Page 1

EMT PROGRAM TAKES RIDE INTO FUTURE Page 3

MAKERSPACE FUELS INNOVATION

news

Page 5

BREAKING

SPRING 2016

FOCUS ON THE FUTURE

SCIENCE CENTER PLANNED Page 4

COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS • MAKING DREAMS COME TRUE SINCE 1969

‘BLOCKBUSTER SUMMER’ RETURNS WITH 3 BIG SESSIONS

C

ollege of the Canyons will again offer a “Blockbuster Summer” of classes designed to help students achieve their educational goals. Offered in three sessions, more than 600 sections of high-demand core classes will be able to accommodate as many as 18,000 students at the Valencia and Canyon Country campuses and online. Most of the classes are those that students need to graduate or meet prerequisites for transfer to a four-year institution, providing an excellent opportunity to get a jump start on coursework before the start of the fall semester.

A number of elective and exploratory courses that students often use to help determine their educational or career tracks also will be offered. “The college has stepped up this summer by expanding the number of courses, days and times available to our students and community member,” said Dr. Jerry Buckley, assistant superintendent and vice president of instruction. “Students will find a number of options at our Valencia and Canyon Country campuses, in addition to online classes, to help them either transfer or pick up a new skill to advance their career.”

Three separate summer sessions begin June 6, June 13 and July 11; see dates at right. The summer schedule of classes is now posted online. To see available classes, follow the “class schedules” link at www.canyons.edu. A printed schedule is not available. Summer 2016 enrollment fees at all California community colleges are $46 per unit, as mandated by the state of California. For more information about summer sessions or to become a student, call Admissions & Records at (661) 362-3280 or visit www.canyons.edu.

SUMMER 2016 SESSIONS Session 1 – June 6 to July 9 Session 2 – June 13 to Aug. 6 Session 3 – July 11 to Aug. 13 • Returning student registration now open. Late registration begins May 31. Information: (661) 362-3280 www.canyons.edu

SPEECH TEAM NAMED NO. 1 IN NATION

Speech Team Brings Home 14 Medals from Phi Rho Pi Nationals

F

THE RECORD-SETTING COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS SPEECH TEAM EARNED ITS FIRST-EVER NO. 1 RANKING IN THE PHI RHO PI NATIONAL TOURNAMENT, BRINGING HOME A COMBINED 14 MEDALS ­– INCLUDING THREE GOLDS – AND OUTSCORING THEIR NEAREST COMPETITION BY 20 POINTS.

BOND MEASURE ON BALLOT C iting the growing shortage of classrooms and labs that places 4,000 students on waitlists per semester, the Santa Clarita Community College District Board of Trustees voted unanimously March 9 to put a $230 million bond measure on the June 7, 2016, general election ballot. Before the vote, board members received a detailed presentation by college staff about the projects that would be funded by a bond. There is an urgent need to build new classrooms and labs for the training of critical professions, including nurses, emergency medical technicians, firefighters, and law enforcement officers. Plus, more classrooms are needed to serve a growing population of local students who choose College of the Canyons for the first two years of college as a high-quality, cost-effective alternative to more expensive California State University campuses and the University of California system. “College of the Canyons has a demonstrated need for new classrooms and labs, along with safety and accessibility improvements and technology upgrades,” board president Bruce Fortine SEE BOND ON PAGE 4

College of the Canyons 26455 Rockwell Canyon Road Santa Clarita, CA 91355

or the first time in the program’s 12year history, the College of the Canyons Speech Team has been ranked No. 1 at the annual Phi Rho Pi National Tournament, bringing home a combined 14 medals to put a cap on its most successful season to date. COC finished the event No. 1 in the competition’s intermediate Wheeler Division by scoring more than 20 points higher than its closest competitor. Along the way, the team claimed three gold medals, three silver medals and eight bronze medals. “We keep on telling each other, ‘We did it’…because we’re still in shock,” said Michael Leach, speech team director and communications professor. “Watching each team member support each other and root for each other at the awards ceremony will forever be with me.” Phi Rho Pi is the National Junior College Forensic Association and Honor Society, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting the forensic arts – here meaning speech and debate – at the junior and community college level. The organization dates SEE SPEECH ON PAGE 6

Non-Profit Organization US Postage PAID Santa Clarita CA 91355 Permit 56

ECRWSS

Postal Customer


COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS BREAKING NEWS • SPRING 2016

2

SUMMER INSTITUTE REGISTRATION OPEN

R

egistration is now open for the popular career exploration-themed College of the Canyons Summer Institute, with weekly sessions running July 11 to 14 and 18 to 22. The institute is open to students entering the seventh, eighth and ninth grades. The Summer Institute provides hands-on career exploration and learning opportunities in a variety of areas such as: robotics, special effects and movie making, allied health, video game design, sports medicine, photography, architecture and welding. Instruction is provided by College of the Canyons professors, student teachers or industry professionals who have tailored their curriculum to junior high and high school students. Each track allows students to discover multiple career possibilities through a unique blend of innovative lesson

plans and engaging hands-on activities. “The COC Summer Institute is much more than your typical summer camp,” said Mark Carr, Summer Institute coordinator. “It’s an opportunity for your child to discover a potential career path, and have some fun at the same time.” All Summer Institute sessions run from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Enrollment costs $225 per person per week. • July 11 to 14 – Video game design; robotics; photography; allied health; special effects and movie making; welding. • July 18 to 22 – Video game design; robotics; photography; introduction to architecture; special effects and movie making; how it’s made and how it’s done; sports medicine. Information: www.canyons.communityext.net

News Briefs

JAZZ GROUP TAKES THIRD PLACE AT FESTIVAL

“Just Jazz,” the college’s vocal jazz choir, placed third among a field of jazz choirs from across the nation during the prestigious Next Generation Jazz Festival in Monterey April 8 to 10. College of the Canyons was the only community college to win an award in the “college vocal jazz” category, finishing behind second-place winner Long Beach State University and first-place winner Sacramento State University.

COMMUNICATION STUDIES A MODEL PROGRAM

FORMER CONGRESSMAN HOWARD P. “BUCK” MCKEON (CENTER) PRESENTS A CHECK FOR $10,000 TO COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS FOUNDATION BOARD MEMBER RANDY MOBERG (LEFT) AND FOUNDATION CHIEF DEVELOPMENT OFFICER MURRAY WOOD (RIGHT).

