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PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID ENCINITAS, CA 92024 PERMIT NO. 94

THE COAST NEWS

MAKING WAVES IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD

VOL. 27, NO. 3

Gun sales booming due to fear of bans By Rachel Stine

COAST CITIES — After a devastating mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementar y School in Connecticut last month, state and feder al politicians have introduced an array of legislation to r estrict the manufacturing and sales of guns. As a result, gun sales have exploded for local firearms stores as people rush to buy guns in case greater restrictions are passed into law. “I’ve got customers coming in dr oves,” said Shawn Stahl, the sales manager of Direct Action Solutions, a firearms store in Solana Beach. “They’re buying it now in case they are not able to do Direct Action Solutions’ sales manager Shawn Stahl stands next to a shelf that was once packed with ammunition in the Solana Beach firearms store. With the recently proposed gun bans in light of a school shooting, so in a year. store and other local firearms dealers have had difficulty maintaining stock to meet the high demands for “The shooting itself has this products that may soon be banned. Photo by Rachel Stine nothing to do with people buying the guns, ” Stahl explained. “The shooting als and 23 executive actions banning background checks for gun purchases, forced our administration to look into and limiting the manufacturing and pur- and stricter gun trafficking laws. restricting guns. The restrictions that chasing of firearms in response to the California currently has some of the they intend on imposing now are what’s public outcry after the Connecticut strictest firearm sales and purchasing forcing the gun buying spree.” school shooting. Obama’s proposals regulations in the country, and some On Wednesday, President Barack include a ban on assault weapons, limits TURN TO GUNS ON A16 Obama put forth four legislative propos- on high-capacity magazines, expanded

Issuing of new permits not on city’s menu By Bianca Kaplanek

DEL MAR — It will be at least another 45 days — and likely longer — before any new food trucks can get cooking in Del Mar. City Council unanimously agreed at the Jan. 14 meeting to again temporarily disallow the issuance of any new permits for the mobile businesses while staff continues to study potential regulations. Food truck operators who already have business licenses have until Jan. 31 to renew them. As of Jan. 16, three of the nine had done so, Planning Director Kathy Garcia said. The original moratorium

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was adopted Nov. 19 following resident concerns about public safety after the Wednesday night food truck gatherings began in October in the parking lot at 1601 Coast Blvd., across from Powerhouse Community Center. While area restaurant owners also said they didn’t support the e vent because they feared a drop in business, state law precludes cities from banning the trucks because they may add competition to bric k-and-mortar Area residents check out a food truck gathering in November in the parking lot on Coast Boulevard in Del Mar. Council members halted the establishments. “You can’t outright ban it issuance of any new permits until an ordinance is created to regulate the trucks. A second 45-day moratorium was adopted at the Jan. 14 meeting. Photo by Bianca Kaplanek

Two Sections, 40 pages

BREAKING THE MOLD San Diego artist Michael Carini overcomes adversity, and makes giving back to the community one of his top priorities. A13

Arts & Entertainment . A13 Food & Wine . . . . . . . . A10 Legals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A17 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A4 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A15

WELLNESS WEEK January 19-26, 2013

Report: San Diegans drive more than those in L.A. By Jared Whitlock

COAST CITIES — L os Angeles might ha ve more traffic, but San Diego takes the cake for most miles driven. That’s according to a new report measuring San Diego’s quality of life. On average, San Diegans traveled 12.8 miles per day by car in 2011. It’s a slight decline from 2010’s total, but it’s still higher than L.A.’s average of 10.7 and San Francisco’s 7.7. “San Diego’s limited public transportation is a major factor in us being higher,” said Sarah Benson, communications director with Equinox Center, the nonprofit and nonpartisan group that pr oduced the report. Benson said that San Diegans use less public transportation than most cities, largely because w e have fewer options. L.A. is better connected b y subways, light-rail and shuttles, which data r eflects. More than 6 percent of residents in L.A. take public transit to work, compared with only 3 percent in San Diego, according to the report. Also, when stacked up against other major cities, San Diego’s public transit is concentrated in select spots. “Our public tr ansit doesn’t reach most parts of the county,” Benson said. “Residents that live far from work have to drive.” The drawbacks from a

greater number of hours on the road? More traffic congestion and e ventually an increase in fuel costs, the report states. And then there are issues like air and noise pollution as well as greenhouse gases. “We look at air quality in the report, which is negatively impacted b y more cars,” Benson said. “We have a lot of interrelated problems where solving one could help fix others.” But Benson believes carcentric attitudes are changing. Recently, she said that many residents and representatives have pushed back against San Diego’s dependence on fr eeways. Most notably, a judge last month ruled that SANDAG violated state law by failing to account for greenhouse gases and climate change in its long-term transportation plan. Rather than focus so much on infrastructure for cars, the judge ar gued SANDAG should place more emphasis on g reen transportation. Meanwhile, individual cities within the county are trying to dissuade residents from using their cars. The city of San Diego and the unincor porated areas clocked in the most miles traveled on their roads, according to the report. In North County , Oceanside had the highest TURN TO DRIVING ON A16

TURN TO PERMITS ON A16

HOW TO REACH US (760) 436-9737 Calendar: calendar@coastnewsgroup.com Community News: community@coastnewsgroup.com Letters to the Editor: letters@coastnewsgroup.com

Cars travel on Coast Highway 101 in Encinitas. On average, San Diegans drove 12.8 miles per day in 2011, even higher than those in Los Angeles. An Equinox Center study recommends more public transportation and bicycle ridership to bring this number down. Photo by Jared Whitlock

WELLNESS WEEK FESTIVAL

DOWNTOWN ENCINITAS MAINSTREET ASSOCIATION & Present

JAN. 18, 2013

FREE Classes - Exams Treatments + Exclusive Discounts Yoga Massage Acupuncture Personal Training Chiropractic & More

Saturday, January 19, 10am-4pm at the Encinitas Library Performances & Demos - Product Samples Health Screenings - Free Treatments Kids Activities - Raffle Drawings More info at www.encinitas101.com


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www.SDSeaCoast.com

THE COAST NEWS

JAN. 18, 2013

Celebrating 27 Years

Encinitas $3,295,000 Gated resort style estate, car collectors dream and more. MLS# 130001786

Cardiff $2,227,000 4.76 acres currently zoned for 1/2 acre lots. MLS# 120043856

Leucadia $1,895,000 One of a kind, over 30,000 sf on Batiquitos Lagoon. MLS# 120056046

Cardiff $1,749,000 Private gem sits on almost 1/3 acre with ocean view. MLS# 120060011

Cardiff $1,295,000 Craftsman/beach cottage in heart of walking district. MLS# 120060333

Encinitas $1,195,000 Downtown Encinitas living at its finest, great end unit. MLS# 130001677

Pacific Beach $1,099,000 Best ocean front penthouse, remodeled 2BR/2BA. MLS# 120013200

Solana Beach $900,000 Best location in St Francis Ct, beautiful single story. MLS# 120042073

Encinitas $899,000 Classic New England farm house on 1/2 acre. MLS# 130000583

Carlsbad $880,000 Custom with mature landscaping in Rancho La Costa. MLS# 120060307

Solana Beach $879,000 Premier location in St Francis Ct, great views, private. MLS# 120060592

Encinitas $875,000 Gorgeous Canyon views this 4BD/2.5BA pool home. MLS# 130001992

Solana Beach $845,000 Beach bungalow west of the 101 and 2 blocks from beach. MLS# 120055014

Carlsbad $825,000 Custom upgrades thruout this beautiful Summerwalk Home. MLS# 130000515

Carlsbad $799-825,000 Gorgeous home on quiet, private lot, bright and open. MLS# 130000713

Pacific Beach $749,950-755,000 Beautifully furnished beach condo with whitewater view. MLS# 120032830

Carlsbad $689,000 Beautiful move-in ready corner lot home, quiet location. MLS# 130000717

Carlsbad $655,000 Wonderfully remodeled home west of 5 fwy. MLS# 120051512

Carlsbad $616,000 Bressi Ranch beauty, dramatic soaring ceilings. MLS# 130001552

Solana Beach $609,900 Gorgeous beach town home in prime location. MLS# 120060564

Carlsbad $529-569,000 Elegant Aviara living in gated community Brindisi. MLS# 130000849

Carlsbad $459,000 Beautifully renovated and remodeled, 3BR/2BA. MLS# 120056069

San Marcos $430,000 Bright, sunny home across from pool and clubhouse. MLS# 120035515

Bonsall $421,000 Spectacular all around views with guest home. MLS# 130000953

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THE COAST NEWS

JAN. 18, 2013

The Encinitas City Council recently approved all of The Coastal Commission’s recommendations for the Cardiff Specific Plan. One of the changes: More space was set aside for a protected ocean view, marked by the white line, at the Cardiff Town Center. It’s against the rules to construct large buildings or walls near or within the white line. Photo courtesy of the City of Encinitas

Amendments to plan adopted By Jared Whitlock

ENCINITAS — The Cardiff Specific Plan is nearing the finish line. After reviewing the Cardiff Specific Plan in October, the Coastal Commission agreed to adopt it on the condition that Encinitas make changes related to public vie ws, off-street parking and potentiall y invasive plants. The Encinitas City Council approved all of the suggested modifications last week with little discussion. The Cardiff Specific Plan outlines future development for residents and the comm unity’s business district. The plan, nearly a decade in the making and often contentious, was approved by Council in 2010 and then submitted to the Coastal Commission in 2011.The Coastal Commission sent it bac k to Council with three requirements. First, the Coastal Commission said the city should dedicate mor e space for ocean vie ws. Under the Cardiff Plan, it’s against the rules to construct lar ge buildings or walls that could bloc k the view for 30 areas that over-

look the ocean. But upon the Coastal Commission’s recommendation, just two of those areas were quadrupled in siz e — parking lots at the Car diff Town Center and 7-Ele ven in Cardiff — to further pr otect coastal sights. Laurie Winter, associate planner with the city , noted that the par king lots are currently in compliance with the Costal Commission’s plan, but in the futur e some kinds of development are not allo wed in or near the areas. Second, the Coastal Commission said the Car diff Specific Plan w ould have led to less public par king being available near the coast. Most outdoor restaurants must provide a certain n umber of offsite parking spots, but the draft of the Car diff Specific Plan would have let some sidewalk and outdoor cafes count spots in the public-right-of-way toward this requirement. As such, restaurant goers could have potentially taken up spots intended f or beach access. In response to this concern, the Cardiff Specific Plan now includes language that spots in the public-right-of-way

don’t apply toward the n umber of parking spots sidewalk and outdoor restaurants must have. Third, based on issues raised, the Cardiff Specific Plan now forbids Catalina Cherry and Weeping Bottlebrush from being planted in the community. Both are “moderately invasive species” that could thr eaten the San Elijo Lagoon, according to Winter.And even if placed several miles a way, their seeds could be transported by wind, animals or runoff. “We’re not going to be removing any plants that ar e currently there,” Winter said. “This is a rule for new developments.” With the amendments being approved, the Cardiff Specific Plan will go bac k to the Coastal Commission, and then to Council for a final vote. Winter said it could go into effect in March. The Cardiff Specific Plan includes all the pr operties between San Elijo Avenue and the alley west of Manc hester Avenue, and from Mozart Avenue to the north and Orinda Drive to the south.

Ocean Knoll Elementary School in Encinitas is the latest to be hit by an unknown number of thieves apparently targeting technology such as laptops and tablets. After breaking into a classroom at the school, thieves didn’t find any gadgets to steal. Photo by Tony Cagala

Thieves targeting technology from North County coastal schools By Tony Cagala

SOLANA BEACH — Sheriff’s Deputies ar ound North County ha ve responded to a n umber of burglary alarm acti vation calls to schools in Encinitas and Solana Beac h in the past two months. The latest instance occurred at 11:50 p.m. Jan. 13, where an unkno wn number of thie ves broke into a classr oom at Ocean Knoll Elementary in Encinitas, but the thie ves didn’t find an y electronic devices to steal. “The CATCH team is working this from the more global investigative purposes,” said Jan Caldwell, the public aff airs director of the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department. CATCH is the

Computer and Technology Crime High Tech division, a multi-agency team that in part investigates crimes where technology is targeted. The team includes agencies as the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department, the Federal Bureau of In vestigation, County Police Departments and others. “They’re going out to the school and doing site surveys and talking with the principals,” she said. All four of the br eak ins was done in a similar manner and time: the thieves entered a classroom by breaking a window to enter the building and subsequently breaking the locks on ca binets containing the electr onics.

When deputies arri ved to investigate no suspects were found. Caldwell couldn’t say if more patrols around the schools would be put into effect at the appr oximate times of pr evious break ins, and didn’t want to discuss further details due to the ongoing natur e of the investigation. On Dec. 11 deputies responded to a br eak in at Solana Beach’s Skyline Elementary School where two dozen Apple laptop computers, estimated at $36,000 were stolen from a classroom. In late December tw o schools in Encinitas, Ada Harris Elementary and Cardiff Elementary were broken into by thieves targeting iPads.

City adopts resolution to stop gun shows By Bianca Kaplanek

DEL MAR — With the threat of a la wsuit and ar guments from people on both sides of the issue, the Del Mar City Council unanimousl y adopted a resolution at the Jan. 14 meeting ur ging the 22nd District Agricultural Association to not r enew its contract with Crossroads of the West, which produces several gun shows annually at the Del Mar Fairgrounds, and not include the city name in an y advertising associated with the events. Councilman Don Mosier said he and Councilwoman Lee Haydu co-sponsored the resolution in r esponse to a petition signed by more than 1,100 residents who oppose the shows. He described it as a “relatively timid” move that offer s “two modest improvements.” Five of the nine speak ers at the meeting w ere residents who support the resolution. “One component of the very complex problem of gun violence is easy access to guns and the Del Mar gun shows provide that easy access in our community,” resident Tom McGreal said. “Gun violence is a plague afflicting our country that continues to g row,” said Joel Holliday, whose wife prompted

the petition after posting a sign in front of their Del Mar house that read “Stop Del Mar Gun Show and Sale.” Holliday said the 22nd DAA, which governs the f airgrounds, “encourages the trafficking of mor e guns and … introduces the fascination with guns to a ne w cohort of y oung people.” “While most of the gun show attendees are fine responsible citizens, some of them are not,” he said. “They may be immature, emotionally unstable, disaffected or prone to violence. And our curr ent laws and enforcement resources are not able to sort out all of these gun buyers. “This action we’re requesting won’t make an immediate impact on the o verarching problem of gun violence in America, but it’s better than doing nothing,” he added. “We can do better than doing nothing.” The owner of a bod y armor business and v endor at the gun sho ws asked council members to r econsider adopting the resolution. “This affects e verybody here in the county ,” he said. “This is a hea vily regulated industry. … It’s not a wild-west situation. I just really want you guys to think about that before

you try and tak e away something that all of us are counting on as a way to make our living.” “I just ask that you be consistent. On the same day as the Crossroads of the West gun show there’s a wine-making show,” Solana Beach resident Paul Breed said, providing statistics on the number of people who die annually from alcoholrelated issues. “Just like prohibition didn’t work to stop alcohol deaths, restricting legal access to weapons only drives them underground,” Breed said. “If you’re going to be consistent about wanting to fight evil then kill the wine show.” The city also r eceived about a half doz en letters and emails, including one from an attorney, representing the National Rifle Association, claiming the r esolution is potentially violating the F irst Amendment. “Your ability to make findings consistent with what y ou think is the best for Del Mar is what you are allowed to do ,” City Attorney Lesley Devaney said. “The resolution that y ou have before you is doing nothing that overreaches your ability to require that nobody misrepresent information on a sign as it relates to Del Mar. “It does not pr eclude …

someone to use the name Del Mar because Del Mar’s name is not trademarked. You can’t do that,” she said. “What this resolution does do is sa y that nobody shall f alsely represent that the city of Del Mar is endorsing or otherwise putting on this gun sho w, which is fair. It’s a defensible action f or you to take. So in that regard I don’t believe there’s anything in the First Amendment that this violates.” “We have lots of gun owners who ar e very responsible individuals,” Mosier said. “But the idea that these gun sho ws only supply guns to owners who are responsible … is patentl y false. “Let’s show our displeasure with this gun show happening in Del Mar,” he added. At the r equest of Ma yor Terry Sinnott, a provision that the city does not belie ve the shows are consistent with the mission of the 22nd D AA will be added to the resolution. More than a dozen people spoke for and against the shows at the Jan. 8 fair board meeting during public comment time. Adam Day, fair board president, said he would discuss the issue at a future meeting if one of his colleagues ask ed that it be put on the agenda. None did.

Detectives release composite sketches of two suspects involved in a home invasion robbery in Rancho Santa Fe in December. Courtesy San Diego County Sheriff’s Department

Detectives seek suspects in Rancho Santa Fe home invasion RANCHO SANTA FE — Detectives from the Encinitas Sheriff's Station areasking for assistance from the public to identify two men w anted in connection with a home in vasion robbery in Rancho Santa Fe. On Dec. 20, 2012 between 12:15 p.m. and 12:30 p.m., two men entered a home in the 5000 block of El Mirlo, Rancho Santa Fe, where one of the suspects br andished a black gun (unkno wn type) and held the housek eeper at gunpoint during the r obbery. The housekeeper was not hurt. The men were driving a blue Hyundai Elantr a at the time of the r obbery that was later recovered by deputies.

One suspect is described as a white male adult, in his late 20s to ear ly 30s, 5 feet 7 inches to 5 feet 8 inc hes tall, weighting 150 to 160 pounds. He has a long, narrow thin face, thin nose, gaunt face, tan complexion and shoulder length straight blond hair. The second suspect is described as a white male adult, also in his late 20s to early 30s, approximately 6 feet tall, 180 pounds, with a tan complexion, and black and grey short wavy to curly hair. Crime Stoppers is offering up to a $1,000 r eward for information leading to an arrest. Calls may be made anonymously by calling Crime Stoppers at (888) 580-8477.


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O PINION &EDITORIAL

Focused leadership produces results ANDREW AUDET Life, Liberty and Leadership I think past Encinitas City Councils often lost focus on the needs of r esidents. Many times the Council hir ed facilitators creating more bureaucracy to the decision making process that cost taxpayers. An example is the General Plan Update where the city paid the consulting firm MIG near $1 million and r esidents were unhappy with the results. While successful leadership requires vision, goal setting and str ategic planning when focus is lost taxpayers pay the price. At last week’s council meeting Encinitas City Manager Gus Vina made a presentation recommending the council possibl y hire a facilitator to lead the Council in goal setting workshops. Encinitas taxpayers don’t need to

spend more money on f acilitators. We pay enough for city staff currently. In April 2000, the City Council heard the results of the vision w ork performed by then City Manager Kerry Miller. The two leading keywords that came out of this pr ocess were “Preservation” and “Character” yet 13 years later the vision the f ormer city council put forth for the future of Encinitas is one of high density housing that destr oys community character. It’s clear to me the city lost its focus. During his presentation the city manager made recommendations to the budgeting process suggesting planning w orkshops. While planning is an important part of leadership it’s my opinion the financial challenges facing the city ar e not the r esult of a lac k of planning but rather the result of lost focus. For example the past council dela yed road repairs we needed while approving pension increases we didn’t need. They built new fire stations for some $16 million that we didn’t need while f ailing to build the Hall P ark. TURN TO LEADERSHIP ON A16

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Letters to the Editor and reader feedback are welcome. Unsigned letters and letters without city of residence will not be published. Letters should be no longer than 300 words and include a contact telephone number. Submission does not guarantee publication. Email letters to letters@coastnewsgroup.com. Views expressed in letters do not reflect the views of The Coast News Group. If published, please wait one month for next submission.

Seawater: To drink or not to drink Corp. The Poseidon Resources Corp. expects A local comm unity issue has r ecently alerted me: fr eshwater scarcity. As the human population g rows, the amount of freshwater available shrinks. There are many different approaches we can use to tak e on this problem, one of which is desalination — the process of removing salt and other contaminants from ocean water. San Diego fir st started r esearching desalination when a dr ought in the ear ly 1990’s led to the conclusion that a r eliable water supply is necessary. Finally, on Nov. 29 of 2012, the San Diego County Water Authority Board of Directors voted to build a desalination plant near the Car lsbad coastline, contracted by the P oseidon Resources

to start construction on the plant ear ly 2013. On their webpage they write: “With deal in place, construction on the plant e xpected to start early next year.” Many other ne wspapers, such as The Union Tribune, confirm that this desalination plant will use the r everse osmosis technique — whic h involves water being pushed by pressure through a semi-permeable membrane, separating the salt and contaminants from the w ater. This plant is also proposed to produce 50 million gallons of clean water each day, enough to suppl y 450,000 county residents — exactly what our community needs. TURN TO LETTERS ON A12

THE COAST NEWS

Views expressed in Opinion & Editorial do not necessarily reflect the views of The Coast News

JAN. 18, 2013

COMMUNITY COMMENTARIES The Community Commentary section is open to everyone. Opinions expressed in the Community Commentary section are in no way representative of The Coast News Group. Send submissions, no longer than 700 words, to editor@coastnewsgroup.com with “Commentary” in the subject line. Submission does not guarantee publication. If published, please wait one month for next submission.

Sharrows: Getting to the heart of the matter By Darius Degher

I’m writing in response to a recent letter by Lynn and Russell Marr regarding changes to Highway 101 in Leucadia. The Marrs claim that the public has had too little voice in the matter. They go as f ar as threatening the new council with a comparison to Jerome Stocks. This strikes me as highly theatrical, and I am am used by it, but my concerns with their letter lie elsewhere. My concern is that they are attempting to squelch an important opportunity , to defend an outmoded w ay of thinking. Here are some thoughts on what I see as the true heart of the matter: cycling in Encinitas. When my family and I r ead about the new sharrows/lane-diet project, which will facilitate cycling on Highway 101, we were elated. We were almost gid dy about the prospect of being a ble to bik e around Leucadia without fear of getting run over or “doored.” I lived in Eur ope (Sweden) for a long time. My wife and I rode our bicycles to work every day, along with thousands of other people. There was even bicycle traffic. Imagine that! I guarantee that if you experienced it, you would never be willing to exchange it for automobile traffic. The weather sucked. We rode anyway.

In sleet, freezing rain, drizzle, wind, snow, ice. It was a boon for our health. It was ecological. It reduced dependence on f oreign oil. It ameliorated traffic congestion. Most amazingly, I discovered that c ycling generates a true sense of wellbeing. When you get on a bike, you’re a kid again. You breathe. You smile. Life is great.

