual preferences and tradition. Most traditions are represented in the Cedar Rapids area.

LOCAL RELIGIOUS COMMUNITY CONNECTION — Students

Christian campus ministry opportunities including Intervarsity, Salt Company, Fellowship of Christian Athletes and Navigators. Try them all!

JEWISH OBSERVANCES — Rosh Hashanah and Passover Seder dinners

SPIRITUAL CARE — The college chaplain is available for one-on-one

are offered annually, as is the building of a sukkah during Sukkot. Coe students enjoy attending services at nearby Temple Judah.

conversation, vocational discernment and pastoral care. A confidential resource, the chaplain is ready to listen and support you during your time at Coe, especially during times of difficulty, crisis or hardship. Students need not be “religious” or “spiritual” to seek counsel from the chaplain.

ALTERNATIVE FALL AND SPRING BREAK — Mission trips and other travel experiences sponsored by the college chaplain. Recent trips have been to the Gulf Coast; Joplin, MO; Chicago; Taize; France and Iona, U.K.

COE WELLNESS SERVICES It is important to take care of yourself as a student. Coe has two counselors on campus available to meet one-on-one and talk through dealing with stress, emotional challenges and more. Throughout the year, Coe offers wellness initiatives focusing on sleep, mental health, fitness, stress and more. In addition, Coe offers free and confidential short-term counseling for full-time students through the St. Luke’s Counseling Center, located conveniently across Coe Road in the St. Luke’s Hospital Resource Center. The Counseling Center staff is available to talk about concerns including, but not limited to:

DIFFICULT LIFE TRANSITIONS

EATING DISORDERS

MANAGING STRESS

ADJUSTING TO COLLEGE

ACADEMIC CONCERNS

DEALING WITH GRIEF

RELATIONSHIP CONCERNS

SUBSTANCE USE

COPING WITH MENTAL ILLNESS

Appointments can be made by calling 319.369.7952 and identifying yourself as a Coe student. Students enrolled at Coe with previously identified or anticipated mental health concerns may choose to continue with their current providers. In addition, students are encouraged to work with Coe staff to obtain referrals for other more intensive, longer term or more specialized treatment options and to establish a local support network in the Cedar Rapids area. Please contact Emily Barnard, Director of Health & Wellness and Counselor, for questions or more information.

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HEALTH SERVICES Coe Student Health Services is located in the Lower P.U.B. Students are seen by appointment Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 9:00 AM - noon and 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM and Tuesday 9:00 AM - noon and 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM. Appointments are made by phone at 319.399.8617 or email at o-healthservices@coe.edu. Most of the services performed in Coe’s Health Services are free to Coe College students who are currently registered at Coe College. The student’s insurance is utilized when the student needs additional health care services such as ER/physician visits, laboratory tests, referrals, X-rays and prescription medications. It is required that a student have medical insurance. Students need to be familiar with how their insurance works and may need to set up an “away from home care.” Prescriptions given to students can be filled at any pharmacy in the area, with the closest located within walking distance at the First Avenue Hy-Vee. As part of Health Services’ effort to provide quality health care to Coe students, it is our policy that students submit a physical examination within

the last 12 months, along with immunization records, TB screening form and medical history forms prior to becoming a student at Coe. This information will be kept on file with Health Services. All health records are maintained strictly confidential. Information is released only when a student’s permission is given by written consent. Having this information allows the health services staff to meet your ongoing health care needs. All health forms must be completed and submitted by July 1. Forms can be found at my.coe.edu. You can email, fax or mail the forms. Class registration will be held until proof of immunization has been submitted to Health Services. Student athletes will not be allowed to practice without a physical (within the last six months) on file with Health Services and the Athletic Department. Please inform Health Services of any health conditions or needs you may have (mental illness, chronic medical conditions, severe allergies, etc). It is important that your roommate and/or Resident Assistant know of your health problems (diabetes, seizures, asthma) to ensure proper medical treatment if a medical emergency occurs.

WHAT HEALTH SERVICES PROVIDES: (NOT ALL INCLUSIVE) »» Assessment and evaluation of minor illness and injury »» Diagnosis and management of acute or chronic medical conditions »» Free reference materials on a variety of health topics

»» Diagnostic tests (i.e. strep screen, mono test, urinalysis, pregnancy, blood sugar) »» Prescriptions for medications, when appropriate »» Tuberculosis (TB) screening

»» Referrals for counseling

»» Medical referrals, as necessary

»» Initial assessment/referral for mental »» Women’s and men’s health needs, health conditions: depression, anxiety, including STI screening/treatment and ADHD, eating disorders contraception »» Health promotion screenings: blood pressure screens and weight checks

»» Samples of over-the-counter medications »» Refresh Sleep Program

REQUIRED IMMUNIZATIONS ARE:

HERE ARE SOME IDEAS ON HEALTH-RELATED ITEMS TO HAVE IN YOUR RESIDENCE HALL ROOM AT COE:

»» Diphtheria/Pertussis/Tetanus (Td or Dtap) primary series (four immunizations) and a booster within the last 10 years (Td, or Tdap). The booster series requires two doses.

Over-the-counter medications, such as Tylenol and ibuprofen (for minor aches, pains and fever); as well as cold remedy medications for cough, congestion, runny nose (Dayquil, Nyquil, Sudafed, Mucinex, etc). You may consider also bringing an antihistamine, such as Claritin, Zyrtec or Allegra, especially if you suffer from seasonal allergies. Other items to have onhand: antibiotic ointment, a thermometer, heating pad, nasal saline spray, throat lozenges, Band-Aids and sunscreen.

»» Measles/Mumps/Rubella (MMR) two doses. »» Polio series: Three dose primary series and a booster. »» Hepatitis B is highly recommended for all students. It is required for nursing and athletic training majors. It is a three dose series.