MCKEON SEEDS SCHOLARSHIP WITH $10K

C

ollege of the Canyons hosted U.S. Rep. Howard “Buck” McKeon (Ret.) for a special on-campus reception to officially endow the new McKeon Scholars Award annual student scholarship fund. McKeon spoke about the many benefits of civic engagement programs and the importance of a younger generation’s involvement in helping to better their community, before presenting the College of the Canyons Foundation with a $10,000 check to seed the scholarship fund. The McKeon Scholars Award is available to COC students with a GPA of 3.0 or higher who are majoring in political science and/or interested in pursuing a career in public service and civic engagement. The annual $500 scholarship will help defray the costs of college education. “This is a tremendous honor to support student success at College of the Canyons and inspire the next generation of community leaders,” McKeon said. “If we can encourage people to serve and be involved, the impact on our colleges, our community, and our country will be immeasurable.” Several students spoke during the event to discuss their various civic engagement activities, as well as share potential initiatives with McKeon and college administrators. “We are proud to partner with Chairman McKeon in equipping a new generation of leaders,” College of the Canyons Chancellor Dr. Dianne Van Hook said. “Because of his generosity, today’s students will be inspired to complete their educations, pursue their dreams of public service, and become tomorrow’s leaders.” The donation is the result of a pledge McKeon made

during the first installment of the McKeon Leadership Forum, a speaker series aimed at promoting civic engagement throughout the community. During the inaugural event held in November, McKeon was joined by Marine Corps Gen. John F. Kelly, commander of U.S. Southern Command, who spoke about the importance of civic responsibility and commented on some of the challenges facing the nation. “We all need to reconnect to what makes America so extraordinary, to rediscover why we should be proud of who we are, what we stand for, to be part of something bigger, to strive for something better, but to strive together,” Kelly said. “We can find this very easy in our county and our society, and that is through service.”

ABOUT CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

College of the Canyons launched its Center for Civic Engagement in the fall of 2015 with the goal of inspiring students to be more involved in shaping their community’s future. Part of the Service-Learning Department, the center encourages students and community members to make a difference in their communities while developing knowledge, skills, values and motivation needed to bring about positive change. The center also offers information about volunteer opportunities throughout the Santa Clarita and San Fernando valleys with organizations such as Help the Children, HandsOn Santa Clarita, LA Works and Northeast Valley Health Corporation. Information: www.canyons.edu/offices/servicelearning

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RECOGNIZED

T

he College of the Canyons Information Technology department has been recognized for innovation by both the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office and the California Community College Chief Information Systems Officers Association.

2016 TECHNOLOGY FOCUS AWARD

The department was honored with the Chancellor’s Office Technology Focus Award for its “registration appointment text message reminder” program, which debuted this past winter and alerts students via text message about upcoming registration appointments. On the day of their registration appointment, students who have provided the college with their cell phone numbers and service providers receive text-message alerts 15 minutes prior to their scheduled appointment times. The program has been credited with vastly reducing the number of students who miss registration appointments and increasing the number of students who successfully register for classes. “It is an honor to be recognized by the Chancellor’s Office for the work we have done to use technology to help ensure students get registered for the classes they need,” said Jim Temple, the college’s associate vice president of technology. “Like many of us, students are busy with classes,

work and family responsibilities. Because of that we try to do whatever we can to remind them of important dates and appointments. We are fortunate at College of the Canyons to have such a talented group of people who visualize ideas and make them happen.” The award was presented during the California Community College Chief Information Systems Officers Association annual convention in Garden Grove in February.

2016 TECHNOLOGY EXCELLENCE AWARD

The department also was awarded the 2016 California Community College Chief Information Systems Officers Association Technology Excellence Award in recognition of new online services that enhance student success. The college was recognized for its “online education plan” for students, online counseling services, and online tutoring services offered by The Learning Center (TLC). The projects were made possible by a $2.6 million Department of Education grant to fund technological improvements that enhance students’ educational experience. “These initiatives are extremely important in ensuring our students are able to meet their educational goals,” Temple said. “Collectively, they have provided students with the tools they need, at the time they need them, in order to be successful.”

The college’s Communication Studies Program has been honored as a “model program” by the Western States Communication Association, whose annual award is given to an educational institution that excels in teaching, research, creative works and effective use of resources. “Winning the award means a lot, especially since I believe we have built our department up to be one of the very best in Southern California,” said Victoria Leonard, chair of communication studies. College of the Canyons was a co-recipient with Irvine Valley College of the 2016 award, which was announced during the WSCA’s annual convention in San Diego Feb. 27 to March 1. College of the Canyons offers 14 communication studies courses, with up to 68 sections offered each semester. They satisfy general-education requirements for the associate degree and California State University bachelor’s degree.

COUGAR BASKETBALL CAMP OFFERS 2 SESSIONS

The College of the Canyons men’s basketball program invites boys and girls ages 6 to 14 to participate in the 2016 Howard Fisher Cougar Basketball Camp, with two sessions running in June. Open to players of all skill levels, each four-day camp session will provide a unique opportunity to learn new techniques and strengthen current skills. Camp meetings will be led by men’s basketball head coach Howard Fisher, his staff of assistants and intercollegiate players from the eight-time Western State Conference champion men’s basketball program. Each of the camp sessions will be highlighted by fundamental instruction, skills contests, guest speakers and team competition. The camp sessions are: • June 20 to 23 – 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. • June 27 to 30 – 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. All sessions will be held in the college’s West P.E. Gymnasium, located at the Valencia campus. Cost is $225 per player, per session. Every camper will receive a Cougar Basketball Camp T-shirt and camp photograph. Campers are encouraged to bring their own lunches; box lunches will be available for purchase. Space is limited.

FOUNDATION OFFERS EUROPEAN TRIPS

The College of the Canyons Foundation is offering two European trips. The first excursion will be a tour of Ireland from July 9 to 17. The tour includes sailing on scenic lakes, exploring castles, and introducing tour members to the rich history and culture Ireland has to offer. The foundation will also offer an opportunity to board a Luftner cruise ship and travel along Europe’s second longest river, the Danube, from Dec. 3 to 11. Prices range from $3,700 to $4,100 per person, depending on how many people register. Included in the price for both trips are round-trip airfare from Los Angeles, air taxes and fees/surcharges, and hotel transfers. For more information, please visit www.canyonsfoundation.com.

news BREAKING

Breaking News is published by the College of the Canyons Public Information Office to inform the community about programs, events, issues and accomplishments of the Santa Clarita Valley’s community college. It is distributed to residences, P.O. boxes and businesses within the Santa Clarita Community College District. Advertising is not accepted. MAIL: College of the Canyons Public Information Office 26455 Rockwell Canyon Road, Santa Clarita, CA 91355 EMAIL: pio@canyons.edu


3

COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS BREAKING NEWS • SPRING 2016