Here in Encinitas, we should be progressive in encouraging cycling. Here in Southern Calif ornia, cycling and the pr omotion of it ar e no-brainers. Many of us ar e overweight; we have issues with air quality; w e’re often str essed out; and traffic is a perpetual problem. Here in Encinitas, we should be pr ogressive in encouraging cycling. We should strive to be a model for the rest of Southern California. By the way, I’m not referring to the kind of cyclists who come out in packs on the weekends wearing fancy outfits (the TURN TO SHARROWS ON A12

Cycling is huge in Encinitas By Mark Lathrop

Cycling is huge in Encinitas and w e love it.We don’t like being called names,but we have all been called something while on the road, so we keep riding out of our passion for the sport. Encinitas gained its national and international reputation in the mid-80s and is still tentatively hanging on to that reputation. Thousands ride thr ough town each week and if anything goes wrong there are seven shops to gi ve professional service. Hundreds of professional and top amateurs train here in the winter and most of the residents of Encinitas welcome them warmly. In the early ‘90s Lance Armstrong lived in an apartment at the top of Encinitas Boulevard; Marianne Berglund (World road champion from Sweden) lived up Chesterfield in Car diff, Greg LeMond stayed at the Ranc ho Santa F e Inn; J ohn Howard (gold medal winner at the P an Am

games) lived in Encinitas and Axel Merkx (whose father was the greatest cyclist ever) showed up e very winter to tr ain with Swami’s Cycling Club. Encinitas’ own Swami’s Cycling Club was the nation’s best amateur team in the ‘90s. Their riders won 10 national c hampionships and represented the United States and Canada in the Ol ympics, World Championships and top international races. The first rider to br eak through was Ryan Dahl fr om Leucadia whose f ather owns Wax Research. Ryan represented the U.S. at the Cyclocross World Championships in Belgium in 1990. Swami’s latest alumnus to ride for the U.S. was Chris Horner at the London Olympics this y ear. He joined Swami’s as a happ y-go-lucky 19-year-old from La Mesa in 1991. Even though he now rides the biggest races in Europe for Radio TURN TO CYCLING ON A16

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A5

THE COAST NEWS

JAN. 18, 2013

City’s draft housing plan is off to HCD By Bianca Kaplanek

Max Disposti, founder and executive director, North County LGBTQ Resource Center, in Oceanside. A native of Rome, Italy, he received his American citizenship in 2007. “I was always fascinated with Americans and their passion for promoting civil rights and women’s rights to bring about a fair and civilized society,” he said. “It was inspiring. I’m very proud to call myself an American.” Photo by Lillian Cox

Max Disposti: Living his own American dream By Lillian Cox

OCEANSIDE — Born and raised in the shadow of the Vatican, Max Disposti was expected to be both Catholic and macho. He was neither. “When I ‘came out’ at the age of 15, all my parents were concerned about was discrimination,” he remembers. “We had good communication. They were culturally Catholic, not practicing. Instead, they were community activists always giving back and thinking of others.” Condemnation by the church of disad vantaged groups prompted Disposti to become a c hampion of human rights, especially women’s and labor issues. “I was also frustr ated that I couldn’ t hug m y boyfriend in public, and that there was no legislation that protects gay people,” he said. “I wanted to go to a place where I was accepted.” Disposti worked in the hotel industry, saving money until 1998 when he moved to San Francisco. He volunteered with the immigration task force in San Francisco and Oakland, supporting campaigns for equality and social justice. The winter of 2001-02 he moved to Oceanside, and in 2007 received his American citizenship. “I was always fascinated with Americans and their passion for promoting civil rights and women’s rights to bring about a fair and civilized society,” he said. “It was inspiring. I’m very proud to call myself an American.” Through hard work and long hours, Disposti achieved the American dream, realizing success in the real estate market. Like most entrepreneurs, there were sacrifices. “My mother would call

me and say, ‘What book have you read?’” he remembered. “I’d explain that I was too busy to read. She’d say, ‘Is that why you moved to the United States? To buy houses and get into real estate?’” It wasn’t the ans wer Disposti expected, and prompted him to reassess his life. “My mother knew I was a giver, and I began to realize that I had bought into the system and lost the freedom to express myself,” he said. “The American dream is about how much you can use your knowledge to help others to experience happiness, not being self-centered. “At the age of 35 I matured from a young adult to an adult. My family told me that I needed to speak up. It’s my ability to communicate that makes me happy and feel alive.” Disposti had alr eady been involved with the San Diego LBGT Center and became increasingly concerned about bullying and the high suicide rate among gay teens, and the seeming lack of inter est among schools to address the issue. In January 2008, he founded the North County LGBT Coalition, a nonprofit that began to create LGBT visibility in North County. In 2010, he left real estate and put his own money into opening a stor efront for North County LGBTQ Resour ce Center where he volunteers today as executive director. Linda Johnson met Disposti in 2010 through the coalition. “I heard he was going to start a center and wanted to be part of it,” she said.Today, Johnson serves as Disposti’s right arm as F ront Desk Program Coordinator, fielding inquiries and scheduling

appointments for free services that include counseling, HIV/AIDS testing and prevention, civil rights advocacy and workshops. “We are ‘the little center that could,’ but we need the community to support us,” she explained. “People can sign up online for membership and ha ve their dues deducted monthly. Funds go directly to outreach on issues including suicide prevention and homelessness. We honor anyone who calls or comes in, and where they are on their journey.” In 2010 Disposti w as honored with the Har vey Milk Award by the San Diego LBGT Center, and in 2011 he became the recipient of the Heroes, Pioneers & Trailblazers award presented by the Lambda Archives, a nonprofit that preserves and teaches the histor y of the LGBT community. Last year, he was nominated Oceanside Citizen of the Year by the Oceanside Rotary Club and served as a member of the Oceanside Library Advisory Committee. He is a nominee for the Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Award at the J unior Seau Community Center Jan. 21. In addition to serving as executive director of the North County LGBTQ Center, Disposti is on the board of the nonpr ofit Advancing Compassion Project and Main Street Oceanside. For more information, visit ncresourcecenter.org or call (760) 994-1690. The LGBTQ Resource Center is located at 510 North Coast Highway, Oceanside. Hours are noon to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and they are closed Sunday.

DEL MAR — With only two objections at the Jan. 14 meeting, City Council moved its housing element another step forward, agreeing to send the dr aft document to the state Department of Housing and Comm unity Development for a r equired preliminary review. California law mandates that cities update their housing plans to sho w they can accommodate their allocated share of the region’s housing needs. Because Del Mar didn’ t receive certification during the last cycle, from 20052010, it was penalized with having to designate 10 additional units f or the curr ent cycle, from 2013-2020. It must now show it can provide a total of 71 units, 22 of which must be in the very low- or low-income category. The law doesn’t require the units be built. Market forces generally determine whether that occur s. But land-use designations and the development review process must demonstrate realistic opportunities to build the new units. The state indicator that affordable units can be built is a zoning density that will allow 20 units per acre. A lack of areas designated to accommodate that type of density w as one r eason HCD didn’t certify the city’s last housing element. In its latest dr aft, the city has listed 58 pr ograms that show it can ac hieve its housing goals. Some, such as a rental subsidy program, already exist. Others are existing programs that ar e being modified. And this time ar ound the city has listed thr ee areas where higher density could occur: the professional commercial, public facilities

Optimists invite all to bowl-a-thon CARLSBAD — The Optimist Club of Car lsbad, “The Achievers” will kick off Super Bowl Sunday at the bowling lanes to r aise money for its many youth-oriented charities. The club will host its 21st annual Super Bo wl-A-Thon from 9 a.m. until noon Feb. 3 This cost is $20 per person and includes three games, bowling shoes and ball, at the Vista Entertainment Center, 435 West Vista Way. This annual event provides family fun and entertainment before the Super Bowl game. Most important, this event helps to r aise funds to help the y outh of North San Diego County. There will be free juice, coffee, bagels/cream cheese and doughnuts. The club will also award door prizes, hold a raffle drawing that will a ward special prizes including a money tree for more than $300. For more information or reservations call Ric h Busby at (760) 304-0600 or Carl Tillinghast at (760) 633-3096.

and north commercial zones. In the latter, a prospective buyer has expressed interest in a higher -density designation on two sites. That didn’t sit well with residents Arnold and Annette Wiesel, who said the history of what is known as the Jefferson lot, indicates increased density is inappropriate because the area is environmentally sensitive. “It should be e xcluded from the recommendation,” Arnold Wiesel said. But council member s opted to leave it in the draft document that will be submitted. In response to other community concerns – and there were several when the first document was presented months ago -- the Planning Commission previously eliminated another area – the centr al commercial zone – where increased density had been proposed. A second-dwelling unit program has been in place in Del Mar f or more than a decade but it has never been used. So the draft plan also includes increased incentives for second d welling units such as a 550-squar efoot floor area ratio exemption and the allo wance of a rear-yard setback encroachment. The Planning Commission also r ecommended, and council agreed, that additional opportunities for condominium conversions be pur sued but accompanied by new mitigation measures to help renters who w ould be displaced. “You have a v ery good shot at getting certification,” said Veronica Tam, a consultant who was hired to help the city cr aft its housing plan.

Tam said she has helped write 100 housing elements and only one w as not certified. “I would say this is a very good attempt, a very strong attempt,” she added. Tam also said the la ws have changed since the last cycle. She said a “damaged party” is no longer a requirement for litigation if a city doesn’ t have a certified plan. “In the e vent that y ou do not have a certified housing element and you are sued, most likely you would not be a ble to defend y ourself,” she said. The state can withhold a city’ s ability to issue any building permits, something that has happened twice. Resident Bud Emer son said the pr oposal to spr ead affordable units thr oughout the city r ather than tr y to build one complex “enables us to get a m uch richer socioeconomic mix in our town.” “I think this is going to enhance our community,” he said. “Let’s do it because it will make our com munity more vibrant.” The city m ust have a certified plan b y April 27. HCD is e xpected to tak e about 90 days to review the draft before sending it back, with recommendations, to City Council f or final approval and resubmittal.

SellersWhyPayMore.com


A6

THE COAST NEWS

Flower Hill is ready to bloom again By Bianca Kaplanek

SAN DIEGO — “Something new. Something different. Something fresh.” That’s how Jeffrey Essakow, president of Pr otea Properties, described the r enovated Flower Hill Pr omenade, which will kic k off a fi veday grand opening Feb. 27; the same day anchor tenant Whole Foods Market will begin serving customers. Essakow called the $30 million project a “10-year journey,” that included “a little bit of r esistance,” from nearby residents, the city of San Diego and the California Coastal Commission. “But it w as very, very worthwhile,” he said. “We worked through all of those issues. We worked as a team. We collaborated and the neighbors came around and really embraced the project.” Protea purchased the 14-acre site, formerly known as the Flo wer Hill Mall, in 2002. “It’s always been our vision, from day one, to renovate,” Essakow said. “Most of our pr ojects we buy and ad d value. We wanted to tak e advantage of underutilized square footage.” The project has gone through several redesigns since the fir st plans w ere presented about a decade ago. Concerns about increased traffic and the overall size of the pr oject prompted the f ormation of an opposition g roup, Citizens Against Flower Hill’s Expansion. “We finally scaled this thing down,” Essakow said. There was also contr oversy between the city of San Diego, where the property is located, and the California Coastal

JAN. 18, 2013

Council makes changes to housing, regional appointments By Promise Yee

Jeffrey Essakow, president of Protea Properties, and property manager M. Rose Jabin, point out some of the new features at Flower Hill Promenade during a Jan. 16 media tour of the renovated site. Photo by Bianca Kaplanek

Commission over which agency had jurisdiction to grant permits. (It’s the city.) Renovation work finally began in 2011. Essakow said the focus was to create “gathering spaces” to encourage people to do more than just come and shop. “We are grouping businesses together to cr eate a symbiotic relationship,” he said. For example, Beach Bungalow Designs, Sweetpea Children’s Shop, Geppetto’s toy store and Pigtails and Crewcuts, where youngsters can get a haircut while sitting in a fire engine, are clustered at the west end, close to a planned outdoor c hildren’s play area with slides and swings. “It’s a really cool center where stores are unique,” Essakow said. Flower Hill contin ues to feature independently

owned boutique stores, which property manager M. Rose Jabin said pr ovides shoppers with a higher level of customer service. “A lot of the stor es are run by owners or managers so they have a greater stake in it,” she said. While many longtime favorites remain at Flo wer Hill, there is no shortage of new shops. Essakow said no tenants were lost during construction, but some, such as Book Works, left before the renovations began, mainly due to the economy. Some opted to leave, while for others, such as the UltraStar theater that w as replaced by Whole Foods, Protea chose not to r enew the leases. The rejuvenated center has 70,000 ad ditional square feet of r etail space and eight restaurants, including a planned pizza

and sandwich shop with outdoor seating and a beer and wine bar in Whole Foods. Taste of Thai and Milton’s Deli r emain, but Chevy’s will be r eplaced by Cucina Enoteca, a two-story restaurant with the same k i t ch e n - m e e t s - h i s t o r i c farmhouse concept as its sister eatery, Cucina Urbana, on Laurel Street downtown. That is expected to open in May. A new restaurant from the owners of Urban Solace in North Park and Solace & the Moonlight Lounge in Encinitas will take over the space previously occupied by Paradise Grill. What was once Tony Roma’s is no w Burger Lounge, featuring sandwiches from grass-fed cows, fresh-cut fries and onion rings and organic salads. TURN TO FLOWER HILL ON A19

OCEANSIDE — To help meet its goal to pr ovide more inclusionary housing, City Council approved changes to inclusionary housing standar ds for building pr ojects that exceed base density on Jan. 16. New options f or builders include land donations, rehabilitation of market-rate units, $12,250 per unit in-lieu fees f or units above base density , and builder incentives of one additional story of building height, reduced parking requirements, and waiver of a conditional use permit. Initial recommendations applied to lo w and moderate-income housing and limited incenti ves to projects in transit corridor areas. Councilman Jerry Kern modified r ecommendations to e xclude moderate-income housing and apply standards citywide. The changes became a point of contention and resulted in a 3-2 council vote in whic h Mayor Jim Wood and Councilwoman Esther Sanchez voted no. “Our job is to do what’s best for our city and our residents,” Sanchez said. “It’s about quality of life in our neighborhoods.” Sanchez said citywide application of the standards would result in building projects that w ould be out of character with neighborhoods. She added that current in-lieu fees, which are overwhelmingly selected b y developers, are too lo w to cover the cost of building affordable housing units.

“It’s really clear what the BIA (Building Industr y Association), who helped determine the standards, was pushing at the time — get rid of fees, get rid of as many regulations as possible — under the guise of building affordable housing,” Sanchez said. Half a doz en residents said the incenti ves would cause parking shortages, and might lo wer the pr operty value of curr ent homes. Planning commissioner Bob Neal, speaking as a citizen, said he supported applying the standar ds citywide. “It releases up a lot of potential of what the building industry can do f or the city,” Neal said. “We need to open up the city to opportunity that might be there.” Sanchez said she would like to see the city return to using a formula to determine in-lieu fees that would cover the cost of building affordable housing units. Councilman Gary Felien said he supported the standards and added that the higher in-lieu fees previously required could not be collected in the current recession. In another 2-3 v ote, council re-voted on changes to the appointment process to regional boards and approved allowing council members to mak e nominations for appointments. Wood and Sanchez voted no. Regional appointments will be made in late February.

Funds approved for quality monitoring of beaches By Jared Whitlock

COAST CITIES — The San Diego County Board of Supervisors approved $324,000 for a program that gauges whether local waters are too polluted to swim in. Currently, the county collects and analyzes 20 samples each week at 15 differ ent sites along San Diego’s coastline. Water samples detect disease-causing pathogens or microbes at places like Torrey Pines State Beach and the San Elijo Lagoon. The tests take 24 hours to analyze. With the help of the nonprofit San Diego Coastkeeper, results are put online for residents to check before going in the water. If

Expires 1-31-13

Water-quality monitoring will continue at beaches through at least September due to the San Diego Board of Supervisors approving funds for the program. File photo

high levels of pathogens are detected, the county also posts advisory or closure signs at any affected beaches. The program received the funds from the state for a contract that began last July and runs through September of this year. According to the Board of S upervisors’ staff report, the contract wasn’t voted on sooner because funding was still being sorted out. Although the contr act was technically just approved, the program has operated as normal since July, according

to Mark McPherson, chief of the Department of Environmental Health’s Land and Water Quality Division. “We were told to continue our work and that we’d be reimbursed,” McPherson said. Of the $324,000 in state funding, $24,000 goes toward fall and winter monitoring, and $300,000 covers summer and spring monitoring, according the staff report. While fewer people are at the beaches in the fall and winter, advisories and closures are more common dur-

ing this period due to increased urban runoff and untreated sewage from rainfall. Former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger axed funding for water-quality monitoring at beaches in 2008 due to the state budget crisis. Temporary funding was obtained from various sources for several years. More than a year ago, Gov. Jerry Brown restored funding b y giving the California Resources Control Board the authority to provide up to $1.8 million for beach testing statewide.


A6

THE COAST NEWS

Flower Hill is ready to bloom again By Bianca Kaplanek

SAN DIEGO — “Something new. Something different. Something fresh.” That’s how Jeffrey Essakow, president of Pr otea Properties, described the r enovated Flower Hill Pr omenade, which will kic k off a fi veday grand opening Feb. 27; the same day anchor tenant Whole Foods Market will begin serving customers. Essakow called the $30 million project a “10-year journey,” that included “a little bit of r esistance,” from nearby residents, the city of San Diego and the California Coastal Commission. “But it w as very, very worthwhile,” he said. “We worked through all of those issues. We worked as a team. We collaborated and the neighbors came around and really embraced the project.” Protea purchased the 14-acre site, formerly known as the Flo wer Hill Mall, in 1993. “It’s always been our vision, from day one, to renovate,” Essakow said. “Most of our pr ojects we buy and ad d value. We wanted to tak e advantage of underutilized square footage.” The project has gone through several redesigns since the fir st plans w ere presented about a decade ago. Concerns about increased traffic and the overall size of the pr oject prompted the f ormation of an opposition g roup, Citizens Against Flower Hill’s Expansion. “We finally scaled this thing down,” Essakow said. There was also contr oversy between the city of San Diego, where the property is located, and the California Coastal

JAN. 18, 2013

Council makes changes to housing, regional appointments By Promise Yee

Jeffrey Essakow, president of Protea Properties, and property manager M. Rose Jabin, point out some of the new features at Flower Hill Promenade during a Jan. 16 media tour of the renovated site. Photo by Bianca Kaplanek

Commission over which agency had jurisdiction to grant permits. (It’s the city.) Renovation work finally began in 2011. Essakow said the focus was to create “gathering spaces” to encourage people to do more than just come and shop. “We are grouping businesses together to cr eate a symbiotic relationship,” he said. For example, Beach Bungalow Designs, Sweetpea Children’s Shop, Geppetto’s toy store and Pigtails and Crewcuts, where youngsters can get a haircut while sitting in a fire engine, are clustered at the west end, close to a planned outdoor c hildren’s play area with slides and swings. “It’s a really cool center where stores are unique,” Essakow said. Flower Hill contin ues to feature independently

owned boutique stores, which property manager M. Rose Jabin said pr ovides shoppers with a higher level of customer service. “A lot of the stor es are run by owners or managers so they have a greater stake in it,” she said. While many longtime favorites remain at Flo wer Hill, there is no shortage of new shops. Essakow said no tenants were lost during construction, but some, such as Book Works, left before the renovations began, mainly due to the economy. Some opted to leave, while for others, such as the UltraStar theater that w as replaced by Whole Foods, Protea chose not to r enew the leases. The rejuvenated center has 70,000 ad ditional square feet of r etail space and eight restaurants, including a planned pizza

and sandwich shop with outdoor seating and a beer and wine bar in Whole Foods. Taste of Thai and Milton’s Deli r emain, but Chevy’s will be r eplaced by Cucina Enoteca, a two-story restaurant with the same k i t ch e n - m e e t s - h i s t o r i c farmhouse concept as its sister eatery, Cucina Urbana, on Laurel Street downtown. That is expected to open in May. A new restaurant from the owners of Urban Solace in North Park and Solace & the Moonlight Lounge in Encinitas will take over the space previously occupied by Paradise Grill. What was once Tony Roma’s is no w Burger Lounge, featuring sandwiches from grass-fed cows, fresh-cut fries and onion rings and organic salads. TURN TO FLOWER HILL ON A19

OCEANSIDE — To help meet its goal to pr ovide more inclusionary housing, City Council approved changes to inclusionary housing standar ds for building pr ojects that exceed base density on Jan. 16. New options f or builders include land donations, rehabilitation of market-rate units, $12,250 per unit in-lieu fees f or units above base density , and builder incentives of one additional story of building height, reduced parking requirements, and waiver of a conditional use permit. Initial recommendations applied to lo w and moderate-income housing and limited incenti ves to projects in transit corridor areas. Councilman Jerry Kern modified r ecommendations to e xclude moderate-income housing and apply standards citywide. The changes became a point of contention and resulted in a 3-2 council vote in whic h Mayor Jim Wood and Councilwoman Esther Sanchez voted no. “Our job is to do what’s best for our city and our residents,” Sanchez said. “It’s about quality of life in our neighborhoods.” Sanchez said citywide application of the standards would result in building projects that w ould be out of character with neighborhoods. She added that current in-lieu fees, which are overwhelmingly selected b y developers, are too lo w to cover the cost of building affordable housing units.

“It’s really clear what the BIA (Building Industr y Association), who helped determine the standards, was pushing at the time — get rid of fees, get rid of as many regulations as possible — under the guise of building affordable housing,” Sanchez said. Half a doz en residents said the incenti ves would cause parking shortages, and might lo wer the pr operty value of curr ent homes. Planning commissioner Bob Neal, speaking as a citizen, said he supported applying the standar ds citywide. “It releases up a lot of potential of what the building industry can do f or the city,” Neal said. “We need to open up the city to opportunity that might be there.” Sanchez said she would like to see the city return to using a formula to determine in-lieu fees that would cover the cost of building affordable housing units. Councilman Gary Felien said he supported the standards and added that the higher in-lieu fees previously required could not be collected in the current recession. In another 2-3 v ote, council re-voted on changes to the appointment process to regional boards and approved allowing council members to mak e nominations for appointments. Wood and Sanchez voted no. Regional appointments will be made in late February.

Funds approved for quality monitoring of beaches By Jared Whitlock

COAST CITIES — The San Diego County Board of Supervisors approved $324,000 for a program that gauges whether local waters are too polluted to swim in. Currently, the county collects and analyzes 20 samples each week at 15 differ ent sites along San Diego’s coastline. Water samples detect disease-causing pathogens or microbes at places like Torrey Pines State Beach and the San Elijo Lagoon. The tests take 24 hours to analyze. With the help of the nonprofit San Diego Coastkeeper, results are put online for residents to check before going in the water. If

Expires 1-31-13

Water-quality monitoring will continue at beaches through at least September due to the San Diego Board of Supervisors approving funds for the program. File photo

high levels of pathogens are detected, the county also posts advisory or closure signs at any affected beaches. The program received the funds from the state for a contract that began last July and runs through September of this year. According to the Board of S upervisors’ staff report, the contract wasn’t voted on sooner because funding was still being sorted out. Although the contr act was technically just approved, the program has operated as normal since July, according

to Mark McPherson, chief of the Department of Environmental Health’s Land and Water Quality Division. “We were told to continue our work and that we’d be reimbursed,” McPherson said. Of the $324,000 in state funding, $24,000 goes toward fall and winter monitoring, and $300,000 covers summer and spring monitoring, according the staff report. While fewer people are at the beaches in the fall and winter, advisories and closures are more common dur-

ing this period due to increased urban runoff and untreated sewage from rainfall. Former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger axed funding for water-quality monitoring at beaches in 2008 due to the state budget crisis. Temporary funding was obtained from various sources for several years. More than a year ago, Gov. Jerry Brown restored funding b y giving the California Resources Control Board the authority to provide up to $1.8 million for beach testing statewide.


A7

THE COAST NEWS

JAN. 18, 2013

SANDAG board California 10/20 race looks like a go questions priorities, funding splits By Bianca Kaplanek

By Promise Yee

COAST CITIES — Returning and ne w SANDAG board members met for an inf ormationonly session Jan. 11. San Diego alternatives Todd Gloria and Lorie Zapf both sho wed up for the v acant San Diego seat and Oceanside alternate Jack Feller filled in the vacant seat left by Mayor Jim Wood, who was recently voted off SANDAG by his fello w council members. Despite cities’ internal debates on their r epresentatives, the new SANDAG board moved forward with discussions. The question is, how will the new board divvy up funds f or regional transportation? SANDAG has historically approved equal funding for mass transit, regional roadways and local streets. Recently, the prior SANDAG board voted in f avor of a warding more funds to mass transit projects. “In the past spending was one-third regional roadways, one-third transit, and one-third local streets,” Carlsbad?representative Mayor Matt Hall said. “Recently more than a third is transit. “Transit has equal or higher priority as an ything else at the moment,” he added. With new board members just settling in, it’s uncertain if SANDAG will continue to f avor mass transit projects, but Solana Beach representative Lesa Heebner is one board member who hopes things contin ue in that direction. Heebner said she is a strong proponent of mass transit. She added that focusing solely on

increasing roadways and ignoring environmental impacts such as climate change is “last century stuff.” Heebner said ther e has been a stead y improvement in the region’s mass transit system over the last fi ve years, but more funds are needed to e xpand and maintain countywide transit, which is alr eady highly subsidized. She said she is in favor of ad ding a quarter-cent to half-cent regional sales tax to cr eate funding, but added that recent polls ha ve shown that onl y 58 percent of v oters support the tax incr ease, which needs a tw o-thirds vote to pass. Heebner said she hears a lot of support from North County r esidents for mass tr ansit and the benefits of reduced traffic time and a healthier environment. “A lot of people believe in tr ansit,” Heebner said. “They see that people need to ha ve a viable alternative to cars.” Currently, SANDAG focuses on tr ansit for daily commuters. Heebner said she w ould like to see transit expand to accommodate tr avelers’ “last mile” and cover shorter trips betw een major transit stops. Hall looks at r egional transportation a bit differently. He said he supports a balanced regional transportation plan that includes equal funding for mass transit, regional roadways and local streets. Hall sits on the SANDAG transportation subcommittee. He said he is confident in the ratTURN TO SANDAG ON A16

Luncheon, speaker hosted by Carlsbad Republican Women CARLSBAD — Radio commentator Mark Price will speak at 11 a.m. Jan. 22 at the Car lsbad Republican Women Federated luncheon about assuming per sonal responsibility and gi ve updates on political issues and events. The luncheon will be at the Hilton Gar den Inn, 6450 Carlsbad Blvd. Cost of the lunc heon is $29 for members and $35 f or non-members. Reservations are needed b y Jan. 18, to Jackie Peacock at (760) 3904452 or jpeacock2306@gmail.com. Price challenges his audiences to mak e a difference by expecting to make a difference. He asks “If not you, then who?” Price was the founding chairman of the San Diego Association of Republican Elected Officials

and has been a trustee on the Alpine Union Sc hool District for 12 years. He also served on the Alpine Planning Board and was cochairman with Go v. Schwarzenegger’s Education Reform Coalition. He was recently honored by the San Diego County Board of Supervisors for outstanding ser vice and leadership and commitment to the residents of Alpine. In addition to his comm unity service accomplishments, Price is an author , business executive and a Shakespearean-trained actor. The Carlsbad Republican Women Federated meets e very fourth Tuesday. For more information visit car lsbadrepublicans.com.

