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‘Best Project in the Midwest’ Engineering group cites Homeland Education center as ‘outstanding’ JORDIN GIGNAC G>PL >=BMHK

While most of the noto-­ riety that the Homeland Education Center receives is for the services and technology that are housed indoors, the building has now received an award for the architectural work. The blue glass construct-­ ing the building was used to represent the merge of technology and nature and with the many other fea-­ tures was enough to win the Best Higher Educa-­ tion/Research Project from the Engineering News-­Re-­ cord (ENR) Midwest’s Best Projects competition for 2012. Among the two design teams that COD hired to build the HEC, Legat Architects submitted the HEC into the Best Proj-­ ects 2012 Competition for ENR. “Legat Architects and the Construction Manag-­ er, Power Construction entered the project [into the competition] due to the building’s unique curricu-­ lum, function, and archi-­ tecture,â€? Communications Manager of Legat Archi-­ tects Douglas Ogurek said. Brubaker Design and Legat Architects designed the building to assist with the existing Police, Fire Sciences, Suburban Law Enforcement Academy, and Criminal Justice Pro-­ grams that COD offers. Legat Architects said they overcame many ob-­ stacles while building and

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Constructware, they were able to create the type of environment for function and aesthetics. In addi-­ tion to ENR, students also have been won over by the HEC.

“You get some good inspiration from this room and they have great places to do your homework or study for your tests,� Second year student Hugo Calderon said. “There’s

enough room for the classes here, but I guess it’s more of architectural GHVLJQ WKDQ WU\LQJ WR ÀW LQ around a hundred classes.�

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$150,000 to Human Services JORDIN GIGNAC G>PL >=BMHK

The Human Services department won the Cen-­ ter of Excellence award, along with a $150,000 grant over three years, and can attribute some success to their unique application. They turned not to themselves, but to the community members

and students, whom they serve, for feedback. “From the feedback we received, the most unique feature of our application was the inclusion of sever-­ al letters from community agencies commending our program for its work with the community and for the high level of student preparedness for working LQ WKH Ă€HOG Âľ $VVLVWDQW Professor Jason Florin

said. “We really tried to convey our interaction with the broader DuPage community and how well our students connect their education to the working world.� Community members and students seemed to agree with the Human Services department and their recommendations, and that carried over to Associate Vice President

“Any teacher I have had in my three and a half years in the department, have put their heart and soul into their classes and I truly believe in what they are teaching,� SHEILA DALTON | Lmn]^gm

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Human Services won goes from August 2012 through June 2013 and continues every August through June for those next three years. With a total of $150,000 in the three-­year span,

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NORTH CENTRAL COLLEGE

NAPERVILLE, IL

TRANSFER TO NORTH CENTRAL COLLEGE AND

Be central.

NORTH CENTRAL COLLEGE OFFERS: Âť over 55 majors Âť academic scholarships and need-based grants Âť an excellent location for internships and jobs Âť a smooth transfer of credit Âť NCAA Division III athletics Âť exciting study abroad opportunities

NORTH CENTRAL COLLEGE WILL BE AT COLLEGE OF DUPAGE ON:

October 10, 9:30-12:30 October 17, 9:30 -12:30 October 23, 9:30-12:30 October 31, 9:30-12:30 These visits are located on the second floor of the SRC near Campus Central.

Âť great support for COD students

To learn more about North Central College, visit northcentralcollege.edu.

LEARNING COMMONS ONE-STOP ACADEMIC SUPPORT CENTER

Finish what you started. Ä‘ĆŤ +),(!0!ĆŤ5+1.ĆŤ $!(+.Äš/ĆŤ !#.!! Ä‘ĆŤ ! !%2!ĆŤ+*!ÄĄ+*ÄĄ+*!ĆŤ !)% ĆŤĆŤ advising Ä‘ĆŤ Ăť!.%*#ĆŤĂ˝!4% (!ĆŤ!2!*%*#ÄŒ ĆŤ 3!!'!* ĆŤ * ĆŤ+*(%*!ĆŤ ( //ĆŤ+,0%+*/ Adult Degree Completion majors offered in: Accounting Business Administration Communication | Criminal Justice Marketing | Psychology RN to BSN | Social Work

Adult Degree Completion Open House Saturday, October 13, 2012 9:00–11:00 a.m. University Banquet Hall

TUTORING SERVICES tutoring@cod.edu, (630) 942-3686 s 4UTORING AVAILABLE FOR A VARIETY OF SUBJECTS BY APPOINTMENT DROP IN OR ONLINE s $ROP IN TUTORING FOR !CCOUNTING !NATOMY 0HYSIOLOGY #HEMISTRY %3, -ICROBIOLOGY

0HYSICS 3PANISH AND -ATH

AND s 3UPPLEMENTAL INSTRUCTION FOR SELECTED COURSES s /NLINE TUTORING AT BB COD EDU THEN SELECT h!SK A 0EER 4UTORv s !SSISTANCE FROM OTHER #/$ STUDENTS PEER TUTORS s 5NIQUE PROCESS TO SERVE STUDENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES College of DuPage Learning Commons 3TUDENT 2ESOURCE #ENTER 32# 2OOM www.cod.edu/learningcommons SELECT @4UTORING 3ERVICES

The Center for Adult and Graduate Studies 347 S. Gladstone Ave. | Aurora, IL 60506 630-844-5294 | AUadmission@aurora.edu


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HUMAN, from Page 1 Human Services plans to use the money to improve its student services, veteran foundations, and community services. “We have several ideas planned,� Florin said. “Working with Veterans Services and Counseling and Advising to develop a counseling center for veterans on campus.� According to Florin, some money will be used to give scholarships to

students, begin partner-­ ships with internship agencies, faculty develop-­ ment and have expert pre-­ senters come to campus. As the Human Services Department works to-­ wards the additions and changes, many students enrolled in Human Ser-­ vices studies are proud and excited for the award to take action. “Any teacher I have had in my three and a half years in the department, have put their heart and

soul into their classes and I truly believe in what they are teaching,â€? current student Sheila Dalton said. Human Services said they hope the future is greatly impacted by the money they received and that the students and faculty will grow even more in their careers with servicing people. “This award is repre-­ sentative of years of hard work on the part of facul-­ ty, local agencies, and our

students. The students in our program bring tre-­ mendous enthusiasm and passion to want to work in the helping professions and this spirit is the reason our program has grown stronger,â€? Florin said. “As we move for-­ ward, we want to see our program grow in the types of specializations offered as well as the types of agencies where our stu-­ dents can intern and eventually work.â€?

