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Santa Clarita Community College District 26455 Rockwell Canyon Road Santa Clarita, CA 91355

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College Commended During Accreditation T

BoarD of TruSTeeS Bruce D. Fortine Michele R. Jenkins Joan W. MacGregor Ernest L. Tichenor Scott Thomas Wilk Nicolas Cardenas, Student Trustee

Super Game for Former Cougar C

Former Cougar J.J. Arrington carries the ball in Super Bowl XLIII. Photo: Arizona Cardinals

F R O M

ollege of the Canyons athletics had a part in Super Bowl XLIII when Arizona Cardinal and former COC running back J.J. Arrington took the field in Tampa Bay on Feb. 1. Arrington was a member of the 2001 and 2002 Cougar football teams before transferring to Cal for his last two seasons and has been with the Arizona Cardinals since being drafted in 2005. During the week leading up to the championship game, the North Carolina native was bothered by a sore knee, but he made notable contributions against the Pittsburgh Steelers. The 26-yearold tallied four kickoff returns for 23 yards and caught two passes for 35 yards, including a key 22-yard reception during a fourth quarter Cardinal drive. Arrington spent most of the 2008 season as a kick return specialist for the Cardinals. He returned 11 kickoffs for 230 yards, the second-highest total of any kick returner in the NFL during the 2008 season. Arrington left College of the Canyons in 2002 after breaking numerous rushing and scoring records. He still holds a piece of the records for most touchdowns in a game (five) and most points scored in a game (30). He was the first player to be offered a scholarship by a Pac-10 school after the football program was reinstated at the college in 1998.

Students’ Success Always Inspires

he grades are in, and College of the Canyons passed with flying colors! Every six years, community colleges undergo thorough evaluations to maintain their accreditation. This process includes completing a lengthy self-study and hosting a visit from a team of administrators, faculty and staff from other colleges. With College of the Canyons having completed those steps, the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges, Western Association of Schools and Colleges, recently reaffirmed its highest accreditation status upon College of the Canyons. In reaffirming accreditation status, without the

placement of additional requests or conditions, the Commission also commended the college for its strong commitment to student success, collaborative governance, the fostering of numerous community partnerships, the use of data-driven planning and evaluation processes, technology use including student and faculty training and support, the provision of a wide array of student support services, and the presence of professional development opportunities for faculty and staff. College of the Canyons was among four of 15 colleges to receive full accreditation at the commission’s January meeting. See ACCREDITATION on Page 9

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ehind every student at College of the Canyons is a story. The stories are as unique as the students themselves, but common themes often tie them together. Determination. Discovery. Second chances. Uncertainty. And ultimately, success. Jamie Loren is wrapping up her final classes at College of the Canyons and preparing to transfer, marking the completion of an improbable accomplishment. Jamie got off to a rough start academically when she first enrolled at COC. See VAN HOOK on Page 2

College of the Canyons library media technician Eneida Bejkoa displays one of the textbooks students can receive through the MESA program’s Physics and Calculus Book Award Program. To be eligible for the donorfunded book program students must demonstrate a financial need, have a GPA of 3.0 or higher and be majoring in a field of math, engineering or science.

Donors Put Books in the Hands of Students

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iloted in 2007, the donor-funded Physics and Calculus Book Award Program at College of the Canyons provides textbooks to deserving students studying for careers in mathbased career fields. The Physics and Calculus Book Award pro-

gram is administered through the college’s Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement (MESA) program. Since its inception the book program has awarded a total of 19 books, at a cost of roughly $200 apiece, and has subsequently expanded See CALCULUS on Page 10

W E B E L I E V E I N T E A C H I N G , L E A D I N G A N D S TAY I N G AT T H E F O R E F R O N T O F C H A N G E


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2

THE BOTTOM LINE

Van Hook FROM PAGE 1

But as life often does, it threw some curveballs. The adversity molded Jamie, giving her a chance to prove herself and get a glimpse of her true capabilities. Two days after her husband departed for his U.S. Army tour in Iraq, she discovered she was pregnant. She was a full-time student, and was also working full-time. Despite the stress of worrying about her husband, who endured three roadside bombing attacks, she maintained her commitments to school and work, earning straight A’s and never missing a day of work. Shortly after her husband returned home and their son was born, the Army transferred them to El Paso, Texas. As a new mother in a new place, she was forced to rely on herself. She describes it as the hardest and most challenging time of her life, but she again demonstrated her character and her resolve. She continued her studies, maintained her strong academic record, and has since returned to College of the Canyons. The Jamie who is now applying to USC is not the same young woman who first came to us six years ago at College of the Canyons. She emerged into a confident and capable student whose recent performance is indicative of her determination and her true potential. At the other end of the spectrum is Gina Roscigno, whose story is found on page 6. She was studying at a state university in New York when she married. Three children later, she was a full-time mother, and never returned to school. Until she moved to California. Following a scare over her husband’s

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THE BOTTOM LINE

SPRING 2009

health, she decided to return to school. But thinking about it was easier than actually doing it. It took three tries to summon up the courage to actually walk on campus and enroll. But when she found her niche in the Computer Information Technology Department, she went from student to teaching assistant, and now, adjunct faculty member. Now she is the one inspiring

‘If they can dream it, they can do it, and if they can imagine it, they can become it. And with our help, they are doing just that.’ students to learn new skills and accomplish more than they might have dreamed. Many of our students can identify with Fafa Young (page 6) and the circumstances in which she found herself. Laid off when her employer of 15 years went bankrupt, she wasn’t sure which direction she wanted to go. Her husband suggested cooking, and she soon found her way to COC’s Culinary Arts Program.

Returning to school at the age of 50 wasn’t easy, but since Fafa had found a new passion, she didn’t hesitate to ask questions. Her persistence has paid off and she earned the recognition and respect of her instructors. And she now knows where she is headed: a career in culinary arts after she takes more classes at COC. As we meet students and hear their stories, we are inspired to continue the work we are undertaking at College of the Canyons. We are here for Jamie, Gina, and Fafa and thousands of others just like them. We are here when they are ready. We are here when they need a second chance. We are here, ready to accept them as they are. Any age. Any background. Any level of experience. We are here to help them and provide the mentoring, the support, and the assistance they need to discover their potential, acquire the skills needed to capitalize on it, ultimately achieve success, and give back to our community and our state. That commitment to students drives everything we undertake at College of the Canyons, despite what is going on at the state and federal levels. Whether we’re building a new facility to increasing classroom space or add more computer labs, writing new curriculum for degrees in cutting-edge fields, or creating alternative methods of delivery like short-term, online, or fast-tracked classes, our goal is to expand our access and foster the continued achievements of our students. If they can dream it, they can do it, and if they can imagine it, they can become it. And with our help, they are doing just that. I hope you enjoy this issue of the Bottom Line, and share in our joy as we celebrate the accomplishments of our students.

The Bottom Line is published by the College of the Canyons Public Information Office to inform the community of news and events of interest in the Santa Clarita Community College District.

Vice President, District Communication, Marketing & External Relations Sue Bozman Managing Director, Public Relations and Marketing John McElwain

Editor Eric Harnish Stories Jesse Munoz Stephanie Corral Celina Baguiao

Design/Layout John Green Evelyn Cox

Phone (661) 259-7800 Internet http://www.canyons.edu

Mailing Address Photography College of the Canyons Jesse Munoz Stephanie Corral Santa Clarita Community College District 26455 Rockwell Canyon Road Air Pix West Santa Clarita, CA 91355 O’Connor

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SPRING 2009

3

Chancellor Van Hook Honored by County Commission for Women

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n one of her first positions in commu- and concerns of women of all races, eth- worked on behalf of women’s issues and nity colleges, an enterprising young nic and cultural backgrounds, religious made significant contributions to faculty member created a model pro- convictions, social circumstances, and women’s equality. gram for Santa Ana College in the Rancho sexual orientation. Chancellor Van Hook was selected for Santiago Community College District — a Van Hook created the New Horizons this award by Michael D. Antonovich, Los program that would help other women program so that women could have the Angeles County Supervisor, Fifth District. enter the workforce by giving During the luncheon, them access to the training and Antonovich praised Van Hook as support services they needed to a “trail blazer,” saying, “We’re succeed. Within five years, the very proud of the schools in the program became a state model Santa Clarita Valley, but especialand was funded at more than 50 ly the college, which is a benchother colleges across California. mark for the rest of the schools in She named her re-entry our district.” program, New Horizons, and “I’m passionate about Calinow, decades later, the Los fornia community colleges and Angeles County Commission the opportunities they afford for Women and County Board people to become what they of Supervisors honored Colwant to be,” said Chancellor Van lege of the Canyons Chancellor Hook. “It has been a blessing to Dr. Dianne G. Van Hook as a work in this amazing system of recipient of the 2009 Women of education and to build bridges the Year Award. This presti- COC Chancellor Dr. Dianne Van Hook and her husband Roger at for people so they can open gious award was presented dur- the Los Angeles Women of the Year Luncheon, where Dr. Van Hook doors and realize that they can ing the 24th Annual Women of was honored. succeed.” the Year Awards Luncheon held March same opportunities as men, and since Throughout Chancellor Van Hook’s 16 at the Millennium Biltmore Hotel in then, she has dedicated her life to provid- career, she has mentored women, advoLos Angeles. ing access to education for everyone, and cated for the promotion of women and The county’s Commission for to helping students succeed. championed women’s equity issues, Women was established in 1975, (about District awardees are selected by each while serving as a first-hand example to the same time Chancellor Van Hook Los Angeles County Supervisor and her peers and colleagues of just how helped create her first women’s re-entry aside from serving as role models, powerful a role model and visionary center) to represent the special interests Women of the Year nominees must have leader one woman can be. See WOMAN OF THE YEAR on Page 8