Please don’t hesitate to call or email if you have questions or concerns. Remember, turn in your health forms and immunizations before classes begin!

RECOMMENDED IMMUNIZATIONS ARE: »» Meningitis vaccine is highly recommended. The state of Iowa requires that incoming students who will be residing in a campus residence hall receive information regarding the risks associated with Meningococcal disease. Students who reside in campus housing must affirm whether he/she has received the vaccine against Meningococcal disease and must provide the date of the vaccination, if any. A waiver must be signed if the student elects not to receive the Meningitis vaccination.

COE COLLEGE HEALTH SERVICES STAFF:

»» Hepatitis A two dose series

Sara Heisdorffer, BSN, RN

»» Varicella date of chicken pox disease or dates of a two dose series

Health Coordinator Appointments available Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays.

»» HPV three dose series

Lindsay Shedek, MSN, ARNP

Appointments available on Thursdays.

»» Seasonal influenza vaccinations yearly

All health forms must be completed and returned to Health Services by July 1, 2018.

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CAMPUS SECURITY Coe College Security is staffed by Coe College employees and Per Mar Security Services and provides seven-day-a-week, 24-hour-per-day coverage. All officers are trained in basic first-aid, emergency procedures and CPR. The security personnel work closely with the Cedar Rapids Police Department to create a safe campus environment. The Coe College campus is equipped with “blue light” security phones located by the campus-side doors of most buildings and in some parking lots. These

phones ring directly to the security dispatch center. Security personnel will respond and initiate whatever action is necessary to resolve a situation, including the notification of Cedar Rapids police, fire or medical agencies when appropriate. The security office is located in Upper Gage. Campus Security can be contacted by calling x8888 on any campus phone (319.399.8888 from off-campus). This number is posted throughout campus and in residence halls.

SERVICES INCLUDE: »» »» »»

On-campus escorts Regulation of parking enforcement Student bike registration (free permits for all students with bikes)

»» »» »»

Room/building locking/unlocking Medical emergency response Campus patrols (walking, biking and vehicle)

»» »» »» »»

Emergency message delivery Wellness checks Vehicle “jump start” Campus policy enforcement

PARKING POLICIES Coe does not restrict who brings a car to campus. However, if you want to park in one of the Coe student parking lots you are required to purchase a parking permit. While the college has several student-only parking lots, space is limited and permits are sold on a first-come, first-serve basis. Street parking is available near campus, subject to city regulations. For safety and security reasons, Coe encourages students to park in campus parking lots. There are specific parking lots designated for student parking. If you are bringing a car to Coe, you can buy your permit online this summer. Fines are issued for all improper parking offenses.

BOOTING VEHICLES POLICY A vital piece of the parking enforcement program is to identify vehicles that are unknown in the campus parking system or have received repeated parking citations. A “boot” list shall be maintained in the Safety and Security Office. All Security officers are expected to actively search for vehicles on the list during their assigned shift. If located on Coe property, a vehicle on the list may have a vehicle immobilizer or “boot” placed on its tire until the

person responsible for the vehicle has resolved all parking violations. Vehicles on the boot list may be booted at any time including on the weekends. The weekend is defined as after 4:30 PM on Friday until 8:00 AM Monday. When the boot is placed on the vehicle, a notice will be placed on the driver's side window to notify the drive/owner of the boot placement. Damage

or theft of a boot will be billed to the violator. Removal of the boot by the Safety and Security Department is contingent on payment of all outstanding fines and payment of a boot removal fee (unless authorization is given by an approved party). The Vice President of Student Development, Dean of Students or the Director of Safety and Security may authorize the removal of a vehicle immobilizer based on extraordinary circumstances.

The college assumes no responsibility or liability for loss or damage to any vehicle or its contents while operated or parked on college property.

CAMPUS MAIL The mailroom is located in the lower level of Gage Memorial Union. All new students who are living on campus are assigned mailboxes at the beginning of the academic year, and they keep these boxes throughout their Coe career. Packages are delivered to the mailroom, which, in turn, notifies the student of such mail. Packages and mail are also able to be sent from the mailroom. Mail to a student should be addressed as shown below.

Hours: Student’s Name Monday - Friday: 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Coe College GMU# 1220 First Avenue NE Cedar Rapids, IA 52402-5012

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LEARNING COMMONS

RESOURCES INCLUDE:

The Learning Commons brings together all of the college's academic support programs in one central location at the heart of campus. Learning Commons staff work with students throughout their four years to make the most of the wide range of academic opportunities Coe offers and to plan for great lives after graduation. Learning Commons consultants are available for appointment or drop-in meetings throughout the week. Come by to talk about current courses, majors, study and time-management skills, opportunities to connect in the community, ways to meet your academic goals, assessing your strengths and interests, finding the classes, activities and organizations that will help you develop professional skills and more. Bring a draft of a paper to the Writing Center. Visit the Speaking Center to practice a class presentation. Sign up for a tutor — or to be a tutor.

»» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »»

Major exploration Strengths exploration Tutoring ADA support Student-staffed Writing and Speaking Centers Academic coaching Mentoring Study skills Time management support

319.399.8844 — Dr. Gina Hausknecht — Associate Dean for Student Academics — ghauskne@coe.edu

STEWART MEMORIAL LIBRARY The library is an excellent research facility and is home of the Learning Commons to meet students’ academic needs. There are individual and group study areas, 10 closed group study rooms, computer workstations throughout the library, two classrooms, large media presentation area, theater, AV preview room, small group and individual media stations (TV, VCR, DVD), video-editing workstations in AV, Perrine Gallery (reception/party room), Richter Room (formal meeting room) and George T. Henry College Archives. The Media Technologies houses a preview and virtual reality studio, editing room and MakerStudio. The MakerStudio has laser cutters, 3-D printers, animation equipment and a sewing machine. The department also has a first-rate DVD film collection, viewing stations and camera/recorders and sound equipment to checkout. »» Our collection can be accessed through the library web page, which includes the catalog and a large selection of electronic resources.