HEC, from Page 1 “I think there is value for housing us all under the same roof, we all have a similar goals and interests in providing safety and security,â€? Chief of Police Joe Mullin said. “All of us being together here is a plus.â€? A ceremony will be held at the Crowne Metro Chi-­ cago Plaza for a breakfast on Nov. 29 to receive the award.

Major in Business at Elmhurst You’ll find the complete package. We offer you a personal, powerful education designed for tomorrow’s business leaders—at one of the best liberal arts colleges in the Midwest. In small classes, you’ll work face to face with professors who’ve served as corporate strategists and technology experts. You’ll conduct actual market research and gain real-world experience—long before you graduate. And you’ll prepare for real leadership in the new global world of business.

A top college. It’s official: Elmhurst College is among the best in the Midwest. Check out “America’s Best Colleges,� the influential study by U.S. News & World Report. Elmhurst College ranks among the top colleges in the Midwest and also is one of the best values in the region, according to the survey. Elmhurst also appears in The Princeton Review’s most recent list of top colleges in the Midwest, earning especially high marks for financial aid offerings, faculty and quality of life. Get real. Our first-rate internship program offers you opportunities to gain not only real-world experience but also course credit. Selected sites include Allstate, AT&T, Fifth Third Bank, IBM, Marriott, Merrill Lynch, Minolta, Motorola, Smith Barney, and United Airlines. And through our unique Small Business Institute, you’ll plunge into the process of solving authentic business problems.

Go far. You’ll enjoy unlimited access to field experiences throughout the Chicago area. You’ll work with major international corporations through our Hardin Institute for Market Research. You can even study abroad and see first hand how business is conducted in Turkey, Russia, Morocco, Costa Rica or on the Pacific Rim. Majors in Business • Accounting • Business Administration • Economics • Finance • International Business • Logistics & Supply Chain Management • Management • Marketing • Music Business

Elmhurst is coming to COD!

Contact us

Wednesday, October 31, 2012 from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.; SRC 2nd floor near Starbucks

(630) 617-3400 admit@elmhurst.edu www.elmhurst.edu/transfer

See you there!

190 Prospect Avenue Elmhurst, Illinois 60126

facebook.com/ElmCol twitter.com/ElmhurstCollege

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For students 24 and up. Adult learners come to class well equipped with skills, knowledge and experience. Elmhurst gives credit where credit is due. You can earn up to 32 semester hours for significant learning beyond the classroom. And you can select one of our accelerated programs such as business administration, information technology, pre-clinical psychology or our newest major, organizational leadership and communication. Adult students may qualify for transfer scholarships of up to $18,000 per year; Phi Theta Kappa members may be eligible for an additional $2,000.


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EDITORIAL COURIER POLICY The Courier is published every Friday when classes are in session during the Fall and Spring Semes-­ WHU H[FHSW IRU WKH Ă€UVW and last Friday of each Semester and the week of and the week after Spring Break as a public forum with content chosen by student editors. One copy free, additional copies available on request. Views expressed in editorials represent opin-­ ions of the majority of the Editorial Board, made up of all the Courier editors. The Courier does not knowingly accept adver-­ tisement that discriminate on the basis of sex, creed, religion, color, handi-­ capped status, veteran or sexual orientation, nor does it knowingly print ads that violate any local, state or federal laws. The Courier encourages all students, faculty, staff, administrators and com-­ munity members to voice their opinions on all the topics concerning them both in and out of school. Writers can express their views in a letter to Letters to the Editor. All correspondence and letters for publication must be typed and signed with the author’s day-­ time phone number. The editor-­in-­chief may withhold the author’s name on request. Deliver all correspondence to BIC 3401 between regular RIĂ€FH KRXUV RU PDLO WR WKH Courier, College of DuP-­ age, 425 Fawell Blvd., Glen Ellyn, IL. 60137. Letters also may be sent by e-­mail. The subject heading to the message must read “Letter to the (GLWRU Âľ 7KH ZULWHU¡V Ă€UVW and last names, street address, city, state and complete phone number with area code must be included for identity ver-­ LĂ€FDWLRQ E\ WKH &RXULHU Deadline for letters meant for publication is noon Tuesday. E-­mails can be sent to editor@cod.edu Letters are subject to editing for grammar, style, language, length and libel. All letters represent the views of their author.

