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JUN E . 2 0 1 0

INSPIRATION for the

CURIOUS MIND No . 0 3

S PEC I AL R EP O R T

“Quote” ... MORE SMALL TALK Stepping into the world of

‘A glimpse into her style’

GENERATION-Y


I N S I DE THIS ISSUE OF SCOOP

FORWARD

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FROM THE PLANNERS’ CORNER

• We Are Going Global • Editor’s Note • Contributors SP E CIA L R E P O R T

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Appearances Matter: Points of View from Around the World

A GL I M PS E I NT O H E R S T YL E

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STORIES FROM AROUND THE WORLD

Stories from Argentina, India, Spain, Lebanon, China, U.S, and Germany SMALL-TALK

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REMARKABLE ‘QUOTES’

C UR IO U S T ID- B IT S

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Stepping into the world of Generation-Y

June 2010


No. 03


COLLECTING

ST OR I ES

F RO M DIF F E RE NT CO RNE RS O F T H E W O RLD

RUSSIA US Venez uela

U.K GERMANY POLAND

FR AN C E S PA IN

HUNGARY TURKEY

MO R OCCO

LEBANON

A LG E R IA ARGE N TI N A S O UT H A F R ICA

C HINA INDIA

Contributors Ana Leber / Angie Ma / Coco Videla / Dominika Blachnicka Esra Ilgin / Hadi Zabad / Helen Chapman / Julia Hoetzel / Julie Dombreval Maria del Mar Muns / Nils Diezemann / Pride Mkhwanazi / Sophie Robbins Vipasha Shah / Wanda Pogue


FOR WARD

FROM THE PLANNERS’ CORNER

FROM THE

PLANNERS’ CORNER We are going GLOBAL! About a year ago, we introduced our CEEMEA partners to the first ever issue of Scoop, a collection of real life stories, quotes, anecdotes, and interesting tidbits into the lives of women in the region. The hope was that Scoop would keep us in touch with the everyday lives of women and ultimately help inform, inspire and infuse better ideas. And it has! Thanks to our wonderful editor and planners Coco, Dominika and Hadi, Scoop has become an endless source and stream of inspiration. So much so, that we wanted all the regions to reap its benefits. So welcome to our first global issue, as like in previous issues, the pages here are filled with wonderful stories and observations. This issue is dedicated to the importance of appearances, clothes, and why our clean can matter.   We hope that the snapshots and insights in this issue and those to come will serve as inspiration for how Ariel and Tide can fit into people’s lives, seamless and wholeheartedly and for how we can take the steps to building a true LOVEMARK everywhere. Remember.... “The one who hears me, loves me”. Lacan and “The first duty of love is to listen”. Paul Tillich Hear her words.

Wanda Pogue, Global Planning Director. It’s been said that what’s good for the shell is good for the soul. We concur: Appearances DO matter. The way we look influences the way we feel, the way we carry ourselves, and how we present ourselves to the world. This fact remains true no matter where we come from. So what better way to kick off our first global issue of Scoop? In collaboration with Ariel planners from all regions, we bring you the latest on appearances. From the country that brought us Yoga and a philosophy of introspection, we hear that in India it’s all about the package these days. In China, fashionistas are changing the face of a booming industry. The Smarteez are inspiring South Africans with outlandish creations. The French seek allure. The Brits avoid sticking out. The Spanish keep up with the times, and the Lebanese are stepping in the glam lane. This issue’s “Glimpses” is filled with stories about personal style, and our “Curious Tidbits” come from the everinnovative, never-boring GEN Y. Enjoy the ride!

Coco Videla, SCOOP Editor.

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SPECIAL REPOR T

POINTS OF VIEW FROM AROUND THE WORLD

If you are what you wear, you better dress the part you want. More than ever, people want to look presentable and feel good about themselves. Clean clothes are integral to a good appearance and to a positive self-expression. They give a sense of readiness, pride, confidence and certainty. They allow us to fit in, or to stand out. To seduce with a first impression or leave a lasting one. They are a way to show that we have our priorities in the right place. Far from being superficial, appearance is essential to who we really are. This collection of articles explores the role of appearances in different parts of the world, showing us the many ways we can help improve the appearances that matter. Because at the end of the day, keeping clothes clean and looking their best is what helps keep our appearance intact.