»»

»» The library subscribes to more than 100 online databases, which can be accessed both on and off campus through the library’s website and students’ My.Coe page.

»» A large selection of popular videos and DVDs are available for checkout in the AV department located in the basement of the library.

»» If needed material is not owned by the college, students can use Interlibrary Loan to request items free of charge. »»

Our collections support collegiate research with over 240,000 books, 234,000 eBook titles, 33,000 journal-serial titles, 3,000 electronic journal titles, 7,800 videos and DVDs and 3,700 music CDs.

Our staff can provide individual research-building skills: drop-ins are welcome, or phone/email us. Services are available throughout the week and on weekends. The staff is also available via Zoho chat on the library’s web page.

»» Librarians and trained library staff teach courses throughout the year on research skills, database use, plagiarism and other library services.

»»

The library space accommodates a variety of learning styles, with tables for group study, computer labs, private and group study rooms, study carrels and large spaces such as the Richter Room and Perrine Gallery for hosting group meetings and college events.

»»

Coe provides a world-class art collection, with four galleries with major artists including Marvin Cone '14 (60 paintings), Conger Metcalf '36 (45 paintings) and Grant Wood (13 paintings).

HOURS: Monday-Thursday: 7:45 AM - 1:00 AM Friday: 7:45 AM - 6:00 PM Saturday: 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM Sunday: 11:00 AM - 1:00 AM For more information visit http://library.coe.edu

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ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT PROGRAM The Academic Achievement Program is an educational assistance program offering participating students academic and personal support enabling them to meet and surpass their educational goals. This federally funded grant program provides the following services and opportunities: »»

Academic counseling and advising

»»

Financial literacy education

»»

Scholarship resources

»»

Help with study skills and time management

»»

Assistance with academic accommodations

»»

Particular assistance with math and reading

»»

Career planning assistance

»»

Trips to local cultural events

»»

Help with graduate school preparation

»»

Personal counseling

Academic Achievement Program Phone Number: 319.399.8547 Director of Academic Achievement Program Lois Kabela-Coates – lkabela@coe.edu

Learning Commons Administrative Assistant Karen Swenson – kswenson@coe.edu

Academic Coach and Tutoring Coordinator Michelle McIllece – mmcillec@coe.edu

Disability Services Coordinator Kim Pierson ­– kpierson@coe.edu

Selection of participants is based on academic merit. A student must be a U.S. citizen or registered permanent resident. In addition, a student must be: (1) limited financially (according to federal guidelines); and/or (2) first-generation college student (neither parent has received a Bachelor’s degree); (3) and/or documented as having a disability

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SPEAKING CENTER The Speaking Center, founded in 2005, provides individual consultation and workshops for students interested in improving oral communication skills. Stop by to chat with a consultant about your assignments, warm up your clammy hands with paraffin wax treatment, check out our Creativity Corner for last-minute poster supplies, or take a study break on Thursday nights to play board games from 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM.

HOURS: Monday - Thursday 9:00 AM - 10:00 PM Friday 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM LOCATION: Learning Commons, Stewart Memorial Library Walk-ins are welcome or schedule an appointment FOR MORE INFORMATION: www.coe.edu/academics/speakingcenter or email speakingctr@coe.edu

SERVICES INCLUDE: »» Brainstorming »» Speech organization »» Delivery coaching »» Videotaping practice sessions »» Interview and network preparation

Twitter: SpeakingCenter

CONSULTING ON: »» Formal speeches »» Elevator speeches »» Visual aids, PowerPoint »» Group presentations »» Interviews »» Discussions »» Debates »» Public Service Announcements

WRITING CENTER WHAT CAN THE WRITING CENTER DO FOR YOU? The main purpose of the Writing Center is to help students with any writing task, whether personal or academic, finished or not yet begun. Writing consultants focus on issues ranging from ideas and organization to punctuation and sentence structure. In addition to free copies of Coe publications, handouts on citation and writing techniques are available to all students.

LOCATION: Stewart Memorial Library

PHONE: 319.399.8743

HOURS: (subject to change) Monday–Thursday: 8:00 AM - 12:00 AM Friday: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Sunday: 11:00 AM - 12:00 AM Walk-in or by appointment

WEBSITE: https://sites.google.com/a/coe.edu/writing-center/ EMAIL:

Dr. Jane Nesmith – jnesmith@coe.edu

TUTORING SERVICES Peer tutors are available to help students in most academic courses. Tutors have successfully completed the tutored course, received faculty approval and received tutor training. There is no charge to students for tutoring services. Students may apply for tutors at the Learning Commons in Stewart Memorial Library. Tutor appointments may be scheduled during the day, in the evenings and on weekends.

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CENTER FOR CREATIVITY AND CAREERS The Center for Creativity and Careers can assist you with finding an internship, connecting and networking with alumni, job searching and interviewing. This center, unique and specialized to Coe, emphasizes the connections between liberal arts education and careers and between Coe College and our region, known as the Creative Corridor. Through programming including internships, grants, experiential learning opportunities, sponsored visits from entrepreneurs and innovators, and expansive partnerships with local businesses, arts organizations and nonprofits, students explore career options associated with all areas of study. To learn more about how the Center for Creativity and Careers peer advisers work with their fellow students, click here: www.youtube.com/watch?v=rVQWEOkYYHI.

SERVICES INCLUDE: »» Career fair tips »» Help with resume writing »» Externships »» Creating a four-year plan »» Preparing for grad school »» Searching for internships »» Preparing for interviews »» Online job board »» Preparing a LinkedIn profile »» Mentoring

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT PROGRAMS The Coe College Community Engagement staff provides students with a variety of opportunities to get involved in the community including volunteering, service-learning and civic engagement. Make your college experience rich through service to others!