Events need better timing Students play role in college decisions, need to be present

The college recently hosted its second Town Hall meeting bringing in administration and staff to talk to students about any questions they might have con-­ FHUQLQJ Ă€QDQFLDO DLG There was only one problem; less than 15 students showed up. Financial aid is something that is near and dear to many hearts on campus, as it often allows them to attend college. However, the lines are often long, and infor-­ mation can be confus-­ ing which is why there are always questions about how to check one’s aid status or when re-­ imbursement checks will be sent out, and yet, there was very little attendance. In an editorial on Sept. 7, 2012, the Cou-­ rier discussed student

involvement or the lack thereof, but it goes beyond the students. When events are SODQQHG WR Ă€W LQWR HYHU\-­ one’s schedule, they don’t work out for anybody. Town Hall meetings for the year so far have consisted of discussions on the Tobacco Ban as ZHOO DV Ă€QDQFLDO DLG WZR of the “hot topicsâ€? on the year, according to Stu-­ dent Leadership Council. However, when a meet-­ ing or event is held at 4 p.m., and there are far fewer amount of students on campus than earli-­ er in the day, is simply setting up for failure. If the goal is to have student feedback and attendance, then events need to cater more to the student schedule which could include polling students as to when the college could serve the greatest amount

of students at once. When the college had its birthday celebration for the Student Services Center and Campus central last month, it was held in the middle of the day unlike many of the other events, and the attendance and student participa-­ WLRQ UHĂ HFWHG WKDW For a slice of sheet cake, approximately 100 people gathered around, some singing as President Robert %UHXGHU FXW WKH Ă€UVW slice and spoke about the effect that the SSC has had on the campus. )RU DQVZHUV WR Ă€-­ nancial aid questions concerning their fu-­ ture as well as money, less than 10 showed up to voice concerns and get answers. Having events later in the day usually result in OHVV FRQĂ LFW IRU FODVV EXW

also limits your amount of available options. If the college or any or-­ ganization wants student participation to thrive, it has to be accessible and not limited to just a few. Events can be planned to cover a block of time that could span between two usual class times so less people might be able to make it to the whole duration of the event, but more people could make it to parts to have their questions answered or receive more information. It’s always easier to blame someone else, but coming up with solutions will only work towards the betterment of the col-­ lege as a whole and make the experience better. With better student feedback, more events and programs can cater to the student body be-­ cause a business without FXVWRPHUV ZRQ¡W SURĂ€W

CourierStaff Editor in Chief Nathan Camp 942-2683 editor@cod.edu

A&E Courtney Clark 942-2660 arts@cod.edu

Graphics Grieta Danosa 942-3113 graphics@cod.edu

News

Jordin Gignac 942-2153 news@cod.edu

Sports Austin Slott 942-3066 sports@cod.edu

Advertising Christina Payton 942-3379 paytonc359@cod.edu

Features Rosalie DeAstis 942-2713 features@cod.edu

Photography London Summers 942-2531 photo@cod.edu

Adviser Eric Hahn 942-4269 hahne148@cod.edu


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OPINION Want your voice heard? The Courier accepts letters to the editor from students, staff, faculty and com-­ munity members. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday prior to publication. Letters must include the author’s name, occupation (student, staff or communi-­ W\ PHPEHU GD\WLPH SKRQH QXPEHU DQG VWUHHW DGGUHVV IRU LGHQWLW\ YHULĂ€FDWLRQ /HWWHUV FDQ EH GURSSHG RII DW WKH &RXULHU RIĂ€FH GXULQJ UHJXODU EXVLQHVV KRXUV RU H PDLOHG WR HGLWRU#FRG HGX /HWWHUV DUH VXEMHFW WR HGLWLQJ IRU JUDPPDU VW\OH ODQJXDJH OHQJWK DQG OLEHO $OO OHWWHUV UHSUHVHQW WKH YLHZV RI WKHLU DXWKRU

COMING SOON:

)

NEW COURIER WEBSITE

ImportantEmails Board of Trustees

Chairman: David Carlin carlind@cod.edu Vice Chairman: Erin Birt birte@cod.edu Secretary: Allison O’Donnell bot-­odonnella@cod.edu Dianne McGuire bot-­mcguire@cod.edu Nancy Svoboda bot-­svobodan@cod.edu Joseph Wozniak wozniakj@cod.edu Student Trustee: Olivia Martin bot-­martino@cod.edu

POLICE REPORT Wednesday, Oct. 3 Accident

Driver of unit 1 stated WKDW KH ZDV WUDYHOLQJ VRXWKERXQG WKURXJKW SDUNLQJ ORW & ZKHQ KH approached the intersec-­ tion. He started to enter WKH LQWHUVHFWLRQ ZKLOH PDNLQJ D OHIW WXUQ DQG did not see unit 2. Unit 1 hit unit 2 on its rear. No LQMXULHV ZHUH UHSRUWHG

Accident

8QLW ZDV GULYLQJ HDVW-­ ERXQG LQ WKH FROOHJH PDLQ DLVOH 8QLW ZDV northbound in the park-­ LQJ DUHD DWWHPSWLQJ WR cross the main aisle. Unit 1 failed to yield and ZDV VWUXFN E\ XQLW

Incident

Victim parked her car LQ )DZHOO ORW ' DW a.m. and returned to her YHKLFOH DW DURXQG p.m. She discovered a ORQJ VWUDWFK RQ WKH GULY-­ er’s side of her vehicle’s UHDU GRRU WKDW ZDV QRW WKHUH LQ WKH PRUQLQJ

Public Safety

Chief of Police: Joe Mullin mullin@cod.edu Deputy Chief: Ray Snisko snisko@cod.edu

Admissions Coordinator Julie Marlatt marlattj@cod.edu

Counseling and Advising counseling@cod.edu

McAninch Arts Center Director: Stephen Cummins cummins@cod.edu

Athletics

Director: Paul Zakowski zakows@cod.edu

Student Leadership Council

Adviser: Steph Quirk quirks@cod.edu

President: Hank Gordon SLC.Hank@cod.edu Vice-­President: Tim Ziman SLC.Timothy@cod.edu Coordinator of Outreach: Jenna Holakovsky SLC.Jenna@cod.edu Adviser: Chuck Steele steelec@cod.edu

Prairie Light Review

Phi Theta Kappa

Facilities Master Plan Director: John Wandolowski wandol@cod.edu

Alter Ego Productions

Adviser: Linda Elaine elaine@cod.edu

Adviser: Shannon Hernandez hernan@cod.edu

)