EMT PROGRAM TAKES RIDE INTO FUTURE W ith the installation of its new state-ofthe-art ambulance simulator, the College of the Canyons emergency medical technician (EMT) program becomes the first program in the state — and one of only 16 in the nation — to incorporate this technologically advanced classroom-learning resource into its curriculum. The ambulance simulator, built by Simulator Solutions, replicates a variety of situations that take place in an ambulance by mimicking road movements, as well as other distractions that can occur inside a moving ambulance. The simulator was built to match actual ambulance dimensions and includes fully functional interior control panels and storage areas. Interior shelves are stocked with everything found in an actual Basic Life Support (BLS) ambulance. College officials worked directly with Simulator Solutions to customize both interior and exterior features to better meet student and program needs. “This state-of-the-art ambulance simulator provides COC students with an enhanced learning experience,” said Patti Haley, director of the EMT Program. “Our instructors and staff are excited to help pave the way for the future of emergency medical services education by using this valuable resource.” Currently, the EMT Program requires that students complete one eight-hour ride-along in the field, which may have limited patient contacts. The ambulance simulator will provide realistic scenarios and hands-on training. The simulator’s interior design and accompanying equipment provides added opportunities to practice skills such as administering CPR, assessing patients, managing patient airways, evaluating vital signs, providing trauma care and recording patient history – all while working in a confined space and dealing with simulated road movement. “College of the Canyons and the EMT Program are committed to providing our students with the latest information and technology,” Haley added. “The ambulance simulator allows students to apply and master their knowledge, skills and abilities in a realistic environment.” In coming years, the EMT Program hopes to expand the breadth and depth of its training services by pairing additional technological resources with expanded classroom facilities. Replacing the EMT Program’s 40-year-old building with an expanded, state-of-the-art facility is a top priority. In addition to providing a new home for the EMT Program, a new facility would better position the college to expand other vital career training programs such as fire technology, nursing and administration of justice.

STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN TRAINING PROGRAM WILL LEARN IN A TECHNOLOGICALLY ADVANCED AMBULANCE SIMULATOR. THE COC PROGRAM IS THE FIRST IN THE STATE AND ONE OF ONLY 16 NATIONWIDE TO OFFER THIS STATE-OF-THE-ART LEARNING RESOURCE.

ABOUT THE COC EMT PROGRAM The EMT Program at College of the Canyons prepares students to render pre-hospital basic life support at the scene of an emergency, during transport of the sick and injured, or during inter-facility transfer within an organized emergency management system (EMS) system. The program integrates ethics, anatomy, physiology, basic life support, communication skills, patient assessment, trauma care and transportation of the pre-hospital patient. As part of the program, students participate in clinical hours at an emergency department and in a working ambulance.

The EMT Program prepares students to take the National Registry Exam in order to gain certification in Los Angeles County and State of California as an EMT. Curriculum is based on the Department of Transportation’s National Emergency Medical Services Education Standards. The College of the Canyons EMT Program has been approved by the Los Angeles County EMS Agency, State of California Emergency Medical Services Authority, and National Registry of EMTs. For more information, visit www.canyons.edu/departments/emt.

WE HAVE YOUR DEGREE PROGRAM! GET YOUR BACHELOR’S OR MASTER’S DEGREE RIGHT HERE!

Brandman University

California State University Bakersfield

University of La Verne

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

BACHELOR’S DEGREE PROGRAMS

BACHELOR’S DEGREE PROGRAMS

All of the programs listed here are offered by a variety of excellent universities at the Dr. Dianne G. Van Hook University Center, conveniently located on the Valencia campus of College of the Canyons. We’ve taken the long commute to distant campuses out of the equation, making it more convenient than ever for you to get that degree you’ve been dreaming about. Your degree is waiting!

• Applied Studies • Applied Studies – Supply Chain Systems • Criminal Justice – Corrections, Homeland Security, Leadership, Victim Advocacy or Forensics • Legal Studies • Psychology • Social Science • Social Work • Computing Technology – Project Management, Info. Technology or Business Systems Admin.

INFORMATION (661) 362-5474

www.cocuniversitycenter.com

• Autism

BACHELOR’S DEGREE PROGRAMS

MASTER’S DEGREE PROGRAMS

• Communications • Sociology

California State University Northridge MASTER’S DEGREE PROGRAMS

• Public Administration – MPA • Social Work – MSW

National University BACHELOR’S DEGREE PROGRAMS

• Homeland Security & Emergency Management • Nursing • Paralegal Studies • Sport Psychology

• Psychology – Marriage & Family Therapy (MFT) • Psychology – MFT & Professional Clinical Counseling • Psychology – Professional Clinical Counseling

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

• Criminal Justice • Teaching – Applied Behavior Analysis

• Nursing Practice

• Applied Behavior Analysis MASTER’S DEGREE PROGRAMS

• Accounting • Business Administration • Child Development • Educational Studies • Organizational Management CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS

• Mild/Moderate Education Specialist – Level I & II • Multiple-Subject Teaching • Preliminary Administrative Services • Pupil Personnel Services • Single-Subject Teaching MASTER’S DEGREE PROGRAMS

• Business Administration – MBA • Educational Counseling • Educational Leadership • Leadership Management • Special Education


COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS BREAKING NEWS • SPRING 2016

4

BOND REFINANCING TO SAVE TAXPAYERS MILLIONS

C

ollege of the Canyons refinanced $97.4 million of outstanding general obligation bond debt. The district’s taxpayers will have cash flow savings of $35.07 million over the next 30 years. This represents $22.82 million in present value and represents an overall savings of more than 23 percent of the bonds that were refunded. “Given the historically low interest rates that are now available, the district took advantage of the opportunity to refinance the bonds and pass the savings on to local property owners,” College of the Canyons Chancellor Dr. Dianne G. Van Hook said. “There was good interest in these bonds from a wide variety of stable investors based on the strong credit ratings of the College.” The Santa Clarita Community College District Board of Trustees, which oversees the college, voted in April to re-

finance these particular general obligation bonds from Measures C and M. The sale was completed May 17. It’s the second time in three years the college has refinanced bonds to lessen the tax impact on property owners. A 2013 refinancing yielded $3.73 million of present value savings, which represented more than a 10 percent reduction. That refunding also lowered taxes for area property owners.   Measure C, which local voters passed in 2001, funded a number of significant improvements at College of the Canyons, including the cost of acquiring 70 acres of land on Sierra Highway to build the Canyon Country campus, and constructing the Hasley Hall classroom and computer facility, Aliso Hall and Aliso Lab science facilities, and Pico Canyon Hall performing arts classroom and rehearsal spaces. The funding provided through Measure M, approved

by voters in 2006, helped the college complete a number of facilities projects, including construction of all the initial buildings at the Canyon Country campus. It also qualified COC to receive state matching funds used in building the Dr. Dianne G. Van Hook University Center that now offers more than 40 bachelor’s and master’s degree programs. Other key projects included the Culinary Arts building; expansion of the Mentry Hall classroom building, Library and The Learning Center; the Applied Technology Education Center at the Canyon Country campus, and the Canyons Hall student services center. Together, Measure C and Measure M qualified College of the Canyons to receive $56.2 million in construction funds from the state. Colleges that have local bond funds available are given priority when applying for state funding.