SOLANA BEACH — A 10mile race that will take runners from Del Mar to Encinitas and back is on the mar k to get set and go. Solana Beach council members authorized the city manager at the Jan. 9 meeting to review and process all necessary permit requirements, leaving Peter Douglass, president of event producer Turnkey Operations, with only a fe w small hurdles to clear before he can begin nationally marketing the California 10/20. The race was originally slated to tak e place ne xt month. But when plans w ere presented this past August, Solana Beach council members asked Douglass to postpone it f or a year because most of Coast Highway 101, where the majority of the race will take place, is undergoing renovations that should be complete b y this September. Douglass, co-creator of San Diego’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon and Carlsbad 5,000, agreed to wait and the r ace is now scheduled for Feb. 16, 2014, a Sunday during the three-day Presidents Day weekend. Runners will start at the Del Mar Fairgrounds, exit onto Jimmy Durante Boulevard going south, turn around at the fire station,head west onVia de la Valle, then go north on Highway 101 until the y reach Manchester Avenue in Encinitas. They’ll turn around at the Cardiff Kook statue and return along the same path, entering the fairgrounds at the Solana Gate on Via de la Valle. The course will include 20 stages every half-mile with live music to motivate runners. Six are planned in Solana Beach. The music will be amplified but onl y out a bout 200 feet. Each band will pla y for about 45 min utes, starting as

The proposed California 10/20, a race that will take runners from the Del Mar Fairgrounds to the Cardiff Kook Statue in Encinitas, recently cleared another hurdle. The Solana Beach City Council authorized the city manager to review and process all necessary permit requirements for the February 2014 event. Courtesy rendering

the first runner appr oaches and stopping when the last one goes by. The race will run from 7:30 to 11 a.m., with Coast Highway 101 closed in both dir ections beginning at 7 a.m. The northbound lane, however, is expected to reopen by 10 a.m. Runners finishing later than 11 a.m. would be directed to complete the r ace on sidewalks so all roads will be open by 11 a.m. After the August meeting, Douglass agreed to host w orkshops to garner public input. Two were held but neither was well-attended. Following a recommendation from the city manager , race coordinators and city staff visited businesses and r esidents that would be impacted by the event. Douglass said the reaction was “incredibly positive.” “We went to people who we knew were going to be open,” Douglass said.“We went to businesses that were right on the course. We went to ar eas

that had the most impact fr om the event. We really tried our very best to get this out ther e and search for the f olks that might have the biggest pr oblem with it. “On our little tr eks throughout Solana Beac h … where we were assigned essentially to go door -to-door on the coastal highway,we did not find one person who was vociferously objecting to what w e’re doing,” he said. “We had a v ery detailed description of what w e had planned — the course map, the timelines,the impacts involved. We were not searching for people to gi ve us y eses. We were really searching for people to give us nos.” Based on a similar race he produces in Austin, Texas, Douglass said the e vent will have a positi ve economic impact on the area. He is e xpecting between 10,000 and 12,000 participants, with registration capped at 12,000 runners. About 30 percent will likely come from out-

side the ar ea, meaning hotel rooms should be filled, he said. The event will begin Friday with an expo at the fairgrounds, where most people will park. Runners and their families and friends usuall y check out the cour se beforehand.They dine and shop while doing so, as well as after the race, Douglass said. Solana Beach was set to vote on granting the conditional use permit at the Jan.9 meeting but the traffic control plan wasn’t complete. Once submitted, it will be r eviewed by the Sheriff’s Department, Public Works and the city manager. Douglass must also get final approval from council members in Del Mar and Encinitas, but officials in those two cities overall supported the plan when it w as presented in August. Douglass also plans to donate a total of $30,000 to nonprofit organizations in each city. Council members agreed with a r ecommendation from colleague Lesa Hee bner that Douglass continues the 10/20 theme by giving $10,000 to the other two cities and $20,000 to Solana Beach because it will be most impacted by the race. “My mind is certainl y open,” Douglass said. While council member s were unanimous in their support to move forward to allow the event, Tom Campbell said he was skeptical. “When it’s over we need to have the ability to sit down and really evaluate it, see what worked, what didn’t work, because if this is not trul y providing an economic benefit and it’s turning out to be a big pain in the f anny for our residents we need to rethink it,” he said. Mayor Mike Nichols said if it is successful, the city should also set a polic y to limit the number of races annually. All Solana Beach residents will receive information regarding the race 30 days before the event by mailers and eblasts.


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THE COAST NEWS

JAN. 18, 2013

Find wellness at weeklong health fair Board introduces recycling ordinance ENCINITAS — Start your new year with events and special offer s that teach and sho w how to improve physical, mental and spiritual w ell-being. The Downtown Encinitas MainStreet Association (DEMA) will host its third

annual Wellness Week with a large indoor/outdoor festival at the Encinitas Library, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 19. This event will feature dozens of e xhibitors offering free mini-treatments of acupuncture, massage and

reflexology, free product samples, free health screenings, cooking demonstrations, performances by Aikido, Kids’ Yoga, Zumba and mor e, plus special acti vities for youngsters. During the w eek that follows (through Jan. 26), the public is in vited to take advantage of numerous other fr ee classes, treatments, consultations and presentations, held at the library and at other participating organizations that ar e all part of the weeklong Wellness Week. Most will be held at the Encinitas Br anch of the San Diego County Library. Tri-City Medical Center is the lead sponsor of this y ear’s program. The center will offer a variety of free screenings and treatments at the opening day festival and will demonstrate its innovative Robotic Spine Surgery and Vitamin E Knee Replacement.

By Jared Whitlock

COAST CITIES — Businesses that produce 4 cubic yards of waste or more per week will soon be required to recycle. The San Diego Board of Supervisors introduced an ordinance expanding commercial recycling last week. On Feb. 9, the board is expected to adopt the measure. Under the county’s current plan, businesses that are larger than 20,000 square feet have to recycle certain materials. The new ordinance changes the requirement to follow a 2 011 statewide law, which mandates businesses that produce 4 cubic y ard cards of waste or more per week must recycle. Four cubic yards is the size of a large dumpster. According to Mic hael Wonsidler, a recycling specialist with San Diego County, the new ordinance will only affect businesses in unincorporated areas like Rancho Santa Fe. He said 10 of the 19 cities in San Diego County, including Encinitas and Carlsbad,

Baled recyclables stacked on the ground at a local business. Businesses that produce 4 cubic yards of waste or more per week must recycle under a new ordinance from the San Diego County Board of Supervisors. Photo courtesy of the Allan Company

have already passed similar recycling ordinances to comply with California law. “I expect more cities to evaluate their recycling goals in the near future and come into compliance,” Wonsidler said. The state has also set a goal of diverting 75 percent of solid waste from the landfill by 2020.

Awards to honor animal lovers COAST CITIES — The San Diego Humane Society and SPCA is seeking candidates for its fir st annual “Animal Compassion Awards,” to recognize the extraordinary animals and animal lovers throughout San Diego County . Submissions will be accepted through Feb. 15 for individuals and businesses tha t have demonstrated an exceptional level of compassion to ward animals in one of thr ee categories. “We see e xtraordinary examples everyday of people who are bettering animal welfare in San Diego and making this a mor e compassionate society f or people and animals, said Gary Weitzman, president of the San Diego Humane Society and SPCA. Through applications submitted by the community for individuals and businesses, the San Diego Humane Society will r ecognize and pay tribute to those who have

an extraordinary and inspiring story or example of compassion towards animals in one of three categories: — Human-Animal Bond: This award will recognize the powerful and unique r elationship between humans and animals. This award will high light how an animal has impacted a human life in an extraordinary way, or vice versa. — Humane Her o: This award will recognize an individual, business or g roup that goes a bove and be yond to create positive awareness of animals and the unconditional love they bring to individuals. — Pet-Friendly Destination: This award will recognize a local business that promotes and su pports an extraordinary pet-friendly environment. To submit an application for the Animal Compassion Awards, and for more information about eligibility and

requirements, visit sdhum a n e . o r g / AnimalCompassionAwards. Serving San Diego County since 1880, the San Diego Humane Society and SPCA’s scope of social responsibility goes be yond adopting animals. The Humane Society offer s San Diegans a wide range of programs and services that strengthen the human-animal bond, prevent cruelty/neglect, provide medical care and educate the community on the humane treatment of animals. As one of San Diego ’s oldest nonprofit organizations, the Humane Society has campuses in both San Diego and Oceanside and is supported solely through contributions, grants, bequests, investments, proceeds from the Muttique retail store, and small fees for services. For more information or to see curr ent animals available for adoption, visit sdhumane.org.

San Diego schools offer up kindness CARLSBAD — Sc hool districts ranging from Oceanside to Chula Vista and Del Mar to Julian kicked off the Ne w Year with the

Great Kindness Challenge Jan. 14 through Jan. 18. The Great Kindness ChallengeSchool Edition was created by Kids f or Peace, a Carlsbad-based global nonprofit dedicated to uplifting our world through love and action. The event included a celebration and awards ceremony from 3:30 to 5:30 J an. 22 at the Children's Museum in downtown San Diego. Prompted by the Sandy Hook shootings, students and staff acr oss the county joined the Gr eat Kindness Challenge. The challenge was a one-week event where students performed as many acts of kindness on campus as possible, using a checklist of 50 suggestions. Imagine students complimenting each other, reach-

ing out to a lonel y child, picking up tr ash, surprising friends with happy notes in their backpacks, thanking their teachers and eating lunch with a new group of friends. Several schools organized a Kindness Kic koff Rally Jan. 14. Other schools hosted kindnessthemed spirit days, creating a Wall of Kindness, or launched Kindness Stations at recess. According to Jill McManigal, executive director of Kids f or Peace, “Hearts were cracked wide open with the unthinka ble shootings at Sand y Hook Elementary. Now, there's a profound desire to do something positive that will affect enduring change on campuses nationwide.”

Unincorporated areas achieved a 60 percent diversion rate in 2011. According the Board of Supervisors’ staff report, the ordinance will assist the county in meeting state-mandated goal requirements, conserving landfill capacity and encouraging investment in the recycling and waste reduction industry.

Art comes out at night at OMA OCEANSIDE — Responding to the exhibition “Enviroscapes: Jen Trute Retrospective,” the Oceanside Museum of Art’s next Art After Dark will echo the environmentallyminded subject matter of Jen Trute’s surrealist paintings. Immerse yourself in an ecologically-inspired utopian wonderland including live music, live artwork, interactive art ar eas and more. Come enjoy “Ecotopia,” 7 to 10 p .m. Jan. 25, which will feature music by Fleetwood Max and DJ Mongo, a terrarium installation from Pigment of San Diego, environment friendly furniture from Sage In Design and local eco-artists Rodney McCoubrey and P aul Uglow creating sculptures from recycled materials. Visitors can enter for the chance to win the finished works of live artists Gloria ‘Glow’ Muriel and Miguel Angel Godoy. They can also cr eate an en viroscape in the New Village Arts Foundry’s interactive art area. Enjoy craft beer and specialty wine with light appetizers from local artisans promoting the farm-totable philosophy and local sustainability. In 2013, guests will enjoy a ne w admission price of $10 for OMA members or $20 for nonmembers. This price includes complimentary appetizers and one drink ticket, with additional tickets available for purchase. Visit omaonline.org or call (760) 4353721 for reservations, or get tickets at the door the night of the event. OMA invites guests 21+ to attend Art After Dark.


JAN. 18, 2013

A9

THE COAST NEWS

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A10

THE COAST NEWS

JAN. 18, 2013

F OOD &W INE

Low calories, seasonal wines at the new Seasons 52 FRANK MANGIO

Taste of Wine I’ve known for some time now that the most vital district in San Diego County is that business and residential area between University City and Del Mar. If you take a good look at a county map, it’s the geographical center of this vibrant part of Southern California. It’s no surprise that stunning new restaurant formats have positioned themselves in two multi-faceted shopping centers in this dynamic consumer magnet. The first dining room we’ll visit is Seasons 52, with a front porch location in University Town Center. Seasons 52 is a fresh grill

52 of which are offered by the glass, in the restaurant and the wine bar which also offered mixed drinks. It is the work of International Master Sommelier George Miliotes, one of only 180 in the world. Miliotes commented he likes to find wine “before they become famous. I love the Mosel River District. I visit as much as I can with a smile on my face,” he revealed. Try a few sips before stardom at Seasons 52. Free valet parking all day. Call (858) 4501252 for a reservation. Davanti’s Introduces Rocking Piemonte Reds Davanti’s Enoteca in Del Mar Highlands Center and Little Italy San Diego is no stranger to TASTE OF WINE. Under GM Maris Laipenieks, the format of fresh, upscale small bite Italian, tested in Maris Laipenieks of Davanti in the Del Mar Highlands Center introduces Italian Wine Importer Luciano Chicago, has been a hit in San Brussolo and his family of Piemonte Wines. Photo by Frank Mangio Diego. We’ve featured them twice. So when I got the call to taste a new lineup of Italian Piemonte reds, I made sure I was there on time. It was Davante’s first wine dinner and Executive Chef Jaysen Euler collaborated with Italian Wine Importer Luciano Brussolo to put the passion on the plate for the packed house. Brussolo paraded out his heavy hitters and sparklers: wines like Soave, Gavi di Any Entree Any Entree Gavi, Barolo and Barbaresco. Buy one entree & 2 beverages at With the purchase of one entree reg. price & get a 2nd entree of But the wine with the buzz and one beverage at regular price. equal or lesser value at 50% off. around the table was the 2010 Limit 4 per coupon. 1 coupon per Limit 1 per coupon. 1 coupon per table. No separate checks. Not table. No separate checks. Not Damilano Barbera d’Asti valid on weekends, holidays valid on weekends, holidays or w/any other coupons., DOCG ($15). Barbera is the or w/any other coupons., specials, offers or w/private specials, offers or w/private Chianti Classico of the north groups. groups. in Italy. This is a friendly, accessible red that makes any food taste rich and flavorful Any Entree Any Entree with its high acidity. Barbera Buy one entree & 2 beverages at With the purchase of one entree reg. price & get a 2nd entree of and one beverage at regular price. is best served at 65 degrees. equal or lesser value at 50% off. The coolness brightens the Limit 4 per coupon. 1 coupon per Limit 1 per coupon. 1 coupon per table. No separate checks. Not wine’s red berry texture and The Cedar Plank Scottish Wild Salmon is a favorite at the new Seasons table. No separate checks. Not valid on weekends, holidays valid on weekends, holidays or w/any other coupons., hints of vanilla. On this occa- 52 in the University City area of San Diego Photo courtesy of Seasons 52 or w/any other coupons., specials, offers or w/private specials, offers or w/private sion, Chef Jaysen chose to go groups. groups. with a “Tartara Di Cer vo” with the Barbera accompani- Details at (858) 586-9463. ment: a v enison, quail egg A 1980s Prom Night is and frisee salad with truffle the theme for an event at oil complexion. The wine is at Orfila Vineyards in Escondido home with other dishes as Jan. 26 from 7 to 9 p.m. A DJ well, like cold cut appetizers, and music videos highlight rich beef roasts and stews and wine, beer, snacks for $10. medium aged c heeses. For Call (760) 738-6500 ext. 22. more on this wine and others Exploring Wine is the from Piemonte, see subject of a series of lectures viaswine.com. at San Diego State University Jan. 28 to Feb. 25 from 6 to 9 Wine Bytes p.m. Fee $299. Find out more PAON Wine Bar down- at (619) 594-1138. town Carlsbad has a Brown Bag “Blind” Tasting Jan. 17 to Jan. 23. Enjoy six tastings for $16, plus a bonus tasting. Call Frank Mangio is a renowned wine connoisseur certified by Wine Spectator. (760) 729-7377 for times. San Diego Wine His library can be viewed at www.tasteCompany on Miramar Road ofwinetv.com. (Average Google certified presents a Chardonnay and 900 visits per day) He is one of the top Pinot Noir Tasting Jan. 19 five wine commentators on the Web. from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. for $10. Reach him at mangiompc@aol.com.

and piano bar that provides a dining experience with no menu item mor e than 475 calories. The Executive Chef at the UTC location is Steve de Barril who oversees lunch, dinner and snacking, from signature flatbreads to entrees that change weekly with seasonal and farmers market visits. You must order the Scottish Wild Salmon on Cedar Plank. The British Isles have some of the coldest salmon waters in the world. That and a vigorous spawning grounds, make this wild Scottish Salmon a delicious culinary masterpiece. Two weeks ago, I revealed my Top Ten Wine Tastes highlighted b y a Riesling discovery, the Selbach Mosel, Germany 2011, that fit with this Cedar Plank Salmon. Seasons 52 has an award-winning wine program of over 100 selections,

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A11

THE COAST NEWS

JAN. 18, 2013

A transformative four-day cleanse with Beaming & the bBAR DAVID BOYLAN Lick the Plate As I’ve mentioned in past columns, my strategy for maintaining my health while writing and talking a bout food on a w eekly basis has been to intensify my exercise routine in or der to burn off the highest amount of calories as possible. Calories in, calories out and keep the calories in as healthy as possible at least 80 percent of the time allo wing 20 percent for indulgence and maintaining r egular exercise. I still think that is a common sense appr oach for living, especially for those of us that love to eat. That said, how to fill the 80 percent with health y, yet tasty, food is the topic that fuels a ne ver-ending debate and a nice siz e chunk of our economy with companies claiming to have the answer. Paleo, Atkins, vegans, vegetarians, juicers — just to name a few — all ha ve very strong opinions on the best way to eat. I was approached recently by a compan y called Beaming and the ne w bBAR super food vitality esta blishment in Del Mar . Beaming started a y ear ago as a r aw food cleansing pr ogram that has become one of San Diego’s most popular cleans-

Part of the Beaming team from left Simone Powers, Lisa Odenweller and Susan Sbicca” Photo courtesy Beaming

es. Lisa Odenweller is the CEO and founder of Beaming and when I learned she had Susan Sbicca on board as one of her c hefs my interest piqued. If there is any chef in the area I trust to mak e healthy taste good it w ould be Susan. I noticed they were starting one of their wildl y popular four-day cleanses and thought that would be a per-

fect way to start my new year and a way to turn m yself on to healthier options to fill my 80 percent. It was shortly after I agreed to this, that the reality of what I had ag reed to take part in sunk in. I have never attempted anything like this and the closest I’ve come to cleansing has been a bout with the flu. One big selling point of the Beaming cleanse is ho w they

formulate it to be a simple and delicious e xperience. They do not belie ve that cleansing should in volve major discomfort or distress. Instead, they know that by feeding your body foods made from fresh, organic, raw fruits and v egetables that taste good they have created a realistic and pr actical program that is simple, easy to follow, highly nutritious and

for me, after my rough first day, an enjoyable and tr ansformative experience. The Beaming folks provide a daily cooler filled with five juice, smoothie and chilled soup concoctions plus a salad, tea, and several liquid supplements meant to add. They can be pic ked up the day before at their bBAR location in Del Mar or atYoga 6 in Carlsbad. Some of the juices and elixirs took a little getting used to, but it was more about adjusting my taste buds and that took a bout a da y. The smoothies and soups w ere consistently delicious and the salads were tasty as w ell, especially the dressings. The cucumber, basil, coconut soup and gazpacho were both restaurant quality and will be incorporated into my 80 percent rotation for sure. So back to that r ough first day, and let me give a full disclaimer that I r eally did not do anything they suggested to pr ep for this so I w as cutting myself off cold turkey. I was doing fine until about 3 p .m. when I started feeling some serious hunger pangs and was just a bit irritable in general. I had a Cr ossfit class to attend that night and in m y current state ther e was no way I w as going to mak e it. One of their instructions w as to listen to m y body and snack if necessary on almonds or other r aw foods. Well, that was not going to cut it for me so in a moment

of weakness I ga ve in to a Lean Cuisine that w as in the office freezer and inhaled a tiny Swedish meatball meal. OK, yes, I went bad, but can proudly admit that it did not happen again. Day two had me feeling m uch better about the whole thing and days three and f our had me realizing the positi ve effects of all the good stuff that w as going in m y body and really starting to think ho w I could incorporate what I was eating and drinking into m y daily life. I will admit the con venience of ha ving my day of nutrition pre-made was really nice. Beaming also provided a daily email with encour agement and detailed the men u for the day. Lisa set out to fill the need for a program that went beyond the curr ent weightloss fad, deprivation-laden, confusing cleansing regimens on the mar ket and in m y opinion she nailed it. I am a Beaming convert and will make it a point to r egularly visit their bBAR at 2683 Via de la Valle across from Flower Hill mall. Learn more about Beaming at bebeaming.com.

Lick the Plate can now be heard on KPRi, 102.1 FM Monday-Friday during the 7pm hour. David Boylan is founder of Artichoke Creative and Artichoke Apparel, an Encinitas based marketing firm and clothing line. Reach him at david@artichoke-creative.com or (858) 395-6905.


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THE COAST NEWS

SHARROWS

CONTINUED FROM A4

ones who the Marr s seem to think only travel in one direction). These racing cyclists are great, and I love to see them, but what I’m talking about is cycling instead of driving, cycling for day-to-day transportation. This is what Encinitas should be stri ving towards. While the Marrs seem to think we should implement cycling improvements only as they are demanded b y cycling groups, I feel that we need to be pr oactive. My daughter is twenty years old, and she w ould love to c ycle around Encinitas in or der to run errands and get to public transportation. But she’s uncomfortable with the safety aspects of c ycling on

Highway 101. She has a point. I bike there often, and I’ve had close calls. The Marrs mention traffic issues and their effects on emergency response times. I would suggest that if mor e elderly people c ycled for daily errands, there would be less need f or emergency response vehicles accessing them, because there would be fewer heart attac ks and strokes. Again, I think of Sweden: one w ould see old people on bic ycles all the time. We need to encour age cycling, not stifle it. It’s one of the plainest no-br ainers out there. Our goals should be to get people out of their car s and onto bic ycles whenever it’s possible to do so.The only way that’s going to happen is if motorists ar e inconvenienced. Yes, this is unfortu-

nate, but it’s the onl y way change is likely to take place. That’s the w ay we comfortable Western World people are. If gas prices ar e low, we buy big stupid cars.When gas prices go up, we buy smaller, more ecological ones. It’s the same with c ycling. People will not lea ve their car s unless they’re inconvenienced enough to do so. And clearly it’s worth the inconvenience. If drivers on Highway 101 ar e slowed down, that’s good. Only then will they wake up, smell the coffee, and buy a bike. In my case, complaints motorists have about being inconvenienced fall on deaf ears. As I see things, it’s the motorists who are inconveniencing us cyclists, reducing our quality of life, our quality of air . It’s time we, as a society, started caring less a bout motorists

and started caring mor e about cyclists. It’s time we started deemphasizing the automobile. Here in Encinitas, it’s a no-br ainer, especially now that we have a city council majority with insight and pr ogressive values. One small caveat: I agree that if such changes are going to be included in the 101 Streetscape project, then perhaps everything should be done at the same time. However, this consideration only holds if the Str eetscape project is going to be started in the very near future. If the Streetscape project is going to be delayed for years, as I suspect it will, then this current project of sharrows and lane diet is a bsolutely necessary. Darius Degher is a Leucadia resident.

3 DAYS

JAN. 18, 2013

LETTERS

CONTINUED FROM A4

This project is bound to be a huge success. Desalination has helped countries such as Australia and Saudi Arabia who lack freshwater. The ocean is basicall y limitless, making desalination a reliable drought-proof source of water. The scarcity and demand of freshwater is incr easing, and desalination may just be the perfect solution. Allison Wood, Carlsbad

Preserve Calavera, please!