Apprenticeship Program Trains Veterans

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he first engineering apprenticeship program of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Engineering Initiative to address the state’s decade-long goal of training 20,000 new engineers for the workforce, has begun accepting applications. The program, targeted for veterans, is a collaboration among College of the Canyons, Valencia-based Stellar Microelectronics, Cal State Los Angeles and the California State University system, Governor’s Office, State Labor Agency, EDD (Employment Development Division), State Division of Apprenticeship Standards and the Veteran’s Administration. The apprenticeship program, announced during a Stellar Micro-

electronics press conference in December, is geared toward training veterans to become engineers in the lucrative microelectronics field. Under this program, Stellar Microelectronics will provide paid apprenticeships for successful applicants, and Cal State Los Angeles and College of the Canyons will offer engineering classes to program participants. The program’s first apprenticeships will begin this spring. The program will be extremely beneficial to returning veterans with a background in engineering and electronics, but non-veterans are also encouraged to apply. See STELLAR on Page 8


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THE BOTTOM LINE

Van Hook FROM PAGE 1

But as life often does, it threw some curveballs. The adversity molded Jamie, giving her a chance to prove herself and get a glimpse of her true capabilities. Two days after her husband departed for his U.S. Army tour in Iraq, she discovered she was pregnant. She was a full-time student, and was also working full-time. Despite the stress of worrying about her husband, who endured three roadside bombing attacks, she maintained her commitments to school and work, earning straight A’s and never missing a day of work. Shortly after her husband returned home and their son was born, the Army transferred them to El Paso, Texas. As a new mother in a new place, she was forced to rely on herself. She describes it as the hardest and most challenging time of her life, but she again demonstrated her character and her resolve. She continued her studies, maintained her strong academic record, and has since returned to College of the Canyons. The Jamie who is now applying to USC is not the same young woman who first came to us six years ago at College of the Canyons. She emerged into a confident and capable student whose recent performance is indicative of her determination and her true potential. At the other end of the spectrum is Gina Roscigno, whose story is found on page 6. She was studying at a state university in New York when she married. Three children later, she was a full-time mother, and never returned to school. Until she moved to California. Following a scare over her husband’s

l

THE BOTTOM LINE

SPRING 2009

health, she decided to return to school. But thinking about it was easier than actually doing it. It took three tries to summon up the courage to actually walk on campus and enroll. But when she found her niche in the Computer Information Technology Department, she went from student to teaching assistant, and now, adjunct faculty member. Now she is the one inspiring

‘If they can dream it, they can do it, and if they can imagine it, they can become it. And with our help, they are doing just that.’ students to learn new skills and accomplish more than they might have dreamed. Many of our students can identify with Fafa Young (page 6) and the circumstances in which she found herself. Laid off when her employer of 15 years went bankrupt, she wasn’t sure which direction she wanted to go. Her husband suggested cooking, and she soon found her way to COC’s Culinary Arts Program.

Returning to school at the age of 50 wasn’t easy, but since Fafa had found a new passion, she didn’t hesitate to ask questions. Her persistence has paid off and she earned the recognition and respect of her instructors. And she now knows where she is headed: a career in culinary arts after she takes more classes at COC. As we meet students and hear their stories, we are inspired to continue the work we are undertaking at College of the Canyons. We are here for Jamie, Gina, and Fafa and thousands of others just like them. We are here when they are ready. We are here when they need a second chance. We are here, ready to accept them as they are. Any age. Any background. Any level of experience. We are here to help them and provide the mentoring, the support, and the assistance they need to discover their potential, acquire the skills needed to capitalize on it, ultimately achieve success, and give back to our community and our state. That commitment to students drives everything we undertake at College of the Canyons, despite what is going on at the state and federal levels. Whether we’re building a new facility to increasing classroom space or add more computer labs, writing new curriculum for degrees in cutting-edge fields, or creating alternative methods of delivery like short-term, online, or fast-tracked classes, our goal is to expand our access and foster the continued achievements of our students. If they can dream it, they can do it, and if they can imagine it, they can become it. And with our help, they are doing just that. I hope you enjoy this issue of the Bottom Line, and share in our joy as we celebrate the accomplishments of our students.

The Bottom Line is published by the College of the Canyons Public Information Office to inform the community of news and events of interest in the Santa Clarita Community College District.

Vice President, District Communication, Marketing & External Relations Sue Bozman Managing Director, Public Relations and Marketing John McElwain

Editor Eric Harnish Stories Jesse Munoz Stephanie Corral Celina Baguiao

Design/Layout John Green Evelyn Cox

Phone (661) 259-7800 Internet http://www.canyons.edu

Mailing Address Photography College of the Canyons Jesse Munoz Stephanie Corral Santa Clarita Community College District 26455 Rockwell Canyon Road Air Pix West Santa Clarita, CA 91355 O’Connor

l

SPRING 2009

3

Chancellor Van Hook Honored by County Commission for Women

I

n one of her first positions in commu- and concerns of women of all races, eth- worked on behalf of women’s issues and nity colleges, an enterprising young nic and cultural backgrounds, religious made significant contributions to faculty member created a model pro- convictions, social circumstances, and women’s equality. gram for Santa Ana College in the Rancho sexual orientation. Chancellor Van Hook was selected for Santiago Community College District — a Van Hook created the New Horizons this award by Michael D. Antonovich, Los program that would help other women program so that women could have the Angeles County Supervisor, Fifth District. enter the workforce by giving During the luncheon, them access to the training and Antonovich praised Van Hook as support services they needed to a “trail blazer,” saying, “We’re succeed. Within five years, the very proud of the schools in the program became a state model Santa Clarita Valley, but especialand was funded at more than 50 ly the college, which is a benchother colleges across California. mark for the rest of the schools in She named her re-entry our district.” program, New Horizons, and “I’m passionate about Calinow, decades later, the Los fornia community colleges and Angeles County Commission the opportunities they afford for Women and County Board people to become what they of Supervisors honored Colwant to be,” said Chancellor Van lege of the Canyons Chancellor Hook. “It has been a blessing to Dr. Dianne G. Van Hook as a work in this amazing system of recipient of the 2009 Women of education and to build bridges the Year Award. This presti- COC Chancellor Dr. Dianne Van Hook and her husband Roger at for people so they can open gious award was presented dur- the Los Angeles Women of the Year Luncheon, where Dr. Van Hook doors and realize that they can ing the 24th Annual Women of was honored. succeed.” the Year Awards Luncheon held March same opportunities as men, and since Throughout Chancellor Van Hook’s 16 at the Millennium Biltmore Hotel in then, she has dedicated her life to provid- career, she has mentored women, advoLos Angeles. ing access to education for everyone, and cated for the promotion of women and The county’s Commission for to helping students succeed. championed women’s equity issues, Women was established in 1975, (about District awardees are selected by each while serving as a first-hand example to the same time Chancellor Van Hook Los Angeles County Supervisor and her peers and colleagues of just how helped create her first women’s re-entry aside from serving as role models, powerful a role model and visionary center) to represent the special interests Women of the Year nominees must have leader one woman can be. See WOMAN OF THE YEAR on Page 8

Apprenticeship Program Trains Veterans

T

he first engineering apprenticeship program of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Engineering Initiative to address the state’s decade-long goal of training 20,000 new engineers for the workforce, has begun accepting applications. The program, targeted for veterans, is a collaboration among College of the Canyons, Valencia-based Stellar Microelectronics, Cal State Los Angeles and the California State University system, Governor’s Office, State Labor Agency, EDD (Employment Development Division), State Division of Apprenticeship Standards and the Veteran’s Administration. The apprenticeship program, announced during a Stellar Micro-

electronics press conference in December, is geared toward training veterans to become engineers in the lucrative microelectronics field. Under this program, Stellar Microelectronics will provide paid apprenticeships for successful applicants, and Cal State Los Angeles and College of the Canyons will offer engineering classes to program participants. The program’s first apprenticeships will begin this spring. The program will be extremely beneficial to returning veterans with a background in engineering and electronics, but non-veterans are also encouraged to apply. See STELLAR on Page 8


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THE BOTTOM LINE

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THE BOTTOM LINE

SPRING 2009

COC Hosts Economic Strategy Session

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n February, College of the Canyons and the City of Santa Clarita joined forces to host a discussion designed to participate with the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corporation (LAEDC) in drafting the county’s first ever economic development strategic plan. Attracting a collection of nearly 100 local business and industry members, the event featured a presentation from Bill Allen, President and CEO, of LAEDC — and a series of economically themed round table discussions designed to facilitate conversation about what the key points of the plan should be. “The California Community College system will play a major role in providing the state with the fuel needed for economic recovery, and College of the Canyons takes that responsibility very seriously,” said Chancellor Dr. Dianne Van Hook. In his presentation, Allen laid out what was referred to as the LAEDC’s ‘five point plan’ for economic development: responsible land use; the development of a business friendly environment; the presence of an attractive quality of life; 21st century infrastructure; and workforce education and job training.