WITH VOTER APPROVAL OF MEASURE E IN JUNE, COC WOULD BE ABLE TO BEGIN CONSTRUCTION OF MUCH-NEEDED CLASSROOM AND LAB SPACE — INCLUDING A NEW SCIENCE CENTER — THAT WOULD ALLEVIATE OVERCROWDING AND REDUCE THE NUMBERS OF STUDENTS WHO ARE ON WAIT LISTS FOR CLASSES EACH SEMESTER. BOARD MEMBERS CONSIDER THE BOND INITIATIVE A CRITICAL NEXT STEP IN THE COLLEGE’S EFFORTS TO MEET THE COMMUNITY’S GROWING NEEDS.

BOND FROM PAGE 1

said. “And because this college has a proven track record of helping local students, professionals and employers meet their educational and business goals – from nursing, to technology-based careers, to giving local high school students a jump start toward four-year degrees – it is clear that enrollment will continue to increase.” “Our college has demonstrated a consistent ability to plan for the future, leverage state and local resources for maximum impact, and provide the facilities and programs our community needs,” said Anna Frutos-Sanchez, a Santa Clarita resident and local business leader who attended the board meeting. “This bond is a crucial next step in ensuring College of the Canyons is equipped and ready to deliver the education and training students and workers need to excel in 21st century careers.” California’s community colleges – and College of the Canyons particularly – will play a critical role in ensuring the continued vitality of California’s thriving economy. Job market projections show that thousands of the jobs in L.A. County and the state will require more education than a high school diploma, but not necessarily a bachelor’s degree. By 2025 – just nine years from now – 30 percent of all job openings in California, or 1.9 million jobs, will require some college, but not a bachelor’s degree. Given the 200-plus training partnerships that College of the Canyons has with area businesses, the demand for access will continue to increase. A recent poll conducted at a local economic development conference showed that access to workforce training was the top priority for area business leaders. During the board meeting, information was presented about how the college has struggled to provide enough classes at times when students can take them. During peak attendance times – from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. and between 6 and 10 p.m. – classrooms, labs and parking lots are at their maximum capacity. Because of this overcrowding, it takes students longer to complete their educational goals.

Avneet Ghotra, the student member of the Board of Trustees, shared her experiences in trying to get the classes she needed. “I tried enrolling in Biology 107 multiple semesters, but it was always full because most students who are science majors need this class,” she said before the board’s vote. “Adding more labs, especially at the Canyon Country campus, will relieve the overcrowding and help students to earn their degrees faster and transfer to a four-year campus.” Enrollment data shows that 60 percent of the students who graduate from the Wm. S. Hart Union High School District high schools attend College of the Canyons at

cess to higher education.” Van Hook noted that if state funding does become available in the future, local bond money would be required for College of the Canyons to access it. “When the state funds construction projects at local colleges, it awards money first to those colleges that can contribute local resources to the project,” she said. “Passing a bond will enable us to leverage state resources when they come available, and stretch our local dollars.” College of the Canyons operates two campuses, a 154-acre site at the corner of Valencia Boulevard and Rockwell Canyon

ANOTHER VIEW OF THE PLANNED SCIENCE CENTER AT THE CANYON COUNTRY CAMPUS.

some point. And, more than 900 Hart district students attend College of the Canyons while they are still in high school, taking advantage of a college policy that waives enrollment fees for high school students, to get a jumpstart on their college educations. “This is a defining moment for the future of College of the Canyons,” Chancellor Dr. Dianne G. Van Hook said. “We can’t rely on funding from the state of California to accommodate both our current and future enrollment. With no new construction money approved by Sacramento in the last 10 years, there are billions of dollars in projects that need funding in California. Local bond funding is the only way to ensure College of the Canyons has the resources it needs to meet this community’s expectations for ac-

Road in Valencia, and a 72-acre facility on Sierra Highway in Canyon Country. The Canyon Country campus exceeded its fiveyear enrollment target the day it opened in 2007, drawing more than 3,500 students. Because of continued enrollment growth there, the campus is eligible to receive 85 percent of the construction costs of three permanent buildings from the state, assuming state resources are available, and only if the college has local funding to match state resources. The Valencia campus was designed 46 years ago to serve a capacity of 5,000 students. Currently, the college serves 20,000 students on both campuses. Projections now call for a student body exceeding 30,000 in little more than a decade.

The growing cost of obtaining an education in the UC and CSU systems means more students will rely on College of the Canyons as an affordable alternative for the first two years of college. On average, attending a CSU campus costs students five times more than equivalent classes at College of the Canyons. For a UC, the expense grows to 10 times more. “Our commitment has always been to meet the community’s needs,” Van Hook said. “We want the facilities at College of the Canyons to be ready when our local families need them.” At Wednesday’s board meeting, college staff also briefed the board about other urgent facilities needs, including upgrades to security and electrical systems, plumbing, lighting, heating, ventilation, fire and earthquake safety, as well as repairing or replacing several aging roofs, some of which are more than 40 years old. In addition, some of the stairs, walkways, ramps and parking lots on campus need to be upgraded to comply with current requirements for providing access to disabled students. The June 7, 2016 general obligation bond measure adheres to the guidelines of Proposition 39, which requires approval by 55 percent of the voters within the college district. It also includes accountability measures such as a citizens’ oversight committee and annual audits. The impact on homeowners would be $15 per $100,000 of assessed value (not market value), which would generate $230 million over the next 12 years. “We want to be sure voters understand that the money provided by the bond will stay in our community and cannot be taken by Sacramento,” Fortine said. “It will be carefully monitored, with citizen oversight and third-party audits. And, the funds will be spent only on the specific projects we’ve described. The money cannot be used for things like faculty, administrator, and staff salaries, or other college operating expenses.” “This bond is focused on ensuring student access,” Fortine said, “and will ensure College of the Canyons can provide the education and training necessary to meet the needs of students, whether their goals are to move on to higher levels of education, or to learn skills needed for success in fast-growing, high-paying career fields.”


5

COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS BREAKING NEWS • SPRING 2016

NEW MAKERSPACE FACILITY FUELS INNOVATION

C

ollege of the Canyons unveiled its new MakerSpace facility on May 12, providing students and staff members interested in the science, technology, engineering, art and math (STEAM) fields with a dedicated area designed to spark creativity, spur collaboration and fuel innovation. Located in the Valencia campus Student Center, MakerSpace is designed as a collaborative learning area that gives users free access to tools, materials, technological resources, skills training and a variety of entrepreneurial opportunities. “The MakerSpace is a unique learning environment that not only gives students an opportunity to bring their ideas to reality, but it also fosters the development of skills needed for successful 21st century careers,” Chancellor Dr. Dianne Van Hook said. “When individuals, student clubs and cohorts, staff groups and potential business partners engage, consult, collaborate and create using the facility’s tools and technology, they will learn the importance of collaboration, communication, adaptability, problem-solving, and other key attributes today’s employers look for when hiring.” Development of MakerSpace is the result of a multi-discipline collaborative effort, with several on-campus departments, administrators and faculty members contributing time, ideas and equipment to help launch the new initiative. Included among that group are staff members from the college’s architecture, art, theatre/stagecraft, interior design, biology, engineering, computer networking, electronic systems, welding technology and information technology departments.