Please reconsider saving the panhandle of Quarr y Creek and reduce the number of units belo w 656. Keep development on the alr eady degraded part of the site and preserve the historic sense of place and the regional wildlife movement corridor. Leave open spaces for wildlife, hiking and other recreation NOT for homes! Our freeways and side str eets are too crowded now and can not support the tr affic more homes would bring. The intersection at Emerald Drive is horr endous now! As well as the inter section at College and other s along state Route 78! My Mother lives in the area and I worry everyday about her moving through those intersections and pr ay she sta ys safe and no distr acted driver hits her while tr ying to run a yellow light. You have to agree! Please place quality of life a bove the quantity of homes! Sandy Zelasko, Valley Center

Not smart growth

For years McMillin, the developer of the pr oposed Quarry Creek Project in Carlsbad, has been touting

this as “Smart Growth.” But it turns out the y are the onl y ones who think so. Few people would think that putting 656 homes in an ar ea zoned for 293 is very smart. It also is not very smart f or this Car lsbad project to dump 100 percent of their tr affic on Oceanside roads — causing tr affic failures on College,Vista Way and Lake Blvd. And how smart is it to ha ve cash str apped Oceanside provide 100 percent of the police, fire, and emergency medical ser vices to this Car lsbad neighborhood? SANDAG, the Regional Planning Agency, has now officially weighed in. They said Quarry Creek fails to meet the land use or tr ansit criteria required for a smart g rowth project. Hmm, if Quarry Creek is not smart growth — what should we call it? Hopefully the Mayor and City Council of Car lsbad are smarter than this de veloper and will approve a project that really is smart — a down sized project that preserves the irreplaceable natural and historic resources of this valley. Diane Nygaard Preserve Calavera, Oceanside

Armed teachers

Hooray for the John Birch Society and the National Rifle Association (NRA) for demanding that our sc hool teachers be armed to pr otect our children by using their U.S. Constitutional gun rights and armed guards. If the teachers had been routinely armed in the past decades, it’s obvious that the killings and the casualtie s would have been reduced by at least 90 per cent. However, our leaders and the police wouldn’t allow our teachers to be armed and by doing so they have directly violated our Constitution that they have sworn to uphold and f acilitated the horrible death and destruction. They should be investigated and pr osecuted for such acts against our c hildren. We should support the John Birch Society and the NRA in their eff orts to arm our teachers and pr otect our children, and if the teac hers bring their o wn guns, it will cost nothing. Sincerely, Ed Nemecheck, Landers

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A13

THE COAST NEWS

JAN. 18, 2013

A RTS &ENTERTAINMENT

Send your arts & entertainment news to arts@thecoastnews.com

Painter transcends obstacles to share what inspires him KAY COLVIN A Brush With Art They say what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. San Diego artist Michael Carini has triumphed over adversity as he makes giving back to the community his top priority. Growing up in San Diego, Carini’s artistic talents were apparent before age 13 when his work was selected for a y outh art show at the San Diego Museum of Art. As a senior at UNI (no w Cathedral Catholic) High Sc hool in Carmel Valley, his tessellated drawing won first place in the San Diego County fair. Working his w ay through Loyola Marymount University, where in 2006 he graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in Studio Arts and a minor in Art History, his extraordinary artistic talents were recognized as he appr enticed under acclaimed artists Jane Brucker and Roland Reiss. However, life has not been effortless for Michael Carini. Challenges including neurological disorders such as Tourette’s syndrome and obsessi ve-compulsive tendencies ha ve often made it difficult f or him to function socially and professionally. Additionally, a violent assault in his home in 2009 required many months of healing from physical and emotional trauma. Carini states pensively, “We all ha ve obstacles we have to o vercome and times of ad versity. Rather than focus on the negative, however, I make a conscious choice to turn it into something positive.” Never allowing them to define his c haracter,

ARTS CALENDAR Got an item for Arts calendar? Send the details via email to calendar@coastnewsgroup.com.

JAN. 18

AUDITIONS

OPEN

San Marcos Theatre West invites youth ages 7 to 18 to audition for “Little Mermaid” at the San Marcos Community Center, 3 Civic Center Drive, San Marcos between 5 and 8 p.m. Jan. 18. Be prepared to sing a one-min ute excerpt from a song of y our choice. Bring an instrumental CD or sing a cappella. Also bring a school photo and a short list of past e xperiences you have had speaking, singing or

Meghan Anrews, as Rita, leans forward, imparting her eagerness to learn from her tutor Frank, played by Bjorn Johnson, in the North Coast Repertory Theatre’s production of “Educating Rita.” Photo courtesy of Aaron Rumley

North Coast Rep’s ‘Rita’ stands too firmly on sociological soapbox By Rachel Stine Michael Carini at work on his newest 9-canvas polyptych painting titled “Regenaissance.” Courtesy photo

Carini states, “My conditions and e xperiences are significant components of who I am, or who I was at a specific period of m y life, and that is undoubtedl y reflected in m y work.” He

solo residency program in an extremely small, completely exposed studio space in the mid dle of Downtown San Diego. He says of the confrontational experience,

My work shares personal narratives of my own life and experiences, filtered through a broad spectrum...” Michael Carini Artist

continues, “My work shares personal narratives of my own life and e xperiences, filtered through a broad spectrum of art history of various cultures, philosophy, theology, geometry, and literature.” Carini has courageously risen to his c hallenges. During the summer of 2012 the obsessive, socially uncomfortable artist faced his fears during a 50-da y

“It was very much a sociological experiment — me being in a box with people walking down Broadway all day long looking in at me.” With his door open to the public during the 500 hours in the space, Carini says, “I was there to spark interest, and my responsibility was to mak e people feel welcome and that art TURN TO BRUSH WITH ART ON A14

JAN. 21

dancing in fr ont of a g roup. Performances will be held F eb. 14, through Feb. 17. For further COASTAL TALENT Through information. call (760) 744-9000 March 9, the William D. Cannon Art Gallery, 1775 Dove Lane or go to san-marcos.net. Carlsbad, will present 100 works of art in all media b y artists who w ork in San Diego READY TO ROCK In The County. Open Tuesdays through Midst 777 will play melodic rock Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and metal after a finger -food Sundays 1 to 5 p.m. potluck at 5 p.m. Jan. 19 at Rushing Wind Church, 4168 Avenida De La Plata, GUITARS Oceanside. Open to the public, WORLD no charge. For more informa- International Guitar Night will be at 7 p.m. Jan. 22. Tickets are tion, call (760) 940-0257. available at (760) 438-5996 or museumofmakingmusic.org. Acoustic guitarists Brian Gor e WESTERN PACE Run to the with Scotland's Martin Taylor, strains of Cowboy Jack and the Solorazaf from Madagascar and North County Cowboys as they Guinga from Brazil perform perform from 7 to 10 a.m., Jan. their latest w orks and then 20 at the Carlsbad Marathon, exchange musical ideas. 901 Palomar Airport Road, ROCK AND ROLL North Carlsbad.

JAN. 19

JAN. 22

JAN. 20

SOLANA BEACH — The entire play takes place in one location: a clutter ed office space filled with books, a desk, a couple of chairs, a filing ca binet, a lamp, a fireplace, and two Gothic-style windows. In this one r oom at an unspecified university in Britain, a failed-poetturned-literature-professor encounters a br assy hairdresser in an a brupt clash of class status and education in the North Coast Repertory Theatre’s production of “Educating Rita.” But despite the sincer e efforts by the pr oduction’s performers, design team and crew, playwright Willy Russell’s script hinder s the show by pushing too man y social themes on under developed characters. In the pla y, heavydrinking university professor Frank agrees to tutor a cheeky hair stylist named Rita, who is eager for an education to gain g reater opportunities in her life. Meghan Andrews, who plays Rita, lights up the stage with an earnestness to learn, in Rita’s words, “everything.” As Rita’s hair County Academy of Music Performance is offering an After School Rock Band pr ogram in Vista Tuesdays and Thursdays, 4 to 5:45 p.m. Jan. 22 to Feb. 28, for youth ages 6 to 12. All materials are provided and a live performance ends the sixweek session. Cost is $149. Visit ncamp.net for details.

JAN. 25 NEW

EXHIBIT The Oceanside Museum of Art will open “Art After Dark: Ecotopia,” at 7 p.m. Jan. 25 and host a New Member reception at 10 a.m. Jan. 26, at the museum, 704 Pier View Way, Oceanside. For information on memberships, call Teresa Ellis at (760) 435-3724.

JAN. 26

OPERA INSIGHT Free Opera

and clothes gain sophistication, Andrews crafts the way Rita speaks and moves, embodying the transition of a woman learning to find herself in the midst of E.M. Foster and Shakespeare. Bjorn Johnson’s portrayal of F rank honestly embraces the struggle of a forlorn academic w orking to overcome professional and personal failure. The audience can almost smell the alcohol on F rank’s breath and feel his attac hment to his attr active, young pupil in the w ay that he slurps his drinks and gazes at Rita. Credit should be gi ven to sound designer Chris Luessmann who chose classical covers of British r ock hits to intersect each interaction, effectively highlighting Rita and F rank’s drastically different backgrounds. Yet even a li vely burst of Queen’s “Killer Queen” between scenes w as not enough to lighten the load of social issues thrown in by Russell’s writing of this supposed comedy. With long, desperate monologues, Russell’s script burdens his tw o characters

with a jumble of g rand themes ranging from education opportunities f or the underprivileged to social standing. Furthermore, the audience is gi ven limited insight into each character’s lives outside of the office, making Rita and Frank rather two-dimensional. Though humorous oneliners liter eac h scene, the constant struggles f or each character makes it difficult to call the play a “comedy.” As a result, “Educating Rita” will entertain playgoers but leave them wanting for characters, not stereotypes, to carry the two-person show. “Educating Rita” is playing at the North Coast Repertory Theatre through Feb. 3. Ticket information and show times can be found at the theatr e at 987 Loma Santa Fe Drive, Suite D, during box office hour s or online at northcoastrep.org.

Previews 10 a.m. Jan. 26, at the Carlsbad City Libr ary, 1775 Dove Lane Carlsbad, begin with “The Daughter of the Regiment,” giving an in-depth look at the history, musical style and story of each production in the San Diego Opera season by musicologist Ron Shaheen.

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Band along with guest Bernie Dresel will perform a tribute to Big Band Drummer s at 2 p .m. Jan 20 at Car lsbad Community Church, 3175 Harding St., Carlsbad. Tickets are $15. For advance tickets, call Gary Adcock at (858) 775-1113.


A14

THE COAST NEWS

A RTS &ENTERTAINMENT

JAN. 18, 2013 Send your arts & entertainment news to arts@thecoastnews.com

Alums bring play debut to San Dieguito’s Leiggett Theater

From left: Isabelle Nelisse, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Megan Charpentier and Jessica Chastain in “Mama,” executive produced by Guillermo del Toro. Photo courtesy Universal Pictures

‘Mama’ is a terrifying tale told tenderly By Noah S. Lee

Pulsating with terr or at every twist and tenderness at every turn, “Mama” emerges as a solid genr e story that not onl y sends chills down your spine, but also haunts the depths of your soul. Horror films may have lost a considerable amount of respect nowadays, but that doesn’t mean they are terrible by definition. When given the appr opriate treatment, even a genre such as this can experience better da ys than it usually does. So, what do y ou get when you have a pr oject with Guillermo del Toro serving as e xecutive producer and Jessica Chastain leading the cast? The end result is “Mama,” a terrifying but touching scary tale that shows just ho w far a mother’s love for her c hildren goes. Five years ago, sisters Victoria (Megan Charpentier) and Lill y (Isabelle Nélisse) disappeared from their suburban neighborhood, leaving behind no trace. After the kids are discovered alive and well inside a decr epit log cabin, they are placed into the care of their Uncle Lucas (Nikolaj CosterWaldau) and his girlfriend, Annabel (Jessica Chastain), who is not at all enthusiastic about taking care of the children. It soon becomes apparent that the gir ls are not the only ones the couple has w elcomed into their home. As Annabel tries to help Victoria and Lilly readjust to living normal lives, she begins to feel the presence of a sinister force lurking in the house. Are the girls experi-

encing the usual post-tr aumatic stress, or is a ghostlike entity in their midst? And how could the y have survived on their own in the woods? Spanish director Andres Muschietti shows no bounds when it comes to establishing the mood of the film. I liked how the blue, black and gray colors in many of the scenes worked both ways: you can feel dread during one moment, and then warmth in another. Plus, the lingering gaze of the camer a heightens the tension and suspense within the narr ative as y ou wonder what kept those girls alive and what will happen to their new parental figures. Your heart pounds as you witness Victoria and Lilly begging Annabel not to venture into a specific area of the house, or when you watch Dr. Dreyfuss talk to the girls about “Mama.” And yet, there’s room for a soft side, most noticeably when Annabel breathes out air onto Lilly’s hands to calm her down, as well as her nailing the windo ws shut f or the girls’ safety. It’s not easy to ac hieve that sense of balance in the horr or genre, but as “Mama” proves, such a feat is not impossible. It shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone that the supernatural aspect of the film contains traces of del Toro’s “Pan’s Labyrinth,” given he ser ves as e xecutive producer of “Mama.” Nevertheless, the design of the ghostly entity is hideous yet tragic, and the way it slither s and darts across the en vironment is eerily mesmerizing. Jessica Chastain han-

dles herself well in spite of her adopted rock musician appearance, proving that looks can be decei ving. Her Annabel humanizes the story in a way that may never have occurred had she not joined this project. Nikolaj Coster-Waldau has his share of moments, but it’s obvious this “Game of Thrones” alumnus is pla ying second fid dle to the Oscar-nominated actress, and he doesn’t seem to mind. Both Megan Charpentier and Isabelle Nélisse are perfectly cast as the two girls; they steal a good portion of the film. The only complaint I have regarding “Mama” is the pacing of its ending scenes. I can’t say for certain whether the unfolding of the final e vents should have been sped up or slowed down, but the manner in whic h the end pr oceeds isn’t quite what I would define as “smooth.” This downside doesn’t take away from the f act that “Mama” is still a good horror film; it’ s just an o versight I feel could’v e been refined. In the end, “Mama” triumphs as a competent genre keeper and is sure to delight horror fans looking for something with f ar more substance than what is usually available. Even if you’re not one f or scary movie nights, this one rises above the slump that most fall into and is w orth checking out. MPAA rating: PG-13 for violence and terror,some disturbing images and thematic elements. Runnig time: 1 hour 40 minutes Playing: General release

ENCINITAS — The San Dieguito Academy High School will pr esent a onenight-only benefit fundraiser for the sc hool’s Theater Department at 7 p .m. Jan. 26 in the Clayton E. Liggett Theater, 800 Santa F e Drive. The special e vening gathers talented alumni of SDAHS for the one performance. The play will then make its world premiere in Los Angeles in the summer of 2013. The play, “The End of It,” is written and dir ected by former student P aul Coates. It will be performed by an all-alumni cast, including Mary Jeffries, class of ‘71; Bill Barker, class of ‘73; Mike Ball, class of ‘75; Coates, class of ‘76; Sharon Corbett-Parry, class of ‘78 and Leslie Sw artz-Bartlett, class of ‘83. The Liggett family is expected to attend, including Marty Liggett-Smith,

Clayton Liggets’s widow, and his tw o children, Mark and Marcia. Proceeds from the event will benefit SD A’s Theatre Arts Council, which funds a professional technical director for the theater and theatrical r esources and supplies f or SDA students. A pre-show reception, consisting of light appetizers and beverages, will start at 6:30 p.m. in the lobby of the Clayton E. Liggett Theater. Desserts and be verages will be served at the conclusion of the perf ormance. Tickets cost $30 and can be pur chased by visiting seatyourself.biz/sandieguito. “Each member of this cast was indelibly affected by our y ears at San Dieguito under the w atchful and commanding pr esence of Mr . Liggett,” said Coates. “I work in the entertainment industry, having

managed the car eers of such actors as Hugh Laurie, James McAvoy, Miriam Margolyes, Toby Stephens, John Francis Daley and others and I w ould not be who I am without Cla yton. My dad died while I w as a student of Cla yton’s and he took up the r eins of a missing parent without my even knowing it and cast me at Willy Loman in ‘Death Of A Salesman’ at the age of 17. “I owe him so much and am thrilled to be bringing back some of his f avorite students to perf orm this play.” Coates has had his work produced in Ne w York, off-Broadway in Los Angeles and throughout the country. In this pla y, “The End Of It, ” three couples simultaneously dissolve 20year marriages. The honest, often humorous and fr ank situation delivers a v oyeuristic punch as the couples erupt with anger, blame, grief and ultimately acceptance.

BRUSH WITH ART

Carini states, “This is the greatest thing I can offer the world and I could receive no g reater gift in return than to kno w I am making a difference in people’s lives.” He continues, “I am putting myself out there and never hold back. I will always give everything I have to gi ve…and then I will give everything that is left.” One of the most popular entries fr om Carini’s online daily journal of hope and inspiration reads, “I will never apologize for being me, but I will apologize for the times that I am not.” He comments, “The most important thing about being an artist, in my opinion, is making sure that you are being y ou. I will ne ver waver from that.” Carini goes on to sa y, “Our differences and our unique experiences are the greatest thing we have to offer the world. My hope is that by sharing my own, others may find a way to grow through inspirational and creative avenues such as painting, or simply discover

that there is hope.” With four distinctive bodies of w ork already to his credit, Carini states, “As I continue to grow, continuously redefining myself, I will have new boxes to break out of . My work, undoubtedly, will change in the process.” Selected Michael Carini paintings ar e currently on displa y at the Merrill Lynch Building, 701 B Street. For links to his dail y journal, monthly “The Painter’s Edge” column, and to learn more about the artist, visit MichaelCarini.com.

CONTINUED FROM A13

is approachable.” He adds, “It was about me breaking out of m y metaphorical box and learning to paint lik e a child again — intuiti vely, organically and natur ally with just a brush, resulting in a fr eely expressive new body of work.” He emerged with a 30-piece series titled, “The Boy In The Box.” It proved to be a tr ansformative experience on many levels. Carini has escaped the limitations of his “box” with Houdini-like finesse. He is curr ently focused on cr eating an immense 9-canvas polyptych work based on fractals, the Golden Ratio , and the concept of a Rubik’ s Cube with virtually countless orientations. Carini’s attitude a bout giving back to the comm unity has been a significant aspect of tr anscending his conditions. Donating his time and talents to nonprofit organizations, working to increase art awareness, and providing opportunities and inspiration for other artists,

Kay Colvin is an art consultant and director of the L Street Fine Art Gallery in San Diego’s Gaslamp Quarter. She specializes in promoting emerging and mid-career artists and bringing enrichment programs to elementary schools through The Kid’s College. Contact her at kaycolvin@lstreetfineart.com.

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A15

THE COAST NEWS

JAN. 18, 2013

S PORTS

Contact us at sports@coastnewsgroup.com with story ideas, photos or suggestions

Pro Kids opens its greens By Promise Yee

From left: Chargers President Dean Spanos, new head coach Mike McCoy and general manager Tom Telesco. The organization hired McCoy and Telesco to replace former head coach Norv Turner and general manager A.J. Smith, who were fired at the end of the 2012 season. Photo by Tony Cagala

The ‘We’ Generation looks to begin for the Chargers ■ New head coach, GM bring

message of organizational unity By Tony Cagala

SAN DIEGO — The practice fields at Char gers Park have since taken on a yellowish hue with the wintry chill. Tarps were covering portions of the fields, once filled with dark green blades of grass, and where players’ cleats pock-marked the g rounds following months of tryouts,workouts and practices. In a matter of time, the fields will be g reen again and filled with r eturning players and player-hopefuls. While the fields are in the process of renewal, so too is the Chargers organization. Near one of the fields, veteran quarterback Philip Rivers was talking to media, expressing excitement about his new head coach who was just introduced moments before. Mike McCoy, the former offensive coordinator of the Denver Broncos, was named as the Chargers new head coach Tuesday — the 15th in team history to fill that role. When introducing McCoy, Chargers President Dean Spanos said that he’ d had all the qualities they were looking for in a head coac h, including having a structur ed vision on how to coach and build a team. Spanos emphasized McCoy’s energy and especially his devoutness as a f amily man, which has taken on more importance with the or ganization and with the ne wly hired General Manager Tom Telesco. “Tom, myself, the rest of the organization, the personnel department, we’re all in this together,” McCoy said. “And once we make a decision in this organization it’s the organization’s decision. It’s not just my decision, or Tom’s

decision or Mr . Spanos’ decision; it’s the organization’s decision. Once we call a play in the game, the team, the organization, that’s our play. Same thing with the draft,” he added. “When we draft our player, we’re not going to w orry about who w e didn’t get, the guys we missed…we’re going to worry about the players we draft, the free agents, the people we sign her e, you’re our football players and we’re all in this together.” McCoy, 40, called the coaching position with the Chargers an “opportunity of a lifetime.” He said he kne w during his interview that this was the place for him, but before accepting the job, he said, he had to go bac k home and talk with his wife Kelly. “Without a doubt, we knew this w as the place we wanted to be.” “Some people come in to an interview prepared for an interview,” said Telesco, who was hired to the or ganization more than a week before.“And he was prepared for the job…. “He’s a teac her who can communicate with all different backgrounds of players, different levels of e xperience and we think he can moti vate as a coach to get guys to pla y their best at critical times.Those are the kind of things w e were looking for and just started to come out naturally with him.” As for his per sonality, Telesco said: “We’re going to find out as w e move through this whole y ear kind of what his personality is. “But I can tell y ou from speaking with him, he’s very firm and he kno ws what he wants. “There will be no g rey

area with him. “Now, it’s going to be this or this and if you don’t do it his way we’ll find out a differ ent way; and ma ybe that pla yer isn’t here anymore. But he knows what he w ants to do , and we’ll see what his per sonality is on the field.” McCoy said he w asn’t a yeller or a scr eamer on the sidelines, but tempered that with the fact that “all coaches snap sooner or later.” With the y outhfulness between the ne w coach and general manager, McCoy said there will be some new energy. “Anytime there’s change, there’s going to be some new energy that’s brought into the building,” he said. “It’ll be different and change happens for reasons, and we’re going to do what we think is best f or this organization moving forward.” As for any message that McCoy brings into the loc ker room, Rivers said it’ s important, but that he e xpects McCoy will see a group of guys that know how to pla y, that have been w ell coached and know how to win. “Yeah, we haven’t won as much as we’d like in the past few years,” Rivers said. “Certainly we’ll be r eady for his message and his style, but I do think there’s a foundation that’s been building that’s sustained regardless of what’ s happened the last fe w years that we can build on r ather quickly.” McCoy said the or ganization has one goal in mind every year and that’s to win it and be the last team standing up on the podium with the tr ophy. “And that’s our goal. That’s what we’re going to w ork towards everyday from here on out. “It’s not going to be an easy task,” he said, adding that it wasn’t going to be a quic k process and that it w ouldn’t happen overnight.

OCEANSIDE — Pro Kids invites the community to celebrate the grand opening of its six-hole, par-3 golf course Jan. 19. The kid-scale golf course boasts holes with dri ve lengths of 60 to 80 y ards This makes it ideal for young players who are just learning the game. The course also offers the challenges of sand tr aps and hills. Pro Kids is a nonpr ofit youth club that teac hes children character development, life skills and v alues through education and the game of golf. Members enjoy golf instruction, use of the g reens, homework assistance, a computer lab and enric hment field trips. On the cour se children learn the game of golf and the etiquette of shaking hands, knowing where to stand and when to talk. “The golf program has a lot of depth to it, ” Kathy Wilder, senior program director, said. “Golf is a very honorable activity with a lot of discipline. They learn self-discipline, focused practice, etiquette.They’re learning about putting their best foot forward interacting with other pla yers.” Unlike other after school programs there are no mandatory attendance r equirements. Children can determine how often they come to the club. Once there, they are required to participate. “The uniqueness of the program is the high e xpectation we place on kids f or performance and participation,” Wilder said. “They develop a whole plethora of skills — life skills, golf skills, athletic skills.” Golf instruction begins with skills training using oversize golf clubs and Velcro targets. Once club members show sufficient aptitude they grad-

Join the fun for Kook run CARDIFF-BY-THESEA — Get your kook on and enjoy coastline vie ws while burning off the calories before Super Bowl snacks at the Cardiff Kook 5K Run from 7:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Feb.3.Register now at cardiffkookrun.com. The Cardiff Kook 5K Run was created to promote healthy living while gi ving back to the comm unity. All proceeds from the event will go directly into impr oving Cardiff-by-the-Sea. Registration will tak e place at Moonlight Beac h parking lot and the run takes place along 2nd Str eet and South Coast Highway 101.