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FEATURES

Professor receives Harvard Grant :gmakhiheh`r m^Z\a^k \hgmbgn^l iZllbhg _hk bgm^kgZmbhgZe ^]n\Zmbhg bg ma^ IZ\bĂ›\ ROSALIE DEASTIS

COURIER FEATURES EDIOTR

Dale F. Simpson Jr., son of a Vietnam Veteran, Cadet Illinois State Champ for wrestling in ’95, nom-­ inated for Outstanding COD Faculty Member last year, has been sharing his passion for anthro-­ pological education for four years at the college. Having earned a wrestling scholarship to University of Man-­ itoba in Canada. “My friends of different ethnicities and I would always wonder about where their families came from,â€? said Simpson. “I guess this is my gift of cultural curiosity.â€? In 2001 he took a leap LQWR KLV Ă€UVW DUFKDHRORJLFDO Ă€HOG ZRUN RQ (DVWHU ,V-­ land. The island, its people, and archaeology ended up meaning so much to him that he moved to Santia-­ go, Chile in 2002 to teach English, learn Spanish, and to eventually move to Easter island in 2004.

After two years of living on Easter Island, Simp-­ son went on to continue his education in 2006 and earn his M.A. at the University of Auck-­ land in New Zealand. While there, he tu-­ tored for the Department of Anthropology, won a scholarship for the summer of 2007, and graduated in 2008 with Honors and Distinction. Simpson then moved back to Chicago after receiving a Regenstein 3DFLĂ€F &ROOHFWLRQ ,QWHUQ-­ ship at the Field Muse-­ um of Natural History. He was later hired by COD in 2009 to teach anthropology. His latest achievement is a Global Education Initia-­ tive to attend Harvard’s 3DFLĂ€F +LVWRULHV 3HRSOH Land, and Ocean confer-­ HQFH LQ WKH 3DFLĂ€F LVODQGV November of this year. Although Simpson has been traveling to the 3DFLĂ€F HYHU\ \HDU VLQFH WKLV LV WKH Ă€UVW \HDU he has received a grant

to go on the journey. This experience at the conference will help Simpson enhance the learning environment in his classroom, as he will learn about new research, FDVH VWXGLHV DQG SURĂ€OHV while also promoting his development as a Pa-­ FLĂ€F $QWKURSRORJLVW Simpson mentioned how the Eastern Islands are un-­ der collapse due to a heavy Ă RZ RI WRXULVWV HDFK \HDU At the conference, the an-­ thropologists will be able to teach the island residents how to protect their land and give them ideas on how to better their island. “I will also bring back plenty of valuable in-­ formation to present for H.A.V.E.N. Student Club where I’m a co-­chair,â€? commented Simpson. H.A.V.E.N. stands for Human Aesthetics for Valued Equality and Nondiscrimination and it is a club who has a mission to advocate for human rights and explore cultures different from their own.

Photo Courtesy of Dale Simpson

=Ze^ Lbfilhg mkZo^el mh ma^ IZ\bĂ›\ ^o^kr r^Zk mh k^Z\a his anthropological goals. Above, he is in Easter Island at the Rano Raraku quarry during the 2011 Terevaka. net Archaeological Outreach program. Simpson feels encour-­ aged to get back on his anthropological road and

begin his doctorate because of this upcoming trip.

G^p \en[ `^mmbg` kb`am mh [nlbg^ll ROSALIE DEASTIS

COURIER FEATURES EDITOR

Last year, college stu-­ dent Umair Shah, start-­ ed a club at the college called Entrepreneurship Club due to personal interests in people’s experiences when it comes to business and because of his future dream of opening up his own car dealership. He is vice president of the club along with Michael Batts, president. The mission of this student club is to learn about the many different aspects of starting one’s own business through the experiences of suc-­ cessful entrepreneurs and business owners. Members have been working hard since the club began to gain at-­ tention from the school and community. They PHOTO BY LONDON SUMMERS

Entrepreneurship Club President, Michael Batts, talks agenda and upcoming events with club members.

have a Facebook where they keep close track of viewers and activity and they are putting together business cards and they will be getting a Twitter. One opportunity the club was very thrilled about was the 10th annu-­ al National Association of Community College Entrepreneurship Con-­ ference that took place this past Wednesday at the Hyatt Regency O’Hare in Chicago. “This was a great op-­ portunity for a club still in its early stages, to coordinate with other FOXEV SRVVLEO\ Ă€QG VSRQ-­ sors, and to just spread the word about who we are, while also gaining knowledge,â€? said Batts. The conference had a number of notable speakers such as Ray Charles Robinson Jr.,

accomplished entrepre-­ neur, award-­winning Ă€OP SURGXFHU DQG VRQ RI the famous entertainer Ray Charles; and Doris K. Christopher, found-­ er and chairman of The Pampered Chef – the premier direct seller of high quality kitchen tools. “NACCE let us really network with all kinds of people, exchange ideas, and make connections,â€? said Richard Stark, mem-­ EHUVKLS RIĂ€FHU RI WKH FOXE Entrepreneurship club believes it’s important that everyone knows they are club and any-­ one can join to be ed-­ ucated, whether it’s to apply the knowledge to a future career or just because the business world interests you. They meet every Thurs-­ day 2:30 to 3:30 in BIC 2625 G conference room.

“This was a great opportunity for a club still in its early stages... to just spread the word about who we are, while also gaining knowledge,�

MICHAEL BATTS | Entrpreneurship Club President


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AMERICA’S MOST INFLUENTIAL ART AND DESIGN SCHOOL SAIC encourages investigation that is interdisciplinary, collaborative, and experimental.