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INDIA I t ’ s all about the P A C K A G E I met Kusum just before her concert. She was dressed in a simple salwar kurta, shoes that neither matched her clothes or her bag. She oozed confidence from having rehearsed well, being in the right mood and having a good audience. What didn’t seem to matter much was how she looked, what she wore. Like every other Indian her age (45+ yrs) she was brought on the Gandhian principle of ‘simple living and high thinking’. But the generation after her is realizing that talent or intelligence alone is not enough. In today’s India the way things are packaged and presented have gained as much importance if not more than the real stuff, the content. When purchasing a bed sheet, it seems more important to match it to the colour of the wall and curtains rather than buying the right fabric count. So what if a mobile phone lasts only 6 months, it should look stylish, have the latest features. There is a definite mindset shift towards what you see on the outside since that can help you win half the battle. Same rules apply to people. Kusum’s daughter, participating in Indian Idol sums up the role of appearance for today’s youth, “it’s not just about the talent anymore, but how the talent is presented. You can be the best, but if you don’t look presentable, you are out.”


CHINA C ra z y A bout C lothes Say ‘Ni Hao’ (hello) to a new breed of fashionistas and trend followers in China. Unlike their parents, these women grew up in an era of globalization, super malls and online shopping. The influx of mid-tier brands has meant sophisticated style and improved appearances has become more accessible to women everywhere. Pan Jie, a 22-year-old shopaholic from Shanghai has taken notice of the change, ‘In three years the thing that has most changed in Shanghai is that there are many more beautiful looking women, as affordable fashion brands like Zara and H&M have arrived.’ But window-shopping is not enough for these clothes crazy ladies. They are also flocking to virtual stores to feed their addiction. According to “Chinese Apparel Brands and Online Apparel Shopping Study 2009” conducted by ChinaIntelliConsulting, apparel is the most popular online shopping category in China. About half of the online shoppers are aged 23 to 32, and they are

the

most

the population.

appearance-conscious

section

of


FRANCE CHASING AFTER ALLURE French women have the fortunate gift of making just about any trend look and feel timeless: a bright orange dress, a fabulous head scarf, a ride on the city bike. Their style is classic without being predictable. Provocative, but never vulgar. Very put together while seemingly effortless. The iconic ‘French look’ is not limited to the world’s most famous catwalks. For French ladies appearances matter because it enables their personality to come through. ‘Appearance is about matching my soul with my body’ described Francois a painter and mother of two adolescent daughters. Clothes are important because they help express individuality. It’s not about following the latest trends blindly; it’s about owning the look by adding a personal touch- the little details that help you look ‘you’. Above all, no matter how much time and effort it takes, the look must have the “effortless” effect. Looking naturally chic, with a sprinkle of originality is what gives French women their allure.


U.K ABOVE ALL, NOT LOOKING ODD Britain remains very social and class conscious when it comes to style and appearance. The ‘right’ clothes send the right message about their attitudes, values, heritage and class. Unlike the French, Brits want to show they have made an effort to look the way they do. That’s why looking clean, well presented and put together matters a great deal, whether you are a young teen blindly following the latest trends, a busy mum sporting her comfy and practical mum uniform. Blending in is another must for the British. They need to feel relevant in every situation. During the recession, while people were losing jobs left and right, keeping up with appearances brought a sense of normalcy to the newly unemployed like Corine and her husband, “It was the smallest things like wearing a clean shirt everyday that made us feel like we were still part of society- that we weren’t being left behind despite our circumstances and that eventually, everything would be ok.”


SPAIN C ontemporary C haracters The effortless mix and match of patterns, flowers, polka dots, stripes and beautiful, bold colors makes people-watching on the streets of Madrid anything but boring. These are not just people walking down the street. They are characters you want to meet. But today’s characters are practical and contemporary. They don’t have the time (nor the patience) of their mothers and grandmothers who would wake up 3 hours earlier to do their hair or spend endless hours creating the perfect look. No, these are women who create their vivacious styles with easy to wear clothes that are versatile and fashionable at the same time. What matters most to Spanish women is the ability to push aside outdated conventions while keeping their Spanish flair.


POLAND BEHIND THE GREY The time of communism in Poland and other countries of Eastern Europe is connected with times of grey – because everything was owned by the state and the state had no money, everything remained poor and… grey. Streets were grey, buildings were grey, life was grey with limited opportunities for a better future. But when you look back at the photos from the past you notice that in this world of greyness women wore amazing clothes - chic, bright and modern. Of course they weren’t coming from shops - there were no clothes like that in communist shops. It was all about doing something out of nothing. Second hand clothes that were coming in parcels from relatives from the West would be repurposed and adapted. There was also loads of sewing going on based on styles and cuts spotted in fashion magazines (smuggled from the west). The art of mending was flourishing. In these times where political freedom was taken away from people, clothes and clothing styles were important because they were a symbol of resistance. They expressed personal freedom, a yearning for diversity and a desire to be different.