ADVOCATES FOR COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Interested in learning more about Cedar Rapids? Maybe you want to volunteer in a specific area, like youth programming, or museums and the arts? Contact one of our ACEs and they will help you get connected to our local community!

COE CARES: DAYS OF SERVICE Throughout the year Coe College students plan and attend several days of service both on and off campus. They plan letter writing campaigns, neighborhood cleanups, America Reads Day, MLK Day Events, Spring 500 and more!

COMMUNITY-BASED PRACTICUM A community-based practicum is an opportunity for you to work with a nonprofit organization in Cedar Rapids to meet a community need, utilize community assets and strengthen your understanding of how to use your major in the world outside Coe's doorsteps. It is a first-hand opportunity to put your academic and classroom knowledge into action.

ICAP (IOWA CAMPUS AMERICORPS PROGRAM) Each year, Coe selects six students to serve in the ICAP. As a member of AmeriCorps, you have the opportunity to serve nonprofit and public agencies to build a culture of citizenship, service and responsibility. You will learn about yourself and the world around you in new and exciting ways. After you have finished your service, you will receive an education award to cover current education expenses, future college expenses or pay back student loans. For more information, please contact the Community Engagement staff. Applications are due in early September.

OFF-CAMPUS FEDERAL WORK STUDY Off-Campus Federal Work Study is an opportunity for eligible Coe students to earn their financial aid money through working regularly at a community nonprofit organization. There are over 40 nonprofit partners within a one-mile radius of campus, so you have plenty of options! This is a great opportunity to help you prepare for your practicum experience or your future career.

PARTICIPATION IN SERVICE-BASED CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS Watch for other service projects being organized by your residence hall staff, board of directors and independent organizations. Examples of service organizations on campus are listed on page 31.

319.399.8660 communityengagement@coe.edu 30


OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM LEADERSHIP AT COE

Coe College is committed to developing leadership skills and providing leadership opportunities for its students. The school provides a multitude of opportunities for individuals to get involved on campus. All campus organizations and clubs provide a different opportunity to get involved and become a leader, and if you cannot find a group that interests you, you can always start one.

HELLO CLASS OF 2022! We are Fatima Elsheikh and Lotukalafi Ahomana, the current president and vice president of the student body. On behalf of all students, we extend our warmest welcome to you! If you are anything like us when we first arrived, then you must be brimming with anticipation to begin your journey as a Kohawk! Well, that moment is finally here, and all of us — the student body, faculty members, administrators and the entire Kohawk family — are thrilled to see you gathered here on campus. As unique individuals, each of you bring an array of personalities, talents, ideas and interests that help make Coe such a wonderful place. We encourage you to get involved, and want to challenge each and every one of you to broaden your horizons, perspectives and connections during your time here. Not only that, we hope that you will use your skills to make a positive impact in the world around you. Whatever it is you decide to do, be sure to make the most of your next four years. One way get involved is to join Student Senate. This is a unique privilege to represent your fellow students and make a difference on campus. Being a part of Student Senate allows you to demonstrate leadership, look behind the scenes on the inner workings of the college, and coordinate closely with the faculty and staff. We, along with the rest of the executive board, which is made up of the recording secretary, communications officer, treasurer and chairperson, facilitate these meetings. However, we are powerless without senators and students like you. Each senator represents a different housing district at Coe, and new elections happen every fall term. We would love to see your names on this upcoming ballot! Look out for an all-campus email with more information regarding elections this fall. If you have any questions, comments or would just like to get to know us more, feel free to reach out to us at faelsheikh@coe.edu and llahomana@coe.edu. You can also follow Senate on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @KohawkSenate. We look forward to seeing you around campus! FATIMA AND LOTU

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STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS CAMPUS INVOLVEMENT ASIAN AMERICAN CLUB

ENVIRONMENTAL CLUB

LATINX

This club wants to be able to share and bond over Asian-American heritage and cultural experiences, as well as raise awareness within the Coe community.

The purpose of the Environmental Club is to educate on sustainable practices, to implement change in the best interest of the environment and to include all persons working to improve the future of our earth.

The goal of Latinx is to bring awareness of the Latinx population here at Coe and educate people on campus about our culture. The ‘x’ on the end of Latin ensures gender neutrality and increases inclusion on campus. It is bridging the Latinx community to the rest of campus, making it a friendly and an accepting environment.

BLACK SELF-EDUCATED ORGANIZATION

GEEKFEST

BSEO’s goal is to have critical conversations about social justice and to continue to strive to create a community where students feel safe and open to expression.

We, the members of Geekfest, through our meetings and various functions we will bring out everyone’s true inner geek and show them there is a place where they can be themselves.

COE COLLEGE COOKING CLUB

HORROR FLICKS CLUB

Cooking Club's goal is to provide an opportunity for students to learn to cook different dishes from around the world.

The purpose of the Horror Flicks Club is to watch and analyze films of the horror genre.

KOHAWK FILM

Through the organization of Coe’s first-generation college students, we hope to create solidarity among our minority and supply a support system for our unique needs. Our goals include: create a community, make resources available, advocate for first-generation students and host events that show we are not alone in our journey.

The goal of Kohawk Film is to foster a strong appreciation of film as a form of artistic expression through the viewing and intelligent discussion of a wide variety of film genres and directors.

KOHAWK OTAKU ANIME CLUB The Kohawk Otaku Anime Club seeks to foster appreciation of anime and related interests as a form of artistic and cultural expression through regular free viewings, group discussions, activities and outings, focusing on as varied a selection of genres and styles as possible.

PUBLIC INTEREST COE ALLIANCE Coe Alliance aims to promote the education, awareness and respect for persons of all sexual orientations and gender identities.

COE HUMAN RIGHTS ADVOCATES The organization serves to educate the Coe College community on issues pertaining to human rights problems, challenges and advocacy efforts.