Transfer to Lewis University

APPLY NOW: saic.edu/ugapp

ADMISSIONS 312.629.6100 | 800.232.7242 ugadmiss@saic.edu

Philip Chesnick (BFA 2012), One Thing Leads to Another (detail), 2012, cast aluminum

SPRING 2013 SCHOLARSHIP DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 1

We offer more than 80 undergraduate majors and programs of study, adult accelerated degree completion programs and 25 graduate programs. We seek to develop strong, capable graduates who build successful careers. We have more than 6,500 total students including international students from more than 20 countries. Our most popular transfer majors include aviation, criminal/social justice, education, nursing, healthcare leadership, and business.

www.lewisu.edu (815) 836-5250

6 Convenient Locations:

COLLEGE OF DUPAGE STUDENTS Transfer credit is pre-approved through existing agreements between Lewis University and the College of DuPage Learn more about our programs on-site: t $SJNJOBM 4PDJBM +VTUJDF BOE 'JSF͇4FSWJDF "ENJOJTUSBUJPO EFHSFFT t &OIBODFE 5FBDIFS &EVDBUJPO EFHSFFT &MFNFOUBSZ 4QFDJBM BOE $PNCJOFE &MFNFOUBSZ 4QFDJBM &EVDBUJPO

Romeoville, Chicago, Hickory Hills, Oak Brook, Shorewood, Tinley Park

TRANSFER TO

LOYOLA , BE TRANSFORMED.

ONSITE ADMISSION APPOINTMENTS t Fridays, Loyola’s Lake Shore Campus FALL OPEN HOUSES t Oct. 20 and Nov. 17 Visit LUC.edu/transfer to RSVP or schedule an appointment.

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COMICS MindGym

October 15, 2012

October 15, 2012

King Features Weekly Service

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9

PHOTO

Work smarter, not harder Alternative campus transportation, including skateboarding, reviewed LONDON SUMMERS PhotoEditor

With more than 11 buildings and 273 acres, the college is able to serve the thousands of students and com-­ munity members who walk through its doors, but the vast size can be overwhelming. Simply walking from building to building can be a daunting task and a bit tedious, especial-­ ly with construction or other hindrances that could affect the trek across campus, but there are students who already walk or com-­ mute through other means to the college. Some students have taken their hobbies and turned them into an effective mode of transportation. First year student Mi-­ BOTTOM LEFT: First year student, Michael Mancanocoasts his way to the cafeteria for an afternoon snack. Top and bottom left photos by London Summers, bottom right photo by Nathan Camp

chael Mancano says that skating on campus greatly decreased the time it takes, traveling from class to class, “It literally takes me three minutes to get from the Home-­ land Security building to the Berg‌ Its also a fun way to exer-­ cise,â€? said Mancano. However adversities loom over those who choose to take this al-­ ternative means of campus transportation. According to campus police policy, the college allows skateboarding to and from class, as long as the students are not performing tricks on railings or any oth-­ er campus property. This is a fairly light concern where as many students have said that they have never had

problems with skating on campus or incidents with campus police, as well as some students who say they haven’t had an issue in over four years of attending the college. Glen Ellyn has a skate-­ board park off of DuPage Blvd in their park dis-­ WULFW URXJKO\ Ă€YH PLQXWHV from the college’s main campus to allow stu-­ dents to practice tricks without disturbing any patrons of the college. The park is open from dusk until dawn and offers a pyramid as well as handrails and a half-­ pipe allow students to blast tricks and grind to their heart’s content.

TOP LEFT: Michael Mancano takes a moment to explain his board set up.

BOTTOM RIGHT:Courier Photo Editor, London Summers, performs a frontside body jar at the Glen Ellyn Skate Facility.


10

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11

ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT Student Music Concert More than 200 students performing in concert marks start of season for music department COURTNEY CLARK

ARTS & ENTERTINMENT EDITOR

After a change of ven-­ ues, the Student Music Concert will move to the Turner Conference Center in the SRC on Oct. 18 at 7:30 p.m. This show marks the start of season of performances for the music department as well as displaying the talent accrued through-­ RXW WKHLU HQVHPEOHV “Mid-­semester is a JUHDW WLPH WR KHDU Ă€YH RI RXU WHUULĂ€F VWXGHQW PXVLF HQVHPEOHV Âľ PX-­ sic professor Lee Kes-­ selman said. “Over 200 student performers will participate on one stage in music ranging from percussion to jazz, from choral to orchestral. Many different musical styles ZLOO EH UHSUHVHQWHG Âľ The concert will include the Percussion Ensem-­ EOH 6PDOO *URXS -D]] &RQFHUW &KRLU &KDPEHU 2UFKHVWUD DQG &KDPEHU 6LQJHUV 7KH FKDPEHU orchestra is “a tradition-­ al classical orchestra consisting of groups of violins, violas, cellos,

EDVVHV DQG PRVWO\ SDLUV RI ZRRGZLQGV DQG EUDVV and timpani,â€? said Kes-­ selman. The percussion HQVHPEOH IHDWXUHV PDQ\ types of percussion such DV PDULPEDV JRQJV ZKROH GUXP VHWV EHOOV SODVWLF EXFNHWV ZKLVWOHV African drums, thunder sheets, and many others. Each group will perform two to three selections to give the audience mem-­ EHUV DQ LGHD RI WKH YDULHW\ of music studied in the college’s music program. All of these groups practice as classes and then perform concerts. “All of the music ensem-­ EOHV DUH FXUULFXODU ZLWK registration, credit, and grades,â€? said Kesselman. He continued to say that since the music is the curriculum for the class, “we take into account WKH QHHGV DQG DELOLWLHV of students. Of course, we always hope that students will like the music and they seem to.â€? 7LFNHWV DUH DYDLODEOH DW the Arts Center Ticket Of-­ Ă€FH DW RU DW WKH door. See atthemac.org under student music for additional information.