SEVERAL HUNDRED PEOPLE ATTENDED THE OPENING OF MAKERSPACE, TAKING THE OPPORTUNITY TO PARTICIPATE IN A VARIETY OF HANDS-ON TUTORIALS AND DEMONSTRATIONS.

“The campus community has really shown a strong interest in coming together to open this facility,” said Ron McFarland, dean of the School of Applied Technologies. “It’s our hope that interest in the MakerSpace will continue to grow and encourage additional support and future collaboration.”

The College of the Canyons Foundation provided a $15,000 grant to help get the MakersSpace project off the ground, with further grant funding to be pursued as the space grows in both size and scope. Several departments and individuals have donated additional equipment ranging from hand tools to high-end computers

and microprocessors, to a laser cutter and a 3-D printer. The grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony on May 12 attracted several hundred people. The event included tours of the facility, hands-on tutorials and demonstrations, and opportunities to put their imaginations to the test.

SCIENCE PROJECT WILL SOAR TO NEW HEIGHTS

T

he College of the Canyons Astronomy & Physics Club (A&P) has been selected to provide one of 12 college-level experiments that will be placed aboard NASA’s High Altitude Student Platform 2016 (HASP), set to launch from Fort Sumner, N.M., over Labor Day weekend. The club’s “Cosmic Dust Collection Unit” experiment will take place during a weather balloon mission that will be aloft 10 to 20 hours and reach an altitude of approximately 120,000 feet. Upon the weather balloon’s return to earth, NASA will secure the collection unit, protecting the integrity of the contents, and return the unit to the college. Using one of the college’s clean rooms, the student project team will analyze the collected particles and synthesize their findings into a scientific paper slated for release in December. Student Daniel Tikhomirov developed and submitted the winning proposal on behalf of the A&P team, composed of 21 students from the A&P, engineering and biology clubs. Teresa Ciardi, physical science faculty and club advisor, serves as the club’s advocate to generate project funding in addition to leading and encouraging the students along the way. For Tikhomirov, the 2016 HASP opportunity marks his second attempt at collecting cosmic dust for analysis. He was SEE SCIENCE ON PAGE 7

THE ASTRONOMY & PHYSICS CLUB HAS BEEN SELECTED TO PROVIDE AN EXPERIMENT THAT WILL BE PLACED ABOARD A NASA HIGH-ALTITUDE WEATHER BALLOON THIS FALL.

FUTURE BUSINESS LEADERS WIN BIG AT STATE CONFERENCE

N

ine students from the college’s Future Business Leaders of America Phi Beta Lambda excelled at the FBLA-PBL California State Business Leadership Conference in competition against students from California’s top four-year universities. Student teams analyzed issues in a business case and made recommendations to a panel of judges. The students also competed in knowledge events to demonstrate their mastery of essential business concepts and skills. The College of the Canyons team made an impressive showing: • First Place, Business Ethics Division: Janeth Avina, Tyler Larson and Cameron Mandley. • Second Place, Management Analysis & Decision-Making: Johnzel Iniba, Tyler Larson and Dana Levine.

• First Place, Name Tag Graphic Design: Janeth Avina and Jonathan Maxwell. “Our students showed they are able to compete and excel in competition against much larger and better known schools,” said Bob Maxwell, faculty advisor and business professor. “All of the students enjoyed competing and networking with students from across the state, and learning how to create their personal brand in the workshops. It was an inspirational experience.” In addition, COC chapter president Johnzel Iniba was selected as a state officer for the 201617 California State Officer Team. “We are proud of Johnzel for being selected to help lead California PBL next year,” Maxwell added. Participating were more than 225 students from 14 colleges and universities, including UC Berkeley, UCLA, USC and Cal State Fullerton.


COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS BREAKING NEWS • SPRING 2016

6

TRAINING PUTS STUDENTS ON ‘FAST TRACK’ TO CAREERS T he latest graduates from the College of the Canyons Fast Track Program prove that with the right training, you can go from being unemployed to launching a new career in just seven weeks. Offered by COC’s Economic Development Division, the program is a collection of intensive courses geared toward entry-level skills training and certifications that prepare students for varied fields, including CNC (computer numerically controlled) manufacturing. In CNC manufacturing, operators program and control machines that shape metal into parts for a wide range of industrial and aerospace applications.

Fast Track is designed to train people with no previous experience for work in a new field, although a few students already working in CNC are upgrading their skills. “We’ve had everyone from bartenders to Starbucks baristas to people who haven’t worked in five years,” said Joe Klocko, recently retired dean of economic development. He described the program as “shortterm, intensive training that would give someone the skills to find a better job.” The 280-hour, seven-week CNC program is divided into classroom and hands-on time to teach students the skills they’ll need on the job. Topics include safety protocols,

blueprint reading, shop math, and machining parts. Students are taught in the college’s machining lab by experts trained to educate adults in CNC machining, and utilize textbooks alongside a scientific calculator, online toolset, and machinist’s measuring implements. Upon completion, students earn a CNC Machining Certificate of Completion and National Career Readiness Certificate. Graduates are highly sought, earning up to $20 per hour after gaining on-the-job experience. The Fast Track graduation features a job fair, the most recent of which attracted 12 companies that interviewed the nine

CULTIVATING THE NEXT GENERATION OF TEACHERS M

MELLADY HONORED

LOCAL BUSINESSWOMAN AND COMMUNITY VOLUNTEER JILL MELLADY WAS HONORED WITH THE COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS FOUNDATION’S SILVER SPUR AWARD FOR COMMUNITY SERVICE DURING A GALA CELEBRATION AT THE SHERATON UNIVERSAL HOTEL. HUNDREDS OF HER FRIENDS, FAMILY MEMBERS, COLLEAGUES AND ADMIRERS PACKED THE HOTEL’S TOP-FLOOR STARVIEW ROOM TO SHARE IN THE MARCH 19 OCCASION AND CELEBRATE HER COMMITMENT TO THE COMMUNITY. SHE IS, AS CHANCELLOR DR. DIANNE G. VAN HOOK PUT IT, “AN EXAMPLE OF THE DIFFERENCE THAT ONE PERSON CAN MAKE BY GIVING FROM THE HEART.”