Kevin Sheriff, Pro Kids golf coach, tutors (left to right) Davina Saguing, 10, Julian Rassel, 11, and Darrin Morris, 9. Kids receive homework assistance and golf instruction. Photo by Promise Yee

uate to playing with golf clubs on the Pro Kids course. The course has tw o tee boxes at eac h hole. Children progress from beginning tees to advanced tees. The next step f or club members is playing on area golf courses. “It’s incredible how good they get,” Kevin Sheriff, Pro Kids golf coach, said. Academics and enrichment activities are also important club components. Club members hunker down and complete homework before daily golf instruction begins. There are also opportunities for members to take field trips throughout the year. Pro Kids w orks with Oceanside Unified School

District and teaches six-week golf workshops at schools on a rotating basis. Children often become club member s after being introduced to the game. “Our program is a link in the chain of support for kids in this community,” Wilder said. Membership runs $100 annually. There are also scholarships available. “The vast majority of kids participate fr ee of charge,” Wilder said. “We are a development-driven program. We really try to make it accessible to people.” Pro Kids is located at 821 Douglas Drive. The grand opening is from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Jan. 19. Pro Kids also runs a golf program in City Heights.

Pro Kids 6-hole par-3 golf course will open Jan. 19. Holes have 60 to 80 yards drive lengths, which makes the course ideal for young players learning the game.

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A16

THE COAST NEWS

GUNS

CONTINUED FROM A1

DRIVING

CONTINUED FROM A1

figure. Del mar posted a whopping 93 percent gain in miles driven on its streets, yet its total was still lower than most cities. Kathy Garcia, Del Mar’s planning and community development director, said she couldn’t comment as to wh y miles driven jumped in the ar ea, because the r eport

Our public transportation doesn’t reach most of the county.” Sarah Benson Communications Director,Equinox Center

had yet to be released to the public when she was reached for comment. But to encourage eco-friendly ways of tr aveling, she noted that Del Mar widened a major bike lane, has installed mor e sidewalks and is part of a SANDAG study measuring how many bikes cycle through certain streets. Once complete, the study will inform planners where to in vest bicycle infrastructure. “There are exciting things happening,” Garcia said.

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but you can r egulate it to ensure the public safety issues are addressed,” City Attorney Lesley Devaney said. Staff researched laws governing the trucks in other cities but was unable to craft one for Del Mar within 45 days. The initial or dinance expired Jan. 4. Council didn’t have a meeting sc heduled until Jan. 14 so it could not be extended and a ne w one had to be adopted. Staff is w orking to cr eate an or dinance that will address hours of oper ation, noise, the number of truc ks allowed at each event, parking requirements, restroom availability, lighting, signage, traffic, neighborhood impacts and trash collection and recycling. Council previously directed staff to develop regulations for all outdoor mobile vending services, including those that sell clothing or offer games f or birthday parties, because it is a g rowing business tr end nationwide. Garcia said that list could also potentiall y include push carts suc h as those that sell coffee and ice cream and mobile barber s and knife sharpening.

Although San Diego County’ s miles driven ticked down in 2011, the Equinox Center’s report said that’s likely due to gas prices rising, and not necessaril y policy initiatives. To that end, the report advocates that officials institute mixed-use de velopment — blocks or even buildings that combine residential, commercial, cultural and industrial purposes — so people don’ t have to get in their cars as much. Further, the report states, they should also encourage infrastructure for walking and bicycles. On that note, the report says bicycle infrastructure is key for bridging the “the last mile,” the distance between a public transit hub and a person’s home. For this reason, the report commends the Encinitas Bik e and P edestrian Committee and similar g roups for working to improve bicycling. Brian Grover, the chairman of the committee, said the group is looking to install bik e racks in do wntown Encinitas and Leucadia to encourage ridership. “We’re not plotting e xactly one mile around the coaster station or anything like that,” Grover said. “But these are areas where more bike infrastructure could encour age people to ride to public tr ansit, or to simpl y ride their bike instead of dri ve when the y’re going short distances,” he added.

“I would encourage you to stick with the food trucks,” resident Bill Michalsky said. “I would hope that we really don’t encourage more of these uses.” Council members agreed, but directed staff to do so being mindful a mor e comprehensive ordinance may eventually need to be created. “We’ve got to mo ve on with the f ood truck ordinance … but I would do it in a way that y ou know the mobile industry is coming, ” Mayor Terry Sinnott said. “Don’t do it just to solv e the immediate problem, but do it with the f oresight that y ou know that mobile v ending may be a problem so that we create the matrix that w e can, later on, add the same perspective that the community concerns ar e to other mobile vending businesses.” “It’s more important to move forward on the f ood trucks,” Councilman Don Mosier said. “The extent to whic h this may, in the future, need regulation is sort of daunting,” he added, noting there is a pole-dancing truc k in Chicago. “There are future challenges to r egulation of this kind of trucks, but let’s start simple and lea ve the adult entertainment trucks until down the line,” Mosier said.

By law, an interim urgency ordinance is onl y valid for 45 da ys unless extended by council at a public hearing. Garcia said it could take about two months to craft a new law. All business licenses in Del Mar expire at the end of the calendar y ear. Fees are based on g ross receipts earned in Del Mar on a sliding scale. “Each of the food trucks has stated that they will earn less than $15,000 annually in Del Mar, which equates to a $30 annual license,” Garcia said. Christian Murcia, who started the Del Mar e vent and owns two of the truc ks that currently hold business licenses to oper ate in the city, said last y ear the Wednesday night gatherings were “very, very slow,” and some operators opted not to return. “The trucks aren’t making a lot of mone y,” Murcia said, adding that he had reached out to other truc k owners to join the mid week event. The trucks haven’t been there since No vember and according to some food truck websites, none are scheduled in the near future. At press time he did not return a phone call r equesting a status update.

politicians are pushing f or more. Firearms dealers in the state must have a federal and state license, as well as a local permit to sell guns. The state pr ohibits those who have been convicted of a felony or specific violent or drug-related crimes or those who have a history of mental illness from buying guns. All gun purchases require a bac kground check and a 10-da y waiting period. California only allows buyers to purchase one handgun every 30 days. The Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence ranked California as ha ving the strongest laws against gun violence in the nation last year. Yet several politicians have seized recent public opinion to introduce even tougher gun laws in the state. California Senator Dianne Feinstein announced her plan to introduce a bill bef ore Congress this month that will ban assault weapons and large ammunition magazines. California Senator Leland Yee also introduced a bill after the shooting that pr ohibits semi-automatic weapons from having bullet buttons,which he claims allow the easy reloading of multiple rounds of ammunition. He furthermore announced his plan to intr oduce legislation that w ould require annual registration and

SANDAG

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ing scale SANDAG uses to weigh which projects should be funded, and is secure with the c hecks and balances Environmental Impact Reports provide. “I support the plans SANDAG has in place, ” Hall said. “I feel they are extremely balanced.” Two major pr ojects

LEADERSHIP

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Because the council lost their focus the city needed to r aid approved capital pr ojects of $7 million and go in debt with a $9 million bond to get the park started.This leaves little money for other pr ojects. It wasn’t that the city f ailed to prioritize capital projects it’s that they lost focus on serving residents. One public speak er at the meeting rightl y suggest-

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Shack, he still will give you a wave and smile. You will probably see him on the road this winter riding the bac k roads of North County. I don’t want to leave out the triathletes, who have as great, if not g reater, impact on riders in Encinitas. Scott Tinley in Oli venhain, Mark Allen and J ulie Moss in Cardiff; Paula Newby Frasier and Greg Welch in Encinitas are all Ir onman Hawaii winners and tr ained here full time. They attracted pros and amateurs alike to s wim our oceans, ride the w orld-class roads of North County , and run the tr ails of Ranc ho

JAN. 18, 2013 background checks for gun owners and another bill w ould strengthen firearm safety laws. “I’ve always planned on filling out some of m y gun collection,” said Larry Yoo, a customer at Dir ect Action Solutions.He explained that he made his most recent purchase, an AR-15 semi-automatic rifle, out of concern that he may not be able to purchase it while it is in high demand, or if the gun becomes banned under ne w legislation. “Fortunately I bought it just in time before the big panic, but I’m still ha ving trouble getting ammunition for it.” Another hindrance for buyers and seller s is that firearm manufacturers are slowing down their production for fear that their products may be banned and illegal to sell, according to Stahl. As a result, he said it is incr easingly difficult to maintain the stor e’s stock and meet the high demand. For Duncan’s Gunworks in San Marcos, customers have been concerned a bout potential firearm restrictions since Obama was elected in 2008. “It’s been very, very busy since the election,” said Cathy Duncan, the store’s owner. “We’ve had difficulty replacing our usual stock.” The increase in demand is evident on many local firearms stores’ websites. Direct Action Solutions has stopped taking or ders online due to the high demand

and its limited stock. While the store’s website normally receives 30,000 hits per month, the site was blasted with 60,000 hits within a w eek after the Connecticut school shooting, Stahl said. “EVERYTHING is STILL out of stoc k. That is right... EVERYTHING,” announced Ares Armor, an Oceanside store, in a blog post on Jan. 9. The store has hired extra people to help with customer service and shipping to handle the influx of sales, according to the post. In spite of this, the post noted that the stor e has been unable to handle all of the incoming calls into the stor e and no longer r eturns voice messages, only emails. Ares Armor’s post advised customers, “Please only place your order if you are willing to wait for your products.” Creedmore Sports, another Oceanside stor e, posted a large message in red on the top of its website’s homepage stating, “Due to o verwhelming orders, our website inventory may not be accur ate. Please call to check inventory.” But while business may be booming now for firearms stores, bans on fir earms and ammunition will undoubtedl y cut sales in the future. The owner of Dir ect Action Solutions, Colby Schrader, said that after Obama’s proposed bans the only thing he can hope for now is, “a new job.”

that were recently OK’d by the prior SAND AG board are the build out of the rail corridor and expansion of Interstate 5. Approved plans r equire that mass tr ansit elements be added before I-5 expansion begins. Representatives agree that r egional transportation is an important and complex issue. “There are 17 cities, 25 different streams of

money, and all differ ent ways of doing e xpansion,” Hall said. On another note, the SANDAG 2050 Regional Transportation Plan is in litigations due to petitioners’ concerns, which include the f ailure to study greenhouse gas emissions. Litigations have not stopped pr ojects that are currently in progress, but may impact future projects.

ed that budgeting for the city doesn’t need to be complicated. City staff should forecast how much money would come in for a given year and the council should then prioritize the pr ojects and determine how the money will be spent.The speaker called this type of ann ual budgeting “Pay as you go.” There’s little ar gument from me that the ne w city council has inherited man y challenges left over from the failed policies of the past 10

years. Our roads need repairs, our storm drains maintained, our parks improved and our pension liabilities cut. We need a General Plan Update that updates our current plan preserving character not a new general plan pr omoting high-density housing. We need fiscal budgeting that serves the needs of r esidents not fiscal budgeting that rewards special interests. More facilitators are not the solution to these pr oblems greater focus is.

Santa Fe. They’ve come from Australia, Japan, Europe, Africa, and all o ver North America. Their intense training, positive outlook, and camaraderie have inspired us all. But, I’m sure you’ve noticed, not all c yclist are elite athletes. A great majority are weekend warriors that love to be outside putting in a hard effort and r ewarding themselves with a cup of coffee. Fifteen years ago I knew everyone on the Coast Highway, but now I’m har d pressed to recognize anyone. Cycling has become a mainstream sport with hundr eds of thousands of San Diegans participating. Encinitas should r enew

its effort to enhance our local, national and international cycling reputation. My hope is “the powers that be” will think of the cyclist first when upg rading our streets. They will think of the cyclist first when developing new transportation corridors. They will think of the cyclist first when w e want Encinitas to be mor e intimate, quiet and unique. I know that will attr act more cars, bring people who w ant to escape the c haos (Los Angeles), but over time they too will come to under stand what we already know. Cycling is huge in Encinitas. Mark Lathrop is a Leucadia resident.


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CITY OF ENCINITAS PUBLIC NOTICE OF COMMISSION RECRUITMENT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Encinitas is accepting applications f or appointment to City Commissions. Application forms may be obtained fr om the City Clerk’s Office, 505 South Vulcan Avenue, via e-mail from khollywood@encinitasca.gov, or from the City’s website www.encinitasca.gov. All applicants must be registered voters in the City of Encinitas. ALL APPLICATIONS ARE DUE BY FEBRUARY 28, 2013, 6:00 P.M. Applicants will be asked to attend the March 13, 2013, City Council meeting to briefly discuss (2 to 3 min utes) their qualifications and inter est in ser ving on a commission. Appointments are scheduled to be made by the City Council at its meeting on Mar ch 20, 2013, 6:00 p.m. Terms will begin March 2013. Applicants who would like specific information on the various Commissions should contact the following Departments:

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to you, because your interest may be affected, that the Planning Commission of the City of Carlsbad will hold a public hearing at the Council Chambers, 1200 Carlsbad Village Drive, Carlsbad, California, at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 30, 2013, to consider the following: SUP 12-01- LA COSTA RESORT GOLF COURSE GRADING – Request for approval of a Floodplain Special Use Permit to renovate the south golf course at La Costa Resort and Spa, located north of La Costa Avenue and east of El Camino Real within Local Facilities Management Zone 6. The project is exempt from the California Environmental Quality Act.

Commission for the Arts – City Manager’s Office at 633-2746 Environmental Commission – Public Works Department 633-2827 Parks and Recreation Commission - Parks and Recreation at 633-2740 Planning Commission - Planning Department at 633-2681 Senior Citizens Commission - Parks and Recreation at 633-2740 Traffic Commission - Traffic Engineering at 633-2705 The following is a list of appointments to be made: COMMISSION FOR THE ARTS -- Three (3) appointments to be made for two-year terms with a term ending Mar ch 2015; ENVIRONMENTAL COMMISSION – Three (3) appointments to be made f or two-year terms with a term ending Mar ch 2015; P ARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSION – Three (3) appointments to be made f or two-year terms with a term ending March 2015; PLANNING COMMISSION – Two (2) appointments to be made for two-year terms with a term ending Mar ch 2015 (Terms are expiring for the representatives of Cardiff by the Sea and Old Encinitas); SENIOR CITIZEN COMMISSION – Three (3) appointments to be made f or two-year terms with a term ending Mar ch 2015; TRAFFIC COMMISSION – Two (2) appointments to be made f or two-year terms with a term ending March 2015 (Terms are expiring for the representatives of Cardiff by the Sea and Olivenhain). For more information, please contact Kathy Hollywood at 760-633-2601. 01/18/13, 01/25/13, 02/08/13 CN 14460

Trustee Sale No . 24915CA Title Order No. 95503730 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 6/26/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 2/8/2013 at 10:00 AM, MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE f/k/a MTDS, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION DBA MERIDIAN TRUST DEED SERVICE as the dul y appointed Trustee under and pur suant to Deed of Trust Recorded 07/03/2006, Book , Page , Instrument 2006-0468549 of offi cial records in the Office of the Recorder of SAN DIEGO County , California, executed by: JESUS R. GONZALEZ AND CARMEN GONZALEZ, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS as Trustor, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR LO AN LINK FINANCIAL SERVICES, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auc tion sale to the highest bid der for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or feder al credit union, or a cashier’ s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the F inancial Code and authoriz ed to do busi ness in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and no w held by the trustee in the her einafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without con venant or w arranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possesssion, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the notes (s) secur ed by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and e xpenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set f orth below. The

amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE EAST COUNTY REGIONAL CENTER BY STATUE, 250 E. MAIN STREET, EL CAJON, CA Legal Description: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST Amount of unpaid balance and other c harges: $245,407.86 The street address and other common designation of the real property purported as: 183 AVENIDA DEL GADO, OCEANSIDE, CA 92057 APN Number: 158-211-02-00 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under stand that ther e are risks in volved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not the pr operty itself. Placing the highest bid at trustee auction does not automatically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice may be postponed one or mor e times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the Calif ornia Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made a vailable to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not pr esent at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this property, you may call (714) 5731965 or visit this Internet Web site

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www. Priorityposting.com , using the file n umber assigned to this case 24915CA. Information about postponements that are very short If you challenge these projects in court, you may be limited to raising only in duration or that occur close in those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in time to the scheduled sale may not this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City of Carlsbad at or prior to the public hearing. immediately be r eflected in the telephone information or on the Copies of the environmental documents are available at the Planning Internet Web site. The best way to Division at 1635 Faraday Avenue during regular business hours from 7:30 verify postponement inf ormation am to 5:30 pm Monday through Thursday and 8:00 am to 5:00 pm Friday. is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any Those persons wishing to speak on these proposals are cordially invited to liability for any incorrectness of attend the public hearing. Copies of the staff reports will be available online at http://carlsbad.granicus.com/ViewPublisher.php?view_id=6 on or after the street address and other common designation, if any, shown the Friday prior to the hearing date. If you have any questions, please call the Planning Division at (760) 602-4600. herein. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. DATE: 1/15/2013 MERIDIAN PUBLISH: January 18, 2013 FORECLOSURE SERVICE f/k/a MTDS, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION DBA MERIDIAN CITY OF CARLSBAD TRUST DEED SER VICE 3 SAN JOAQUIN PLAZA, SUITE 215, PLANNING DIVISION NEWPORT BEACH, CA 92660 Sales Line: (714) 573-1965 OR 01/18/13 CN 14483 (702) 586-4500 JESSE J. FERNANDEZ, PUBLICATION LEAD MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE IS ASSISTING THE BENEFICIARY TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID herein. The property heretofore THAT PURPOSE. P1015237 1/18, DEED OF TRUST Amount of described is being sold “as is”. 1/25, 02/01/2013 CN 14482 unpaid balance and other DATE: 01-15-2013 MERIDIAN charges:$217,154.27 The street FORECLOSURE SERVICE f/k/a address and other common desig - MTDS, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORTrustee Sale No . 24901CA Title nation of the real property purport- PORATION DBA MERIDIAN Order No. 95503932 NOTICE OF ed as: 3569 PASEO DE LOS C ALI- TRUST DEED SER VICE 3 SAN TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN FORNIANOS # 257 , OCEANSIDE, JOAQUIN PLAZA, SUITE 215, DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF CA 92056 APN Number: 165-362- NEWPORT BEACH, CA 92660 TRUST DATED 06-01-2005. 27-43 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL Sales Line: (714) 573-1965 OR UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO BIDDERS: If y ou are considering (702) 586-4500 JESSE J. FERNANPROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT bidding on this pr operty lien, you DEZ, PUBLICATION LEAD MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC should understand that ther e are MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERSALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA- risks involved in bid ding at a VICE IS ASSISTING THE BENEFINATION OF THE NATURE OF trustee auction. You will be bid- CIARY TO COLLECT A DEBT THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST ding on a lien, not the pr operty AND ANY INFORMATION YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A itself. Placing the highest bid at OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR LAWYER. On 02-08-2013 at 10:00 trustee auction does not automati - THAT PURPOSE. P1015235 1/18, A.M., MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE cally entitle y ou to fr ee and clear 1/25, 02/01/2013 CN 14473 SERVICE f/k/a MTDS, INC., A ownership of the pr operty. You CALIFORNIA CORPORATION should also be a ware that the lien DBA MERIDIAN TRUST DEED being auctioned off ma y be a jun- Trustee Sale No . 24653CA Title SERVICE as the dul y appointed Order No. 6999070 NOTICE OF Trustee under and pur suant to ior lien. If you are the highest bidTRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN Deed of Trust Recorded 06-09- der at the auction, you are or may DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF be responsible for paying off all 2005, Book , Page , Instrument DATED 8/25/2006. 2005-0483420 of official r ecords in liens senior to the lien being auc - TRUST the Office of the Recor der of SAN tioned off, before you can r eceive UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT clear title to the pr operty. You are DIEGO County, California, executed by: BRETT W. DRAINER, A SIN- encouraged to investigate the exis- MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC GLE MAN as Trustor, MORTGAGE tence, priority, and size of out- SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLAELECTRONIC REGISTRATION standing liens that ma y exist on NATION OF THE NATURE OF SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE this property by contacting the THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST FOR TROXLER & ASSOCIATES, county recorder’s office or a title YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORA- insurance company, either of which LAWYER. On 2/8/2013 at 10:00 TION, as Beneficiary, will sell at may charge you a fee for this infor- AM, MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE f/k/a MTDS, INC., A public auction sale to the highest mation. If you consult either of CORPORATION bidder for cash, cashier's check these resources, you should be CALIFORNIA drawn by a state or national bank, aware that the same lender ma y DBA MERIDIAN TRUST DEED SERVICE as the dul y appointed a cashier’s check drawn by a state hold more than one mortgage or operty. Trustee under and pur suant to or federal credit union, or a deed of trust on the pr Deed of Trust Recorded NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan associa - The sale date shown on this notice 08/30/2006, Book , Page , tion, savings association, or savings may be postponed one or mor e Instrument 2006-0617939 of offi times by the mortgagee, benefici- cial records in the Office of the bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authoriz ed ary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Recorder of San Diego County , to do business in this state. Sale Section 2924g of the Calif ornia California, executed by: JOY will be held by the duly appointed Civil Code. The law requires that GHOSH AND LANA GHOSH, HUStrustee as shown below, of all right, information about trustee sale BAND AND WIFE, AS JOINT TENtitle, and interest conveyed to and postponements be made a vailable ANTS WITH RIGHT OF SURto you and to the public, as a cour- VIVORSHIP as Trustor, MORTnow held b y the trustee in the hereinafter described pr operty tesy to those not pr esent at the GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRAunder and pursuant to the Deed of sale. If you wish to learn whether TION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMITrust. The sale will be made, but your sale date has been postponed, NEE FOR QUICKEN LOANS INC., without convenant or w arranty, and, if applicable, the rescheduled as Beneficiary, will sell at public expressed or implied, regarding time and date f or the sale of this auction sale to the highest bid der title, possesssion, or encum- property, you may call (714) 573- for cash, cashier's check drawn by a brances, to pay the remaining prin- 1965 or visit this Internet Web site state or national bank, a cashier’s cipal sum of the notes (s) secur ed www. Priorityposting.com , using check drawn by a state or feder al by the Deed of Trust, interest the file n umber assigned to this credit union, or a cashier’ s check thereon, estimated fees, charges case 24901CA. Information about drawn by a state or federal savings and expenses of the Trustee for the postponements that are very short and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified total amount (at the time of the ini- in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not in section 5102 of the F inancial tial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be immediately be r eflected in the Code and authoriz ed to do busiset forth below. The amount may be telephone information or on the ness in this state. Sale will be held greater on the day of sale. Place of Internet Web site. The best way to by the dul y appointed trustee as Sale: AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE verify postponement inf ormation shown below, of all right, title, and EAST COUNTY REGIONAL CEN- is to attend the scheduled sale. The interest conveyed to and no w held TER BY ST ATUE, 250 E. MAIN undersigned Trustee disclaims any by the trustee in the her einafter STREET, EL CAJON, CA 92020 liability for any incorrectness of described property under and purLegal Description: AS MORE the street address and other com- suant to the Deed of Trust. The sale mon designation, if any, shown will be made, but without con-

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City of Encinitas Planning and Building Department NOTICE OF PENDING ACTION ON ADMINISTRATIVE APPLICATION AND COASTAL DEVELOPMENT PERMIT The Planning and Building Department of the City of Encinitas is currently reviewing the following Administrative Application request for a project located within the Coastal Zone of the City of Encinitas. A minimum 10-calendar day review period has been established for the subject application. The application submittal is available for your review and comments during regular business hours, 7:00 AM to 6:00 PM Monday through Friday. City Hall is closed alternate Fridays (1/18, 2/1, etc.) and will be closed on Monday, January 21, 2013, in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. CASE NUMBER: 12-126 BACC/CDP FILING DATE:

August 20, 2012

APPLICANT:

Jay Refold

LOCATION:

