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COLLEGE OF DUPAGE STUDENT NEWSPAPER \\ 18 SEPTEMBER 2013 \\ VOLUME 49, ISSUE 4

Beatrice Maldonado “Cooking is my world”


WHAT’S

INSIDE 4

10+11

EDITOR’S NOTE

7

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT B E AT R I C E M A L D O N A D O

Q+A WITH THE PRESIDENT

8

POLITICAL COLUMNIST TA L K S S Y R I A

13

12 WINE FEST

14 17

THE TRUE CAMPUS COMMUTER: BY BIKE WHY YOU NEED TO SEE BOOK OF MORMON NEED A BREAK? CHECK OUT OUR ‘COFFEE BREAK’ SECTION WHILE YOU ENJOY A CUP OF JOE

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EDITOR’S

NOTE T

his morning started out great for me, tried a new concoction from Starbucks (The Starbucks that normally screws up my drink) and it was probably the best tasting Chai latte I’ve had in awhile. I was also lucky enough to be given a free sample of a doughnut, which was not a sample at all, but in-fact the whole doughnut itself. To my surprise, was not stale. All because of the great service I received on my way to school, the mood was set for me, all because the lady serving me coffee wasn’t cranky. I feel like most students here are like the cranky barista who will always screw up your drink. But if you go in with a smile, you’re likely to get customers who will smile back and give you a break. This was the case with our face on the cover this week. Beatrice Maldonado, a culinary student at the college, has found her smile when it comes to culinary arts. Our features editor, Rosalie DeAstis, wrote an enlightening piece in our student spotlight for this week that is a story that cannot be skimmed through. Skimming will get you no-where if you’re reading The

Courier. We have a comic page for those who would rather play. We’ve been developing better ways to improve on our paper. This week, we grouped the comics, Overheard and Straight Talk together and we added a new page dedicated to specific themes each week. This week’s can be found on page 17 and it focuses on how to recycle any old issues of The Courier while making your nails pretty for a weekend date or other special event. Thus we created a new section titled “Coffee Break” which is a concept we came up with so that you know where to go when you’re sipping that cup of Joe. Among other bugs that we are working on fixing, I received our first Letter to the Editor from a paralegal student, Kathy Omelka. In her letter, she discussed how she found grammatical errors in the editor’s note along with an event date mistake. To address Omelka and the rest of our readers who are curious, as a student newspaper we strive to be as professional and error-free as big newspapers like the Chicago Tribune are. Since we are only a

community college and our office represents opportunities for an internship, we take our mistakes as a learning experience. Without an outlet to make mistakes and learn from them so that we do not make them again, we would not be able to do what we do today. So I say to you, we are hard workers. We come into school on our days off and work untill late hours trying to put out a publication for the students to enjoy on their long hours on campus. I hope you enjoy this week, as well as the many to come.

Enjoy,

Jordin Gignac Editor-in-Chief

S TA F F

JORDIN GIGNAC EDITOR-IN-CHIEF editor@cod.edu

A huge Radiohead fan and an enthusiast of the culinary arts

CHRISTINA PAYTON ADVERTISING ADVISOR paytonc359@cod.edu

The ‘Office Mom’ and handles all of the advertising

JOASH MENCIAS NEWS EDITOR news@cod.edu

An amateur font geek and political junkie

ROSALIE DEASTIS FEATURES EDITOR features@cod.edu

CAROLINE KOCH ARTS EDITOR arts@cod.edu

Is outgoing and is obsessed with Has a music blog called Operation: animal print HandHug


COURIER

CONTRIBUTORS

Courier policy

HAROON ATCHA POLITICAL COLUMNIST haroonatcha@yahoo.com

TABREZ KAHN PHOTO FREELANCER ktabrez46@gmail.com

OUMAR MELVIN GRAPHIC DESIGNER melvinoumar@gmail.com

Haroon Atcha is a business student minoring in political science. Aside from working on numerous campaigns, Haroon is involved in various cultural and community activities including teaching English and martial arts after school.

Tabrez Kahn is an international student from Mumbai, India. He loves his new hobby of photography and has been the photo editor’s intern for a month now and really enjoys what he’s learning.

Oumar Melvin (illustrator/ Animator) An incredible visual artist, Oumar’s work delivers real vibrancy to the world and its characters. He truly brings your imagination to the stage.