ASL STUDENT WINS STATEWIDE SCHOLARSHIP

A

touching essay about her experiences as an intern in the Sulphur Springs School District earned American Sign Language student Courtney Wiscarson a statewide scholarship – and the honor of being the first student from College of the Canyons to win the award. “Fingers flutter and hands slide as they form pictures and words; each sign comes together to create the beautiful art of American Sign Language,” Wiscarson wrote in her award-winning essay for the Dr. Bernard L. Hyink Scholarship given by the California Internship and Work Experience Association (CIWEA). COC’s Cooperative Work Experience Education is a member.

Gina Bogna, acting assistant dean of Internships, Job Development and Career Center, encouraged 10 students to apply for the award’s two-year college category, which was open to students from California’s 113 community colleges. Only one person – Wiscarson – was selected to receive the $1,000 award. Her 750-word essay about working as an interpreter highlighted the resilience of the deaf and hardof-hearing students with whom she worked. She also touched on the uncertainty she felt in taking what she learned in the classroom and applying it in a professional setting, in particular, her worry about signing incorrectly to the children.

SPEECH FROM PAGE 1

back to 1927, and offers the only full-service speech tournament at the national level in the United States. This year’s event, entitled “Going Coastal,” was held in Costa Mesa, with more than 60 colleges from across the nation competing in the five-day tournament. There were 11 individual events encompassing three types of debate and a category called “interpreter’s theatre.” Events ranged from team debates to parliamentary debates, while individual events were split into Public Address, which includes persuasive and informative speaking; Interpretation, where competitors interpret selections of poetry, prose or drama; and Limited Preparation, where extemporaneous or impromptu speeches or readings were given with around half an hour to prepare. After days of live performances, participants were whittled down in every category, sometimes going as many as six rounds before reaching the semifinals. In the case of debate events, teams had to be prepared to debate either side of the chosen issue. For individual events, students had to follow

STUDENT COURTNEY WISCARSON (LEFT) AND GINA BOGNA, ACTING ASSISTANT DEAN OF INTERNSHIPS, JOB DEVELOPMENT & CAREER CENTER.

the guideline for whatever type of speech they were presenting, be that informative, persuasive, or simply to entertain. Entrant schools were split into three divisions according to size: Hindman Division included those schools registered in one to 15 performance slots, Wheeler Division schools were entered in between 15 to 30 slots, and the Wyman Division schools were entered in more than 30 slots. COC, which entered in 29 categories, ranked first in the Wheeler Division for individual events and overall points, finishing with a score of 87.5. Under Leach’s direction, the Speech Team has appeared at the Phi Rho Pi National Tournament multiple times, but had yet to garner this level of success. Prior to this season several individual students had gained recognition at the national level, but had yet to realize a team victory. “I have never been so motivated to better myself, not just in performing, but with every aspect of my life,” said second-year team member Teon Sewer about his experience at the national tourney. “The talent on this team is second to none, which makes me want to improve even more. It’s not just a team, it’s a family.” Others on the roster seemed to echo that sentiment, while also noting the personal gains competing on the team

most recent graduates looking for work.The companies included Aerospace Dynamics, Honda Performance Development, and The Spaceship Company, owned by Virgin Galactic’s Richard Branson. Each graduate spent 15 minutes interviewing with each employer, with follow-up interviews scheduled based on the initial meetings. New Fast Track classes start throughout the year. Admission is based on application, and enrollment fees are waived for unemployed students. For more information, visit www.canyonsecondev.org/business-units/fti

ore than 100 aspiring and current educators attended the Education Leadership Conference at College of the Canyons on May 13. Organized by the college’s Teacher Preparation Pipeline Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM) and Career Technical Education (CTE) programs, the event attracted students from nearly every high school in the Santa Clarita Valley, along with aspiring teachers from the student ranks at College of the Canyons, California State University Northridge, University of La Verne, Fullerton and Cypress Community College. Also in attendance were faculty members from COC and the William S. Hart Union High School District. With an event schedule that included 12 breakout sessions, a keynote address focused on 21st century education, and opportunities for students and community members to network with educational leaders, the goal of the event was to help students identify the career path and leadership opportunities most closely aligned with their professional goals, while generating excitement about the opportunities available to those looking to enter the field of education. “We currently have a teacher shortage across the state and people just don’t understand that,” said Renee Marshall, director of the Teacher Preparation Pipeline and chair of Early Childhood Education. According to a recent study by the California Department of Education, the state projects a need for 27,000 newly trained teachers every year for the next decade. “This is not just about teaching,” Marshall said. “It’s also about needing counselors, administrators, after-school personnel at the preschool, K-12 and college levels. “We’re experiencing a systematic shortage in many areas, especially in STEM/CTE fields,” she added. To help combat this problem, COC and the Hart district have partnered to develop curriculum and program requirements for a new education career pathway designed to streamline the training process for students interested in becoming educators.

has provided. “Before joining the speech team I had made plenty of bad decisions and was on the way to making plenty more,” said first-year competitor Diego Ortega, who brought home a gold medal in Informative Speaking. “This team saved my life. But I see us as more than a team, we’re a family.” “When I first joined this team, I knew that I would definitely improve as a performer,” said first-year competitor Jacob Johnson, who won gold in the Prose Interpretation event. “What I did not know is that I would become a better student, networker, and corporate asset. Being on the speech team has taught me lessons that I will be able utilize all throughout my life.” “Auditioning for the speech team was one of the best decisions I have ever made,” said first-year competitor Valeria Lopez. “I’ve learned to be confident in myself and gained skills that I otherwise wouldn’t have fostered.” Earlier this semester, the Speech Team placed second at the California Community College Forensics Association State Tournament, bringing home 11 individual medals. “This season has been amazing,” said Leach. “But what makes it that much more rewarding is watching these competitors support their teammates.”


7

COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS BREAKING NEWS • SPRING 2016

MODEL UN TEAM HONORED AT UCLA CONFERENCE

T

he College of the Canyons Model United Nations Team attended a conference hosted by UCLA April 14 to 17, and came home as one of four colleges to be honored at the event, joining prestigious four-year institutions such as USC, Stanford and UC Berkeley. Model United Nations is a fast-paced political strategy competition that places an emphasis on diplomacy and interactive

problem-solving. Through courses and competitions offered by the college’s Political Science Department, students conduct research on relevant global issues, enhance their public speaking skills, and work to comprehend the essential goals of conflict resolution, all while simulating the work of the United Nations and its agencies. For the second time in the last four years, COC was awarded the Outstanding

Large Delegation Award. In addition, eight team members won individual awards: • Best Delegate – Clark Wintle • Outstanding Delegation – Sergio Partida and Raina Iqbal • Honorable Mention – Jonathan Flores, Jack Schulze and Tim Smith • Verbal Commendation – Younus Al-Bojermi and Dana Levine With several of the team’s veteran par-

ticipants slated to graduate at semester’s end, the team is already scouting for new talent. “If any students out there like being challenged – both personally and academically – please consider being part of the COC Model United Nations experience,” said Phil Gussin, team advisor and political science professor. For more information, contact Gussin at phil.gussin@canyons.edu.