1738 Oxford Avenue (APN: 260-282-05 & -18)

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: A Boundary Adjustment and Coastal Development Permit request to adjust an interior lot line between 2 existing legal lots. No new lots will be created as a result of the adjustment. The subject property is located in the Residential 8 (R8) zone and the Coastal Zone. ENVIRONMENTAL STATUS: The project is determined to be exempt from Environmental Review as per Section 15305(a) of the California Environmental Quality Act Guidelines, which exempts lot line adjustments from environmental review. PRIOR TO 6:00 PM ON MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2013, ANY INTERESTED PERSON MAY REVIEW THE APPLICATION AND PRESENT TESTIMONY, ORALLY OR IN WRITING, TO THE PLANNING AND BUILDING DEPARTMENT. WRITTEN TESTIMONY IS PREFERRED IN ORDER TO HAVE A RECORD OF THE COMMENTS RECEIVED. If additional information is not required, the Planning and Building Department will render a determination on the application, pursuant to Section 2.28.090 of the City of Encinitas Municipal Code, after the close of the review period. An appeal of the Department’s determination accompanied by the appropriate filing fee may be filed within 10-calendar days from the date of the determination. Appeals will be considered by the City Council pursuant to Chapter 1.12 of the Municipal Code. Any filing of an appeal will suspend this action as well as any processing of permits in reliance thereon in accordance with Encinitas Municipal Code Section 1.12.020(D)(1) until such time as an action is taken on the appeal. The above item is located within the Coastal Zone and requires the issuance of a regular Coastal Development Permit. The action of the Planning & Building Director may not be appealed to the California Coastal Commission. Under California Government Code Sec. 65009, if you challenge the nature of the proposed action in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised regarding the matter described in this notice or written correspondence delivered to the City at or prior to the date and time of the determination. For further information, please contact Roy Sapa’u, Senior Planner, at (760) 633-2734 or via email at rsapau@encinitasca.gov, or the Planning & Building Department at (760) 633-2710 or via email at planning@encinitasca.gov, 505 S. Vulcan Avenue, Encinitas, CA 92024. 01/18/13 CN 14469

CITY OF ENCINITAS PUBLIC NOTICE OF PROPOSED ORDINANCE ADOPTION ORDINANCE 2012-17 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Encinitas will consider adoption of Ordinance 2012-17 entitled “An Ordinance of the City Council of the City of Encinitas, California, adopting Modifications Suggested by the Coastal Commission to the Cardiff-by-the-Sea Specific Plan, SP-5; Located Between the West Side of San Elijo Avenue and the West Side of the Alley Between Newcastle Avenue and Manchester Avenue; and from the South Side of Mozart Avenue to the North Side of Orinda Drive. CASE NUMBER: 04-266 GPA/SPA/LCPA/EIA).” Approval of City Council Ordinance 2012-17 would amend the Cardiff Specific Plan (CSP) previously adopted by the Council by incorporating modifications suggested by the Coastal Commission. Once adopted, staff would resubmit the CSP to the California Coastal Commission for certification. The CSP would become effective following Coastal Commission certification. This ordinance was introduced on January 9, 2013. The City Council will consider adoption of Ordinance 2012-17 at its regular meeting to be held on January 23, 2013, commencing at 6:00 P.M. in the City Council Chambers 505 South Vulcan Avenue. The ordinance is on file in the office of the City Clerk, 505 South Vulcan Avenue and may be viewed between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M. The City of Encinitas is an equal opportunity public entity and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age or disability in employment or the provision of service. Please notify the City Clerk as soon as possible before the meeting if disability accommodations are needed. /Kathy Hollywood, City Clerk. 01/118/13 CN 14461

venant or w arranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possesssion, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the notes (s) secur ed by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and e xpenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set f orth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: At the entrance to the East County Regional Center b y statue, 250 E. Main Street, El Cajon, CA 92020 Legal Description: As more fully described in said Deed of Trust Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $798,112.13 The street address and other common designation of the r eal property purported as: 3405 COR TE BREZO , CARLSBAD, CA 92009 APN Number: 223-614-12-00 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bidding on this pr operty lien, you should understand that ther e are risks involved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not the pr operty itself. Placing the highest bid at trustee auction does not automati -

cally entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a jun ior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auc tioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or

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Coast News Legals From Page A17 deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice may be postponed one or mor e times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the Calif ornia Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made a vailable to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not pr esent at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this property, you may call (714) 5731965 or visit this Internet Web site www. Priorityposting.com , using the file n umber assigned to this case 24653CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be r eflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement inf ormation is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. DATE: 1/15/2013 MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE f/k/a MTDS, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION DBA MERIDIAN TRUST DEED SER VICE 3 SAN JOAQUIN PLAZA, SUITE 215, NEWPORT BEACH, CA 92660 Sales Line: (714) 573-1965 OR (702) 586-4500 Jesse J. Fernandez, Publication Lead MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE IS ASSISTING THE BENEFICIARY TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1015230 1/18, 1/25, 02/01/2013 CN 14472 Trustee Sale No . 25173CA Title Order No. 120304636 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 11/17/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 2/8/2013 at 10:00 AM, MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE f/k/a MTDS, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION DBA MERIDIAN TRUST DEED SERVICE as the dul y appointed Trustee under and pur suant to Deed of Trust Recorded 11/22/2005, Book , Page , Instrument 2005-1009812 of offi cial records in the Office of the Recorder of San Diego County , California, executed by: MARLA FLORES, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN as Trustor, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., QUICKEN LOANS INC, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or feder al credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authoriz ed to do business in this state. Sale

JAN. 18. 2013

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will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held b y the trustee in the hereinafter described pr operty under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without convenant or w arranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possesssion, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the notes (s) secur ed by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: At the entr ance to the East County Regional Center by statue, 250 E. Main Street, El Cajon, CA 92020 Legal Description: As more fully described in said Deed of Trust Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $354,709.41 The street address and other common designation of the r eal property purported as: 276 ASPENWOOD LANE , ENCINITAS, CA 92024 APN Number: 257-110-27-39 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bidding on this pr operty lien, you should understand that ther e are risks involved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not the pr operty itself. Placing the highest bid at trustee auction does not automatically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice may be postponed one or mor e times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the Calif ornia Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made a vailable to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not pr esent at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this property, you may call (714) 5731965 or visit this Internet Web site www. Priorityposting.com , using the file n umber assigned to this case 25173CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be r eflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement inf ormation is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. DATE: 1/15/2013 MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE f/k/a MTDS, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION DBA MERIDIAN TRUST DEED SER VICE 3 SAN JOAQUIN PLAZA, SUITE 215, NEWPORT BEACH, CA 92660 Sales Line: (714) 573-1965 OR (702) 586-4500 Jesse J. Fernandez, Publication Lead MERIDIAN

FORECLOSURE SERVICE IS ASSISTING THE BENEFICIARY TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1015217 1/18, 1/25, 02/01/2013 CN 14471

mon designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. DATE: 01-14-2013 MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE f/k/a MTDS, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION DBA MERIDIAN TRUST DEED SER VICE 3 SAN JOAQUIN PLAZA, SUITE 215, NEWPORT BEACH, CA 92660 Sales Line: (714) 573-1965 OR (702) 586-4500 JESSE J. FERNANDEZ, PUBLICATION LEAD MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE IS ASSISTING THE BENEFICIARY TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1015094 1/18, 1/25, 02/01/2013 CN 14470

information about trustee sale postponements be made a vailable to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not pr esent at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-2818219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case 12-0018635. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be r eflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement inf ormation is to attend the sc heduled sale. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-0194 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone/Sale Information: (800) 2818219 By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a de bt. Any information obtained will be used f or that purpose. FEI # 1006.171523 1/18, 1/25, 2/01/2013 CN 14468

GLAS HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND PACIFIC CARLSBAD L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 7/20/2008 8/1/2008 2008-0412064 10-12-2012 2012 625574 $20885.61 54979 B2415475C GMP533419BE 5334 EVEN 19 211-130-0300 ANGEL J. GARCIA A(N) UNMARRIED MAN AND JANIECE E. JORDAN A(N) UNMARRIED WOMAN AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND PACIFIC CARLSBAD L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 4/6/2008 4/25/2008 20080220892 10-12-2012 2012 625575 $11819.77 54980 B3944385C GMO501607DO 5016 ODD 07 211130-0200 KENNETH L. HARARELL AND MALINDA A. HARRELL HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND PACIFIC CARLSBAD L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 6/10/2010 6/24/2010 20100318169 10-12-2012 2012-0625589 $11512.32 54981 B3993205C GMP543313BZ 5433 ANNUAL 13 211-130-0300 CHERI LYNN JOHNSON A(N) SINGLE WOMAN AS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY GRAND PACIFIC CARLSBAD L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED PARTNERSHIP 9/19/2011 9/29/2011 2011-0508227 10-12-2012 2012 625576 $23962.79 54982 B9984475C GMO502609DE 5026 EVEN 09 211-130-0200 NIR VA ISEL LOPEZ A SINGLE WOMAN AS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY GRAND P ACIFIC CARLSBAD L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED PARTNERSHIP 5/28/2011 6/9/2011 2011-0294381 ASSUMPTION AGREEMENT 2012-11134 10/12/12 2012-625577 $13975.12 54983 B3270475C GMO522448D1E 5224 EVEN 48 211-130-0200 SYLVIA MITCHELL A(N) UNMARRIED WOMAN AS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY ADVANCED COMMERCIAL CORPORATION A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION 3/21/2009 4/3/2009 2009-0167883 10-12-2012 2012 625578 $17283.49 54984 B3355475C GMP542204EE 5422 EVEN 04 211-130-0300 CHI MINH NGUYEN A(N) MARRIED WOMAN AS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY GRAND PACIFIC CARLSBAD L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 4/19/2009 5/1/2009 2009-0228926 10-12-2012 2012 625579 $22042.08 54985 B0607475C GMP533204AE 5332 EVEN 04 211-130-0300 RICHARD S. NIELSEN AND ALEJANDRA NIELSEN HUSB AND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND PACIFIC CARLSBAD L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 9/16/2006 9/29/2006 2006-0693920 10-12-2012 2012 625580 $14635.50 54986 B2103475C GMP521125AZ 5211 ANNUAL 25 211-130-0200 ANDERS C. NOYES AND FUMIKO E. NOYES HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND PACIFIC CARLSBAD L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 11/23/2007 12/7/2007 20070759659 10-12-2012 2012 625581 $38298.09 54988 B0002475A GMP542114DE 5421 EVEN 14 211130-0300 GALE PUENTE AN UNMARRIED WOMAN AS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY GRAND PACIFIC CARLSBAD L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 6/9/2006 6/23/2006 20060447375 10-12-2012 2012 625583 $10562.63 54989 B3953465C GMP541320BZ 5413 ANNUAL 20 211-130-0300 EDWARD SANCHEZ SR. AND TERESA L. SANCHEZ HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND P ACIFIC CARLSBAD L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED PARTNERSHIP 6/15/2011 6/23/2011 2011-0319051 10-12-2012 2012 625584 $23624.00 54990 B0153475C GMP542621DZ 5426 ANNUAL 21 211-130-0300 DERWARD THOMAS AND CHERYL A. THOMAS HUSBAND AND WIFE AND ASHLEY N. JACKSON A SINGLE WOMAN ALL AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND PACIFIC CARLSBAD L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 7/7/2006 7/21/2006 20060514170 10-12-2012 2012 625585 $12108.86 54991 B3944285C GMO513101BO 5131 ODD 01 211130-0200 MARY ANN TITCOMB A(N) SINGLE WOMAN AS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY GRAND PACIFIC CARLSBAD L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 6/7/2010 6/17/2010 20100307450 10-12-2012 2012-0625590 $16652.09 54992 B3954115C GMO522208B1Z 5222 ANNUAL 08 211-130-0200 TIERU WANG A(N) UNMARRIED WOMAN AS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY GRAND PACIFIC CARLSBAD L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 7/3/2011 7/14/2011 20110356889 10-12-2012 2012-0625586 $24654.93 54994 B3607475C GMP521404B1Z 5214 ANNUAL 04 211-130-0200 VICTORIA V. YOUNG A(N) UNMARRIED WOMAN AS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY GRAND PACIFIC CARLSBAD L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED PARTNERSHIP 7/10/2009 7/31/2009 2009-0428568 10-12-2012 2012-0625588 $24589.58 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or

implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit is estimated at AS SHOWN ABOVE Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, may increase this figur e prior to sale. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Def ault and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Def ault and Election to Sell to be r ecorded in the county where the real property is located and more than thr ee months have elapsed since suc h recordation. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bidding on this pr operty lien, you should understand that ther e are risks involved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale ma y be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that inf ormation about trustee sale postponements be made available to y ou and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether y our sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this pr operty, you may call 1-800-540-1717, using the TS number assigned to this case SHOWN ABOVE. Information about postponements that are very short in dur ation or that occur close in time to the sc heduled sale may not immediatel y be r eflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement inf ormation is to attend the scheduled sale. DATE: 1/16/2013 CHICAGO TITLE COMPANY 316 WEST MISSION AVENUE, SUITE 121 ESCONDIDO,CA 92025 PHONE NO . (800) 540-1717 EXT 3061 LORI R.FLEMINGS, as Authorized Signor 01/18, 01/25, 02/01/13 CN 14467

Trustee Sale No . 24543CA Title Order No. 95503431 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 07-07-2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 02-08-2013 at 10:00 A.M., MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE f/k/a MTDS, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION DBA MERIDIAN TRUST DEED SERVICE as the dul y appointed Trustee under and pur suant to Deed of Trust Recorded 07-142005, Book , Page , Instrument 2005-0596897 of official r ecords in the Office of the Recor der of SAN DIEGO County, California, executed by: ERIC BREND AN RAIMO AND SUSAN FRANCES TAPERT, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS as Trustor, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or feder al credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authoriz ed to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held b y the trustee in the hereinafter described pr operty under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without convenant or w arranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possesssion, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the notes (s) secur ed by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE EAST COUNTY REGIONAL CENTER BY ST ATUE, 250 E. MAIN STREET, EL CAJON, CA Legal Description: AS MORE FULL Y DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST Amount of unpaid balance and other c harges:$1,006,248.47 The street address and other com mon designation of the real property purported as: 12980 POR TOFINO DRIVE , (SAN DIEGO AREA) DEL MAR, CA 92014 APN Number: 301-221-11-00 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not the property itself. Placing the highest bid at trustee auction does not automatically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auc tioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice may be postponed one or mor e times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the Calif ornia Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made a vailable to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not pr esent at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this property, you may call (714) 5731965 or visit this Internet Web site www. Priorityposting.com , using the file n umber assigned to this case 24543CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be r eflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement inf ormation is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other com -

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 12-0018635 Title Order No. 120032365 APN No. 123-252-43-00 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 06/18/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTR UST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by SOPHAL SIM AND SANDY SIM, HUSBAND AND WIFE, AS JOINT TENANTS., dated 06/18/2004 and recorded 7/12/2004, as Instrument No. 2004-0642296, in Book , Page 3375, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of San Diego County , State of Calif ornia, will sell on 02/22/2013 at 9:00AM, SHERATON San Diego HO TEL & MARIN A 1380 Harbor Island Dri ve, San Diego, CA 92101 at public auction, to the highest bid der for cash or check as described belo w, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the pr operty situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the a bove referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3658 PALOMAR DRIVE, FALLBROOK, CA, 92028. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein.The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $382,241.66. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total inde btedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a c heck drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the F inancial Code and authoriz ed to do business in this state.Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or w arranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the inde btedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as pr ovided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as pr ovided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. If required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the Calif ornia Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the Notice of Trustee’s Sale dul y recorded with the appr opriate County Recorder’s Office. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If y ou are considering bid ding on this property lien, you should under stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the property. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be r esponsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or mor e times b y the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the Calif ornia Civil Code. The law requires that

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE afc-925 YOU ARE IN DEF AULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED AS SHOWN BELOW. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. CHICAGO TITLE COMPANY as the dul y appointed Trustee under and pur suant to Deed of Trust Executed b y: AS SHOWN BELOW, as Trustor, AS SHOWN BELOW, as Beneficiary, recorded on AS SHOWN BELOW as book AS SHOWN BELOW as Instrument No. AS SHOWN BELOW of Official Recor ds of the County Recorder of SAN DIEGO County, California, and pursuant to the Notice of Def ault and Election to Sell there under recorded on AS SHOWN BELOW as Book AS SHOWN BELOW as Instrument No. AS SHOWN BELOW of said Official Records. WILL SELL BY PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR C ASH On 2/15/2013 at 10:00 AM, AT THE FRONT ENTRANCE TO CHICAGO TITLE COMPANY , ESCONDIDO, CA, 92025 (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a cashier's c heck drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or feder al savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank), all right, title and interest conveyed to and no w held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State her einafter described as mor e fully described on said Deed of Trust. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the r eal property described above is pur ported to be: 5500 GRAND PACIFIC DRIVE, CARLSBAD, CA, 92008 TS#, REF#, ICN#, Unit/Interval/Week, APN#, Trustors, Current Beneficiary, DOT Dated, DOT Recorded, DOT Book, DOT Page/Instrument#, NOD Recorded, NOD Book, NOD Page/Instrument#, Estimated Sales Amount 54972 B2594475C GMP521303AE 5213 EVEN 03 211130-0200 RICKY B ALIGNASAY AND ROSINDA A. BALIGNASAY HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND P ACIFIC CARLSBAD L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED PARTNERSHIP 6/29/2008 7/11/2008 2008-0371271 10-12-2012 2012 625568 $19636.46 54974 B3697475C GMP543424EO 5434 ODD 24 211-130-0300 R OY E. BRADLEY JR. AND JASMINE N. BRADLEY HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND PACIFIC CARLSBAD L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 7/26/2009 9/4/2009 20090498542 10-12-2012 2012 625570 $28815.55 54975 B2219475C GMO561448AO 5614 ODD 48 211130-0300 MARYBETH CHAMBERS A(N) SINGLE WOMAN AS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY GRAND PACIFIC CARLSBAD L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED PARTNERSHIP 1/27/2008 2/8/2008 2008-0064737 10-12-2012 2012 625571 $18053.48 54976 B2937475C GMO561243AE 5612 EVEN 43 211-130-0300 R UDY R. CORTEZ AND FRANCES S. CORTEZ HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND PACIFIC CARLSBAD L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 11/7/2008 11/21/2008 20080603106 10-12-2012 2012 625572 $19890.11 54977 B3405475C GMO522444D1O 5224 ODD 44 211130-0200 JEREMIAH CURLEY A(N) SINGLE MAN AND MELISSA CLEVELAND A(N) SINGLE WOMAN AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND PACIFIC CARLSBAD L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 3/26/2009 5/15/2009 2009-0257304 10-12-2012 2012 625573 $11050.48 54978 B2649475C GMP521310AE 5213 EVEN 10 211-130-0200 KYLE DOUGLAS AND LEYA J. DOU-

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE AFC-913& AFC-924 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED AS SHOWN BELOW. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. CHICAGO TITLE COMPANY as the dul y appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Executed by: AS SHOWN BELOW, as Trustor, AS SHOWN BELOW, as Beneficiary, recorded on AS SHOWN BELOW as book AS SHOWN BELOW as Instrument No. AS SHOWN BELOW of Official Records of the County Recorder of SAN DIEGO County , California, and pursuant to the Notice of Default and Election to Sell ther e under recorded on AS SHOWN BELOW as Book AS SHOWN BELOW as Instrument No . AS SHOWN BELOW of said Official Records. WILL SELL BY PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR C ASH On 2/15/2013 at 10:00 AM, AT THE FRONT ENTRANCE TO CHICAGO TITLE COMPANY, , ESCONDIDO, CA, 92025 (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or feder al credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings

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Fresh Start keeps on changing lives COAST CITIES — F resh Start Surgical Gifts, a Carlsbadbased nonprofit, held its fir st Surgery Weekend of 2013, on Jan. 12 and Jan. 13. Among the many children who received a fr esh start at life that weekend was Kassy, a 3-year-old girl with a se vere skin nevus. Kassy was born with an unsightly nevus, a type of chronic skin lesion that co vers more than half of her little arm and continues to grow. Kassy’s family lived in fear that the ne vus will soon completely cover her entir e arm and hand, but more importantly that it could become malignant. After visiting the children’s hospital in their hometown of Tijuana, Kassy’s family was referred to the Fresh Start Clinic in San Diego f or a thorough evaluation. After ensuring the ne vus was benign, the Fresh Start medical team began assessing Kassy’s condition and tr eatment options in order to guarantee her health and a better quality of life. Kassy will r eceive five to 10 major sur geries spanning the next two to fi ve years to completely remove the growth. This weekend marked her third surgery. The comprehensive Surgery Weekend healthcare program takes place six times per year and tak es includes reconstructive surgeries, Laser Clinics, a Speech Therapy Clinic,Dental Clinics and many

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THE COAST NEWS

JAN. 18, 2013

other services that transform the lives of Fresh Start’s young patients. These services are provided free of charge by the Fresh Start team of v olunteers — made up of San Diego’ s top medical and dental professionals and more — to families who otherwise could not afford these procedures or whose insurance will not co ver the cost of reconstructive surgeries. For more information about Fresh Start Surgical Gifts, visit freshstart.org or call (760) 944-7774.

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FLOWER HILL CONTINUED FROM A6

Even the Mobil gas station was upgraded. “We’ve maintained the integrity without tr ying to compete with UTC or Fashion Valley, not that we’re knocking major malls,� Essakow said. “We want to differ entiate ourselves by bringing something different to the area.� Storefronts have been redesigned, wood railings have been r eplaced with iron and the entr ance was widened. “We freshened it up with a little bit of color so it’s a seamless renovation that doesn’t look lik e it’s part old and part ne w,� Essakow said. With a ne w total of 167,000 square feet, Flower Hill provides about 1,100 parking stalls, including a 420-space, three-story parking structure behind Whole Foods that was once a major concern for nearby residents. “It’s not this obno xious structure,� Essakow said. “We worked hard to ensure we accomplished that. People have asked me when it’s going to be built. They’re surprised when I tell them it’s already open. You can bar ely see it fr om (Interstate 5).� The opening will include fashion shows and music in center courty ards that will featur e pavers, wooden stages, benches and olive trees.

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A20

THE COAST NEWS

JAN. 18, 2013

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JAN. 18, 2013

JEAN GILLETTE Small Talk

Now I am one of the proud Tonight was something new for me and rather special. My political opponents might be a bit surprised, but tonight I had the privilege of dining with and then c heering as my 18-year-old godson went off to Marine boot camp. I will be glad for us all when the 13-w eek adventure is o ver, simply because recruits are incommunicado for the whole time, and I will miss his company. He was nervous, he was excited, but above all, he was ready. Boot camp is just the first step on this young man’s well-thought-out journey to a place as a Marine Corps officer and very probably some sort of special ops. It is wonderful to know any child today who really knows what he wants to do and pursues it with gusto. College awaits him when he returns, then a career in the military. Living this close to Pendleton has helped me know and g reatly admire the Marine Corps and, so, while raised an Air Force brat, I applaud his choices. TURN TO SMALL TALK ON B12

FILLING IN THE GAPS Researching into your family’s history can yield a trove of information about who you are, and can be therapeutic, too.

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SECTION

Sound, healing bowls may have key to wellness By Rachel Stine

COAST CITIES — When working with patient s, Dr. Jeffrey Thompson uses electronic sound equipment, EEG machines, and heart rate variability monitors. Diane Mandle, on the other hand, relies on Tibetan singing bowls, tingshas, gongs, and her intuition when working with her clients. One is the founder and director of Carlsbad’s Center for Neuroacoustic Research. The other is a sound energy healer based in Encinitas. While they maintain drastically different approaches, both Thompson and Mandle ag ree that sound has the po wer to heal the mind and the bod y without medication. Thompson said he uses medical equipment and tests including EEGs and blood tests to scientificall y measure changes in the body and the brain as they are Surrounded by her Tibetan singing bowls, sound energy healer Diane Mandle rubs the rim of one of her bells exposed to differ ent sound in her Encinitas studio. Mandle promotes physical and spiritual healing by awakening energies with sound from her bowls, tingshas, bells, and gongs. Photo by Rachel Stine frequencies.

But while he said his research is some of the fir st to scientifically prove these effects, he acknowledges that sound healing is nothing new. Thompson said that f or thousands of y ears, people have used instruments lik e drums and Tibetan singing bowls to put people into trances. “This is what every culture on Earth has been doing since the beginning of time,” he said. After researching sound for over 30 y ears and w orking with thousands of patients, Thompson said his work proves that sound affects people through physical resonance and br ainwave entrainment. According to Thompson, physical resonance makes it possible to physically adjust specific parts of the bod y without actually touching it. He explained that the body consists of differ ent TURN TO HEALING ON B12

Event will tackle electronic signatures, political reforms By Jared Whitlock

COAST CITIES — Banks, grocery stores, the Department of Motor Vehicle offices. These are a fe w places where signing your name electronically is a common occurrence. In the era of the iPhone, how about using online tec hnology to qualify State initiatives on the ballot? Taking the ink out of signatures is just one r eform that will be discussed by experts of California’s initiative and referendum process at 2 p.m. Jan. 25 at the Dove Library in

Carlsbad. Hosted by the League of Women Voters, the event is titled “Do We Have to Take This Much Initiative?” As a preview of the discussion, several panelists who will be at the e vent, as well as a local political consultant, weighed in on whether electronic signatures are a good idea for the initiative process. Those in favor say digital signatures could make it easier for grassroots organizations to put California propositions before voters. Critics, however, contend digital signatures

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would create too m uch direct democracy, essentially flooding the ballot with measures. Robert Stern, a political scientist who founded the now

within the 150-day time limit. As such, only well-heeled interests have enough funds to hir e paid-signature gatherers to qualify initiatives, Stern said.