SOUTH AFRICA B irth of the S martee z We met up with Kepi, Floyd, Thabo and Sibu, the “God Fathers” of South Africa’s thriving urban movement, The Smarteez. The appointment was set for 12:00 noon on Sunday but these guys are fashionably late. They arrive dressed in very extroverted outfits and outrageous hairstyles. The one guy reminds us of Kanye West and we make mention of this to him. “No, you mean Kanye West looks like me. We are the trend and not the other way around.” This quickly sets the tone of the afternoon. The young men tell us about the magazines and reality shows that are lining up to interview them. Sibu, who you would easily notice from a mile off, speaks to us in his purple top, plastic purple chain, eccentric hairstyle and don’t forget, the cork protruding out of his Zulu pierced ear hole. Sibu is definitely the loudest, “We were the first guys to wear skinny jeans, floral shirts and bow ties. And now the world has followed suit. The world has become so boring and everyone copy cats and steals everything that is fresh and authentic. Nothing is original anymore. I am looking for fresh ideas and new ways of doing things.” Like him, the other guys in the group agree that in a world that is saturated with unoriginality and uncreativity there is so much room for imagination and freedom. “It’s quite a simple answer, fashion is passion.” They take their looks and styles from none other than the streets of Soweto where colour and vibrancy can be seen in every nook and cranny, but these guys have taken it to the next level, with an outcome of a new and interesting look. “We are not about the way we dress but we are about a different mindset. If people would just get out of their boxes then they would see that conformity adds no originality and creativity to a world that needs solutions.” Having spent time with them, one would have to agree that these young minds are a new breed of intellect and aspiration. They are not scared to be all they can imagine to be. If anything, they are daring the rest of the world they operate in to follow suit. They are instilling a new sense of freedom, liberation and inspiration for every South African with a dream.


LEBANON M iss G uided H ow to S tep into the L ebanese G lam L ane Glamour and Lebanon have gone together since long before the 15-year civil war that devastated most of the country. In fact, if Beirut is known for anything - other than civil war and political instability – it is for glamorous women. The capital city was the Paris of the Middle East, admired for its rich cultural heritage and liberal mindset. And while many Lebanese remain nostalgic for those days, the current generation is pushing forward in its appreciation of fashion and beauty. Today, Lebanon’s women continue to represent the epitome of femininity, sophistication and glamour in the region. “Welcome to the delicious, divine and often bewildering world of Lebanese women, where primping is a 24-hour affair, partying a raison d’etre and designer bags reign supreme…” It is with these words that Anissa Rafeh – the Lebanese author of “Miss Guided: How to Step into the Lebanese Glam Lane” – welcomes you to her Facebook page of the same title. Her book and accompanying Facebook group serve as a frothy and dependable companion for Lebanese ladies looking to keep it glam while thriving in the Beirut Jungle. But the book is not all about beauty routines. It also provides advice for life, like comebacks to a comment such as “ablik”

at

weddings (loosely translated as

“hopefully, it will be your turn soon”) and wise grandmother remedies for common ailments. In some ways Rafeh’s book stands as a testament to post-civil war Lebanistas, living in a world where small things do matter, especially when it comes to appearances. She admits, “A well-rounded Lebanese woman with a successful career, who still manages to look good in the process, is the kind of stereotype I would like.”


A glimpse into her life (done)

GLIMPSE

GLIMPSE INTO HER STYLE

From the most conservative to the most experimental, style is a mode of expression. These personal stories are evidence INTO HER STYLE that our choice of clothes dictates how we walk the talk, and in the best of cases, helps us dress the part we want.

From the most conservative to the most experimental, style is a mode of expression. These personal stories are evidence that our choice of clothes dictates how we walk the talk, and in the best of cases, helps us dress the part we want.