“There (has never been) a broad-based consensus approach, where people from all across the county — stakeholder groups representing business and labor and the environment, community groups, and the public sector — gather to collectively share their thoughts, their visions and their dreams about what kind of economy they want to have, and how to ensure its monetary success,” Allen said. “So we began the process of creating such a plan.” “College of the Canyons is proud to have played a role in this historic event,” said Dr. Bruce Getzan, dean of economic development at the college. “It’s always important to have a strategic plan and with California’s current economic climate there is no better time to begin creating a comprehensive and collaborative consensus on how the county should move forward on expanding its varied economy in the future.” Organized through a partnership between the LAEDC, the College of the Canyons Employee Training Institute, the College of the Canyons Foundation and the City of Santa Clarita’s Economic Development Division, this event was sponsored by The Gas Company.

SPRING 2009

5

Tannehill Joins COC as New SBDC Director

Designs being finalized for Library and Mentry Hall expansions

he Santa Clarita Community College District has announced the appointment of Steven Tannehill as director of the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) hosted by College of the Canyons. Tannehill, who comes to College of the Canyons with more than 20 years of business experience in the real estate finance industry will provide managerial oversight of the SBDC and its operations and in-depth consulting services and formal and informal training to current and prospective local/regional small business owners regarding applicable business management practices. Tannehill spent the last 12 years as the chief operating officer of Countrywide Servicing Exchange and a managing director of Banc of America Securities. He has served on the Newhall School District governing board since 1998 and has served on the board of AYSO Region 678 and Troop 888 of Boy Scouts of America. Tannehill holds a bachelor of arts in law and society from University of California at Santa Barbara and an MBA from the Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley -- as well as Series 7 and 63 licenses. “I am looking forward to joining the outstanding team of people at the college, in the Economic Development Division and at the Small Business Development Center,” Tannehill said. “It’s my hope to utilize my business experience, education and background in a public service role that will provide a valuable resource for small businesses throughout our region.” The SBDC, hosted by College of the Canyons, was launched in January 2006 and serves the Santa Clarita, Antelope and San Fernando valleys. It is part of a network of 10 Small Business Development Centers serving businesses from Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles counties.

A

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College of the Canyons hosted a community discussion aimed at developing a countywide strategy for economic development.

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s construction on the Dr. Dianne G. Van Hook University Center nears completion, College of the Canyons officials are preparing to embark on another wave of projects designed to expand and modernize the Valencia campus. Next on the list is a major expansion and remodel of the library. Originally built in 1997 — at a time when the college’s student population hovered around 7,500 — the approximately 36,000-square-foot library will more than double in size as a result of this project, which will add roughly 52,000 square feet of space to the current facility. In addition to significantly increasing the amount of space needed to house library resources and materials, major additions of the expansion will include: the creation of a permanent home for the college’s Tutoring, Learning & Computing Lab (TLC), featuring separate math and English instruction labs; expanded student study areas; and additional computer labs — including a designated ‘community use’ computer lab. Being paid for with a combination of state and Measure M funds (the $160 million general obligation bond voters approved in November 2006) the college’s $24 million library expansion project is expected to break ground in 2009, pending Division of

the State Architect (DSA) plan approval and the availability of state funding. A second expansion and remodel project will take place on the 43,000-square-foot Mentry Hall, which houses the college’s radio, television, film (RTVF), art, photography, architecture, interior design and graphic and multimedia design programs, as well as the college’s Art Gallery. Paid for with Measure M funds, with no state contributions, this design-build project will provide an additional 30,000 square feet of classroom and instruction space to the facility, which was also constructed in 1997. DSA delays as a result of the state’s current economic climate could affect the construction timeline on this project, however college officials hope to break ground in 2009. “With the addition of these new classrooms we are working toward our master plan of eventually removing the classroom village,” said Jim Schrage, vice president, facilities planning, operations and construction at the college, referring to the collection of temporary/modular classrooms on the south end of campus. “That area will then eventually open up into a green space similar to the Honor Grove.”

College Earns Honors on Several Fronts

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his spring College of the Canyons students were honored for their academic and competitive excellence, receiving a variety of accolades at both the regional and statewide level. All State Academics College of the Canyons students DeboDeborah Burch rah Burch and Christopher Haines were selected to the 2009 Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) All-California Academic Team. PTK recognizes and encourages the academic achievement of two-year college students and provides opportunities for growth through participation in honors, leadership, service and fellowship programming. Christopher Haines To be eligible for placement on the PTK All-California Academic Team students must: be enrolled at a California community college through December 2008; have a cumulative college-level GPA of at east 3.50 for all coursework completed in the last five years; be on track to earn an associate or bachelor degree with a minimum of 36 college-level semester units; and have both a clean academic record and personal background.

The 2007 Women’s Golf Team received the Pepsi Scholar team award.

One Scholarly Team Though long deserving of the honor, in March the California Community College Athletic Association (CCCAA) named the 2007 College of the Canyons state champion women’s golf team the 2007-08 Pepsi Scholar Women’s Golf Team. The honor is awarded to a sports team that had at least a comSee HONORS on Page 7


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THE BOTTOM LINE

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THE BOTTOM LINE

SPRING 2009

COC Hosts Economic Strategy Session

I

n February, College of the Canyons and the City of Santa Clarita joined forces to host a discussion designed to participate with the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corporation (LAEDC) in drafting the county’s first ever economic development strategic plan. Attracting a collection of nearly 100 local business and industry members, the event featured a presentation from Bill Allen, President and CEO, of LAEDC — and a series of economically themed round table discussions designed to facilitate conversation about what the key points of the plan should be. “The California Community College system will play a major role in providing the state with the fuel needed for economic recovery, and College of the Canyons takes that responsibility very seriously,” said Chancellor Dr. Dianne Van Hook. In his presentation, Allen laid out what was referred to as the LAEDC’s ‘five point plan’ for economic development: responsible land use; the development of a business friendly environment; the presence of an attractive quality of life; 21st century infrastructure; and workforce education and job training.

“There (has never been) a broad-based consensus approach, where people from all across the county — stakeholder groups representing business and labor and the environment, community groups, and the public sector — gather to collectively share their thoughts, their visions and their dreams about what kind of economy they want to have, and how to ensure its monetary success,” Allen said. “So we began the process of creating such a plan.” “College of the Canyons is proud to have played a role in this historic event,” said Dr. Bruce Getzan, dean of economic development at the college. “It’s always important to have a strategic plan and with California’s current economic climate there is no better time to begin creating a comprehensive and collaborative consensus on how the county should move forward on expanding its varied economy in the future.” Organized through a partnership between the LAEDC, the College of the Canyons Employee Training Institute, the College of the Canyons Foundation and the City of Santa Clarita’s Economic Development Division, this event was sponsored by The Gas Company.

SPRING 2009

5

Tannehill Joins COC as New SBDC Director

Designs being finalized for Library and Mentry Hall expansions

he Santa Clarita Community College District has announced the appointment of Steven Tannehill as director of the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) hosted by College of the Canyons. Tannehill, who comes to College of the Canyons with more than 20 years of business experience in the real estate finance industry will provide managerial oversight of the SBDC and its operations and in-depth consulting services and formal and informal training to current and prospective local/regional small business owners regarding applicable business management practices. Tannehill spent the last 12 years as the chief operating officer of Countrywide Servicing Exchange and a managing director of Banc of America Securities. He has served on the Newhall School District governing board since 1998 and has served on the board of AYSO Region 678 and Troop 888 of Boy Scouts of America. Tannehill holds a bachelor of arts in law and society from University of California at Santa Barbara and an MBA from the Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley -- as well as Series 7 and 63 licenses. “I am looking forward to joining the outstanding team of people at the college, in the Economic Development Division and at the Small Business Development Center,” Tannehill said. “It’s my hope to utilize my business experience, education and background in a public service role that will provide a valuable resource for small businesses throughout our region.” The SBDC, hosted by College of the Canyons, was launched in January 2006 and serves the Santa Clarita, Antelope and San Fernando valleys. It is part of a network of 10 Small Business Development Centers serving businesses from Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles counties.