PAUL TRIUKAS SPORTS EDITOR sports@cod.edu

From Lithuania and loves writing about sports

DENTON DOOLEY   PHOTO EDITOR photo@cod.edu A big Johnny Cash fan

JULIA KLOS SOCIAL MEDIA graphics@cod.edu

In the process of becoming an English teacher

The Courier is published every Wednesday when classes are in session during the fall and spring semester, except for the first and last Wednesday of each semester and the week of and the week after spring Break as a public forum with content chosen by student editors. One copy free, additional copies available upon request. Views expressed in the Courier represent opinions of majority of the staff. The Courier does not knowingly accept advertisement that discriminate on the basis of sex, creed, religion, color, handicapped status, veteran or sexual orientation, nor does it knowingly print ads that violate any local, state or federal laws. The Courier encourages all students, faculty, staff, administrators and community members to voice their opinions on all the topics concerning them both in and out of school. Writers can express their views in a “Letter to the Editor”. All correspondence and letters for publication must be typed and signed with the author’s daytime phone number. Deliver all correspondence to BIC 3401 between regular office hours or mail to the Courier, College of DuPage, 425 Fawell Blvd., Glen Ellyn, IL. 60137. Letters also may be sent by e-mail. The subject heading to the message must read “Letter to the Editor.” The writer’s first and last names, street address, city, state and complete phone number with area code must be included for identity verification by the Courier. Deadline for letters meant for publication is noon on Mondays. E-mails can be sent to editor@cod.edu Letters are subject to editing for grammar, style, language, length and libel. All letters represent the views of the author, not the editorial board.

DAVID WILCOX COPY EDITOR wilcoxd@dupage.edu

An entrepreneur with an editing business

KELLY WEESE STAFF WRITER kellyw@dupage.edu

From sunny San Diego and a first year student

5


NEWS

Photos by Denton Dooley

Courier News Editor, Joash Mencias, asks President Dr. Breuder how he managed to succeed while being the youngest college president at the time and how he has grown since then as a leader.

6


NEWS Q+A

Q+A: President Breuder In an exclusive sit-down interview with The Courier, Dr. Breuder talks about his 32 year career as a college president, the imminent completion of campus construction and more. JOASH MENCIAS // NEWS EDITOR Courier: You’ve received many accolades this year including the National Pacesetter award for marketing efforts and the 2013 ACCT Central Region CEO award, which garnered recognition from the Illinois General Assembly. After 32 years of serving as a college president, does it feel like this year is a peak? Dr. Breuder: I don’t know so much if it’s a peak, it’s just sometimes things run in a cycle. All of a sudden something happens and it begets something else. So you know I am privileged to be identified with the Pacesetter award and the other ones that you mentioned… when the marketing people recognize me, they recognize our college. When ACCT recognizes me, they recognize College of DuPage…I know what my role is but I know that I can’t drive the ball down the field or reach the accomplishments that we’ve been able to reach here and other places without other people. But it’s nice, it feels good and it’s worth having a drink over. Courier: We recently published an article about the stigma over community college. Being someone who has seen community colleges grow over the years, do you think that stigma has changed? Dr. Breuder: I know what you’ve been writing about and what others have expressed for years because I started being educated in one. I was one of those people who was routed the community college route because it was for people who were challenged academically, socially, culturally, economically. And in a good way, community colleges have been the savior for many of us for over 100 years. It doesn’t mean we’re not bright. It doesn’t mean we’re not accomplished. But for whatever reason, we always knew that whatever was in your backyard was never as good as something down the street… Community colleges have seen that, they’ve been the stepchildren, the bastard child… but we’ve persisted. And thank

God we have, because hundreds of thousands of us got the opportunity through a community college and then blossomed from there. I’m delighted to see community colleges after 100 years become respected. When I talk to students in high school, and you ask them where you go to school next year, five years ago then would go like this, (muffled with hands over face) “I’m going to the College of DuPage.”… But the hands were always on the mouth. Today, the hands are down…today our image has changed so much… it has transformed. Courier: Do you think that actively pursuing raising that community college standard is the earmark of your presidency? Dr. Breuder: I’d like to think so. But everything we’re doing today is built on what other people did… And eventually when I leave, I’d like to be able to have someone look back and say what was and what is and look at what’s happened. It’s the physical plant, the programs, the financial stability, the accreditation, taking care of the employees by giving them good salary increases and benefit packages. It’s all of that. And who’s the primary beneficiary of that? It’s you. So you don’t have to leave here saying, “I hope nobody asks me…��� What I want is that you don’t have to be embarrassed when you walk out. Courier: What are some other things that will continue raising that standard as president? Dr. Breuder: I’d like to think that we’re seen for whom we are, a hybrid community college. And if we’re ever successful in getting a baccalaureate degree, that would launch us into the ‘next.’ Today there are 22 states in the country that allow community colleges to offer baccalaureate degrees. Illinois still doesn’t do it. The reason is because university and colleges want to keep the baccalaureate sandbox to themselves. They don’t want us