Ar ge n t i n a

SABRIN A F RO M U G LY B E T T Y TO S EX S Y M B O L

Growing up my mom put me through catholic school so I could be formed in what she called the “correct” way. Because of this I had a very traditional look for a long time and without me even realizing it, I came across a little old-fashioned. I grew up and went through experiences that revealed my essence as a woman. As my true self surfaced, my appearance was transformed. The turning point came at 19 when I started working as an assistant for Calvin Klein’s top management. Everything was perfect- like something out of “The Devil Wears Prada” (minus the über-bitch boss). It was my own declaration of independence; I discovered what I wanted to be and how I wanted to be! When I found out I got the job I went out shopping for a new wardrobe that matched my newfound essence. In that moment the world was at my feet. I went from being “Ugly Betty” to feeling like a “Sex Symbol”.


US

MARCO Pu rsuit of Perso nal S tyle

Describe my style? Hmmmm, I’m wearing a buttoned down collared t-shirt and not-so-baggy pants, but I wouldn’t say this is my style. I guess I haven’t really found it. How about that? I’m in my mid 30s and I still haven’t found a way to express who I am by the threads I wear. It’s not as easy for a guy, you know. For girls, it’s like a past time. In the movies they’re always showing montages of women smiling, shopping, goofing off as they try on outfit after outfit. But guys? We don’t do that stuff. Or at least I don’t. I should tell my girlfriend. We really DO need to find me a style’”


I NDIA

KUSUM A N O U T F I T F O R EV ERY RO LE

When my husband got posted to Kerala, I chose to stay back in Chennai to ensure that my son completes his education here without any hindrance. Today I am the homemaker, the plumber, the teacher and a father to my son. I am a bit like Jhansi ki Raani who fights all her battles herself, always coming out a winner. My mantra – the way I dress plays a big role. When I go to the bank, I ensure I dress well so people perceive me to be intelligent and have often been asked to skip the queue. When I am out with my son for a picnic, I wear my jeans and t-shirt. You know, he often tells me that when I wear those jeans, I am like his friend and not a mother. It’s the black saree that comes to my rescue when my husband comes to visit us. It works its charm on him always


S PAIN

MARIS A T H E G O O D B U S I N ES S WO M A N

I’m a businesswoman and I’m fierce at what I do. By day I look after other people’s investments. At home, I look after my own. For example, my wardrobe isn’t huge but I invest above all in quality essentials: a perfect white blouse, a good pair of versatile jeans, a classic pencil skirt, a beautiful, multipurpose scarf. Well-made basics feel beautiful against the skin and drape over the figure gracefully. Don’t tell me a plainwhite t-shirt by Helmut Lang doesn’t make you look and feel like a million dollars? Now that’s what I call a sweet deal.


L EBANON

ANISS A D r essed fo r the F i r st M ove

It may sound easy enough, but nailing the right outfit when making the first move is incredibly difficult. It needs to be so subtle that the guy doesn’t even know what you’re up to. It’s really quite a feat. Your clothes need to send a message that basically says, ‘Hey, I’d like you to be at my dinner, but don’t let it go to your head that I’m interested in you, but at the same time, here is a big hint that I like you, just in case you weren’t sure and haven’t made a move yet because you were afraid I was going to reject you.’


C HINA

SNOW M A S H - U P I S M Y S T Y LE

I’m happy watching anything from Chinese dramas and Taiwanese soap operas to Gossip Girl and Prison Break. You see, I’m part of a new breed of Chinese women who grew up with Japanese cartoons, Oasis, Beyonce, Korean fashion and Starbucks while our parents and grandparents diligently instilled their traditions and teachings. When it comes to my interests, my convictions and my style I have a pick and mix approach to help me navigate and be my own person in a crowd of 1.3 million.


US

CHRISTIE U N I Q U ELY S I M I L A R

I live in a unique neighborhood. Square sunglasses that span three quarters of a face, fedora hats with trimmed feathers atop, lumberjack plaid shirts with no trees to chop in site – this is the unique uniform that populates my neighborhood. As I sit watching the sidewalk runway, it’s clear that each individual who saunters sideways is wearing a carefully calculated, “thrown together by chance” outfit, hoping to express visually to the common passersby that they are not part of mainstream society. The too-tight tee’s, the stripped slim jeans, and the holey lace-ups all serve a purpose in expressing their counter-culture beliefs reinforcing that they are each unique and original. The funny thing is, when you look around my neighborhood swimming with stylized individuals trying to stand out—no one really succeeds, they all just become part of the crowd.