A

T

College of the Canyons hosted a community discussion aimed at developing a countywide strategy for economic development.

l

s construction on the Dr. Dianne G. Van Hook University Center nears completion, College of the Canyons officials are preparing to embark on another wave of projects designed to expand and modernize the Valencia campus. Next on the list is a major expansion and remodel of the library. Originally built in 1997 — at a time when the college’s student population hovered around 7,500 — the approximately 36,000-square-foot library will more than double in size as a result of this project, which will add roughly 52,000 square feet of space to the current facility. In addition to significantly increasing the amount of space needed to house library resources and materials, major additions of the expansion will include: the creation of a permanent home for the college’s Tutoring, Learning & Computing Lab (TLC), featuring separate math and English instruction labs; expanded student study areas; and additional computer labs — including a designated ‘community use’ computer lab. Being paid for with a combination of state and Measure M funds (the $160 million general obligation bond voters approved in November 2006) the college’s $24 million library expansion project is expected to break ground in 2009, pending Division of

the State Architect (DSA) plan approval and the availability of state funding. A second expansion and remodel project will take place on the 43,000-square-foot Mentry Hall, which houses the college’s radio, television, film (RTVF), art, photography, architecture, interior design and graphic and multimedia design programs, as well as the college’s Art Gallery. Paid for with Measure M funds, with no state contributions, this design-build project will provide an additional 30,000 square feet of classroom and instruction space to the facility, which was also constructed in 1997. DSA delays as a result of the state’s current economic climate could affect the construction timeline on this project, however college officials hope to break ground in 2009. “With the addition of these new classrooms we are working toward our master plan of eventually removing the classroom village,” said Jim Schrage, vice president, facilities planning, operations and construction at the college, referring to the collection of temporary/modular classrooms on the south end of campus. “That area will then eventually open up into a green space similar to the Honor Grove.”

College Earns Honors on Several Fronts

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his spring College of the Canyons students were honored for their academic and competitive excellence, receiving a variety of accolades at both the regional and statewide level. All State Academics College of the Canyons students DeboDeborah Burch rah Burch and Christopher Haines were selected to the 2009 Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) All-California Academic Team. PTK recognizes and encourages the academic achievement of two-year college students and provides opportunities for growth through participation in honors, leadership, service and fellowship programming. Christopher Haines To be eligible for placement on the PTK All-California Academic Team students must: be enrolled at a California community college through December 2008; have a cumulative college-level GPA of at east 3.50 for all coursework completed in the last five years; be on track to earn an associate or bachelor degree with a minimum of 36 college-level semester units; and have both a clean academic record and personal background.

The 2007 Women’s Golf Team received the Pepsi Scholar team award.

One Scholarly Team Though long deserving of the honor, in March the California Community College Athletic Association (CCCAA) named the 2007 College of the Canyons state champion women’s golf team the 2007-08 Pepsi Scholar Women’s Golf Team. The honor is awarded to a sports team that had at least a comSee HONORS on Page 7


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Culinary Arts Gives Rise to New Career

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afa Young was a month shy of retiring from Varig Airlines Young credits her progress and success to her helpful instructors. after 15 years of employment at the company’s Los Ange- “I’m a foreigner over the age of 50 and every time I had a problem les office, when the Brazilian airline filed for bankruptcy or didn’t understand, I would ask for help,” she said. in 2006. Without her retirement pension plan, Young had to make a The college’s culinary arts instructors “want you to learn and sudden career move. they want to share their passion “I didn’t know what new for culinary arts. And it works,” path to pursue,” said Young, said Young. “Every time I start who, fluent in Portuguese, to talk about cooking, I go crazy started working for Varig as a about it.” bilingual secretary and was Schwanke wishes that all promoted to account executive students would have Young’s manager in the sales departwork ethic and passion for their ment. It wasn’t until her huswork. band suggested that she try “Fafa is a very focused stucooking that Young considdent who enjoys learning all ered a career in culinary arts. aspects of the cooking process,” “I found a program up said Schwanke. “She takes north that was completely pride in her work and her food. online before I found COC’s She once said to me, ‘With culinary arts program,” said these culinary classes I have the Valencia resident. “I ran found my passion.’” there and registered.” Young plans to start searchDuring her first semester at ing for a job in the culinary arts the college in fall 2008, Young field as soon as she finishes her Fafa Young discovered her talent in food presentation after taking a took four culinary arts courses, studies. Culinary Arts class at College of the Canyons including a knife skills course “Cindy said I can use her as with Chef Daniel Otto and a reference,” she said. “She can culinary arts and baking courses with Chef Cindy Schwanke. transform anything. She knows so much about what she teaches and “I started to flavor food with herbs and ingredients that I is very motivating. I learned how to bake so many kinds of pastries never knew could be combined in cooking,” said Young. “I start- and breads. I’ve learned so much from her.” ed to have an eye for food presentation that I never knew I was During a recent trip to Brazil, Young cooked every night for capable of having.” friends and family, who, needless to say, were sad to see her go. “The beginning was difficult,” said Young. “I had to read a lot “They said they missed my cooking and didn’t like the food in and it was overwhelming.” Brazil anymore,” she said.

H

ave you ever boarded a bus, took one look at the driver sitting on the other side of that yellow line that boldly says “Do Not Cross Yellow Line” and thought to yourself, “I wonder why?” If so, you’ll definitely want to get on board and attend one of the most interesting topics to be presented at a College of the Canyons Scholarly Presentation. By the way, no fares are required for this ride (admission is free). Featuring original research and firsthand accounts integrated with a collection of familiar bus-themed songs and

movie clips, original photos and videos and a live performance element, the scholarly presentation ‘Busology: Standing Behind the Yellow Line’ will take place 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 29, on the main stage of the Santa Clarita Performing Arts Center at College of the Canyons. “I’m trying to make this presentation something really fun for people to be a part of,” said College of the Canyons sociology professor, and presenter Pamela Williams-Paez, who conducted the research for this presentation over a twoand-a-half year period in Seattle. “But I’m

also trying to give the community an empathetic view of the world drivers work in, what they are up against and what that can tell us about our society.” The Scholarly Presentation is sponsored by the College of the Canyons Foundation and the reception following the event is hosted by the Santa Clarita Community College District Board of Trustees.

Honors FROM PAGE 5

Student Stays to Teach Computer Classes

I

f it hadn’t been for her husband’s trip to the emergency room, Gina Roscigno, a Computer Information Technology (CIT) adjunct instructor at College of the Canyons, might have never returned to school for her bachelor’s degree. Roscigno’s husband, a director of engineering at the time, went to the ER thinking he was suffering a heart attack. Although it was a severe sinus infection that caused the scare, it forced her to consider what life would’ve been like had it been the worst-case scenario.

“It was a real slap in the face,” said the Stevenson Ranch resident. “I was relieved, but the question was still on the table. What am I going to do?” A mother of three, Roscigno didn’t finish her studies at SUNY Stony Brook University after she married and settled nicely into domestic bliss. “I was the typical stayat-home housewife,” she said. “I lost interest. I was too busy living life.” At her husband’s suggestion, Roscigno decided to go back to school. Located five minutes away from her home, College of

the Canyons was the obvious place to start. But as determined as Roscigno was, she was also scared about returning to school. “My friends said, ‘Are you crazy? Get more insurance!’” Roscigno drove into the COC parking lot, but drove back out again. “I did this on three separate occasions before I finally summoned up the courage to park and go into the Admissions building.” Once inside the Admissions office, Roscigno didn’t know where to start. A counselor greeted her and asked her what See TEACH on Page 10

bined GPA of 3.0 and demonstrated better-than-average accomplishments in intercollegiate athletic competition. The 2007 Cougar women’s golf team earned a combined 3.09 GPA while winning the Western State Conference, Southern California and State titles. “It is an amazing feat when your team can win an academic award,” said College of the Canyons head coach Gary Peterson. “It is even more impressive when you can also win a state championship in the same year. I am very proud of the women of the 2007 team and applaud their pursuit of success in the classroom and on the golf course.” Speaking of Team Success More recently, the College of the Canyons speech team was awarded first place in the small schools divisions at the 2009 Pacific Southwest Collegiate Forensics Association (PSCFA) spring championships in March.

While individual team members have won various medals in the past, this is the first time the college’s speech team has earned a school award at a local/regional competition. The team also garnered a number of individual awards including that of Billy Hatton who advanced to the final round in the Oral Interpretation of Prose category, in which the performer presents a thematic argument before performing literature that is either from a short story or edited from a novel. Joining Hatton as winners at the spring championships were bronze medalists Eric Hollingsworth (oral interpretation of drama category) and Josh Tabak (oral interpretation of prose category). In addition, Brian Viggianelli earned a spot in the final round of the impromptu speaking category in only his second tournament appearance. Prior to this most recent success, team member Jaume Arranz earned a silver medal in the impromptu speaking category at the Tabor-Venitsky Invitational.