to play in it for fear that we would be better at it in some cases and that we would take market share. Education is a business. I want to see residence halls happen. We were crafted with a concept of being community, meaning you should live in the community and come here… Why not have them for people who want the full collegiate experience?But the state says no, you can’t do it. So we need law change for both baccalaureate degree and for residence halls. If and when that ever happens, it launches community colleges in the stadium to a whole other world. If you think our enrollment is big now, hold on to your seats. It’ll blow through the roof. Courier: Construction is simmering down now. Are there still any new plans in the near future? Dr. Breuder: The biggest activity you’ll see over the next three months will be the delivery of the MAC, the PE building, the library, and the computing center. They’re all going to be done by the end of the year. The biggest thing that’s happening is that all the temporary buildings are going down. The M and L buildings are going down. OCC and K are going down as soon as we move the people out. Then it will all be converted to green space. You’ll also see completion of the loop roadway. You’ll be able to circumnavigate the campus. Then we’ll build one other building, which would be phase two of Homeland Security. That will be an extension of the SLEAC academy. It will primarily be a shooting pavilion. We think that as we develop College of DuPage, we’ve got to have recognized centers of excellence. One of them is going to be Homeland Security…This is a major separating element for us. Courier: The college’s relationship with Glen Ellyn seems to be healing especially after Village President Alex Demos showed willingness to come together. Do you share that same sentiment? How do

you see the college and the village moving forward after years of contention? Dr. Breuder: I absolutely and unequivocally share his view. College of DuPage’s corporate center is Glen Ellyn. We wouldn’t want to be anywhere else. What had happened over time was a lack of agreement over what was the level of authority that the village had relative to the college’s campus development plans… That conflict had been ongoing for more than 20 years. When we really started to build big time five years ago, it crescendoed again. People have said to me the conflict over this had been around so long that we said “look, we have to bring this to a head sooner than later. This is not good.” We went into a major confrontational relationship with the village. We think we were the most responsible in our behavior, trying to find a way to work with them… But it just really got, not very good as we went through the process. Fortunately, we were able to enter into a partnership of sorts with the county. And that allowed us to exit the relationship with Glen Ellyn… Once we were able to get that divorce, so to speak, relative to the construction going on here with the advent of a new leadership team, it all changed overnight. If you’ve been looking at newspapers over the last year, you’ll see very little in terms of referencing the conflict between Glen Ellyn and the College of DuPage. As a leader, my job was to finally resolve that, and I did…it’s behind us. Now you see a whole different relationship between us. We’re proud to be here. We know we are Glen Ellyn’s greatest asset, so treat us accordingly. Don’t create constant difficulty for us and put roadblocks in our way… But we got that behind us. Today, it’s much better; you don’t read much about it. We want to be here, we want a good working relationship with them.


NEWS OPINION

Syria: Inform yourself

T

HAROON ATCHA // POLITICAL COLUMNIST

8

wo weeks ago, I wrote on the situation in Syria, laying out the basics. Since then, talk about military strikes has absolutely overtaken the conversation. Without a doubt, the American public is adamantly against any sort of involvement, and I’m not going to try to change your mind on that. Of course, when I’m listening to these arguments, one comparison I hear brought up a lot is Iraq, and that’s understandable. The memory of that situation is very fresh in our minds. And while it’s true that “those who don’t learn from history are doomed to repeat it”, I get worried that we’re limiting ourselves. Pulling from a singular experience to inform our opinions is dangerous. In short, it’s time we inform ourselves. Whenever I’m asked my opinion on political matters, I shy away from giving a simple, one sided answer. Despite the fact that I try learning as much as I can about global events, I realize that these situations are complex. Reducing the entire Syrian conflict down to one argument doesn’t do anybody any favors. It cheapens the discourse we have amongst ourselves, it ignores the real causes of what’s happening and most importantly, it trivializes the suffering of human beings. There are a number of situations we can look to beyond Iraq that can inform our decisions. The French intervention in Mali earlier this year and our actions in Libya come to mind. These are all situations that, if not exactly the same, can help us better understand the Syrian sit-

uation and our role in it. In fact, speaking of the French, It wasn’t too long ago that they practically bankrupted themselves aiding some rebels on this very continent. Sound familiar? In these moments throughout history, leaders and populations had to tackle the same issues that we’re struggling with right now in Syria. So why are we ignoring all of this history in favor of incessantly citing one source? To put it simply: because it’s easy. Everyone, including myself, wants to sound smart and citing Iraq as evidence against intervention is an easy way to do that. Bringing up Iraq has become a shortcut to winning any argument about Syria and by doing that, we’ve lost a lot of depth and the possibility of meaningful communication. The reality is, when we ignore history, we aren’t doing ourselves any favors and sounding smart is different than actually being informed. In any other situation, a person would make a major life decision based on more than one experience. In fact, it’s a lot like turning down a date because you had one bad relationship once upon a time. Sure your new date may look like your ex but isn’t that superficial? Wouldn’t you try to get to know this person before you made a decision? Wouldn’t you look at their personality and compare it to other people who have similar traits? You might find that your date is a charming person whose company you thoroughly enjoy. Then again, you might find out that your gut reaction was right but either way; you have good justification for whatever