Photo Courtesy of Lee Kesselman

=Zg = :gk^Z \hg]n\mbg` ma^ <aZf[^k Hk\a^lmkZ pab\a pbee i^k_hkf Khllbgb l Ho^kture from the Barber of Seville on October 18.

Photo Courtesy of Lee Kesselman

The 26-voice Chamber Singers will sing varied selections, including music by Debussy, Levine, Abbie Betinis, and director Kesselman.

Art professor displays work Mara Baker balances teaching and creating art, has two projects featured in galleries COURTNEY CLARK

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Mara Baker, an art professor at the college is showing off her own skills at two different art shows this fall. 7KH Ă€UVW VKRZ LV called Two Histories of the World and it is a VLJKW VSHFLĂ€F H[KLELW A few years ago, she took part in a project where she and a group of artists were invited to make works using only materials found at William H. Cooper, a rundown factory. Sculp-­ tures and installations

were placed throughout WKH EXLOGLQJ PDNLQJ the entire space part RI WKH H[KLELWLRQ Baker said, “A lot of people came to see the show and had very mov-­ LQJ H[SHULHQFHV ZLWK it. It was a memorial to the past century.â€? The Salvation Army SXUFKDVHG WKH EXLOG-­ ing soon after and it was demolished. Baker said, “Work is ephemeral, [it] doesn’t necessarily last.â€? Now Baker has worked to

See Art Show, Page 12

Photo Courtesy of Mara Baker

Untitled work by Mara Baker, installation view at William H. Cooper, Chicago, 2012


12

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smART Dates

College of DuPage

College Music Mid-Semester Concerts All performances are held at College of DuPage, Turner Conference Center, SRC Room 2000 unless noted.

Faculty Recital

Thursday, Oct. 11, 7:30 p.m. Each semester our esteemed faculty step outside the classroom displaying their own performance excellence. Tickets: $4 (general admission)

Chamber Orchestra

The Nerd

Where K Building Theater When Oct. 18- Oct. 28 Info Ma^ G^k] l fZbg \aZk\m^k%PbeeZf% k^\^bo^l Z \Zee _khf Z fZg gZf^] Kb\d Zg] lhhg k^Zebs^l bm l Z fZg pah lZo^] abl eb_^ bg Ob^mgZf' Ma^ G^k] bl Zg ^qmk^f^ \hf^]r% o^k`bg` hg leZilmb\d Z[hnm _kb^g]labi Zg] ma^ e^g`mal i^hie^ pbee `h mh mh a^ei Z _kb^g]'

Hypnotist Show

Director: Dan Pasquale D’Andrea Monday, Oct. 15, 5 p.m. Tickets: Free

DuPage Community Concert Band

Director: Terry Redford Tuesday, Oct. 16, 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $4 (general admission) Location: Elmhurst Christian Reformed Church 149 W. Brush Hill Rd., Elmhurst

Student Music Concert

Thursday, Oct. 18, 7:30 p.m. Join us as the college music ensembles present an evening of mixed repertoire performances. Tickets: $4 (general admission)

Where :em^k >`h Ikh]n\mbhgl Khhf ,+ When P^]g^l]Zr% Ocmh[^k +- Zm *+ i'f' Info :em^k >`h Ikh]n\mbhgl Zk^ [kbg`bg` Z ikh_^llbhgZe arighmblm mh \Zfinl mh arighmbs^ lmn]^gml' Ma^k^ pbee [^ Z li^\bZe l^llbhg _hk lfhd^kl pah pZgm mh jnbm'

Student Music Concert

Where Turner Conference Center in the SRC ;nbe]bg`% Khhf +))) When Mankl]Zr% H\mh[^k *1 Zm 03,) i'f' Info <hg\^km pbee bg\en]^ ma^ I^k\nllbhg >gl^f[e^% LfZee @khni CZss% <hg\^km <ahbk% <aZf[^k Hk\a^lmkZ Zg] <aZf[^k Lbg`^kl pah pbee ^Z\a i^k_hkf + hk , l^e^\mbhgl

Chamber Orchestra

Where Turner Conference Center in the SRC ;nbe]bg`% Khhf +))) When Monday, Ocmh[^k *. Zm . i'f' Info Lahp mbme^] : ?k^g\a <hgg^\mbhg' Ma^ `khni pbee [^ i^k_hkfbg` <^eeh <hg\^kmh * bg : fbghk% hi',,% FZljn^l ^m ;^k`ZfZljn^l% hi'**+% Zg] Ma^ ;Zk[^k h_ L^obee^ Ho^kmnk^'

Halloween Party

Where :em^k >`h Ikh]n\mbhgl Khhf When P^]g^l]Zr% H\mh[^k ,* Zm ** Z'f' Info :em^k >`h Ikh]n\mbhgl bl ahlmbg` Z AZeehp^^g iZkmr' Ma^k^ pbee [^ _hh] Zg] i^hie^ ]k^ll^] bg \hlmnf^l'