COE DEMOCRATS The purpose of the Coe College Democrats is to inform and promote the Democrat Party and its candidates with a goal of promoting student participation in democracy.

ENACTUS Enactus is a student-run organization that builds relationships with businesses, schools and other community partners in need in order to create long-lasting economic, social and environmental improvements by assisting and empowering

I'M FIRST

MULTICULTURAL FUSION Multicultural Fusion is an organization that wishes to educate, experience and promote diversity on Coe’s campus!

RAP CULTURE This club gives students an avenue to learn and engage in weekly conversations about ongoing happenings in the modern hip-hop culture.

RESIDENCE HALL COUNCIL The Residence Hall Council serves as a place for leadership and self-governing of the residence halls and apartments through programming and policy implementation.

INTERNATIONAL CLUB

SMART ALECS

International Club celebrates diversity and wants to bring together the international community with the help of various programs to make the international students feel welcome and accepted here at Coe.

This club’s mission is to bring nontraditional students together with the goal of getting to know other nontraditional students and discuss balancing work, school and home life.

KCOE

STUDENT ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

The purpose of KCOE is to get people interested in the radio business, play music and talk sports with the students.

The Coe Student Alumni Association maintains the link between current students and alumni by keeping the Kohawk traditions, spirit and pride alive on our campus today.

partners through entrepreneurship and service. We emphasize the growth and professional development of our members by encouraging independent creativity and business leadership. We empower students to bring about real change in a plethora of different demographic communities on local, national and global levels.

RISE

MODEL UNITED NATIONS

YOUNG AMERICANS FOR LIBERTY

Model UN is a club that meets once a week in preparation for an annual conference that takes place in November.

RAPE AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE PREVENTION (RSVP)

Rights, Inclusion, Support, Education (RISE) exists to promote and provide an accepting environment in which students with disabilities, both disclosed and undisclosed, find and develop support. We will work to share the message of student success and possibility inside and outside the Coe Community. The purpose of this organization is to promote Constitutional liberties, equal rights and the principles the United States was founded on. It is also designed to keep students informed and active in politics.

RSVP aims to encourage students to take ownership of their sexual behavior and encourage an environment that supports and celebrates healthy sexual experiences and raise awareness about the definition and many facets of consent.

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS CONTINUED

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ACADEMIC BUSINESS CLUB This club will cover business administration, accounting, economics, marketing, investing, etc. This club is open to all Kohawks and is perfect for anyone who wants to get prepared for the professional world after college.

BIOLOGY CLUB The purpose of the Coe College Biology Club is to encourage participation in the biological sciences by providing activities and events that enhance the educational understanding of various areas of the biological sciences.

CHEMISTRY CLUB The mission of this chapter shall be to introduce students to chemistry, to aid those students requiring any help in chemistry, to help students understand the particular fields of chemistry and the chemical industry, to bring about a better feeling for chemistry, and to instill a professional pride in the chemical sciences of the modern chemist.

COMPUTER SCIENCE CLUB The goal of Computer Science Club is to improve technological knowledge and accessibility on Coe's campus. This will be accomplished through various tech talks and events to help showcase and teach about areas of technology that people might not otherwise be exposed to.

FRENCH CLUB French Club promotes Francophone culture to the Coe College community of students and faculty as well as to promote unity and fraternity among its members through the organization of various cultural, intellectual, academic and social activities.

RELIGIOUS LIFE FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN ATHLETES Coe College Fellowship of Christian Athletes offers equal opportunity and access to its membership to all persons.

THE NAVIGATORS The purpose of the Navigators is to know Christ and make Him known. Our goal is to help Coe College students learn how to follow Christ for life. To accomplish this, we provide peer support to fellow Coe students through small groups and one-onone mentorship. These small groups are led by Coe students who train other students to lead in the future, emphasizing personal investment in

HISTORY CLUB

PSYCHOLOGY CLUB

The purpose of the History Club is to encourage and foster knowledge and appreciation of history among students, faculty and staff at Coe College.

The purpose of the Psychology Club is to promote interest in the field of scientific psychology by providing opportunities to learn about current research, preparation for advanced study and careers in psychology through social and academic events.

KOHAWK PRE-LAW SOCIETY The Kohawk Pre-Law Society helps students who have an interest in the legal profession and legal issues by gathering these students, addressing concerns and helping shape course requirements and pre-law course tracks. We hope to make connections with faculty and alumni to give mentorship opportunities and resources for students.

MATH CLUB The purpose of math club is to expose students to mathematics that they would not otherwise be exposed to.

PHYSICS CLUB

STUDENT EDUCATION ASSOCIATION The purpose of this association is to assist members in developing professional skills. Students involved have the opportunity to extend their knowledge of professional education opportunities, events and laws and policies related to education issues on a local, state and national scale. Students work to divulge current issues within education professions and collaborate to answer questions about how to best address issues relating to teaching.

STUDENT NURSING ASSOCIATION

The purpose of the Physics Club is to provide the campus and community with numerous outreach events related to physics and science.

The Student Nursing Association sponsors campus events and activities that promote spirit and enhance interaction between students, faculty, staff and alumni of the college.

POLITICAL SCIENCE CLUB

WOMEN IN STEM

The Political Science Club’s purpose is to bring political awareness to campus and enjoy thoughtful conversation and debate on current issues while drinking tea or coffee.

PRE-HEALTH CLUB The purpose of our organization is to provide information and events for students interested in health professions. We have taken students on field trips and invited guest speakers to campus in the past.

individuals who provide social support. We hope to provide relational value to the community of Coe's campus and train leaders who value the individual.

PEER MINISTRY Students interested in taking on a stronger leadership role in the ministry at Coe College may apply to serve as a peer minister with the college chaplain.