decision you make. Why should political stances be any different? All of the information you could ever want is sitting in wait; in books, online and in radio archives. The information that we need to properly make decisions as global citizens is just a click away. We, more so than any generation before us have little excuse for ignorance. If we hope to influence the political landscape at all, we need to start holding ourselves to a higher standard, and the first step to achieving that is to study. We need to learn from the mistakes of the past and make sure we don’t make those mistakes again. So as we step into the limelight as a generation, will we be known as a group that rushes to decisions rashly, or will we be known as a more pensive crowd? A crowd that considers all factors before plunging into decisions. Now I understand that it can be difficult to pay close attention to all events that span the world but that shouldn’t be our excuse to not try at all. We should never sit back, comfortable with the knowledge we have right this minute. Complacency is never an excuse for ignorance. Our judgment in these matters is a reflection of us as individuals and more importantly as a society. Let’s try to make that judgment informed by a wealth of knowledge. Let’s have our thoughts on the matter be as nuanced as the matter itself. We owe at least that much to ourselves and everyone affected. Because at the end of the day, no event in politics is without precedent; History and politics are just two sides of the same coin.


NEWS ENROLLMENT

FALL ENROLLMENT CLIMBS TO 28,627 STUDENTS

PHOTO BY DENTON DOOLEY

Vice President of Student Affairs, Earl Dowling, commenting on how the college worked hard to get the numbers they have today.

JOASH MENCIAS // NEWS EDITOR The college has released new enrollment numbers last week showing a 9.4 percent increase in tenth day enrollment compared to last fall. 16,565 students were enrolled as fulltime equivalents, up 7.6 percent for the fall term. Current enrollment is 28,627; however, the number was nearly 34,500 just 10 years ago.

Other key figures show significant gains in targeted demographics like high school graduates are up 35 percent. The college also saw its largest number of high achieving scholar students with 97 Presidential Scholars total. As for minorities, the number of Hispanic students continued to increase by 21 percent

compared to last year. In Asian and African American students, enrollment increased by 12 percent and six percent, respectively. According to college administration officials, the increases are a result of a barrage of changes in the past five years, including new programs like 3+1 degrees, a stronger marketing push, and extensive construction. “Our whole program portfolio, our pricing, the people who sell all this by way of customer relations and the campus itself all contribute to this growth,” President of the College, Dr. Robert Breuder said. The newly released numbers also reveal an increase of students coming from outside of the district who now comprise nearly 10 percent of the total student population. Earl Dowling, vice president for student affairs, attributes those numbers not only to the overall changes, but also to 3+1 degrees.

“The out-of-district students are primarily attracted by our 3+1 program,” Dowling said. “We’ve created something that has just been so significant to both our in-district and out-of-district families. We’ve given them a way to earn a baccalaureate degree without ever leaving this campus, saving them from loan indebtedness and out of pocket costs.” Dowling also connected other key demographic numbers to the college’s outreach campaigns. “We’re up in some of the individual markets we targeted. We’re very intentional about those numbers, those didn’t just happen by accident.” Overall, Dowling said the college has “the product, the price and the people” that makes the school appealing for so many families and thus increasing the enrollment numbers. President Breuder also maintained that more students are choosing the college because of the school’s transformation

being compared to four-year institutions. “We look like the big players. And if you want to compete with them, you’ve got to look like them, act like them, perform like them. And obviously we must be, given the dramatic increase in our enrollment.” In the end, President Breuder sees the enrollment numbers as just part of the continued effort to fulfill his vision for the college. “This is a good report and we’re going to build on it,” Breuder said. “This is another stepping stone...COD isn’t going to remain static; it’s going to continue to change. And if we’re as good as we think we are, then we ought to be able to show that... And of course we have to deliver a quality product. We’re going to continue to do that and I suspect our enrollment will grow again next year.”

POLICE REPORTS INCIDENT: Sept. 5 A male student lost a textbook entitled “Diversity Amid Globalization” between September 5 and 6. The last known whereabouts of the textbook was in BIC 1807. The student went back to his classrooms and talked to his professors to check where he left the textbook. His efforts were unsuccess-

ful. The student reported the lost textbook to police five days later. Police checked in the lost and found and in local textbook stores in the area. Police were unable to find the textbook. Police have nothing further to report.

ACCIDENT: Sept. 12 An accident occurred between a red 2008 Chevrolet Aveo and red 2001 Toyota Sienna in college parking lot C on September 12 at approximately 11:20 a.m. The driver of the Sienna was driving straight when the Aveo entered lot C from Scholar Rd. The Aveo, turning from the entrance, struck the Sienna.

The damage to the Aveo consisted of paint transfer and scratches to the driver’s side front corner of the bumper. The damage to the Sienna consisted of paint transfer and scratches to the passenger side front wheel, fender, and door.