For tickets and information, call (630) 942-4000 www.AtTheMAC.org

From Art Show, Page 11

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recreate new versions of her work for the Hyde Park Art Center in Chi-­ cago, for a new audience. Baker said the group was “responding to works we made in the previous yearâ€? but that she “de-­ constructed the work and remade it in a different way.â€? She also said that it was very different this time around working in a “pristine,â€? white gal-­ lery rather than an old, abandoned warehouse. Pictures of the work cannot be found online be-­ cause Baker is interested in “what it means to truly KDYH VLJKW VSHFLĂ€F ZRUN that doesn’t show up all over the web.â€? She says the exhibit is “about mem-­ ory, the memory of ob-­ jects, the artistic process.â€? Baker describes her art as belonging to the “in between, gray area between 2D and 3Dâ€? and said that “blue tape, old packaging foam, and cardboard boxesâ€? are common materials for her to use. She used these kinds of materials to create her series of paint-­ ings in order to “use the same material language but within the form of painting.â€? She said, “On a

deeper level, [the show is] our experience of living.â€? This show is running for the next 4 months from now until until January 6, 2013 at Hyde Park Art Center located at 5020 S. Cornell Ave-­ nue Chicago, IL 6061. Her second show, called Rigoletto’s Curse, is also currently open. In this exhibition, Baker col-­ laborated with a writer named Monica Westin with whom she exchanged sketchbooks. Baker said, “Over the past summer we decided to really delve into how a writer and visual artist could col-­ laborate in a process.â€? She said the sketch-­ books consisted of a “useful and productive dialogue using two dif-­ ferent languages.â€? Baker created a body of small white panels and collag-­ es based off old record albums. “Her writing is directly about my work and the collaborative process,â€? said Baker. This show will only be open until November 1 at Trinity Christian College, Seerveld Gal-­ lery located at 6601 West College Drive, Palos Heights, IL 60463.


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14

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SPORTS

Striker Raquel Salinas kicks the ball in bounds

Conference champs Photo by London Summers

Lady Chaps sweep season series with Joliet, win conference championship AUSTIN SLOTT

SPORTS EDITOR

The Lady Chaps are conference champions after beating the Joliet Junior College Wolves, 2-­1, last Friday. In addition to it being the conference champi-­ onship, the Lady Chaps were playing for home Ă€HOG DGYDQWDJH LQ WKH playoffs. With the importance of the game on their minds, the Chaps began the game looking aggressive

offensively. Barely two minutes LQWR WKH JDPH PLGĂ€HOGHU Marlene Nevarez passed WKH EDOO XS Ă€HOG WR VWULNHU Margaret Lindberg who chased it down and scored the goal. The Chaps were out to an early lead and the de-­ fense seemed determined to keep it. The defensive play was so effective, in fact, the Wolves only attempted one shot on the Chaps’ goal during the entire

Ă€UVW KDOI “There were times when WKH ZKROH Ă€HOG ZDV FRP-­ pressed into about thirty yards, which is like both teams are playing Rus-­ sian roulette at the same time,â€? Head Coach Wil-­ liam Fajkus said. “Both defenses felt com-­ fortable doing that.â€? When the second half began, the Chaps stuck with their strong defen-­ sive game plan and al-­ lowed scarce opportunities for the Wolves to score.

However, at 77:12 mark, Joliet striker Britney Len-­ za found a hole through the defense and snuck a goal in past the Chaps, her twelfth of the season. The game was knotted up at one, but it did not take long for the Chaps to answer back. Just two minutes af-­ ter Joliet tied the game, forward Adriana Hernan-­ GH] VFRUHG KHU Ă€UVW JRDO of the season and gave the Chaps the lead once again.

The goal turned out to be the game winner as the defense held onto the lead for the game’s last ten minutes. Hernandez shared her thoughts on scoring the game-­winning goal. “It feels great, it’s really exciting,â€? Hernandez said. “We were trying to get KRPH Ă€HOG DGYDQWDJH VR we were really looking forward to winning.â€? The victory has the Lady Chaps feeling good

See CHAMPS, Page 15


15

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Fall 2012 Sports Schedule FOOTBALL AUGUST Sat., 25 ERIE (NY) SEPTEMBER Sun., 2 at Wisconsin-Whitewater JV Sat., 8 IOWA CENTRAL Sat., 15 at Iowa Western Sat., 22 NORTH DAKOTA SCIENCE Sat., 29 at Ellsworth (IA) OCTOBER Sun., 7 at Marian University JV (IN) Sat., 20 at Arkansas Baptist NOVEMBER Sun., 4 AIR FORCE ACADEMY JV

GOLF

W 30-0 W 21-0 W 35-28 L 21-65 W 49-21 L 42-49 W 21-6 12:00pm 1:00pm

E=F K KG;;=J AUGUST Sat., 25 at Triton Thu., 30 at Morton Sun., 2 at South Suburban SEPTEMBER Sat., 8 2012 Loggers Invitational @ Lincoln Land vs Owens (OH) Sun., 9 2012 Loggers Invitational @ Lincoln Land vs Illinois Central Sun., 16 vs Southwestern Illinois @ University of Illinois- Springfield Fri., 21 at Prairie State Sat., 29 at Oakton OCTOBER Thu., 4 KISHWAUKEE Sat., 6 at Moraine Valley Mon., 15 LAKE COUNTY Thu., 18 ELGIN Sat., 20 Region IV Play-in Round 1 @ tba Mon., 22 Region IV Play-in Round 2 @ tba Wed., 24 Region IV Playoff @ tba Sat., 27 Region IV Playoff @ tba Wed., 31 Region IV Playoff @ tba NOVEMBER Sat., 3 Region IV Final @ tba Mon., 12- Division III NATIONAL Sat., 17 CHAMPIONSHIPS @ Darton College Albany, Georgia

W 4-0 L 0-3 L 2-5 L 0-1 L 0-4

AUGUST Fri., 24 Highland “36� Park Hills G C Sat., 25 N4C Conference Meet #1 Elliot G C SEPTEMBER Fri., 7 Duane Chanay Invitational Byron Hills G C Sat., 8 N4C Conference Meet #2 Blackstone G C Tue., 11 St. Francis Fall Invitational Wedgewood G C Fri., 14- Illinois Valley Classic Sat., 15 Senica Oak Ridge G C Fri., 21 Skyhawk Classic Emerald Hills G C Sat., 22 N4C Conference Meet #3 Bridges G C Fri., 28 Prairie View Classic Prairie View G C Sat., 29 N4C Conference Meet #4 Cantigny G C OCTOBER Thu., 4Region IV Tournament Sat., 6 Prairie View G C