This club aims to create a space for students to gather and support each other, to advertise opportunities that help STEM students' careers and to provide mentorship and role models to young STEM students. This club is not exclusive, and in fact welcomes all genders to hear the issues, express their own and benefit from the community resources.

INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP The purpose of InterVarsity Christian Fellowship at Coe College is to be an organization of students who follow Jesus as Savior and Lord; growing in love for God, God’s Word, God’s people of every ethnicity and culture, and God’s purposes in the world through spiritual, intellectual, physical and social pursuits.

THE SALT COMPANY The Salt Company is a come-as-you-are, faithbased community that exists to provide students an opportunity to grow in understanding and connection to Jesus Christ.

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LITERARY

HARRY POTTER CLUB

ALPHA NU

COE REVIEW

Alpha Nu Literary Society is a group that provides a forum to discuss books, poetry and diversity in literature. It runs events such as themed discussions, off-campus trips and social events with a literary focus.

The Coe Review is a student-run literary publication that publishes writers both from Coe and around the world. Coe Review publishes poetry in the fall and fiction in the spring.

COSMOS

Colere is a student-run literary publication focused on cultural exploration. We create one journal each year, publishing prose, poetry and art work.

The Cosmos is Coe’s newspaper. It provides stories regarding what is happening on campus and connects students to each other’s lives.

COLERE

An inclusive group of Harry Potter fans that can feel a sense of community within the club. The three goals of this club are to promote campus involvement in the club, build a sense of social connectedness among fans and nonfans alike of Harry Potter and to make an inclusive environment all.

THE PEARL The Pearl is an on-campus publication written and compiled by Coe students made up of poetry, essays, art and short fiction.

COMMUNITY SERVICE CEDAR RAPIDS DANCE MARATHON

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

ALPHA PHI OMEGA (INTEREST GROUP)

The purpose of Cedar Rapids Dance Marathon is to raise money through Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals with a big event in April where the families share their stories and students stand together for 12 hours for the kids.

The Coe College Habitat for Humanity Chapter is dedicated to fundraising, advocating and actively pursuing Habitat’s mission through home builds and volunteerism

This organization aims to open a chapter of Alpha Phi Omega on Coe’s campus, which would give students the chance to join a nationally recognized, gender neutral, service fraternity and a chance to develop leadership skills through direct service.

BRIDGE CLUB

KOHAWK GYM

The purposes of the Bridge Club are to teach the game of contract bridge to students, to provide opportunities for students to get together to play bridge and to facilitate students’ participation in bridge activities off campus. One goal of the Bridge Club is to involve faculty and staff of the college to participate with students in bridge activities.

Strength club will act as an organizational center for bodybuilders, powerlifters and lifting enthusiasts on campus. In addition, the club will promote health and wellness on Coe's campus through introducing prospective members into weight lifting by providing structured lifting-based workouts in the Coe College Fitness Center. Club officers will offer constructive guidance in using the fitness center equipment, which will help ensure members who are new to lifting are staying safe and developing the proper fundamentals. The club is open to all students regardless of their skill levels.

SAAC

RECREATIONAL & ATHLETIC

CHESS CLUB Chess Club is dedicated to providing its members with a positive learning environment and appreciation for Chess as a hobby and a source of competition.

COE OUTDOORS This club aims to provide an outdoor experience in the urban area of Cedar Rapids, allow students to think adventurously and bring about an overall appreciation for nature.

FENCING CLUB Coe Fencing Club is dedicated to providing its members with a positive training environment and fencing education specializing in Foil.

POKEMON GO This club’s mission is to facilitate communication and transport for students with regards to the multiplayer Augmented Reality Game Pokemon Go. Our goals are to provide a central communication point for players, organize transport to off-campus game events and promote events on campus.

ROCK CLIMBING CLUB Work toward fostering skills such as leadership, trust, communication and perseverance. Through rock climbing, our purpose is to build a stronger student body through health and recreation.

SAAC is an organization dedicated to recognizing Coe student athletes for their athletic and academic achievements and enriching the Cedar Rapids community through various service events, encouraging everyone to live an active and healthy life.

TAE KWON DO The Coe College Tae Kwon Do Club is a studentrun group aimed at keeping students’ martial arts training up-to-date throughout their college years, as well as introducing new students to the art.

ULTIMATE FRISBEE CLUB The purpose of Ultimate Frisbee Club is to get students of Coe active, meeting new friends and having fun.

LACROSSE CLUB The Lacrosse Club aims to bring one of the fastest growing sports to Coe’s campus. We are dedicated to teaching the fundamentals of the sport and its rules, and help members stay fit and active while having fun.

WELLNESS CLUB The Wellness Club's purpose is to enrich wellness on campus by emphasizing fitness health and overall well-being in order to benefit the campus as a whole.

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS CONTINUED

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FINE ARTS ACOE-PELLA

COEFACTOR

An inclusive a capella group that values each individual. We promote Kohawk values on and off campus and provide a unique experience for music majors and nonmusic majors.

The goal of this club is to promote discussions through the use of the arts on campus and in the community. We provide a community where local artists can come and discuss ideas on certain issues faced in the community today.

Orchestra a stress-free way to enjoy their hobby and grow as musicians. A related goal is to help students gain confidence as musicians and use their skills to reach out to the community with volunteer opportunities, such as music therapy at the Arc in Cedar Rapids.

COE COLLEGE IMPROV CLUB

OFF-STAGE PLAYERS

The Improv Club's purpose is to provide the opportunity to perform improvised comedy and improve upon acting techniques for the members thereof. Also, this club will provide cathartic release of stress through the act of performing improv, as well as educate its members about the social and academic benefits of performing improv.

The purpose of Off-Stage Players is to advance, promote and provide outlets as well as heighten awareness and appreciation for performing arts within Coe’s campus and the Cedar Rapids community.