ACCIDENT: Sept. 12 An accident occurred between a white 2008 Saturn Outlook and a white 2004 Mazda 6 in parking lot D2 on September 12 at approximately 11:00 p.m. The Outlook was facing west in a parking spot. The driver of the Mazda was heading southbound in a traffic lane east of the Outlook. The driver of the out-

look then began to back out of her parking spot when the Mazda was struck in the right side with the rear bumper of the Outlook. The driver of the Outlook stated that the vehicle sensors did not make her aware of the Mazda passing behind her.

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Chop

FOC

“C

ooking is my world. It makes up majority of who I am,” said Beatrice Maldonado, 26 year-old culinary student, who is sad her time at the college is coming to an end. “I don’t want to leave. I love the people, and I hated school until I came here.” Maldonado grew up in Naperville, was involved with theatre at Naperville Central High School, and was always cooking for her family, who eventually let her take over the daily meals because of how great she had become. At first, she was confused about her major, switching back and forth between journalism, English and literature at Eastern Illinois University. During those couple years, she was living on her own and cooking for herself every day. “Cooking made me feel better because I wasn’t happy with what I was studying.” When she finally came to this realization, she started to look at cooking programs and brought the idea up to her parents. “They didn’t understand at first. They wanted more of a traditional college experience for me – like at a four year university.” Maldonado began to visit other schools despite her parent’s opinions. It took a few disappointing experiences to lead her to this campus. “Some schools like to make a career in cooking glamorous. They like to show off their affiliation with the Food Network to gain enrollment,” she said. “COD was honest. They warned me about the long hours, not having holidays off, and not having a lot of benefits.” Surprisingly, that’s all Maldonado wanted to hear. She knew the food business was not as romanticizing as some may think and she was ready for the dedication it was going to require. She appreciated how the college was completely straightforward with her. In fall 2011, she began her culinary education here and couldn’t be happier about her decision. “School finally made sense,” said Maldonado, who is thankful for all the amazing people she’s met here that inspire her to keep moving forward with her dreams. “All of the chefs are terrific. I look up to them and their work ethics.” This past May, she was given the opportunity to work for the Oak Park & River Forest Day Nursery, a company committed to serving

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Chopping up some mushrooms, Maldonado prepares her secret dish.

ALL PHOTOS BY DENTON DOOLEY

Maldonado’s finished dish

It was just a few years ago when Beatrice Maldo dinner for her family every day. Today, she has ta one of her recipe’s published in a cookbook, workin participating in the college’s culinary program.

family style meals. The Day Nursery centennial committee chooses from a large selection of dishes and recipes to feed their children home cooked meals every day. Maldonado is currently the childcare center’s lead cook and appreciates the strong connections she’s made while working there. One being with centennial committee member, chef and noted food columnist - Melissa Elsmo. Elsmo, along with the rest of the committee, decided to create a cookbook for the organization, Dining with the Day Nursery: One Hundred Recipes Celebrating One Hundred Years of Service, which will feature a variety of

dinners that are served at the nursery. However, over the years some recipes had gotten lost and Maldonado was happy to help re-create one that was served in 2002. “Maldonado took special care to create a version of a French classic that simplifies the recipe for home cooks and reduces the cooking time to make the dish suitable for hectic Monday through Friday meals,” said Elsmo for The Local Dish section of Oak Park’s local newspaper, Oak Leaves, in the Sept. 15 issue. Maldonado took the time to take the traditional flavors of a recipe for Coq au Vin, which includes chicken, mushrooms, and many other flavors, and infuse it with her


pped

CUS

BY ROSALIE DEASTIS // FEATURES EDITOR

onado’s cooking obsession was restricted to making aken the fascination to the next level by getting ng as the lead cook of a children’s school, all while

infatuation for Latin cuisine. “I always try to incorporate my love for Latin cooking into my projects.” The cookbook will be released this month and Maldonado is honored to be contributing to such a meaningful project. Aside from all her time spent running the nursery’s kitchen, she also is interning at Taste of Brazil twice a week, a small family owned restaurant in Oak Park. This internship is one of the last steps for her completion of DuPage’s culinary program. Prior to interning there, Maldonado worked at the business for two years.

“Working there eight hours a day, every day, I picked up Portuguese and my Spanish improved,” she said. This is something that Maldonado is pleased about because it further connects with her appreciation for Latin cooking. In the future she hopes to travel to San Luis Potosí, Mexico, to study their culinary practices. “A lot of the Latin foods are too Americanized here, so I’d love to go back to their roots and learn more by traveling.” Maldonado has also been building up her own catering business, called Provecho, the past six months. Just by networking and handing out business cards, she has

“Some schools like to make a career in cooking glamorous. They like to show off their affiliation with the Food Network to gain enrollment,” - BEATRICE MALDONADO, 26

already catered a number of holiday parties, benefits and corporate events. She composed her own menu for the business, which is all Latin gourmet. Provecho is one of Maldonado’s main focuses right now, and she’s excited to see it grow. Maldonado will be graduating in spring ’14 with her associates degree in applied science and plans on becoming a certified culinary chef through the American Culinary Federation after COD. “I cook as much as I can. I want to keep striving.”