COLLEGE NAMED ORGANIZATION OF THE YEAR

FOCUS ON STUDENTS

C

A SELECT GROUP OF COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS PHOTOGRAPHY STUDENTS HAD THEIR IMAGES ON DISPLAY IN THE LOBBY OF THE GETTY MUSEUM FOR COLLEGE NIGHT ON APRIL 4. THE COLLECTION OF UNIQUE IMAGES THAT WERE DISPLAYED WERE CREATED SPECIFICALLY FOR THE EVENT, WHICH GREW OUT OF A GETTY MASTER CLASS. COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS WAS ONE OF ONLY FOUR COLLEGES INVITED TO PARTICIPATE IN THE EXHIBITION. IT WAS THE SECOND YEAR IN A ROW THE COLLEGE WAS SO HONORED. STUDENTS WHO PARTICIPATED WERE ANDREA FLEMING, STEVEN BRENTNALL, SALVATORE CORCIONE, SUSAN TURNER, TAYLOR SIETSEMA, NORMA NAVA AND LEE OSCAR GOMEZ. FACULTY ADVISOR IS LEE WHITE.

HONOR SOCIETY ACHIEVES SUCCESS

T

he College of the Canyons Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) International Honor Society has had an impressive spring semester, with three students named to the 2016 All-California Academic Team, three students invited to present at the prestigious Honors Transfer Council of California (HTCC) Research Conference. In addition, COC’s Alpha Nu Xi chapter has been named one of PTK’s Top 100 Chapters in the world. Phi Theta Kappa students Elise Levy, George Park and Enrique Ybarra were honored for their academic and extracurricular activities during the All-California Academic Team Awards Luncheon in Sacramento in March. PTK hosts Academic Team ceremonies in 38 participating states, with honorees from each state also nominated for inclusion on the All-USA Community College Academic Team. The students’ scores in the national competition generally determine ranking on the All-State Community College Academic Teams. For the first time in college history, COC was represented at

the annual Honors Transfer Council of California Research Conference with three student presenters. The HTCC Research Conference is an organization of community colleges that negotiates transfer partnerships with colleges and universities. Each year the organization invites honor students from across the state to present their honor projects. Honor students Savannah Macias, Anthony Tashjian and Lisa Tenorio were selected to deliver 12-minute presentations. Macias, a biology major, presented on “Elders Behind the Controller: The New Generation of Gamers,” focusing on how video gaming can improve brain function in elderly people. Tashjian spoke on the topic of “Ethnocentrism, Aptitude, and Tolerance: A Marriage of Unequals,” a topic spawned from a recent debate in his political science debate. And Tenorio, also a biology major, delivered the presentation “The Biological Underpinnings of a Singing Teacher’s Curriculum is Vital to a Student’s Vocal Health and Technique.”

ollege of the Canyons has been named the Community Organization of the Year by the Boy Scouts of America Western Los Angeles County Council (WLACC). The award was presented during the annual Bill Hart District Recognition Dinner on March 3. The theme was “STEM Trek … The Next Generation in Scouting.” Faculty members Tim Baber, chair of the Welding Technology Department, and Regina Blasberg, chair of the Engineering Technologies Department, were both presented with awards. Ron McFarland, dean of the School of Applied Technologies, was also in attendance. The annual recognition dinner honors volunteer leaders from throughout the community for their efforts in supporting scouting. Baber and Blasberg were recognized as part of the Boy Scouts of America’s NOVA program, which incorporates learning with hands-on activities while introducing elements of science, technology, engineering and mathematics for Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, and Venturers. The hope is that the NOVA program will stimulate scouts’ interest in STEM-related fields and show how science, technology, engineering and mathematics apply to everyday living and the world around them. College of the Canyons has routinely hosted scout groups from across the Santa Clarita Valley for on-campus merit badge events. Welding faculty members regularly host Welding Merit Badge events designed to introduce participating scouts to the world of welding, with college partner Lincoln Electric also stepping in to help provide access to the tools, equipment, materials and training needed for scouts to earn their merit badges. “It has been remarkable to see local scouts experience welding for the first time,” said Baber. “We have even had some of the scouts from our first merit badge return to campus years later as COC welding students. In December, faculty members from the college’s Land Surveying Department hosted a similar experience for scouts looking to obtain their Surveying Merit Badge. The event was so popular that a followup event has been scheduled for later this semester.

COLLEGE RECEIVES SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS’ AWARD

T

he Santa Clarita Valley Association of California School Administrators (ACSA) has named College of the Canyons its Golden Apple Award honoree for the 2015-16 academic year. The Golden Apple Award is presented annually to a single person, company, organization or institution that works to collectively support the SCV’s local elementary and high school districts. College of the Canyons was recognized for a wide range of educational support, outreach and volunteer programs that serve students and the community. “The Santa Clarita Valley ACSA has selected an outstanding honoree that goes above and beyond to assist our schools and help them to be the wonderful institutions that they are,” Eran Zeevi, president of the SCV ACSA, said during the award presentation. “I would like to thank, on behalf of the Santa Clarita Valley, a special organization who has impacted all

SCIENCE FROM PAGE 5

part of a 2014 West Ranch High School team that originally launched the experiment. However, that group’s success was thwarted by a crash landing that compromised the collected materials.

schools and districts in so many positive ways.” College of the Canyons Chancellor Dr. Dianne G. Van Hook said the award recognizes a college-wide commitment to partnerships. “We’re honored by this award, which was made possible by the creativity and collaborative spirit of so many different people at College of the Canyons,” she said. “Our faculty, staff and administrators recognize that if we are willing to work together, we can accomplish more for Santa Clarita students than by working as individuals.” Among college initiatives highlighted were: The continued opportunity for high school students to concurrently enroll in tuition-free college courses. The wide variety of college preparedness services and workshops available to high school students and their families, including the assignment of a “college and career coach” at each local high school campus.