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Culinary Arts Gives Rise to New Career

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afa Young was a month shy of retiring from Varig Airlines Young credits her progress and success to her helpful instructors. after 15 years of employment at the company’s Los Ange- “I’m a foreigner over the age of 50 and every time I had a problem les office, when the Brazilian airline filed for bankruptcy or didn’t understand, I would ask for help,” she said. in 2006. Without her retirement pension plan, Young had to make a The college’s culinary arts instructors “want you to learn and sudden career move. they want to share their passion “I didn’t know what new for culinary arts. And it works,” path to pursue,” said Young, said Young. “Every time I start who, fluent in Portuguese, to talk about cooking, I go crazy started working for Varig as a about it.” bilingual secretary and was Schwanke wishes that all promoted to account executive students would have Young’s manager in the sales departwork ethic and passion for their ment. It wasn’t until her huswork. band suggested that she try “Fafa is a very focused stucooking that Young considdent who enjoys learning all ered a career in culinary arts. aspects of the cooking process,” “I found a program up said Schwanke. “She takes north that was completely pride in her work and her food. online before I found COC’s She once said to me, ‘With culinary arts program,” said these culinary classes I have the Valencia resident. “I ran found my passion.’” there and registered.” Young plans to start searchDuring her first semester at ing for a job in the culinary arts the college in fall 2008, Young field as soon as she finishes her Fafa Young discovered her talent in food presentation after taking a took four culinary arts courses, studies. Culinary Arts class at College of the Canyons including a knife skills course “Cindy said I can use her as with Chef Daniel Otto and a reference,” she said. “She can culinary arts and baking courses with Chef Cindy Schwanke. transform anything. She knows so much about what she teaches and “I started to flavor food with herbs and ingredients that I is very motivating. I learned how to bake so many kinds of pastries never knew could be combined in cooking,” said Young. “I start- and breads. I’ve learned so much from her.” ed to have an eye for food presentation that I never knew I was During a recent trip to Brazil, Young cooked every night for capable of having.” friends and family, who, needless to say, were sad to see her go. “The beginning was difficult,” said Young. “I had to read a lot “They said they missed my cooking and didn’t like the food in and it was overwhelming.” Brazil anymore,” she said.

H

ave you ever boarded a bus, took one look at the driver sitting on the other side of that yellow line that boldly says “Do Not Cross Yellow Line” and thought to yourself, “I wonder why?” If so, you’ll definitely want to get on board and attend one of the most interesting topics to be presented at a College of the Canyons Scholarly Presentation. By the way, no fares are required for this ride (admission is free). Featuring original research and firsthand accounts integrated with a collection of familiar bus-themed songs and

movie clips, original photos and videos and a live performance element, the scholarly presentation ‘Busology: Standing Behind the Yellow Line’ will take place 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 29, on the main stage of the Santa Clarita Performing Arts Center at College of the Canyons. “I’m trying to make this presentation something really fun for people to be a part of,” said College of the Canyons sociology professor, and presenter Pamela Williams-Paez, who conducted the research for this presentation over a twoand-a-half year period in Seattle. “But I’m

also trying to give the community an empathetic view of the world drivers work in, what they are up against and what that can tell us about our society.” The Scholarly Presentation is sponsored by the College of the Canyons Foundation and the reception following the event is hosted by the Santa Clarita Community College District Board of Trustees.

Honors FROM PAGE 5

Student Stays to Teach Computer Classes

I

f it hadn’t been for her husband’s trip to the emergency room, Gina Roscigno, a Computer Information Technology (CIT) adjunct instructor at College of the Canyons, might have never returned to school for her bachelor’s degree. Roscigno’s husband, a director of engineering at the time, went to the ER thinking he was suffering a heart attack. Although it was a severe sinus infection that caused the scare, it forced her to consider what life would’ve been like had it been the worst-case scenario.

“It was a real slap in the face,” said the Stevenson Ranch resident. “I was relieved, but the question was still on the table. What am I going to do?” A mother of three, Roscigno didn’t finish her studies at SUNY Stony Brook University after she married and settled nicely into domestic bliss. “I was the typical stayat-home housewife,” she said. “I lost interest. I was too busy living life.” At her husband’s suggestion, Roscigno decided to go back to school. Located five minutes away from her home, College of

the Canyons was the obvious place to start. But as determined as Roscigno was, she was also scared about returning to school. “My friends said, ‘Are you crazy? Get more insurance!’” Roscigno drove into the COC parking lot, but drove back out again. “I did this on three separate occasions before I finally summoned up the courage to park and go into the Admissions building.” Once inside the Admissions office, Roscigno didn’t know where to start. A counselor greeted her and asked her what See TEACH on Page 10

bined GPA of 3.0 and demonstrated better-than-average accomplishments in intercollegiate athletic competition. The 2007 Cougar women’s golf team earned a combined 3.09 GPA while winning the Western State Conference, Southern California and State titles. “It is an amazing feat when your team can win an academic award,” said College of the Canyons head coach Gary Peterson. “It is even more impressive when you can also win a state championship in the same year. I am very proud of the women of the 2007 team and applaud their pursuit of success in the classroom and on the golf course.” Speaking of Team Success More recently, the College of the Canyons speech team was awarded first place in the small schools divisions at the 2009 Pacific Southwest Collegiate Forensics Association (PSCFA) spring championships in March.

While individual team members have won various medals in the past, this is the first time the college’s speech team has earned a school award at a local/regional competition. The team also garnered a number of individual awards including that of Billy Hatton who advanced to the final round in the Oral Interpretation of Prose category, in which the performer presents a thematic argument before performing literature that is either from a short story or edited from a novel. Joining Hatton as winners at the spring championships were bronze medalists Eric Hollingsworth (oral interpretation of drama category) and Josh Tabak (oral interpretation of prose category). In addition, Brian Viggianelli earned a spot in the final round of the impromptu speaking category in only his second tournament appearance. Prior to this most recent success, team member Jaume Arranz earned a silver medal in the impromptu speaking category at the Tabor-Venitsky Invitational.


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Junior High Institute Back for Second Season

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ffering more than the typical summer camp experience, the popular Junior High Summer Institute (JSI) at College of the Canyons is back and better than ever. Available to incoming sixth-, seventhand eighth-graders, JSI allows students to enroll in week-long curriculum tracks – taught primarily by College of the Canyons instructors or field experts – in areas includ-

ing art, film, math and science, and musical theatre. New this summer will be tracks in animation, 3-D design, teen fitness, young entrepreneurship, lake recreation and more. JSI will run Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. from June 15 through July 24 (no meeting July 3) and will consist of six one-week sessions. At a cost of $185 per child per week, parents have the option of enrolling their

student in different tracks for as many as six weeks. Some tracks may require a $15 materials fee. An extended care allows students to attend from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at an added cost of $60 per child per week. JSI will offer need-based camp scholarships. Scholarship forms are due April 17. For more information, please call (661) 362-3300 or visit the institute’s Website at www.canyons.edu/juniorhigh.

Stellar FROM PAGE 3

Students chosen as apprentices will have their tuition paid and will receive onsite company training with Stellar Microelectronics, where they will be guaranteed employment upon graduating. Based on its proximity to Stellar Microelectronics, College of the Canyons was invited to participate in the program due to its long history of collaborating with private industry to train workers in emerging and traditional high-technology fields. As the program’s private-sector partner, Stellar Microelectronics is an example of the growing, high-tech manufacturing sector that is so vital to Los Angeles County and California’s economic future. “This is a very important step in the growth of the industry here in the Greater Los Angeles area,” said Al Mann, the billionaire entrepreneur and philanthropist behind Stellar Microelectronics. “And we are, as I say, hiring people and trying to do a good job. Some of the work they do here enables some of my other medical companies, in particular, to make a difference in people’s lives.” Mann’s vast collection of companies includes MannKind Corp., Advanced Bionics, Second Sight and Bioness, and he is responsible for founding the semiconductor firm Heliotek; Spectrolab, the first of his aerospace firms; Pacesetter Systems, which focused on cardiac pacemakers; St. Jude Medical, MiniMed and many others. “College of the Canyons has partnered with several of Mr. Mann’s companies on various initiatives over the years, and it has

College of the Canyons’ Service Learning students joined with Habitat for Humanity recently to help build a new home.

Service-Learning Program Honored

C Chancellor Dr. Dianne Van Hook joined Stellar Microelectronics founder Al Mann in announcing the training partnership.

always been an exciting, rewarding and beneficial experience because of the spirit he creates, the passion he inspires, and the excellence he strives for as he works to make a difference in humankind,” said Dr. Dianne G. Van Hook, chancellor of College of the Canyons. For more information about the apprenticeship program, contact Dena Maloney at (661) 362-3305.

Woman of the Year FROM PAGE 3

Before coming to College of the Canyons, Van Hook helped create the Asilomar Leadership Conference, which provides training for women looking to advance to executive positions in community colleges throughout California, and later established the Association of California Community College Administrators (ACCCA) Mentor Program to further train future community college leaders.

In addition, each semester for the past two decades Van Hook has shared her extensive knowledge and experience by serving as a role model and mentor to women aspiring to become college presidents — with more than 40 of the women she has mentored going on to achieve that goal at a California community college. Locally, under her leadership, the number of female administrators at College of the Canyons has increased from just two

before she was hired in 1988 to 54 percent of all the college’s administrators. With full belief and personal experience in the leadership capabilities of women, Van Hook is quick to encourage her peers, colleagues, staff and students to strive to reach their full potential through education, professional development and job advancement — demonstrating through her own actions that it can be done.

ollege of the Canyons has been named to the 2008 President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll in recognizing the college’s wide-ranging community service-learning courses and programs available to students. As one of the 635 institutions recognized – and one of only 39 in the state – College of the Canyons created the service-learning program to integrate meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to teach civic responsibility, strengthen communities and enrich the learning experience of students.