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F E AT U R E S

Wine

&

dine

PHOTO BY TABREZ KAHN

PHOTOS BY DENTON DOOLEY

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Food & Wine Festival presented by the Daily Herald on campus at Waterleaf last weekend


F E AT U R E S S P O T L I G H T

THE TRUE CAMPUS COMMUTER

PHOTO BY DENTON DOOLEY

We all know about the “go green” craze that is has become increasingly fashionable. COD’s “Green Cyclists” have found fulfillment in making bicycle riding as means of transportation to campus every day. ROSALIE DEASTIS // FEATURES EDITOR

F

ull-time professor in Criminal Justice, Deborah Klein’s daily commute to the college is definitely out of the ordinary. The 12 year faculty member and former prosecuting attorney’s “triathlon,” as she likes to call it, consists of walking from her residence in downtown Chicago to the Ogilvie Station where she rides the Metra to Glen Ellyn. “I purchased a piece o’ crap bike through Craigslist for $50 which I keep locked at the Glen Ellyn Metra station with a $60 lock,” she said. Klein then rides back and forth from the Glen Ellyn Metra station to the Homeland Security Building on campus,

weather permitting. “I don’t worry about leaving my bike locked up at the station, since I figure it is the least likely bike to be stolen, and the homeless guy keeps an eye on it for me when he can.” If the weather is lousy, she rides the Pace bus between the Metra station and campus. “I certainly prefer, however, to bike to and from campus. It is just fun to ride my bike; it’s exercise and offers more flexibility than having to comply with the limited bus schedule.” Klein is one of many professors that have become a “COD Green Cyclist.”

The Facebook group currently has over 50 members and is growing in popularity. Klein says that as cyclists, they simply love to bike; the environmental and physical health benefits are just a bonus. “We all bike because it’s fun. It’s also just time to think and clear your head.” So how does Klein lug all of her students’ assignments, essays and projects to and fro, you ask? She has technology to thank. “It is so much easier today to bike as much as I do than it would have been five, ten years ago. I do all of my grading on blackboard and on my iPad.” Klein has been biking instead of driv-

ing to campus for over a year now and says her car gets used less than once a month. “Before I get in my car, I always ask myself; is there another way to get from A to B?” She feels that some people aren’t taking the time to look at other alternatives and would love to see more students bike to school. “Think. Think about the environment, think about your physical being, think about your pocket book,” Klein said. “I come to campus and I see sea after sea of cars, I hear students complain about the parking, but hey, can’t blame me – I’m not sucking up one of those spots.”

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SCENE

STUDENT FILMS, ABOUND! Forget Hollywood, the next big filmmaker might just come from the MAC building

EMBRACE by Jeremy Silva

Recent COD film graduate and storyteller sees “filmmaking as another vehicle to spread awareness.” Synopsis: “Embrace is an emotionally raw film set in a very plausible near future. The film addresses these issues plaguing teens around the world, while adding a metaphysical twist… what if there was a legal suicide alternative offered to the public? In an age where we strive to control every aspect of life, why not our death?” Early stages: Embrace is fundraising with a goal of $8,000 on kickstarter.com and indiegogo.com, help Silva and his team reach their target by checking out the film’s teaser and making a donation.

The Courier is on SPOTIFY 14

THE 4TH MEETING by Josh MacNeal

Current COD film student prepares for the screening of his film, right here on campus. Synopsis: A successful, independent woman is crushed to learn about the death of her husband and takes up with a “survivor’s guilt” group counseling program. Jolted into loneliness, the film follows her story as she graduallhy confronts the death of a loved one. Final cut: The Courier featured MacNeal’s initial film fundraising last semester and is thrilled to announce the screening of “The 4th Meeting” next Wednesday, September 25 at 7 p.m. in MAC 175. Check out the trailer by heading to the film’s Facebook page listed below.