After enrolling at COC and joining the A&P club, Tikhomirov was informed of the new opportunity by his former West Ranch teacher, Christine Hirst, who joined COC as an adjunct instructor in fall 2015. Tikhomirov quickly pitched the project to fellow club members, and was met with encouragement and enthusiasm. “Hands-on opportunities like this are

The ongoing operation of the Santa Clarita Performing Arts Center’s K-12 Arts Education Outreach Program, which collaborates with local educators to develop arts education programs in K-12 classrooms. The presence of TEACH program student volunteers at elementary and high school classrooms throughout the community. The continued outreach efforts related to the college’s lineup of free ESL courses. The donation of funds and materials to further the development of STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) curriculum in elementary schools. “Today’s elementary, junior high, and high school students are tomorrow’s College of the Canyons students,” Dr. Van Hook said. “We’re committed to helping them succeed now, understand that college is possible, and inspire them to pursue their dreams. When they are ready for college, we will be ready for them.”

key to igniting student creativity within the realm of science, as well as inspiring our next generation of scientists,” said Ciardi. “I couldn’t be more proud of Daniel and all the students on the project team. It’s their idea. They’re driving the project and employing innovative thought processes along the way. My role is as a sounding board and an advocate. All the

credit belongs to the students.” Well before the estimated September launch, the project team will develop and test their prototype prior to submitting the final experiment to NASA, who will conduct their own pre-launch trials. Once the tests have been completed, the unit will be mounted and deployed aboard the space giant’s weather balloon.


COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS BREAKING NEWS • SPRING 2016

8

SIX INDUCTED INTO ALUMNI HALL OF FAME

T

he College of the Canyons Foundation inducted six people into the Alumni Hall of Fame during a ceremony and luncheon on April 22. The Alumni Hall of Fame was established to honor and recognize College of the Canyons alumni who have made outstanding professional achievements and served the surrounding community and/or college in a significant way. Each year the Alumni Hall of Fame also honors Outstanding Friends of the college who have supported COC in a significant way. The Rising Star Recent Alumni award is being introduced this year to recognize those individuals who have achieved significant professional success within 10 years of their graduation date. Inducted into the Alumni Hall of Fame’s 2016 class were: Dr. Rachael Ostrom Sachar,

Class of 2001 — Outstanding Alumna, DVM, CVA, Twin Oaks Equine Veterinary Services Nicholas A. Lentini, Class of 1989 – Outstanding Alumnus, Managing Partner, Lentini Insurance & Investments Jessica Maganda, Class of 2011 – Rising Star Recent Alumna, Critical Care Nurse, Glendale Adventist Medical Center Jonathan Gonzalez, Class of 2011 – Rising Star Recent Alumnus, News Reporter, 9News Denver Robert and Diane Benjamin – Outstanding Friends “Our distinguished alumni demonstrate the power of possibility that is inherent in the College of the Canyons experience,” said Chancellor Dr. Dianne G. Van Hook. “It is here that students unlock their potential and receive the education, training, and self confidence that prepare them for continued success.”

CHANCELLOR DR. DIANNE G. VAN HOOK SAID THIS YEAR’S INDUCTEES INTO THE COC ALUMNI HALL OF FAME DEMONSTRATE THE “POWER OF POSSIBILITY THAT IS INHERENT IN THE COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS EXPERIENCE.”

SOFTBALL TEAM EARNS SCHOLAR AWARD T

THE ENTIRE SOFTBALL TEAM POSTED A COMBINED GRADE POINT AVERAGE OF 3.24, EARNING THE TEAM THE SCHOLAR TEAM AWARD FROM THE CALIFORNIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. THE TEAM ENJOYED SUCCESS ON THE FIELD, TOO, POSTING A 28-12-1 RECORD EN ROUTE TO A SECOND-PLACE FINISH IN THE WESTERN STATE CONFERENCE. ONLY ONE TEAM IS SELECTED FOR THE STATEWIDE AWARD IN EACH SPORT.

he College of the Canyons softball team has been named the 2015 California Community College Athletic Association Scholar Team. The Scholar Team Award is the highest academic team achievement given annually by the CCCAA. It emphasizes the academic achievement of all members of one specific team. Only one team is selected for each sport, with a total of 22 men’s and women’s teams honored for the 2014-15 school year. To be eligible, all team members must have excelled academically with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. The team should also have demonstrated better than average accomplishments in intercollegiate athletic competition. The 2015 softball team posted a combined GPA of 3.24. On the field, the team finished with a record of 28-12-1 to place second in the Western State Conference Blue Division, while also earning a spot in the CCCAA Southern California Regional playoffs. Canyons concluded the 2015 season as the No. 10 ranked team in the state. “I’m extremely proud of the way this team represented themselves, both in the

classroom and on the field,” head coach John Wissmath said. “When we started looking at the grades from the fall and spring progress reports, I thought there might be a chance to see our girls honored with Scholar Team Award. To have received that achievement is outstanding.” The team also produced a number of impressive individual performances throughout the season. Eight players were named All-WSC, including catcher Lauren Anderson, who earned WSC Player of the Year honors. Shortstop Cheyenne Steward was named an All-SoCal selection. In addition, three members of the 2015 team continued their playing careers at four-year schools. Anderson is now attending Miami University (Ohio), pitcher Milana Casillas is at University of California, San Diego and infielder Kaitlyn Shreves attends Boise State University. All three players carried a GPA of 3.7 or higher. “The 2015 softball team featured great leadership from the top down,” said Albert Loaiza, athletics counselor. “Coach Wissmath and his staff have instilled an ‘academics first’ environment, and that paid off last year.

MEETING THE CHALLENGES OF A CHANGING WORLD...

TOGETHER!

The Chancellor’s Circle is a partnership between College of the Canyons and a diverse group of businesses, community members, non-profit groups, government leaders and others who are committed to strengthening our community – by actively supporting a strong community college. The underlying tenet of the Chancellor’s Circle is the strong belief that by working together we can add value to a community college education, provide support for creative and innovative programs that enrich the educational experience of students, and provide needed workforce skills that will strengthen and sustain our economy – that we can achieve, by working together, much more than we can by working alone.

Please consider joining us! • Call the College of the Canyons Foundation at (661) 362-3435 • Visit canyonsfoundation.org

CHAMPION

LIFETIME MEMBERS

Bradley J. Kirst D.D.S.

Harold and Jacquie Petersen

Honda Performance Development

Lou and Rita Garasi

Crosscountry Mortgage

Montemayor & Associates at Re/Max – Alicia E.

Tom and Colleen Lee

Gary and Diana Cusu​mano

Newhall Escrow – Steve Corn

Joe and Kathy Klocko

Schools First FCU

Aero Engineering

ADVOCATE

Math Support Services

Shepard Insurance Agency

Boston Scientific - Lisa Welker-Finney

American Family Funding

Jim and Jill Mellady

Dr. and Dr. Lee Shulman

Elliott and Judith Wolfe Family Trust

Aerospace Dynamics International

Mitzi and Randy Moberg

Dr. Dianne and Mr. Roger Van Hook

Dr. Skip Newhall

Wells Fargo

NE Systems, Inc. – Ed Padilla

Dennis Witzel & Sheila Chovan

LEADER

Dr. Jerry L. Buckley

Breaking News, Spring 2016  
Breaking News, Spring 2016