“President Obama has issued a call for all Americans to help and serve in their communities,” said Dr. Jennifer Hauss, director of the college’s servicelearning program. “College of the Canyons servicelearning students have been doing this for years and as a result, their education, our community and our community-based organizations have been enriched by their efforts,” Hauss added. Last semester, the college’s servicelearning projects included the participation of nearly 40 faculty members from various disciplines, 80 non-profit commu-

nity-based organizations and more than 350 students. Honor Roll selection criteria is based on a number of factors including the institution's scope, innovativeness and effectiveness of completed and ongoing service projects, the citing of community service and service-learning goals in the institution's strategic plan, the percentage of student enrollment engaged in community service activities and the institution's latest Federal Work-Study community service participation rate, as reported by the U.S. Department of Education.

Accreditation FROM PAGE 1

“Credit for our successful accreditation belongs to each member of the college’s faculty, staff, administration, and Board of Trustees,” said Chancellor Dr. Dianne Van Hook. “Every day they devote themselves to serving our students in the best way possible, and to establishing and pursuing high standards of excellence to foster student success. It is rewarding to me that their efforts were so evident to the visiting team.” Accreditation is a voluntary process colleges and universities undergo to evaluate and assure the quality of education used by the American higher education community. Including an intensive self-study and outside peer evaluation of an institution’s adherence to standards of good practice, the

accreditation process is conducted not only to assure the quality of the institution, but to encourage institutional improvement. Commission visiting team chair Dr. Robert F. Agrella, Superintendent-President of Santa Rosa Junior College, praised the college for an array of accomplishments. “You are to be commended for your entrepreneurial attitude, enthusiasm and spirit that you display,” said Agrella during the team’s exit interview. Included in the visiting team’s exit interview were just three recommendations for improvement at College of the Canyons: an acceleration of the college’s timeline to transfer the storage of past student records to a digital format; a program review of its

library services designed to improve the effectiveness of the libraries at both the Valencia and Canyon Country campuses; and the continued focus on developing increased student learning outcomes — a recommendation handed down to all institutions undergoing the re-accreditation process. “For an institution of your size and complexity to have just those three recommendations is to be lauded,” said Agrella, adding that he had never prepared an accreditation report with fewer recommendations. To read the College of the Canyons Comprehensive Institutional Self Study Report, or the visiting team’s evaluation report please visit http://www.canyons.edu/ Offices/PIO/ Accreditation/.


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Junior High Institute Back for Second Season

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ffering more than the typical summer camp experience, the popular Junior High Summer Institute (JSI) at College of the Canyons is back and better than ever. Available to incoming sixth-, seventhand eighth-graders, JSI allows students to enroll in week-long curriculum tracks – taught primarily by College of the Canyons instructors or field experts – in areas includ-

ing art, film, math and science, and musical theatre. New this summer will be tracks in animation, 3-D design, teen fitness, young entrepreneurship, lake recreation and more. JSI will run Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. from June 15 through July 24 (no meeting July 3) and will consist of six one-week sessions. At a cost of $185 per child per week, parents have the option of enrolling their

student in different tracks for as many as six weeks. Some tracks may require a $15 materials fee. An extended care allows students to attend from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at an added cost of $60 per child per week. JSI will offer need-based camp scholarships. Scholarship forms are due April 17. For more information, please call (661) 362-3300 or visit the institute’s Website at www.canyons.edu/juniorhigh.

Stellar FROM PAGE 3

Students chosen as apprentices will have their tuition paid and will receive onsite company training with Stellar Microelectronics, where they will be guaranteed employment upon graduating. Based on its proximity to Stellar Microelectronics, College of the Canyons was invited to participate in the program due to its long history of collaborating with private industry to train workers in emerging and traditional high-technology fields. As the program’s private-sector partner, Stellar Microelectronics is an example of the growing, high-tech manufacturing sector that is so vital to Los Angeles County and California’s economic future. “This is a very important step in the growth of the industry here in the Greater Los Angeles area,” said Al Mann, the billionaire entrepreneur and philanthropist behind Stellar Microelectronics. “And we are, as I say, hiring people and trying to do a good job. Some of the work they do here enables some of my other medical companies, in particular, to make a difference in people’s lives.” Mann’s vast collection of companies includes MannKind Corp., Advanced Bionics, Second Sight and Bioness, and he is responsible for founding the semiconductor firm Heliotek; Spectrolab, the first of his aerospace firms; Pacesetter Systems, which focused on cardiac pacemakers; St. Jude Medical, MiniMed and many others. “College of the Canyons has partnered with several of Mr. Mann’s companies on various initiatives over the years, and it has

College of the Canyons’ Service Learning students joined with Habitat for Humanity recently to help build a new home.

Service-Learning Program Honored

C Chancellor Dr. Dianne Van Hook joined Stellar Microelectronics founder Al Mann in announcing the training partnership.

always been an exciting, rewarding and beneficial experience because of the spirit he creates, the passion he inspires, and the excellence he strives for as he works to make a difference in humankind,” said Dr. Dianne G. Van Hook, chancellor of College of the Canyons. For more information about the apprenticeship program, contact Dena Maloney at (661) 362-3305.

Woman of the Year FROM PAGE 3

Before coming to College of the Canyons, Van Hook helped create the Asilomar Leadership Conference, which provides training for women looking to advance to executive positions in community colleges throughout California, and later established the Association of California Community College Administrators (ACCCA) Mentor Program to further train future community college leaders.

In addition, each semester for the past two decades Van Hook has shared her extensive knowledge and experience by serving as a role model and mentor to women aspiring to become college presidents — with more than 40 of the women she has mentored going on to achieve that goal at a California community college. Locally, under her leadership, the number of female administrators at College of the Canyons has increased from just two

before she was hired in 1988 to 54 percent of all the college’s administrators. With full belief and personal experience in the leadership capabilities of women, Van Hook is quick to encourage her peers, colleagues, staff and students to strive to reach their full potential through education, professional development and job advancement — demonstrating through her own actions that it can be done.

ollege of the Canyons has been named to the 2008 President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll in recognizing the college’s wide-ranging community service-learning courses and programs available to students. As one of the 635 institutions recognized – and one of only 39 in the state – College of the Canyons created the service-learning program to integrate meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to teach civic responsibility, strengthen communities and enrich the learning experience of students.

“President Obama has issued a call for all Americans to help and serve in their communities,” said Dr. Jennifer Hauss, director of the college’s servicelearning program. “College of the Canyons servicelearning students have been doing this for years and as a result, their education, our community and our community-based organizations have been enriched by their efforts,” Hauss added. Last semester, the college’s servicelearning projects included the participation of nearly 40 faculty members from various disciplines, 80 non-profit commu-

nity-based organizations and more than 350 students. Honor Roll selection criteria is based on a number of factors including the institution's scope, innovativeness and effectiveness of completed and ongoing service projects, the citing of community service and service-learning goals in the institution's strategic plan, the percentage of student enrollment engaged in community service activities and the institution's latest Federal Work-Study community service participation rate, as reported by the U.S. Department of Education.

Accreditation FROM PAGE 1

“Credit for our successful accreditation belongs to each member of the college’s faculty, staff, administration, and Board of Trustees,” said Chancellor Dr. Dianne Van Hook. “Every day they devote themselves to serving our students in the best way possible, and to establishing and pursuing high standards of excellence to foster student success. It is rewarding to me that their efforts were so evident to the visiting team.” Accreditation is a voluntary process colleges and universities undergo to evaluate and assure the quality of education used by the American higher education community. Including an intensive self-study and outside peer evaluation of an institution’s adherence to standards of good practice, the

accreditation process is conducted not only to assure the quality of the institution, but to encourage institutional improvement. Commission visiting team chair Dr. Robert F. Agrella, Superintendent-President of Santa Rosa Junior College, praised the college for an array of accomplishments. “You are to be commended for your entrepreneurial attitude, enthusiasm and spirit that you display,” said Agrella during the team’s exit interview. Included in the visiting team’s exit interview were just three recommendations for improvement at College of the Canyons: an acceleration of the college’s timeline to transfer the storage of past student records to a digital format; a program review of its

library services designed to improve the effectiveness of the libraries at both the Valencia and Canyon Country campuses; and the continued focus on developing increased student learning outcomes — a recommendation handed down to all institutions undergoing the re-accreditation process. “For an institution of your size and complexity to have just those three recommendations is to be lauded,” said Agrella, adding that he had never prepared an accreditation report with fewer recommendations. To read the College of the Canyons Comprehensive Institutional Self Study Report, or the visiting team’s evaluation report please visit http://www.canyons.edu/ Offices/PIO/ Accreditation/.