ALPHA PSI OMEGA Alpha Psi Omega strives to recognize those who are dedicated to the dramatic arts. We endeavor to encourage the growth and enjoyment of theatrical practices through the Coe and Cedar Rapids community.

ARTS CLUB The purpose of Arts Club is to provide students with an extracurricular means of exposure to the arts present on campus and in the community.

MUSICIANS COLLECTIVE

The purpose of the organization is to provide a venue for amateur musicians to learn to improvise, write songs and play in a band. The Jam Band will give students who cannot commit to Jazz Band or

U-COE-LELE U-Coe-Lele exists to provide a fun, musical experience to all students in the form of group lessons and performances. It is open to any and all skill levels, with the goal of increasing that level by the end of each year.

HONORARY CLUBS ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA

ORDER OF OMEGA

SIGMA BETA DELTA

Alpha Lambda Delta is a national society that honors academic excellence during a student’s first year in college.

This is a national leadership honor society that recognizes those fraternity men and women who have attained a high standard of leadership in interfraternity activities.

This honorary society recognizes the scholarship and accomplishments of students majoring in business, management and administration.

PHI BETA KAPPA

This group is the international honor society of nursing. Their purpose is to recognize superior achievement and the development of leadership qualities and high professional standards.

ALPHA SIGMA LAMBDA This honorary society recognizes the special achievements of highly motivated students who accomplish academic excellence while facing competing interests of home and work.

MORTAR BOARD

The first society to have a Greek letter name, this organization has recognized intellectual achievement of senior students across the country for over 200 years.

An honorary society for college seniors, candidates are selected for membership into the Coe College Crescent Chapter during their junior year based on outstanding leadership, scholarship and service.

PI KAPPA LAMBDA

MU PHI EPSILON

PHI KAPPA PHI

The purpose of Mu Phi Epsilon is the recognition of scholarship and musicianship and the development of a bond of friendship among its members.

This senior music honor society encourages the highest level of musical achievement and academic scholarship.

SIGMA THETA TAU

STRATA A senior women’s honorary society, Strata’s members are selected for distinguished ability and achievement in scholarship, leadership and service.

This honorary organization recognizes and encourages superior scholarship in all academic disciplines.

ADDITIONAL PROGRAMS ARMY ROTC Coe Army ROTC offers leadership training as well as partial and full-tuition scholarship opportunities to Coe students. Opportunities to participate in credit-granting classroom instruction, physical fitness training and hands-on leadership training are available to all members of the Coe community. The Coe Army ROTC program produces Commissioned Officers for the U.S. Army and also provides a no-obligation insight into Army Officership. Whether seeking money for college, a career after school or just looking for adventure and leadership skills, Coe Army ROTC offers students a full range of leadership instruction, physical fitness and practical leadership experiences.

For more information visit www.coe.edu/armyrotc | Email: ROTC@coe.edu

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GREEK LIFE AT COE Greek Life offers unlimited opportunities and benefits through scholarship, social activities, service projects, networking leadership opportunities and lasting friendships. Coe College is home to men’s and women’s organizations. The following pages describe each of these organizations in more detail. Becoming a member of the Greek community at Coe will provide you with a wide variety of experiences in leadership, expand greatly on your abilities with academic planning and management and develop character that will help prepare you not only for a career but also for life. You will gain all of these skills, along with many more, all the while developing lifelong friendships through a number of social events. Although each of the organizations may be unique, the main missions are the same and include scholarship, philanthropy, leadership and friendship.

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FRATERNITY RECRUITMENT Joining the fraternity community is an opportunity to become something larger than you. All Coe College fraternities participate in a year-round, informal recruitment process.

ΛΧΑ LAMBDA CHI ALPHA

ΦΚΤ

Founded in 1909. Lambda Chi Alpha is a fraternity whose purpose is to have a positive effect on the lives of those young men who prescribe to its ideals and practices.

Founded in 1906. The mission of Phi Kappa Tau is to champion a lifelong commitment to brotherhood, learning, ethical leadership and exemplary character.

ΦBΣ

ΤΚΕ

PHI KAPPA TAU

ΦΜΑ

TAU KAPPA EPSILON Founded in 1899. Tau Kappa Epsilon works in cooperation with college offices and the Alumni Council in developing a network between current students and the alumni.

PHI MU ALPHA SINFONIA

PHI BETA SIGMA Is a social/service collegiate and professional fraternity founded at Howard University in 1914. Members are encouraged to effectively embody “Culture For Service and Service For Humanity” and promote brotherhood, scholarship and service.

Founded in 1898. The mission of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia is the development of the best and truest fraternal spirit, the mutual welfare and brotherhood of musical students, the advancement of music in America and a loyalty to the Alma Mater.

SORORITY RECRUITMENT Becoming a part of a sorority at Coe College is a great way to get involved and make the most of your college years. The sororities at Coe College participate in a fully structured recruitment in the fall term. Fall 2018 Recruitment will take place September 7-9. To register for formal recruitment please visit the Greek website at www.coe.edu/greeklife.

ΑΟΠ

ΑΣΑ ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA

Founded in 1897. Alpha Omicron Pi will be the premier international women’s fraternity inspiring an exceptional member experience while developing highly respected servant leaders.

Founded in 1901. Alpha Sigma Alpha’s aim is to foster close friendship between members and develop women of poise and purpose.

ALPHA OMICRON PI

ΑΓΔ

ALPHA GAMMA DELTA Founded in 1904. Alpha Gamma Delta is an international fraternity for women that exists to provide opportunities for personal development through the spirit of sisterhood.

ΔΔΔ DELTA DELTA DELTA Founded in 1888. The purpose of Delta Delta Delta shall be to establish a perpetual bond of friendship among its members, to develop a stronger and more womanly character, to broaden the moral and intellectual life and to assist its members in every possible way.