OGE=F K KG;;=J 8:00am 12:00pm 1:30pm 12:00pm 10:00am 12:00pm 8:00am 1:00pm 11:00am 1:30pm 12:30pm 11:00am

;JGKK ;GMFLJQ W 3-2 L 2-3 L 1-3 W 2-0 W 4-0 4:00pm 4:00pm 12:00pm 3:00pm 3:00pm 12:00pm 3:00pm 12:00pm TBA

SEPTEMBER Fri., 14 Illinois Intercollegiate Championships @ Weibring Golf Course Normal, Illinois Sat., 22 Gil Dodds Invitational @ St. James Farm Warrenville, Illinois Fri., 28 College of DuPage Invitational OCTOBER Sat., 13 Sky Hawk Invitational @ Sauk Valley CC Dixon, Illinois Fri., 19 North Central - Cardinal Open @ St. James Farm Warrenville, Illinois Sat., 27 Region IV Championship @ Sauk Valley CC Dixon, Illinois NOVEMBER Sat., 10 NJCAA Division I Nationals @ Rend Lake CC Ina, Illinois

4:15pm

10:00pm 4:00pm 10:30am 4:30pm 11:00am

TBA

AUGUST Fri., 24 at Waubonsee Wed., 29 at Triton SEPTEMBER Sat., 1 JACKSON (MI) Tue., 4 MORTON Mon., 10 at Prairie State Wed., 12 at Joliet Sun., 16 vs. Southwestern Illinois @ Univesity of Illinois-Springfield Wed., 19 HARPER Fri., 21 TRITON Sat., 22 ROCHESTER (MN) OCTOBER Mon., 1 at Oakton Wed., 3 TRINITY CHRISTIAN JV Fri., 5 JOLIET Mon., 8 SOUTH SUBURBAN Wed., 10 at Harper Fri., 12 LAKE COUNTY Mon., 15 DALEY Wed., 17 TRINITY INTERNATIONAL JV Fri., 19 ELGIN Tue., 23 REGION IV PLAYOFF Sat., 27 REGION IV CHAMPIONSHIP NOVEMBER Thu., 8NJCAA NATIONALS Sun., 11 @ Tompkins Cortland CC Dryden, NY

L 0-4 W 6-0 L 0-3 T 3-3 W 3-2 L 0-6 L 2-3 W 7-0 W 1-0 L 0-3 W 5-3 W 2-1 W 6-3 4:00pm 4:00pm 6:00pm 4:00pm 4:00pm 3:00pm 12:00pm TBA

L=FFAK AUGUST Fri., 31 at Moraine Valley SEPTEMBER Wed., 5 at McHenry Fri., 7 ELGIN Mon., 10 WAUBONSEE Thu., 13 ROCK VALLEY Fri., 14- COD/USTA Sun., 16 TOURNAMENT Mon., 17 at North Central JV Wed., 19 at Oakton Fri., 21 ILLINOIS VALLEY Wed., 26 SAUK VALLEY Thu., 27 at Lake County Fri., 28- COD/USTA Sun., 30 TOURNAMENT OCTOBER Thu., 4Region IV Tournament Sat., 6 at Moraine Valley

3:00pm 3:00pm 3:00pm 3:00pm 3:00pm TBA 3:00pm 3:00pm 3:00pm 3:45pm 3:00pm TBA TBA

CHAMPS _khf IZ`^ *and a mentality that mid-­ Ă€HOGHU ,VDEHOOD 3DUULOOL GHVFULEHV DV ´JR ELJ RU JR KRPH Âľ ´:KHQHYHU \RX ZLQ FORVH JDPHV \RX GHĂ€QLWHO\ EHOLHYH LQ \RXUVHOI DQG ZH¡YH KDG D IHZ ZLQV WKLV \HDU ZKHUH ZH¡YH FRPH IURP EHKLQG Âľ )DMNXV VDLG 7KH &KDSV UHOHQWOHVVO\ DWWDFNHG WKH -ROLHW JRDO HQGLQJ ZLWK VKRWV RQ JRDO FRPSDUHG WR -ROLHW¡V Ă€YH :LWK WKH ZLQ WKH &KDSV SURYHG WKDW QRW HYHU\ JDPH KDV WR EH D VKRRWRXW VRPH JDPHV FDQ EH ZRQ ZLWK D JRDO RU WZR DQG JRRG GHIHQVH $ WRXJK URDG ORVV RQ :HGQHVGD\ EULQJV WKH /DG\ &KDSV¡ UHFRUG WR RQ WKH VHDVRQ 7KH WHDP KDV QRZ ZRQ Ă€YH RI WKHLU ODVW VHYHQ JDPHV DQG DUH EXLOGLQJ PRPHQWXP DV WKH SRVW-­ VHDVRQ DSSURDFKHV 7KHLU QH[W JDPH ZLOO Iahmh [r Ehg]hg Lnff^kl EH )ULGD\ 2FW DJDLQVW Fb]Ă›^e]^k FZke^g^ G^oZk^s p^Zo^l makhn`a ma^ Cheb^m ]^_^gl^ ]nkbg` ma^ <aZil +&* pbg eZlm ?kb]Zr' /DNH &RXQW\


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Our graduates emerge as leaders, managers, & entrepreneurs.

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..1%4%+2 $ 3)2% )- +%- ++7Northwood University is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination and equal opportunity for all persons regardless of race, gender, color, religion, creed, national origin or ancestry, age, marital status, disability or veteran status.The University is also committed to compliance with all applicable laws regarding nondiscrimination. Northwood University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association (800) 621-7440; higherlearningcommission.org.