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THE BOTTOM LINE

CALCULUS FROM PAGE 1

to provide 20 books each year on an ongoing basis. Making the program even more beneficial is the fact that each physics/calculus book can be used for three sequential courses. “One book goes a long way,” said College of the Canyons mechanical engineering student Angie Grayr, 21, pointing out that the $200 she saved through the award program reduced her total semester book cost by more than 35 percent. “Plus you’ll use these books semester after semester, and probably even after as reference material,” Grayr said. “After you spend three semesters using the same book you get really familiar with it, you know its teaching style and if you need to look something up you

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know right where to go. I’m planning on keeping my book forever!” To be eligible for the Physics and Calculus Book Award program students must demonstrate a financial need, have a GPA of 3.0 or higher and be majoring in a field of math, engineering or science. After receiving the book, students must then meet with an academic counselor to create a student educational plan, submit academic progress reports throughout the semester and commit to maintaining at least a “B” average in any physics or calculus course work. Though allowed to keep the book for as many as three semesters, if a student fails to receive a final grade of a “B” or higher in the class they must then return the book to the MESA office — where it can then be awarded to another student. “They have to keep their grade up, so they have to perform,” said Susan Crowther, MESA program director. “But

we like the idea of there being a little bit of competition involved, so that students will aspire to be awarded a book.” Much of the book award program’s success is due to generous contributions to the college’s Foundation by an anonymous donor. Because of the program’s great success the donor has committed to providing an additional 20 books each year. “For somebody to step in and give such a valuable gift for such a deserving group of students is really a blessing,” said Crowther. “The book award program is especially important because of the role it plays in the college’s larger effort to support technical industries throughout the state. California needs more engineers, and College of the Canyons has shown a strong commitment to supporting students pursuing the engineering and science fields.”

TEACH FROM PAGE 6

her goal was. “To get marketable,” This spring, Roscigno is teaching Roscigno remembers replying. classes about Microsoft Word, PowTaking into account Roscigno’s erPoint and Office. background as an assistant manag“CIT classes are a good stepping er and computer lab volunteer at a stone,” said Roscigno. “They’re a local elementary school, the coungood building block” because while selor suggested she take some most of her students grew up with computer classes. computers “they don’t know how to One of her first computer classexplain what they’re doing,” she es was with Melanie Lipman, chair explained. There is a new wave of of the CIT department. students who are returning to school “She was an excellent student to gain computer skills to help them who completed her assignments overcome the economy’s downward before the due dates,” recalls Lipspiral. man. “When she had the time, she Roscigno thinks the greatest Roscigno went from student to teacher after discovering walked around our busy classroom Gina advantage to going to a community her interest in helping others learn computer software programs. and helped fellow students.” college is the level of support from It was Lipman who pointed out the college’s administration and son, an excellent instructor, and a very to Roscigno how much she enjoyed help- valuable addition to our department.” staff. ing and working with students. “She told “So many of our staff are former stuRoscigno, who graduated from Excelme I should teach and that’s when the light sior College in 2005 with a bachelor’s dents who loved being here so much that bulb started going on,” said Roscigno. degree in Computer Information and a they came back to work or teach here. Pretty soon, Roscigno went from being minor in Sociology, never imagined that They’ve grown up with College of the a student to working at the TLC lab and she would teach in the CIT field. Canyons,” she said. “We are the true defiwas then Lipman’s teaching assistant. “I never used computers to write nition of a community college. There are “Everything just fell into place,” she said. papers. I played solitaire!” she said. “I so many programs available for every level “I have watched Gina grow and flour- thought I would do marketing or customer of college student. We have something for ish,” said Lipman. “She is an amazing per- service.” everyone.”

l

SPRING 2009

11

New Theatre Chair Community Takes Center Stage remembers Jill Harper A A

s part of a plan to broaden the selection of courses and range of students in the College of the Canyons theatre department, last fall, actor, director and career educator Paul Wickline was named department chair. Wickline — who holds a B.A. in education in theatre and English from Western Washington University and an M.A. in education with an emphasis in theatre from Central Washington University — will also serve as producer of the college’s student theatre performance season. “I am thrilled to be working with the college’s theatre department and Performing Arts Center staff,” said Wickline. “They have a true passion for theatre and demonstrate daily their commitment and dedication by continually offering students personalized instruction from an outstanding group of faculty.” Before coming to the college, Wickline was a program coordinator and adjunct instructor for the extended education and summer school programs at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. Prior to that, Wickline was director of theatre arts and an instructor and director at Walla Walla Community College in southeastern Washington. Wickline has also served as an adjunct faculty member at Central Washington University, Walla Walla University and The Evergreen State College. In 2003, the Walla Walla Public School District honored Wickline as one of three outstanding district educators with a Staff Achievement Grant. In 2005, he was awarded a Meritorious Achievement Award from the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival. Wickline has produced and directed more than 50 stage productions in the last 15 years while remaining an active performer in professional summer and regional theatre productions. “Paul is a great addition to the college’s theatre faculty,” said Dr. Floyd Moos, dean of fine and performing arts. “With his training and professional background he brings a great deal of artistic vision, acad-

Paul Wickline

Theatre Students Make ‘Noises’ The theatre department will perform the hilarious Tony-nominated comedy “Noises Off” at the Santa Clarita Performing Arts Center at College of the Canyons (PAC). Described by New York critics as “the funniest farce ever written,” this comedy follows the antics of an inept acting troupe as they stumble from dress rehearsal to closing night. Show times are: • Thursday, May 7, at 8 p.m. • Friday, May 8, at 8 p.m. • Saturday, May 9, 8 p.m. • Sunday May 10, at 2 p.m. Admission is $5 for students and seniors and $10 for adults. For tickets, call (661) 362-5304, or visit www.canyonspac.com. emic leadership, and management of the artistic process to our department.” Wickline sees the department as a resource for all students, not just those pursuing careers in the entertainment industry. “Our courses aren’t just for budding actors,” Wickline said. “Students who take part in theatre classes develop confidence and self-esteem, the ability to think creatively and divergently and to speak clearly. They develop a strong work ethic both individually and collaboratively, and they become better students and better human beings.”

bout 200 friends and family of Jill Harper gathered at College of the Canyons March 28 to remember a 12-year Santa Clarita resident who was a devoted wife and mother, tireless volunteer, and whose sense of humor and relentless optimism always left others smiling. Jilll’s husband Phil and sons Richard and Ian shared touching and humorous memories, while City Councilman Bob Kellar, COC Chancellor Dr. Dianne Van Hook, and Ed Masterson, local representative to Assemblymember Cameron Smyth, reflected on Jill’s legacy of service to Santa Clarita. “For COC, she was a breath of fresh air—always upbeat, practical, witty, unselfish, positive, and genuine—present and passionate about all she did,” Van Hook said. In addition to working with seniors, and starting the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life event in Santa Clarita, Jill served on numerous committees at College of the Canyons and helped pass bond measures C and M. In lieu of flowers, Jill’s family asked that donations be made to the College of the Canyons Foundation in her honor. All contributions will benefit the Canyon Country Campus, which Jill donated many hours to as the college planned and built the campus. For more information, please contact the College of the Canyons Foundation at (661) 362-3493.


BL MARCH2009:BL-FALL-03 4/9/09 3:02 PM Page 6

10

THE BOTTOM LINE

CALCULUS FROM PAGE 1

to provide 20 books each year on an ongoing basis. Making the program even more beneficial is the fact that each physics/calculus book can be used for three sequential courses. “One book goes a long way,” said College of the Canyons mechanical engineering student Angie Grayr, 21, pointing out that the $200 she saved through the award program reduced her total semester book cost by more than 35 percent. “Plus you’ll use these books semester after semester, and probably even after as reference material,” Grayr said. “After you spend three semesters using the same book you get really familiar with it, you know its teaching style and if you need to look something up you

l

THE BOTTOM LINE

SPRING 2009

know right where to go. I’m planning on keeping my book forever!” To be eligible for the Physics and Calculus Book Award program students must demonstrate a financial need, have a GPA of 3.0 or higher and be majoring in a field of math, engineering or science. After receiving the book, students must then meet with an academic counselor to create a student educational plan, submit academic progress reports throughout the semester and commit to maintaining at least a “B” average in any physics or calculus course work. Though allowed to keep the book for as many as three semesters, if a student fails to receive a final grade of a “B” or higher in the class they must then return the book to the MESA office — where it can then be awarded to another student. “They have to keep their grade up, so they have to perform,” said Susan Crowther, MESA program director. “But

we like the idea of there being a little bit of competition involved, so that students will aspire to be awarded a book.” Much of the book award program’s success is due to generous contributions to the college’s Foundation by an anonymous donor. Because of the program’s great success the donor has committed to providing an additional 20 books each year. “For somebody to step in and give such a valuable gift for such a deserving group of students is really a blessing,” said Crowther. “The book award program is especially important because of the role it plays in the college’s larger effort to support technical industries throughout the state. California needs more engineers, and College of the Canyons has shown a strong commitment to supporting students pursuing the engineering and science fields.”