ZΦB

ZETA PHI BETA SORORITY, INC Zeta Phi Beta was founded on the campus of Howard University in 1920. The sorority's international programs such as Z-HOPE (Zetas Helping Other People Excel) through mind, body and spirit serve to empower people from all walks of life. It espouses the highest academic ideals, and that has resulted in its members serving in groundbreaking roles in all fields of endeavor.

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COE FITNESS FACILITIES Coe College recently renovated and expanded its athletic and recreation facilities to provide premier fitness opportunities for all students. The project connected Eby Fieldhouse and Clark Racquet Center and tied them to the new Athletics and Recreation Complex resulting in a comprehensive facility. The $20 million project includes the following key components:

EBY FIELDHOUSE

The Eby renovation encompasses updates to virtually all levels including locker rooms, classrooms and offices, and building infrastructure. The centerpiece is the conversion of the current gymnasium and wrestling areas into three separate practice and intramural courts, providing a multipurpose court for recreational sports and intercollegiate practices.

CLARK FIELD AND STADIUM

The reconstruction of the Clark track and improvements to the Clark field include the installation of new bleachers and resurfacing of the track. These upgrades were completed in the summer of 2015.

FITNESS CENTER AND BRIDGE

A key feature of the expansion is a bridge over College Drive that joins the new east-facing façade to the Clark Racquet Center. The bridge – which is mostly glass – provides a stunning visual feature for visitors and houses much of our fitness center.

NEW PERFORMANCE ARENA

Located to the north of Eby, the new performance arena and competition court holds 1,800 spectators and has a modern configuration where visitors enter in an upper-level concourse. The performance arena is connected to Eby via the east-facing façade.

WRESTLING ROOM AND FAÇADE

The expansion of Eby has allowed for the construction of a new wrestling area and façade to the east and south faces of the natatorium. This area features all new wrestling facilities.

NATATORIUM

The Coe Natatorium features a 40-meter eight-lane swimming pool with a 16-foot deep diving well. Open-swim times are typically scheduled each day.

The use of all of these facilities is free of charge to Coe students who show a Coe ID! Fitness Center Hours Monday–Thursday: 6:00 AM – 11:00 PM Friday: 6:00 AM – 8:00 PM Saturday: 9:00 AM – 6:00 PM Sunday: 12:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Grotto Climbing Wall Hours Monday–Thursday: 5:00 PM – 9:00 PM Sunday: 4:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Racquet Center Hours Monday–Thursday: 6:00 AM – 9:00 PM Friday: 6:00 AM – 8:00 PM Saturday: 8:00 AM – 6:00 PM Sunday: 2:00 PM – 6:00 PM

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Pool Hours Pool hours will be posted in the fall


ATHLETICS & RECREATION ATHLETICS For more than 150 years, athletics have been an important component of the liberal arts education provided by Coe College. As a student athlete at Coe, you have 21 varsity sports opportunities from which to select. The Kohawks are affiliated with the Iowa Intercollegiate Athletic Conference, one of the nation’s most active and competitive NCAA Division III conferences. Prior to participation in intercollegiate athletics, each student athlete must meet requirements established by our conference and the NCAA and complete appropriate forms. Details of these forms and directions to access them can be found at my.coe. edu under the "My Orientation" tab. Questions about athletic participation at Coe College can be directed to the Office of Athletics at 319.399.8599. *If participating in intercollegiate athletics, you must have all your athletic forms submitted. Please visit my.coe.edu for more information.

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS WOMEN

MEN

»» Basketball »» Cross Country »» Golf »» Indoor Track »» Outdoor Track »» Soccer »» Softball »» Swimming & Diving »» Tennis »» Volleyball

»» Baseball »» Basketball »» Cross Country »» Football »» Golf »» Indoor Track »» Outdoor Track »» Soccer »» Swimming & Diving »» Tennis »» Wrestling

INTRAMURAL SPORTS Do you love participating in sports but don’t have time to join any varsity athletics at Coe? The Coe intramural program is designed to give opportunities to students who want to maintain physical wellness while having fun. Being an IM Champion is a coveted position on campus. Do you have what it takes to win a championship IM T-shirt? Challenge yourself and create or join an IM team at Coe! Here are some of the intramurals offered at Coe:

»» Bags »» Basketball »» Dodgeball »» Flag Football »» Inner-Tube Water Polo

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»» Table Tennis »» Tennis/Racquetball »» Volleyball »» A variety of one-day tournaments


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KOHAWK VILLAGE ATHLETICS AND RECREATION COMPLEX

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TENNIS COURTS DOUGLAS HALL P.U.B.

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OUTDOOR BASKETBALL COURT

GREENE HALL

HICKOK HALL

KOHAWK HOUSE #2

SCHLARBAUM HOUSE

VOORHEES HALL

WHIPPLE FIRE HOUSE

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B AVENUE NE SPIVEY HOUSE

NASSIF HOUSE

MORRIS HOUSE

COE APARTMENTS

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MURRAY HALL

PETERSON HALL DAN LEHN MEMORIAL PATIO MARQUIS HALL

CLARK ALUMNI HOUSE MCCABE HALL

DOWS FINE ARTS CENTER

SINCLAIR AUDITORIUM

ALUMNI GARDEN

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POWER ENTRANCE ACCESSIBLE ENTRANCE

STUART HALL

ELEVATOR HANDICAPPED PARKING FACULTY, STAFF AND COMMUTER STUDENT PARKING OVERNIGHT RESIDENTIAL STUDENT PARKING COE COLLEGE BUILDINGS

1ST AVENUE NE

*If you are a person with a disability and wish to attend an event at Dows, please call 319.399.8689 beforehand for accommodations.

HAMPTON COURT WEST

HAMPTON COURT EAST

COE COLLEGE HOUSING OUTDOOR RECREATION SPACES

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2018 Orientation Handbook  
2018 Orientation Handbook  
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