It could require an initiative from voters for electronic signatures to become law.” Robert Stern Political Scientist

defunct Center for Governmental Studies, said California established direct initiatives to give voters a chance to o verrule unpopular decisions from the legislature. And they also ser ve the purpose of kicking the legislature into gear if it’s ignoring certain issues. But these days, grassroots groups often can’t mobilize enough support and collect the required 1 million signatur es

“If you have enough money and y ou’re motivated, there’s a m uch better shot of you getting the item on the ballot,” Stern said. “These groups might not have the will of the people in mind.” According to a 2008 stud y from the nonpartisan Center for Governmental Studies, the median cost to qualify an initiative increased from $45,000 in 1977 to $2.9 million in 2006. Stern said digital signa-

tures could make it more affordable for grassroots organizations to put initiatives on the ballot. But as a consequence, there could be an even greater number of initiati ves for residents to parse and vote on. “Voters already have a lot to take into account, ” Stern said. “This could o verwhelm them.” Stern had two suggestions to protect against an avalanche of ballot initiatives. First, those who lend their John Hancock to an initiati ve online would have to answer three short questions about the measure. Further, he recommended allowing voters against the initiative to “downvote” or subtract from signatures. Although gaining traction, it could be a few years or more until electronic signatures are part of the ballot process. Stern noted that r ecently TURN TO SIGNATURES ON B12


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THE COAST NEWS

JAN. 18, 2013

Genealogy search can fill gaps to ‘holes in your soul’ By Lillian Cox

CARLSBAD — When she was a little girl Carol Baird used to sit under the dining room table at her grandmother’s house in Hollywood, listening to the older women chat over tea. Baird was the only child of Jewish German holocaust survivors who immigrated to the United States. “I was as nosy as m y grandmother and al ways asked questions,” she recalled. The experience planted the seed f or what w ould become a lifelong passion tracing her family roots. After marrying her high school sweetheart in 1970, Baird was given family trees from both sides of her family. Following the birth of her first son she began assembling it. In 1987 she joined the North San Diego County Genealogical Society and the San Diego J ewish Genealogical Society and eventually became president. When her two sons were old enough, the Baird family toured Germany, Poland, Czechoslovakia and Hungary with her parents so they could describe their li ves before and during World War II. “Gathering the information on paper is onl y one part,” Baird explained. “The family tree comes to life when you visit.”

“Genealogy can serve as a tool for mental health,” said Carol Baird, past president of the North San Diego County Genealogical Society and the San Diego Jewish Genealogical Society. “If there are gaps in your genealogy there are holes in your soul.” Photo by Lillian Cox

Family history research, she added, is therapeutic, not only for descendants of Holocaust survivors, but for anyone who has lost a relative. “Genealogy can serve as a tool for mental health,” she said. “If there are gaps in your genealogy there are holes in your soul.” Baird explained that the

best time to begin research is following a funeral or holiday dinner when older f amily members are available to answer questions. “A busybody is also a good person to go to,” she added, chuckling. “Then ask for documents and memorabilia to substantiate the stoTURN TO GENEALOGY ON B12

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THE COAST NEWS

JAN. 18, 2013

ODD FILES

by CHUCK SHEPHERD

Jails Need Locks Too?

“Fulton Jail Will Get Working Cell Locks,� read the Dec. 19 Atlanta Journal-Constitution headline. The county commission serving Atlanta had finally voted to break a longstanding 3-3 ti e that prevented buying new jailhouse locks — e ven while knowing that inmates could jimmy the old ones at will and roam the facilities, threatening and assaulting suspects and guards. The three recalcitrant commissioners were being spiteful because a feder al judge had ordered various improvements to the jail, costing $140 million so far, and the thr ee vowed to spend no more. The 1,300 replacement locks will cost about $5 million — but will not be installed right away.

The Entrepreneurial Spirit!

The Chinese f ashion designer “Ms. Lv� told China Newsweek in November that her sales had “quintupled� since she began using her 72-year-old grandfather to model her clothing styles f or girls. “(It’s) helping my granddaughter,� Liu Xianping said. “I’m very old,� he said, and “I have nothing to lose.� Challenging Business Plans: (1) British “medical illustrator� Emily Evans recently created eight pricy, bone china dinner plates emblazoned with the microscope images of tissue slides of the human liver, thyroid, esophagus and testicles ($60 per plate, $200 for a set of four). (2) In October, a shop in London’s St. Bart’s Pathology Museum ran a special sale of cupcakes as part of a sexually transmitted disease awareness campaign. Each pastry’s icing was crafted to resemble the lesions, boils and warts of gonorrhea and other maladies. Leading a “jerky renaissance� is Krave, a Sonoma, Calif., company creating nontraditional flavors such as turkey jerky and jerky flavored with basil citrus or lemon garlic. Actually, Krave points out, jerky is rich in protein, with low calories and fat (but with, admittedly, sky-high sodium) and could be reasonably pitched as a healthy snack. However, jerky’s main obstacle (a Krave competitor’s CEO told The Wall Street Journal in September) is “jerky shame,� in which some male consumer s remain mortified that their girlfriends might see them enjoying the snack.

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Items sail through Coastal Commission By Promise Yee

COAST CITIES — Encinitas and Oceanside items sailed thr ough the Coastal Commission to receive approval Jan. 11. The City of Oceanside received approval on a oneyear extension to file an ordinance change to allo w for mini marts and dri vethroughs in its downtown district and retail and offices in reclassified property east of North Coast Highw ay 101 between the San Luis Re y River and state Route 76. Encinitas property owner Leonard Okun also received long a waited approval for the demolition and re-building of a bluff front property at 828 Neptune Ave. The property suffered bluff failure in 1996. A retaining wall permit was issued by the city in 2001 and again in 2005. Okun received city approval to demolish and rebuild the house in 2009,but the decision was appealed by the Coastal Commission. Okun worked with the commission to gain appr oval over the next four years. He sent updated geotechnical analyses and boring logs to the commission in 2010 and 2011, to ensure the commission that the site w as safe for construction. Communications continued through 2012 and early 2013. A revised building plan

The Coastal Commission approved demolition and re-building of a bluff front property at 828 Neptune Ave. Homeowner Leonard Okun has been working for years to gain an OK. Photo by Promise Yee

was also sent. The Coastal Commission gave the OK for the structure when the building setbac k was measured from the retaining wall. This allowed it to reach 40 feet, compared to the setback from the bluff top that onl y measures 20 feet. Conditions were put on the project, including the requirement to submit a geotechnical/engineering report that assesses bluff sta bility and residence safety every 10

years. Conditions also call for the house to be r emoved if it is determined to be unsafe for occupancy. Encinitas Mayor Teresa Barth said the pr oject could proceed forward. The next step is f or the owner to apply for city building permits. The total size of the project is 11,760 squar e feet f or the bluff top and 8,581 square feet for the bluff face, this includes a gar age and basement.

Carmel Valley celebrates program CARMEL VALLEY — Rides & Smiles, part of Jewish Family Service’s On the Go: Transportation Solutions for Older Adults program, began in 2004. In January 2012, the program expanded into Carmel Valley. It now celebrates its first year there providing mobility for seniors who previously had no public transportation. Rides & Smiles tr ansports riders to necessary medical appointments, grocery shopping and other life necessities in San Diego County northern and eastern regions. Rides & Smiles is the largest volunteer-based transportation service in San Diego County. Other components of the JFS On the Go program include shuttle service, organ-

ized excursions and taxi scrip. Expansion to Carmel Valley (and Tierrasanta) was possible due to grants from New Freedom Federal Funds and a TransNet Senior Mini Grant, which were awarded and are monitored by the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG). Rides & Smiles is open to people age 60 and older who are mentally alert and fairly ambulatory. Riders with mobility or memor y issues may still enroll if they are accompanied by a caregiver. To enroll as a rider, call (619) 220-0268. Rides are provided by a group of 275 volunteer drivers. Ride requests are posted on a convenient, web-based scheduling system for drivers

to review, allowing riders to choose whom, when, and where they drive. No minimum number of rides is expected, secondary insurance is provided by JFS, and mileage is r eimbursed. The average trip is 10 miles roundtrip. Rides & Smiles al ways needs more volunteer drivers. Hour-long group training sessions for new volunteer drivers are held twice monthly throughout 2013. Upcoming sessions are at 3 p.m. Jan 22, at Jewish Family Service’s Turk Family Center at 8804 Balboa Ave. Those unable to attend a group session can request a one-on-one training session.To volunteer as a driver, call (858) 637-3051 or go to jfssd.org/onthego.

How clean were S.D. beaches in 2012? COAST CITIES — San Diego Coastkeeper and the Surfrider Foundation, San Diego Chapter announced results from their 2012 beach cleanup data collection. In 2012, more than 4,000 volunteers removed almost 7,600 pounds of trash, about an a verage of 1.7 pounds per person. The two groups coordinate twice-a-month beac h cleanups along San Diego county’s coastline, rotating through popular beac hes. This year, volunteers collected the most tr ash at Mission Beach while Ocean Beach traded its dirtiest ranking the last three years to become one of the cleaner beaches in 2012. “We had mor e volunteers than ever proving that San Diego lo ves its beaches,� said Haley Jain Haggerstone, chapter coordinator for Surfrider San Diego. “Our 2012 beach cleanup data show that bigger trash items are finding their way to the proper receptacles, but it’s the smaller pieces of de bris continuing to harm our beaches.� According to 2012 data, cigarettes, Styrofoam fragments and plastics too small to be identified accounted for more than 60 percent of the de bris collected. Of the 181,776 pieces of trash collected in 2012, nearly 40 percent was cigarette butts (a consider able increase from 2011.) Plastic pieces accounted for 30 percent of the total number of items, including parts of bags, bottles, cups, straws, food wrappers and other miscellaneous plastic items. With the amount of cigarette butts incr easing at beach cleanups each year, both Coastkeeper and Surfrider have partnerships and campaigns dedicated to reducing the amount of cigar ette waste polluting San Diego’s water. “Rather than sending

cigarette butts off to a landfill, Coastkeeper is registered with TetraCycle, a company that con verts hard-to-recycle and nonrecyclable materials into new products,� said Mallory Watson, community engagement coordinator for Coastkeeper. “At our beach cleanups this y ear, volunteers will collect cigarette butts in separ ate containers to remove them from the trash flow.� C o a s t k e e p e r Waterkeeper Jill Witkowski has also joined forces with la w professors and policy analysts from across the country through the Cigarette Butt Pollution Project to explore innovative legal and policy options f or reducing cigarette butt waste. Surfrider’s Hold On To Your Butts campaign actively prevents cigarette debris by installing outdoor ashcans throughout the county and distributing pocket ashtrays to smokers. According to Haggerstone, the ashtrays, along with community advocacy, have decreased cigarette butt litter b y 65 percent. Another geographical problem area last year, according to Hagger stone, is the large number of tires that volunteers removed from the Tijuana River during special cleanups aimed at r emoving trash from the ri ver before the season’s first rains flush it to the ocean. To help solve these pollution problems and volunteer at beach cleanups, interested community members and visitors can help at one of the 35 cleanups already in the works for 2013. Surfrider and Coastkeeper ask volunteers to bring their o wn reusable bags, gloves and water bottles. Volunteers can find the full clean up schedule at sdcoastkeeper.org or surfridersd.org.

DEANNA STRICKLAND Your Encinitas Territory Manager Call Deanna for all your advertising needs.

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THE COAST NEWS

Who’s NEWS? Business news and special achievements for North San Diego County. Send information via email to community@ coastnewsgroup.com. Pups on parade Oceanside-based Canine Companions f or Independence service dogs will be leading the Inaugural parade Jan. 21 in Washington, D.C.

New bookstore hours

The Friends of the Carlsbad Library announced the Friends bookstore at the Dove Library, 1774 Dove Lane has extended its operating hours to include Wednesday evenings from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. New hours for the bookstore are now Monday and Wednesday 10 a.m. to 7 p .m., Tuesday, Thursday and Friday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturday 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. All proceeds from bookstore sales benefit Library programs.

Sign up for Paw Walk

Registration is underway for the first-ever 5K Paw Walk in the Garden coming up Feb. 23 at the San Diego Botanic Garden, 230 Quail Gardens Drive in Encinitas. For the first time, dogs will be allowed in the gardens. For more information visit Rancho Coastal Humane Society at (760) 753-6413, or log on to sdpets.org.

Pancakes for a cause

International House Of Pancakes (IHOP) will be giving away free pancakes Feb. 5, to celebrate National Pancake Day, while raising $3 million f or Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals in celebration of the organization’s 30th anni versary. Watch for celebrity public

service announcements with comedian Nick Cannon, NFL Hall of Famer Steve Young and Rock Legend Gene Simmons.

Top teachers

Educator’s of the Month were chosen by Jake’s Del Mar.These honorees include Lauren Markarian, Gerardo Hernandez, Kristen Co (Ashley Falls School), Wendy Wojtkowski, Zoylo ‘Junior’ Lopez, Adriana Riley (Carmel Del Mar Sc hool), Gail Morgan, Greg Jordan, Donna Kuriyama (Del Mar Heights School). Also named w ere Allison Warren, Jenna Ellis, Michelle Beeson (Del Mar Hills Academy of Arts and Sciences), Meredith Gleason, Lori Smiley, Kelly Hadland (Ocean Air School), Giovanna Caralline, Tara Mariani, Dan Dahl (Sage Canyon School). More winners were Erin Zoumaras, Juan Rios, Jodi Neilson (Sycamore Ridge), Susie Hopper, Cathy Brizes, Rebekah Canavan (Torrey Hills School), Lauren Barnecut, Kevin Donohue, Susan Deely (Notre Dame Academy). Also honored were Stacey Flory, Judy Tillyard, Mike Campbell (Sk yline School), Snawntanet Jara, Dan Cain, Shannon Salic (Solana Vista School), Jennene Johnsen, Robert Matlock, Polly Bilger (Solana Pacific School). Additional winners included F elicity Smith, Kristen Oliver (Solana Highlands School), Jennifer Lottus, Mike Godebu, Tami Austin (Earl Warren Middle School), Sharon St. Gean, Mary Braun, Laura Pierson (Santa Fe Christian School). Honors also w ent to Laura Millerick, Elizabeth Armao, Andi Medley (St. James Academy), Nina Kim, Allison Menconi, Krista Mullen (Tri City Christian) and Cindy Switzler, Deb Heyer (Ada Harris Elementary).

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Say you saw it in the Coast News!

Martin Luther King Jr. celebration honors local civic leaders By Promise Yee

OCEANSIDE — The legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. will be celebrated by the city of Oceanside and the North San Diego County NAACP with a comm unity prayer breakfast and awards ceremony Jan. 21 at the Junior Seau Comm unity Center. “The expectation is rejuvenation of the tradition and all the things Dr . Martin Luther King Jr . stood for being involved in rights for all,� Reginald Owens, North San Diego County N AACP press and publicity chair, said. “It’s like an inoculation for the next year to be more kind and understanding.� The Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Award acknowledges outstanding community civic leaders. Early recipients of the award include Oscar Culp , who won in 1990 for his leadership with the Men of Oceanside; Terry Johnson, who won in 1991 and later became an Oceanside councilman and ma yor; Concha Hernandez Green and Connie Johnson, community leaders of the Eastside neighborhood, Partners for Healthy Neighborhoods and UC AN Eastside Organization who won in 1996; Gwen Sanders, a 2003 recipient and community volunteer, union activist and NAACP official; and James McCargo, one of the first African American sergeant majors in the United States Marine Cor ps, who won in 2005. Recent recipients include Willie Little Sr ., a labor activist and N AACP member, who was awarded in 2006; Janet Bledsoe Lacy, a community volunteer and NAACP member, who won in 2008; Kay Parker, a community advocate for fair housing

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Community volunteer Janet Bledsoe Lacy receives the Martin Luther King, Jr. Civic Award from Oceanside Mayor Jim Wood in 2008. This year’s nominees are Ray Clendening, Marcus Snead, and Max Disposti. Photo sby Promise Yee

who won in 2011; and Colleen O’Harra, a community activist who was awarded in 2012. This year Ray Clendening, Marcus Snead and Max Disposti have been nominated to r eceive the award. Their civic achievements will be acknowledged at the ceremony. Joan Parks, founder of the Community Prayer Breakfast, will also be honored. While great strides in equal rights have been made, the NAACP points to data that shows gross socioeconomic disparities still exist. These include a dispr oportionately high dr opout rate number for African American males, a growing number of African American male and female incarcerations, and a 20 percent unemployment rate within the African American community.

“We have much more to accomplish in our lifespan to make America the great place it can be — even greater than it is today,� Owens said. The goal of the NAACP is to develop a corrective strategy that involves outreach and education. “The focus is on education,� Shirley Johnson, North San Diego County N AACP president, said. “To go back to school, to stay in school, is always the focus.� Owens added that registering to vote and exercising your voting right is also important to bring a bout needed changes in go vernment decision making and funding. The breakfast and awards ceremony will be held at 7 a.m. Jan. 21 at the Junior Seau Beach Community Center. Tickets for the event are available through the

Kay Parker received the 2011 Martin Luther King, Jr. Civic Award for her work as an advocate for fair housing. The annual award acknowledges outstanding community civic leaders.

North San Diego County NAACP office located at 605 San Diego Street. Tickets will also be available on site the day of the event.

Museum’s exhibit puts history of trains on track ENCINITAS — F or the month of January, the San Dieguito Heritage Museum, at 450 Quail Gardens Drive, presents the history of trains

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starting in the late 19th century. Before the train came to Encinitas in the 1880s, getting here was expensive and took a very long time. With the completion of the coastline from San Diego, new settlers could tak e a chance on moving to the area. Every Saturday and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m., bring the family to find out more about the trains that changed everything, then build your own toy train. The museum’s exhibits will be open during the activity times with docents to guide you through the history of San Dieguito. With these

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new intergenerational activities, families in Encinitas will come to understand that they can visit the Heritage Museum on any weekend and know that new and interesting experiences await. While at the m useum, check out Al’s Barbershop exhibit. See a recreation of the barbershop that was on C o a s t

Highway 101 from the 1930s to the 1950s. See the antique c hair and all the tools of the trade. Each weekend there will be free hands-on experiences that highlight a certain era of San Dieguito history. These activities will change monthly.The historic eras and corresponding activities may include: — Native American period: rock painting and acorn

grinding, — Rancho Period: adobe brick making, cattle roping and soap making — Pioneer Days: butter making, washboard clothes washing and quilt making — Flower-growing period: seed planting, plant identification and plant dyeing — Surfing and concern for ocean ecology: balsa minisurfboard shaping, kelp cookie making and ocean awareness experiences. For more information visit the museum’s website at sdheritage.org or call the museum office at (760) 632-9711.

To learn and have fun, drop by the San Dieguito Heritage Museum, at 450 Quail Gardens Drive, every Saturday and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. This month learn how the trains changed local history, then build a toy train. Courtesy photo


Planning under way for fairgrounds train platform By Bianca Kaplanek

DEL MAR — A decades-long plan to build a seasonal train platform at the Del Mar F airgrounds could potentially come to fruition in our lifetimes, according to one member of the 22nd District Agricultural Association board of directors. “I was very surprised to see how far along (this project) is,” Dave Watson said during the Jan. 8 meeting. In addition to the platform, which would be used by Coaster and Amtrak trains, the project will include replacing the 96year-old wooden trestle San Dieguito Railway River Bridge and adding slightly more than 1 mile of second mainline rail track south of Solana Beach, according to the SANDAG website. The existing bridge, built in 1916, is near the end of its ser vice life and requires expensive and frequent maintenance. It also needs to be raised to meet feder al requirements to avoid floods that could result in damage or failure. It has not y et been decided whether the bridge will have one double-track structure or two singletracks, but the capacity for at least one new track will be provided before the existing bridge is demolished. Possible other improvements include new turnouts, signals, retained embankments and drainage facilities. Some realignment of the tracks is being considered to accommodate the improvements and future rail needs. The new bridge and tracks will be elevated above the 100-year flood plain to reduce potential damage to the line during se vere storms.

The second main track will start in Solana Beach, just south of Dahlia Street, and continue 1.1 miles south across the San Dieguito Lagoon, resulting in a continuous 2.8-mile stretch of double track. Double tracking will eliminate a bottlenec k between Solana Beach and Del Mar. Once the project is complete trains won’t have to idle at a siding to allow other trains to pass. The platform will accommodate trains with up to 10 cars and is expected to attract about 2,700 riders a day during the f air and horse races. A universal track crossover also will be installed between the tracks, allowing trains to reach the new platform from either direction. Total cost for the double tracking, bridge replacement and special event platform is estimated to be $100 million. SANDAG and the California Department of Transportation have $2.6 million from TransNet and $6.9 million in P assenger Rail Investment and Improvement Act funds from the Federal Railroad Administration for the $9.5 million needed for preliminary design and en vironmental studies, which are currently under w ay and expected to take one year to complete. Construction funding has not been identified. “There is no firm date or contract that has been awarded for construction,” said Matt Tucker, executive director of North County Transit District. A public hearing is set for Jan. 22 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Del Mar Heights Academy, 14085 Mango Drive.

Lux welcomes sculptor ENCINITAS — The Lux Art Institute has welcomed its newest artist-in-residence, sculptor Carlos Vega who will be in studio thr ough Feb. 2 and on exhibit through March 2. Lux, at 1550 S. El Camino Real, is open to the public from 1 to 5 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays.Vega is a native of Spain who currently lives in New York City. He will be living at Lux while working on a diptyc h featuring two metaphorical “trees of life” created through the use of engraving, oil paint on lead, and a perforated metal

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plate revealing stamps mounted on a panel underneath. Visitors can see art happen while Vega is in-studio and view his exhibit of ima ges etched and carved in lead. Vega’s visit is underwritten by The William Hall Tippett and Ruth Rathell Tippett Foundation The Lux stor e will feature a refreshed collection of one-of-a-kind items by of San Diego artists and designer s, including Kim MacConnel, Green Tree Jewelry, Tammy Spencer, and more. Proceeds from which benefit Lux’s education pr ograms.

Celeb pup brings insights to Cedros SOLANA BEACH — Celebrity dog, Gentleman Norman, who has taught San Diego’s finest “How to Be a Man” with his book on grooming, wardrobe and manners, brings Cedros Avenue in Solana Beac h some insight on what women really want from their loved ones. Gentleman Norman, a well-groomed Pomeranian, will make an appear ance from 1 to 3 p.m. Feb. 2, at the jewelry and home decor boutique, Circa on Cedr os, 143 S. Cedros Ave. Suite H. He will provide a book-sign-

ing and meet and g reet, while Circa on Cedros showcases its newest collection of locally designed jewelry. Gentleman Norman, a well-mannered dog, will show men the key to staying out of the doghouse and kicking off the month of love in style. Attendees will be gi ven the opportunity to pr eview spring pieces and take home gift bags from various shops along Cedros Avenue, including Circa on Cedros, Cedros Soles, Solana Wellness Center, and Muttropolis. Bring your cam-

College to celebrate Chinese New Year COAST CITIES — J oin MiraCosta College as it celebrates the Chinese New Year of the Snake with free events planned for Jan. 26 through Feb. 23. The new year celebrations begin with “Culture Through Literature - Chinese Storytelling,” presented by Aubrey Kuan Roderick at 10:30 a.m. Jan. 26 at the Oceanside Public Libr ary Foundation Room, 330 N. Coast Highway, Oceanside. Enjoy a lectur e on the history of the Chinese community in San Diego and how it developed in the 20th cen tury at 1 p.m. Feb. 1 at the MiraCosta College San Elijo Campus, Room 201, 3333 Manchester Ave., Cardiff-bythe-Sea. Lee’s lecture will be held again at 3 p.m. Feb. 13 in the MiraCosta College Student Center Club Room (Bldg. 3400), 1 Barnard Drive, Oceanside. Lee is the author of the book, “In Search of Gold Mountain” and will hold a book-signing at the end of both pr esentations. At 1 p .m. Feb. 8, MiraCosta College San Elijo Campus, Room 204, 3333 Manchester Avenue, Cardiff, enjoy a spotlight on the San Diego Asian Film Festival, with “Last Train Home,” a film screening and presentation by Brian Hu, artistic director, San Diego Asian Film Foundation. Founded in 2000, the festival has grown to become the largest exhibition of Asian cinema in the western United States. Prior to teaming up with the SDAFF, Hu was a Ph .D. student at UCLA ’s School of Theater, Film and Television and a critic/editor f or Asia

Pacific Arts. A cultural story time and traditional lion dance will be held at 10 a.m. Feb. 19 with Center Ins tructor YiCheng Hu. The Lion Dance performance will be by the MiraCosta Ambassadors Team in the Mir aCosta College Child De velopment Center (Bldg. 8000), 1 Barnard Drive, Oceanside. Find the delicious side of the Chinese New Year at a Traditional Chinese Dumpling-making workshop at 3 p .m. Feb. 20 at the MiraCosta College Student Center Club Room (Bldg. 3400), 1 Barnard Drive, Oceanside. The Chinese dumpling is one of the most significant foods for the Chinese New Year. Watch a demonstration on how to prepare authentic Chinese dumplings and learn to make some yourself. Space is limited to the first 30 guests. Enjoy a special stor y time for the Chinese Ne w Year and mak e your own paper cutting art in vented during the Han Dynasty (206 B.C.) at 11 a.m. Feb. 23 during the Chinese P aperCutting Art & Book F air, in Barnes and Noble Bookstore, El Camino Nort h Shopping Center, 2615 Vista Way, Oceanside. For more information, contact Aubrey Kuan Roderick at School Relations and Diversity Outreach at (760) 795-6894 or akr oderick@miracosta.edu.

follow us on

era and your questions ... it’s time to take some notes, gentlemen. “Cedros Avenue is a pet friendly area and the perfect destination, approved by Gentleman Norman, for finding unique, classy gifts for your loved ones.” said Laura Martella, author of the tongue-and-cheek book,

“Gentleman Norman: How to be a Man.” Gift bags will be provided for the first 50 guests to attend, and light bites and drinks will also be provided. A portion of the proceeds from the book sales will go to Alzheimer’s Association San Diego and their Imperial Chapter.