TEACH FROM PAGE 6

her goal was. “To get marketable,” This spring, Roscigno is teaching Roscigno remembers replying. classes about Microsoft Word, PowTaking into account Roscigno’s erPoint and Office. background as an assistant manag“CIT classes are a good stepping er and computer lab volunteer at a stone,” said Roscigno. “They’re a local elementary school, the coungood building block” because while selor suggested she take some most of her students grew up with computer classes. computers “they don’t know how to One of her first computer classexplain what they’re doing,” she es was with Melanie Lipman, chair explained. There is a new wave of of the CIT department. students who are returning to school “She was an excellent student to gain computer skills to help them who completed her assignments overcome the economy’s downward before the due dates,” recalls Lipspiral. man. “When she had the time, she Roscigno thinks the greatest Roscigno went from student to teacher after discovering walked around our busy classroom Gina advantage to going to a community her interest in helping others learn computer software programs. and helped fellow students.” college is the level of support from It was Lipman who pointed out the college’s administration and son, an excellent instructor, and a very to Roscigno how much she enjoyed help- valuable addition to our department.” staff. ing and working with students. “She told “So many of our staff are former stuRoscigno, who graduated from Excelme I should teach and that’s when the light sior College in 2005 with a bachelor’s dents who loved being here so much that bulb started going on,” said Roscigno. degree in Computer Information and a they came back to work or teach here. Pretty soon, Roscigno went from being minor in Sociology, never imagined that They’ve grown up with College of the a student to working at the TLC lab and she would teach in the CIT field. Canyons,” she said. “We are the true defiwas then Lipman’s teaching assistant. “I never used computers to write nition of a community college. There are “Everything just fell into place,” she said. papers. I played solitaire!” she said. “I so many programs available for every level “I have watched Gina grow and flour- thought I would do marketing or customer of college student. We have something for ish,” said Lipman. “She is an amazing per- service.” everyone.”

l

SPRING 2009

11

New Theatre Chair Community Takes Center Stage remembers Jill Harper A A

s part of a plan to broaden the selection of courses and range of students in the College of the Canyons theatre department, last fall, actor, director and career educator Paul Wickline was named department chair. Wickline — who holds a B.A. in education in theatre and English from Western Washington University and an M.A. in education with an emphasis in theatre from Central Washington University — will also serve as producer of the college’s student theatre performance season. “I am thrilled to be working with the college’s theatre department and Performing Arts Center staff,” said Wickline. “They have a true passion for theatre and demonstrate daily their commitment and dedication by continually offering students personalized instruction from an outstanding group of faculty.” Before coming to the college, Wickline was a program coordinator and adjunct instructor for the extended education and summer school programs at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. Prior to that, Wickline was director of theatre arts and an instructor and director at Walla Walla Community College in southeastern Washington. Wickline has also served as an adjunct faculty member at Central Washington University, Walla Walla University and The Evergreen State College. In 2003, the Walla Walla Public School District honored Wickline as one of three outstanding district educators with a Staff Achievement Grant. In 2005, he was awarded a Meritorious Achievement Award from the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival. Wickline has produced and directed more than 50 stage productions in the last 15 years while remaining an active performer in professional summer and regional theatre productions. “Paul is a great addition to the college’s theatre faculty,” said Dr. Floyd Moos, dean of fine and performing arts. “With his training and professional background he brings a great deal of artistic vision, acad-

Paul Wickline

Theatre Students Make ‘Noises’ The theatre department will perform the hilarious Tony-nominated comedy “Noises Off” at the Santa Clarita Performing Arts Center at College of the Canyons (PAC). Described by New York critics as “the funniest farce ever written,” this comedy follows the antics of an inept acting troupe as they stumble from dress rehearsal to closing night. Show times are: • Thursday, May 7, at 8 p.m. • Friday, May 8, at 8 p.m. • Saturday, May 9, 8 p.m. • Sunday May 10, at 2 p.m. Admission is $5 for students and seniors and $10 for adults. For tickets, call (661) 362-5304, or visit www.canyonspac.com. emic leadership, and management of the artistic process to our department.” Wickline sees the department as a resource for all students, not just those pursuing careers in the entertainment industry. “Our courses aren’t just for budding actors,” Wickline said. “Students who take part in theatre classes develop confidence and self-esteem, the ability to think creatively and divergently and to speak clearly. They develop a strong work ethic both individually and collaboratively, and they become better students and better human beings.”

bout 200 friends and family of Jill Harper gathered at College of the Canyons March 28 to remember a 12-year Santa Clarita resident who was a devoted wife and mother, tireless volunteer, and whose sense of humor and relentless optimism always left others smiling. Jilll’s husband Phil and sons Richard and Ian shared touching and humorous memories, while City Councilman Bob Kellar, COC Chancellor Dr. Dianne Van Hook, and Ed Masterson, local representative to Assemblymember Cameron Smyth, reflected on Jill’s legacy of service to Santa Clarita. “For COC, she was a breath of fresh air—always upbeat, practical, witty, unselfish, positive, and genuine—present and passionate about all she did,” Van Hook said. In addition to working with seniors, and starting the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life event in Santa Clarita, Jill served on numerous committees at College of the Canyons and helped pass bond measures C and M. In lieu of flowers, Jill’s family asked that donations be made to the College of the Canyons Foundation in her honor. All contributions will benefit the Canyon Country Campus, which Jill donated many hours to as the college planned and built the campus. For more information, please contact the College of the Canyons Foundation at (661) 362-3493.


BL MARCH2009:BL-FALL-03 4/9/09 3:02 PM Page 1

Santa Clarita Community College District 26455 Rockwell Canyon Road Santa Clarita, CA 91355

N E W S

&

V I E W S

C O L L E G E

O F

T H E

C A N Y O N S

S P R I N G

2 0 0 9

College Commended During Accreditation T

BoarD of TruSTeeS Bruce D. Fortine Michele R. Jenkins Joan W. MacGregor Ernest L. Tichenor Scott Thomas Wilk Nicolas Cardenas, Student Trustee

Super Game for Former Cougar C

Former Cougar J.J. Arrington carries the ball in Super Bowl XLIII. Photo: Arizona Cardinals

F R O M

ollege of the Canyons athletics had a part in Super Bowl XLIII when Arizona Cardinal and former COC running back J.J. Arrington took the field in Tampa Bay on Feb. 1. Arrington was a member of the 2001 and 2002 Cougar football teams before transferring to Cal for his last two seasons and has been with the Arizona Cardinals since being drafted in 2005. During the week leading up to the championship game, the North Carolina native was bothered by a sore knee, but he made notable contributions against the Pittsburgh Steelers. The 26-yearold tallied four kickoff returns for 23 yards and caught two passes for 35 yards, including a key 22-yard reception during a fourth quarter Cardinal drive. Arrington spent most of the 2008 season as a kick return specialist for the Cardinals. He returned 11 kickoffs for 230 yards, the second-highest total of any kick returner in the NFL during the 2008 season. Arrington left College of the Canyons in 2002 after breaking numerous rushing and scoring records. He still holds a piece of the records for most touchdowns in a game (five) and most points scored in a game (30). He was the first player to be offered a scholarship by a Pac-10 school after the football program was reinstated at the college in 1998.

Students’ Success Always Inspires

he grades are in, and College of the Canyons passed with flying colors! Every six years, community colleges undergo thorough evaluations to maintain their accreditation. This process includes completing a lengthy self-study and hosting a visit from a team of administrators, faculty and staff from other colleges. With College of the Canyons having completed those steps, the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges, Western Association of Schools and Colleges, recently reaffirmed its highest accreditation status upon College of the Canyons. In reaffirming accreditation status, without the

placement of additional requests or conditions, the Commission also commended the college for its strong commitment to student success, collaborative governance, the fostering of numerous community partnerships, the use of data-driven planning and evaluation processes, technology use including student and faculty training and support, the provision of a wide array of student support services, and the presence of professional development opportunities for faculty and staff. College of the Canyons was among four of 15 colleges to receive full accreditation at the commission’s January meeting. See ACCREDITATION on Page 9

B

ehind every student at College of the Canyons is a story. The stories are as unique as the students themselves, but common themes often tie them together. Determination. Discovery. Second chances. Uncertainty. And ultimately, success. Jamie Loren is wrapping up her final classes at College of the Canyons and preparing to transfer, marking the completion of an improbable accomplishment. Jamie got off to a rough start academically when she first enrolled at COC. See VAN HOOK on Page 2

College of the Canyons library media technician Eneida Bejkoa displays one of the textbooks students can receive through the MESA program’s Physics and Calculus Book Award Program. To be eligible for the donorfunded book program students must demonstrate a financial need, have a GPA of 3.0 or higher and be majoring in a field of math, engineering or science.

Donors Put Books in the Hands of Students

P

iloted in 2007, the donor-funded Physics and Calculus Book Award Program at College of the Canyons provides textbooks to deserving students studying for careers in mathbased career fields. The Physics and Calculus Book Award pro-

gram is administered through the college’s Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement (MESA) program. Since its inception the book program has awarded a total of 19 books, at a cost of roughly $200 apiece, and has subsequently expanded See CALCULUS on Page 10

W E B E L I E V E I N T E A C H I N G , L E A D I N G A N D S TAY I N G AT T H E F O R E F R O N T O F C H A N G E


BOTTOM LINE  

Spring 2009

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