Follow CourierStaff for a playlist g^o`Ylo]j]_jggnaflg afl`]g^Ú[]


SCENE REVIEW

CHECK IT OUT

Open: Wednesday, September 11 - Friday, October 11

Wings Student Art Gallery | Student Services Center | Room 2210

REVIEW

Book of Mormon: “Blowing God’s Freaking Mind“

PHOTO FROM CHICAGO TRIBUNE GRAPHICS CAROLINE KOCH // ARTS EDITOR I’m not sure what more buzz little me could draw up about the insanely popular, nine Tony Award winning Book of Mormon, but I have to put it out in the universe that if you thought you’d never like a musical, this production will cast that idea out faster than Jesus did the moneychangers in the temple of Jerusalem. The hilarious and totally irreverent satire by South Park’s Trey Parker and Matt Stone is not only possibly offensive to Mormons, but Jews, Christians and Africans alike; no one is safe from the creators of Cartman. But perhaps that inclusivity is the best part of the story; the writers are totally comprehensive to religion on a larger scale, set to a catalogue of some impressive and clever songwriting. With character names like General Butt-F****** Naked and scenes of a “spooky Mormon hell dream,” the show is bound to piss some people off, but the audience last Sunday night at the Bank of America theater was in complete stitches, to the point where I started missing some of the smaller lines because I couldn’t hear over the hooting and applause. With major laughs as the muscle, Mormon does cover some very serious secular ideas of identity and acceptance among young people and adults alike. We follow the most successful Mormon-in-train-

ing, Elder Price (Nic Rouleau) on his mission to fulfill his life dream of living in Orlando and changing people, one baptism at a time. Brother Price has been the best Mormon he can be and is ready for his reward, but his faith is tested when he is forced into a partnership with the Mormon equivalent of Anchorman’s Brick Tamland and condemned to service in Africa. Friendships and self-esteem ebb and flow, growing pains are felt, fears are faced, doubts are had and entitlement literally gets shoved where the sun does not shine. In the end, as in all the musical theater before it, there’s a warm fuzzy ending that makes the story come full circle and makes you smile from ear to ear. The theater experience itself is very unique; it’s very different to watch South Park in the privacy of your basement, grinning and repeating punch lines to you friends. It’s another to be watching smiley actors sing explicitly about having AIDS or “God changing his mind about black people in 1978,” with mom, dad, grandma and 2,000 other people in formalwear - it doesn’t register the same level of acceptance. At first it felt like the audience suppressed enjoying the jarring comedy with one eye on everybody else, as if to say, “should I be laughing at this?” But by the fourth song everyone was onboard

and going with it. Without a doubt, the show is completely inappropriate but delectably so; it has major balls (Chef from South Park would be proud). Not only does Book of Mormon poke fun at religion, but Broadway traditions as well. Who doesn’t want to see a bunch of white kids tap dance about “turning off ” their feelings in Uganda, scream obscenities and be made fun of for “being really f****** polite” to people? You may recognize one of the leads as the loveable, goofy magician from “Pitch Perfect,” Ben Platt. One of my favorite moments had to be when Platt comes out on stage and declares “I am Africa, just like Bono, I am Africa!” So good. While the audience definitely leaves their seats going, “wow, that was completely ridiculous,” a majority would probably agree the show was absolutely phenomenal. I love this new take on Broadway, bold and gutsy, expanding the boundaries of what is an “acceptable” topic for stage exploration. Theater has always been a great art of expression and with the advent of shows like Book of Mormon, the expression can manifest into a more relatable, relevant conversation. Funny enough, the show remains to be the best-ever publicity for the Mormons and The Church of Jesus Christ (of Latter-day Saints).

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SPORTS SCHEDULE

FALL SCHEDULE

Football

Women’s Volleyball

Men’s Soccer

Women’s Soccer

Women’s Tennis

September:

September:

September:

September:

September:

Saturday 21 AWAY: Iowa Western at 1:00 p.m.

Thursday 19 AWAY: Rock Valley at 6:00 p.m.

Friday 20 Wednesday 18 HOME: Prairie State AWAY: Harper at 4:00 p.m. at 4:00 p.m.

Thursday 19 AWAY: North Central JV at 4:00 p.m.

Saturday 28 HOME: Ellsworth at 1:00 p.m.

Friday 20 AWAY: Harper Invitational at 3:30 p.m.

Saturday 21 HOME:Dakota Tech (MN) vs. McHenry neutral site match at 2:00 p.m.

Tuesday 24 HOME: McHenry at 2:45 p.m.

October: Sunday 13 AWAY: UWWhitewater JV at TBA

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Saturday 21 AWAY: Harper Invitational at 9:00 a.m.

Sunday 22 HOME: Dakota Tech at 12:00 p.m.

Friday 20 HOME: Johnson County (ks) at 2:00 p.m. Saturday 21 HOME: Dakota Country (ks) at 2:00 p.m.

Thursday 26 HOME: Lake County at 2:45 p.m.


COFFEE BREAK

RECYCLING THE COURIER: BY JULIA KLOS // SOCIAL MEDIA

DIY

Try this fun and easy way to add flair to your nails by recycling The Courier! Six easy steps and a few materials will keep all of the latest literally at your fingertips...

You will need: 10 small strips of newsprint, cut from The Courier Glass of water nail polish remover cotton balls or pads nail polish- any light color clear top coat

1

4

Use the nail polish remover and cotton pads to clean your nails.

Push the strip down onto your nail and hold there for at least 30 seconds.

Paint your nails using two light coats, and let them dry completely.