G ERMANY

PETRA T H E W EEKEN D B ELLE

From Monday to Thursday you could call me a plain Jane. My days are filled with cleaning and cooking and my dog Vincent. So naturally, when I get dressed, I’m only thinking about comfort. But as soon as Friday arrives, the woman in me is ready to come out and play. I transform from ‘just Petra’ to ‘sexy, flirty, elegant, beautiful Petra.’ Luckily, that’s also when my husbands around so we both get a kick out of it.


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SMALL TALK

REMARKABLE QUOTES

SMALL TALK

WHEN YOU DRESS, YOU DRESS YOUR SOUL. IF IT MAKES YOUR SOUL HAPPY, THEN IT’S RIGHT. AYANDA, South Africa

mighty mouth quotes You should not look different just for attention’s sake but rather because you really are different. MIKA, Germany

MY MOST RELIABLE MIRROR IS THE REACTION OF OTHERS. EKATERINA, Russia

If you ask a woman ‘What is the favorite thing in your closet?’ she’ll pull out her newest dress. If you ask a man, he’ll pull out some tattered old thing he’s had forever. That’s the big difference. TRACEY, US

We aren’t Westernized. We are international Chinese. RACHEL ZOU, China


SAATCHI & SAATCHI

JUNE 2010

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Of course, on the day I chose to dress down for my blind date, the guy I was meeting with had to be damn cute! I cursed myself for not attending to my lashes and could hear Victoria’s Secret in my head saying, ‘I told you so!’ ANISSA, Lebanese blogger

BEAUTY IS ABOUT FINDING ONE DETAIL IN YOUR OVERALL APPEARANCE THAT WILL CONVEY YOUR INNER BEAUTY. He Ling Ping, China

I’m not 30…I’m 18 with 12 years of experience. A FRIEND’S Facebook status on her 30th birthday. When you live in France you grow up with the sense that people are watching you so you have to pay attention to your look, even if at the end of the day it looks effortless!

SEVAN, France

IN LATIN AMERICA WOMEN SWEAR BY THE MOTTO ‘BETTER DEAD THAN PLAIN.’ WHY ELSE WOULD ANYONE THINK OF WEARING HEELS TO WALK AROUND MACHU PICHU? CRISTINA, Venezuela


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LAUNDRY WISDOM

CUR IOU S TIDB ITS -

CURIOUS TIDBITS

Stepping into the world of Generation Y. ‘Ke Ai’

A common phrase you’ll hear in China is ‘Ke Ai’ which means cute. Young girls and women love taking ‘Ke Ai’ photos of themselves and each other. Posting them on their social networking sites QQ, Ren Ren, KaiQin or their own blogs. This picture was taken Lei Mei’s own LG smartphone.

Gen Jeans

It’s blue for bottoms. The one visual symbolic of Gen Y in India. And everyone

East London, UK

Young Brits can be amazingly creative when it comes to way they dress. An interesting example is East London, where the styles are a mixture of creative transformation of current trends and where playing with looks and having fun with style are obligatory. The East London ‘look’ has also become a way of life – they are uber aware about their looks, a bit rebellious and courageous about tasting new things. Here, the way you look screams with freedom of self-expression and celebration of diversity.

is wearing them. They have all kinds of them in their wardrobe and all types – blue jeans, black jeans, studded jeans, torn jeans, jeans with patch pockets, acid wash, stone wash... full length, capris, shorts…jeans, jeans, jeans. A pair of jeans has become the new symbol of having arrived in modernity, of being that of a different generation. A style statement announcing who you are.


SAATCHI & SAATCHI

JUNE, 2010

SOCK THIS

Leave it to Gen Y to ruffle the feathers of French classic style. Right around 3 or 4 when school is out, high school students flock to their favorite hangouts…metro stations, McDonalds, park benches. You can tell the “tribes” apart by the accessory that stands out. For some it’s the converse shoes, for others it’s the layered teas. Lately, there has been quite a lot of sock girls or shall we say sockettes? They hang in groups of 5 or 6, often sitting smack in the middle of the metro stairs and rocking all kinds of different knee-length styles. These sockettes are definitely putting a refreshing spin on the catholic schoolgirl image!

Vintage Is the New Classic

Gen Y’s love of all things vintage is not necessarily just a fad. In the ever-changing world, ‘trendy’ things are in and out before you know it and you constantly have to spend more and more money on having the latest Thing – unless, of course, you purposefully don’t have the Latest thing, but something from yesteryear.

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This magasine was printed on recycled paper.

Appearances Matter  

It’s been said that what’s good for the shell is good for the soul. We concur: Appearances DO matter. The way we look influences the way we...