Peel the newsprint strip off of your nail- voila!

Dip the newsprint strip into the water and let soak for a minute. Then, pull the strip out of the glass and put onto your nail.

Finish with a clear top coat to seal the newsprint on to your nails.

2 3

5 6

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COFFEE BREAK COMICS BY OUMAR MELVIN

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COFFEE BREAK SOCIAL

STRAIGHTtalk

Advice, answers and no fluff.

Straight Talk is an advice column aimed at questions you’d ask your best friend... except Straight Talk won’t fluff the answers. Real advice for real issues, from someone who has been there, done that. To get your questions answered, email overheardcod@gmail.com

Trust is a must My girlfriend and I were broken up for about 5 months or so. During this time she got invited to a group trip for Christmas break, and her ex boyfriend will be there. We’re back together now, and as the trip gets closer, the more it’s bugging me. I won’t be going because I have to stay in town for work and I don’t want to start a huge fight over it, but I don’t know how much longer I can hold in my frustration. -Tense Dear Tense, Face the facts: She didn’t invite her ex on the trip, and neither of you can change the fact that he will be there. Trust your girlfriend, and don’t take your frustration out on your relationship. She will most likely feel uncomfortable with the situation as well, and your support can make all the difference. Try doing something nice for her before she leaves (flowers, perhaps?). That will give her something to talk about on the trip, and she will miss you even more while she is away. Be confident in what you have now, and show her that you care about her feelings more than your insecurities.

Boyfriend is a sloppy drunk, HELP!

Don’t be THAT girlfriend...

My boyfriend gets extremely obnoxious when he’s drunk. I have a wedding coming up and of course I want him to come with me, but I’m nervous about him embarrassing me if we decide to have some drinks. I don’t know how to talk to him about this. -Flustered

I have been dating my boyfriend for two years now, and he wants to go out with his friends alone. I get along well with his friends and I want to go with them, but he says that he needs his “guy time” without me. Should I be concerned that our relationship is changing? -Needy

Dear Flustered, Honesty is the best policy. Although it might feel awkward, you have to explain your concerns to your boyfriend. Keep in mind that the way you present these concerns can make all the difference: talking down to him will only make him feel inferior and he may get defensive. Be firm but supportive, and give him a chance to digest what you are saying. If he is committed to monitoring himself (with your help) then go and have a great time together. If he isn’t happy with your conversation then avoid bringing him to a big event until it’s all worked out.

Dear Needy, There is nothing wrong with your boyfriend wanting some time alone with his friends. In fact, you should have time away with your friends too. Absence makes the heart grow fonder, no matter how big or small the time frame! You should both maintain some independence, especially at this point in your lives. It isn’t good for either one of you to be so “clingy,” because you could end up alienating yourself from the world around you. Try to relax and have fun without him! He’ll be back before you know it.

“Why is there a cobra in my cereal?” “I had to tell her to watch out cause she had just thrown up on the side of my car...”

“Hitler may have been the most evil, but he was by far the most attractive.” OVERHEAR SOMETHING FUNNY OR ODD ON CAMPUS? WRITE IT DOWN AND PUT IT IN THE PINK BOX IN FRONT OF OUR OFFICE (BIC 3401) OR EMAIL OVERHEARDCOD@GMAIL.COM

“Hey, could you take my picture next to the Chaparral?”

OVER HEARD

GRAPHIC BY OUMAR MELVIN

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Your Elmhurst

Experience A warm welcome. As a transfer student at Elmhurst, you’ll get to know plenty of people with experiences like yours. About one in three of our students comes to us from another college, and we welcome more than 300 transfer students to campus each fall. We understand your needs and concerns, and we’re deeply committed to your success. Scholarship support. Elmhurst offers special transfer scholarships to qualified students. Depending on your GPA and number of credits, you could qualify for up to $19,000 a year in scholarship funding. A smooth transition. Our admission counselors will make sure your transfer experience goes smoothly. We offer generous transfer credit, and we’ll even evaluate your credits before you apply.

Sonia Pedapati Elmhurst is a good fit for me because professors talk to you without having to look up your ID number. The community here is so close knit and intimate that the College seems like a second home.

LEADING WITH VALUES

Contact us (630) 617-3400 admit@elmhurst.edu www.elmhurst.edu/admission 190 Prospect Avenue Elmhurst, Illinois

Jacob Scott At Elmhurst it’s easy to get involved at a high level. I was news editor for the newspaper, I have an internship, and I’m a fellow with the Interfaith Youth Core. Regular people can make a real difference here.

Elmhurst is coming to COD! Wednesday, September 25, 2013 from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., 2nd floor near the Starbucks. See you there!

INTELLECTUAL EXCELLENCE

COMMUNITY

SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

STEWARDSHIP

FAITH, MEANING AND VALUES


September 18, 2013 The Courier