Charles Daniel Abeyta San Marcos November 1, 1936 to January 6, 2013

Barbara Jane Smith Oceanside August 19, 1937 to January 4, 2013

Nadine Virginia Badillo-Cruz Vista January 3, 2013

Gustavo “Gus” Araiza Ramona December 3, 1953 to January 1, 2013

Marlene E.Drexel Vista November 1, 1937 to December 27, 2012

Arlene Christina Griesse Escondido July 11, 1923 to December 27, 2012

Earl (Bryon) Gibson Cardiff by the Sea December 24, 1931 to December 27, 2012

Hazel Agnes Johnson Escondido May 4, 1930 to January 6, 2013

Elizabeth R. Miles, 91 Vista January 8, 2013

Robert W.McCloskey Fallbrook May 13, 1928 to December 30, 2012

Lillian M. Nelson Carlsbad January 25, 1922 to December 28, 2012

Jake Roybal Fallbrook January 5, 2013

Evie Prete Encinitas December 23, 2012

Ronald Gary Sanders Fallbrook November 9, 1957 to January 2, 2013

John Lenard Rogers Jr. Oceanside August 10, 1923 to January 4, 2013

Vicki Irene Townsend, 65 Escondido December 16, 2012

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Obituaries should be received by Monday at 12 p.m. for publication in Friday’s newspaper. One proof will be emailed to the customer for approval by Tuesday at 10 a.m.


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C AMP P ENDLETON N EWS

Recruits learn about Marine Corps history By Cpl. Liz Gleason

SAN DIEGO — Amidst their busy schedule, recruits of Company G, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, stacked their weapons and neatl y filed into a classroom aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, Dec. 10. Once in the classr oom, they quickly settled in and the academic instructor introduced himself bef ore starting the hour -long class with a clip of the mo vie “Pearl Harbor.” “Today in class w e were taught about World War II,” said Recruit Spencer Goodrun, Platoon 2155, Company G, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion. “We learned about the role of the Marine Corps, the different battles and Marines that received awards for heroic actions.” During the Marine Corps History III class, the instructor spoke about Pearl Harbor, the Battle of Guam, Tarawa and Iwo Jima. Learning about the struggles and triumphs Marines faced through history is important because it helps recruits gain a different perspective, according to Goodrun.

There are six phases of Marine Corps history classes which encompass everything from the birth of the Marine Corps to the r ecent war in Iraq and curr ent operations in Afghanistan. However, the

It keeps us up to date and fresh with how the Marine Corps came about, our traditions and history.” Sgt.Pablo Monta o Academic instructor

knowledge isn’t only taught in the classroom. Throughout training, drill instructors help recruits review, understand and reinforce the inf ormation learned which helps prepare them for the comprehensive test on Training Day 55.

“It’s important f or not only recruits to kno w this information but f or Marines too,” said Sgt. Pablo Montaño, academic instructor, Instructional Training Company, Support Bn. “It keeps us up to date and fresh with how the Marine Cor ps came about, our traditions and history. It helps pass on our culture and instills pride in recruits and Marines alike.” The pride also brings motivation to r ecruits and helps them gain ne w perspective to face difficult challenges, according to Montaño. Recruits learn a bout many different subjects throughout recruit training. “We cover a wide spectrum of classes, ” said Montaño. “We teach everything from general military studies and history to combat first aid and financial classes. These classes not onl y help set them up f or a good Marine Corps career, they also help set them up in life.” All of the kno wledge gained in r ecruit training will stay with the r ecruits long after they graduate and become Marines. “It makes me feel really

A recruit of Company G, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion pays close attention during the history class aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depo San Diego, Dec. 10. The class is the third part of a six-part series that teaches recruits everything from the birth of the Marine Corps up to the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Photo by Cpl. Liz Gleason

good to know that I can leave same seats six years ago and teaching the recruits through an imprint on the r ecruits,” now I’ve come full circle. I’m my experiences, it’s amazing.” said Montaña. “I sat in these standing at the podium

Child care centers earn top marks By Lance Cpl. Derrick K. Irions

BREAKFAST AT PENDLETON During an early morning visit to the 14 Area Chow Hall here, Sgt Maj. Micheal P. Barrett, the 17th, and current Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps, eats breakfast and converses with Lance Cpl. Amanda Cattin, a field radio operator with 1st Marine Logistics Group, and other junior Marines Jan. 9. Barrett toured facilities on Camp Pendleton and held a class for noncommissioned officers, sharing his knowledge and experiences with them. Photo by Lance Cpl. Matthew Howe

By Public Affairs

Iron Fist 2013

Marines and Sailor s with the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit, 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, based out of Camp P endleton, Calif. will participate in a bilateral training event with

the Japanese Ground SelfDefense Force, designed to increase interoperability and enhance military-to-military relations, during exercise Iron Fist, from Jan. 15 to Feb. 15. I MEF forces have conducted similar tr aining annually with the JGSDF since 2006 in Southern California. Effective bilateral training across the range of military operations and amphibious operations are common training interests for U.S. Marines and the JGSDF and support Theater Security Cooperation efforts, promoting military readiness in the P acific Theater.

CAMP PENDLETON — After an unannounced inspection of child care centers, Camp Pendleton was the only installation to receive 100 per cent compliance for 2012. Headquarters Marine Corps inspects all ar eas of operations to ensure the programs and center s are providing the best possible care for service members and their families. “This is a siza ble program to oversee,” said Trish Spencer, the director for Pendleton’s Marine and Family Programs. “Not only were they in compliance in all ar eas, the inspection team w as highly complementary regarding staff interaction, cooperation and teamw ork, both within each site and acr oss the organization.” The program oversees

Pendleton Disposition to allow for training. Customers who ha ve Services to halt operitems to turn in during that ations for training time will have to reschedule CAMP PENDLETON — The Defense Lo gistics Agency Disposition Services, formally known as the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office, here is scheduled to implement new software starting F eb. 25. DLA Disposition Services will not be accepting appointments, walk-ins, or Reutilization, Transfer and Donation customer s from Feb. 11 to March 3. In preparation for the new software implementation, the staff will be limited

or walk in bef ore or after those dates. Normal operations are scheduled to resume March 4. For more information, call the DLA Disposition Services Pendleton Area Manager at (760) 7254332/3605.

Appointments now available at Pass and ID

six Child De velopment Centers, four School Aged Care Centers, four youth and teen sites and 89 Family Child Care homes. Each was inspected on pr ogram management, risk management, resource management and curriculum. “Quality services are a top priority f or all Camp Pendleton child care services,” said Danny Robinson, the branch manager with M&FP Family Care. “We make sure that w e’re committed to our safe pr actices and any nuances that ma y occur within our stages of development.” The inspection v alidated what the F amily Care’s Children, Youth and Teen Programs’ team stri ves to accomplish on a dail y basis, said Spencer, noting that the team of 455 pr ofessionals are focused on being the commander’s partner in Mainside here, Bldg 130132, is now offering limited appointments between the hours of 8 a.m. and 2:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. There will be a 5minute grace period f or all appointments. If you arrive late, you will have to take a number. To schedule an appointment visit: r apids-appointments.dmdc.osd.mil/appoin tment/building.aspx?Buildi ngId=653. Please direct questions to (760) 725-2442 or (760) 725-2160.

CAMP PENDLETON — MCI-West shooting In an eff ort to pr ovide better customer ser vice, the team is searching for new members Pass & ID section at

readiness. “They are very ridged but it’s for the safety of the children and I truly appreciate that,” said Laura Anderson, a mother of tw o who utilizes the base CDCs. “It’s great knowing that the children are in suc h great hands and that the high standards are being upheld at all times for everyone.”

CAMP PENDLETON — The Marine Cor ps Installations West shooting team is no w accepting ne w members. Any interested Marines should attend an informational meeting at the 13 Area Marksmanship Training Unit J an. 8 at 11 a.m. All applicants m ust bring the following information to the meeting: 1. Full Name & Rank: 2. Last 4: 3. Work Phone: 4. Cell Phone: 5. Home Address: For questions or ad ditional information, please email camppendletonshootingteam@gmail.com.


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Coast News Legals From Page A18 bank), all right, title and inter est conveyed to and no w held b y it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State hereinafter described as more fully described on said Deed of Trust. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described a bove is pur ported to be: 5805 ARMADA DRIVE, CARLSBAD, CA, 92009 TS#, REF#, ICN#, Unit/Interval/Week, APN#, Trustors, Current Beneficiary, DOT Dated, DOT Recorded, DOT Book, DOT Page/Instrument#, NOD Recorded, NOD Book, NOD Page/Instrument#, Estimated Sales Amount: 54040 Y1468469A GPP39808AE 398 EVEN 08 211022-28 SCOTT WEERTS AND ISABEL D. WEERTS HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND PACIFIC PALISADES L.P. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 9/23/2004 10/1/2004 2004-0933659 07-18-2012 2012 415837 $13254.78 54949 Y5149469L GPO36413AZ 364 ANNUAL 13 211-022-28 D WAYNE S. ADKISON AND SHERRI E. ADKISON HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND PACIFIC PALISADES LP. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP F/K/A GRAND PACIFIC PALISADES LLC 2/1/2002 6/28/2002 2002-0546777 10-12-2012 2012 625036 $26337.48 54950 Y9438469L GPO17535AZ 175 ANNUAL 35 211-022-28 REMEDUS L. ALTAR A WIDOW GRAND PACIFIC PALISADES LP. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 4/4/2004 4/9/2004 20040301950 10-12-2012 2012 625037 $16911.06 54951 Y9439469L GPO27528AZ 275 ANNUAL 28 211022-28 REMEDUS L. ALTAR A WIDOW GRAND P ACIFIC PALISADES LP. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED PARTNERSHIP 4/4/2004 4/9/2004 2004-0301952 10-12-2012 2012 625038 $15938.09 54952 Y1824469A GPO17310BE 173 EVEN 10 211-022-28 ANTHONY ANAYA AND PATRICIA ANAYA HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND PACIFIC PALISADES LP. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED PARTNERSHIP 12/12/2004 12/17/2004 2004-1187224 10-122012 2012 625039 $11490.04 54955 Y9937469A GPO16842AE 168 EVEN 42 211-022-28 HERIBER TO BOCANEGRA AND ELIZABETH A. QUESADA HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND PACIFIC PALISADES LP. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP F/K/A GRAND PACIFIC PALISADES LLC 6/5/2004 7/16/2004 2004-0664125 10-12-2012 2012 625042 $7745.37 54956 Y6161469A GPP18719BE 187 EVEN 19 211-022-28 JASON JOHN DELAGARDELLE AND SUNSHINE MAE DELA GARDELLE HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS ADVANCED COMMERCIAL CORPORATION A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION 6/30/2007 7/20/2007 2007-0485320 10-12-2012 2012 625043 $12180.55 54957 Y6874469A GPO25012AZ 250 ANNUAL 12 211-022-28 PATRICIA A HOLMES A(N) MARRIED WOMAN AS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY GRAND PACIFIC PALISADES LP. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 11/14/2008 12/5/2008 2008-0622315 10-12-2012 2012 625044 $22503.92 54958 Y2617469A GPO24714BE

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247 EVEN 14 211-022-28 LARR Y THIGPEN AND CAROLYN JEFFRIES HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND PACIFIC PALISADES LP. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP F/K/A GRAND P ACIFIC PALISADES LLC 6/17/2005 7/15/2005 2005-0597804 10-12-2012 2012 625045 $9337.10 54959 Y1574469A GPO37504AZ 375 ANNUAL 04 211022-28 LAURIE A. KLAHN A MARRIED WOMAN AS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY GRAND PACIFIC PALISADES LP. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 10/12/2004 10/29/2004 20041023887 10-12-2012 2012 625046 $122719.65 54960 Y8463469L GPO36308AE 363 EVEN 08 211022-28 JOHNNIE A. METCALF AND TIFFANY J. METCALF HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND P ACIFIC PALISADES LP. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED PARTNERSHIP 10/19/2003 10/24/2003 2003-1300742 10-122012 2012 625047 $9496.56 54961 Y2311469A GPO14849BZ 148 ANNUAL 49 211-022-28 JOHN A. MICOVICH AND KATHLEEN MICOVICH HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND PACIFIC PALISADES LP. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP F/K/A GRAND PACIFIC PALISADES LLC 4/30/2005 5/6/2005 2005-0382603 10-12-2012 2012 625048 $16466.24 54962 Y6902469L GPP39220AE 392 EVEN 20 211-022-28 STEPHEN A. PETERS AND GEORGINNA PETERS HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND PACIFIC PALISADES LP. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 6/28/2003 7/11/2003 20030823447 10-12-2012 2012 625049 $9650.42 54964 Y8708469L GPO37003EZ 370 ANNUAL 03 211022-28 CAROLINA C. SHORT A WIDOW AND CAROLINA SHORT A SINGLE WOMAN AS JOINT TENANTS ADVANCED COMMERCIAL CORPORATION A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION 12/6/2003 12/19/2003 2003-1491062 10-12-2012 2012 625051 $17825.92 54965 Y2093469A GPP29522BZ 295 ANNUAL 22 211-022-28 DERWARD THOMAS AND CHERYL A. THOMAS HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND PACIFIC PALISADES LP. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 3/13/2005 3/25/2005 20050244362 10-12-2012 2012 625052 $14377.49 54968 Y2105469A GPO26603BE 266 EVEN 03 211022-28 DEBRA Z. WILLIAMS AN UNMARRIED WOMAN AS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY GRAND PACIFIC PALISADES LP. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP F/K/A GRAND PACIFIC PALISADES LLC 3/20/2005 3/25/2005 2005-0244240 10-12-2012 2012 625055 $15314.99 54969 Y6716469A GPO16114AE 161 EVEN 14 211-022-28 DEBRA Z. WILLIAMS A(N) UNMARRIED WOMAN AS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY GRAND PACIFIC PALISADES LP. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP F/K/A GRAND P ACIFIC PALISADES LLC 5/3/2008 5/16/2008 2008-0264386 10-12-2012 2012 625056 $25299.41 54970 Y6388469L GPP19120AE 191 EVEN 20 211-022-28 SCO TT M. WILLIAMS AND MICHELLE E. WILLIAMS HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS GRAND PACIFIC PALISADES LP. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 3/23/2003 4/4/2003 20030377772 10-12-2012 2012 625057 $7671.79 54971 Y1772469A GPO36752CO 367 ODD 52 211-02228 LAURA HANGEBRAUK YOUNG AN UNMARRIED WOMAN AS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY GRAND PACIFIC PALISADES LP. A CALIFORNIA LIMITED P ARTNERSHIP 11/26/2004 12/10/2004 2004-

1162802 10-12-2012 2012 625058 $9955.30 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the str eet address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without co venant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the r emaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and e xpenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit is estimated at AS SHOWN ABOVE Accrued interest and ad ditional advances, if any, may increase this figure prior to sale. The beneficiTrust ary under said Deed of heretofore executed and delivered to the under signed a written Declaration of Def ault and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Def ault and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Def ault and Election to Sell to be r ecorded in the county where the real property is located and more than thr ee months have elapsed since suc h recordation. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bidding on this pr operty lien, you should understand that ther e are risks involved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to y ou and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether y our sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this pr operty, you may call 1-800-540-1717, using the TS number assigned to this case on SHOWN ABOVE. Information about postponements that are very short in dur ation or that occur close in time to the sc heduled sale may not immediatel y be r eflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement inf ormation is to attend the scheduled sale. DATE: 1/16/2013 CHICAGO TITLE COMPANY, 316 WEST MISSION AVENUE, SUITE 121, ESCONDIDO,CA 92025 PHONE NO . (800) 540-1717 EXT 3061 LORI R FLEMINGS as Authorized Signor 01/18, 01/25, 02/01/13 CN 14466

Assessors Parcel No. 152-035-03-00 The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secur ed by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $153,583.50. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid, plus interest. The purchaser shall have no further r ecourse against the beneficiary, the Trustor or the trustee. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bidding on this pr operty lien, you should understand that ther e are risks involved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee f or this inf ormation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be a ware that the same lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or mor e times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the Calif ornia Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made a vailable to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not pr esent at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and if applica ble, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this property, you may call 877-4849942 or visit this Internet Web site www.USA-Foreclosure.com or www.Auction.com using the file number assigned to this case 7037.97546. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be r eflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement inf ormation is to attend the sc heduled sale. Date: January 10, 2013 NOR THWEST TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC., as Trustee Jeffrey Mosher, Authorized Signatory 1241 E. Dyer Road, Suite 250, Santa Ana, CA 92705 Sale Info website: www.USAForeclosure.com or www.Auction.com Automated Sales Line: 877-484-9942 Reinstatement and P ay-Off Requests: 866-387-NWTS THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE ORDER#7037.97546: 01/18/2013,01/25/2013,02/01/2013 CN 14464

SIDE, CA 92056 The undersigned Trustee disclaims an y liability for any incorrectness of the str eet address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the r emaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit, estimated to be $416,123.65. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under stand that ther e are risks in volved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that t he same lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale ma y be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that inf ormation about trustee sale postponements be made available to y ou and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether y our sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this pr operty, you may call 714-573-1965 or visit this Internet Web site www .priorityposting.com, using the file number assigned to this case 12-C A0150. Information about postponements that are very short in dur ation or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best w ay to v erify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. For NON SALE information only please call Sale Line: 714-573-1965 or Lo gin to Internet Website www.priorityposting.com. Date: January 7, 2013 MILES, BAUER, BERGSTROM & WINTERS, LLP 1231 E. Dyer Road, Suite 100 Santa Ana, CA 92705 (714) 481-9100 Geno Calder on, Authorized Signor P1013494 1/18, 1/25, 02/01/2013 CN 14459

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE File No. 7037.97546 Title Order No. 7031384 MIN No. APN 152-035-0300 YOU ARE IN DEF AULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 03/23/05. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or feder al credit union, or a check drawn by a state or feder al savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in §5102 to the F inancial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held b y duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or w arranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. Trustor(s): KENNETH P . LEIGHTON A SINGLE MAN Recorded: 03/28/05, as Instrument No. 2005-0251242, of Official Records of SAN DIEGO County , California. Date of Sale: 02/07/13 at 10:00 AM Place of Sale: On the grounds of the Scottish Rite Event Center, located at 1895 Camino Del Rio South,, San Diego, CA The purported property address is: 1109 S NEV ADA STREET, OCEANSIDE, CA 92054

Trustee’s Sale No . 12-CA0150 Order #: 37359 APN: 166-592-37-00 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED MARCH 11, 2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On February 13, 2013 at 10:00 A.M., AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE EAST COUNTY REGIONAL CENTER BY STATUE, 250 E. MAIN STREET, EL CAJON, CA, MILES, BAUER, BERGSTROM & WINTERS, LLP as dul y appointed trustee under and pur suant to Deed of Trust recorded March 22, 2006 as Instrument No . 20060197818 of Official Recor ds in the office of the County Recor der of SAN DIEGO County , CALIFORNIA, executed by CARLOS D. ALARCON ROMAN AND IDALIA ALARCON, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR C ASH (payable at the time of sale in la wful money of the United States, by cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or feder al credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authoriz ed to do business in this state) all right, title, and interest conveyed to and no w held by it under said Deed of Trust in the pr operty situated in said County and state described in said deed of trust.The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3910 CAMEO DRIVE, OCEAN-

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the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $491,837.94. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and deli vered to the undersigned a written Declar ation of Default and Demand f or Sale, and a written Notice of Def ault and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Def ault and Election to Sell to be r ecorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under stand that ther e are risks in volved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that t he same lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that inf ormation about trustee sale postponements be made available to y ou and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether y our sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this pr operty, you may call 714-573-1965 f or information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com for information regarding the sale of this pr operty, using the file n umber assigned to this case 20120159902743. Information about postponements that are very short in dur ation or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best w ay to v erify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: PRIORITY POSTING & PUBLISHING, INC. 17501 IRVINE BLVD., SUITE ONE TUSTIN, CA 92780 714-573-1965 www .priorityposting.com NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 1/9/2013 Trustee Sale No. : 20120159902743 P1013674 1/18, 1/25, 02/01/2013 CN Title Order No.: 120291792 14458 FHA/VA/PMI No.: NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF T.S. No. 12-21242 APN: 158-292-01TRUST, DATED 7/28/2006. 00 Loan No . 9517051602 NOTICE UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC TRUST DATED 6/6/2007. UNLESS SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA- YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT NATION OF THE NATURE OF YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE THE PROCEEDING AGAINST SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION LAWYER. NDEX WEST, LLC, as OF THE NATURE OF THE PROduly appointed Trustee under and CEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU pursuant to Deed of Trust SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest Recorded on 08/02/2006 as Instrument No. 2006-0549409 of bidder for cash, cashier's check official records in the office of the drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or feder al County Recorder of San Diego County, State of C ALIFORNIA. credit union, or a check drawn by a EXECUTED BY: ANTHONY TRU- state or feder al savings and loan JILLO, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC association, or savings association, AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER or savings bank specified in FOR CASH, CASHIER'S Section 5102 of the Financial Code CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or and authorized to do business in other form of payment authorized this state will be held b y the duly by 2924h(b), (payable at time of appointed trustee as sho wn below, sale in lawful money of the United of all right, title, and interest conStates). DATE OF SALE: 2/11/2013 veyed to and no w held b y the in the her einafter TIME OF SALE: 10:00 AM PLACE trustee OF SALE: At the entr ance to the described property under and purEast County Regional Center b y suant to a Deed of Trust described statue, 250 E. Main Street, El below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or w arranty, Cajon, CA 92020 STREET ADDRESS and other common des - expressed or implied, regarding ignation, if any, of the real proper- title, possession, or encumbrances, ty described above is purported to to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed be: 4733 EDINBURGH DRIVE, CARLSBAD, CA 92010 APN#: 208- of Trust, with interest and late 102-22 The undersigned Trustee charges thereon, as provided in the disclaims any liability for any note(s), advances, under the terms incorrectness of the str eet address of the Deed of Trust, interest thereand other common designation, if on, fees, charges and e xpenses of any , shown herein. Said sale will the Trustee for the total amount (at be made, but without co venant or the time of the initial publication warranty, expressed or implied, of the Notice of Sale) r easonably regarding title, possession, or estimated to be set f orth below. encumbrances, to pay the r emain- The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: GABRIELA ing principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with JIMENEZ-UNDERWOOD, A MARinterest thereon, as provided in RIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE said note(s), advances, under the AND SEPARATE PROPERTY Duly terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, Appointed Trustee: Law Offices of charges and e xpenses of the Les Zieve Deed of Trust recorded Trustee and of the trusts cr eated 6/15/2007 as Instrument No . 2007by said Deed of Trust. The total 0405063 in book, page of Official Records in the office of the amount of the unpaid balance of

Legals 800 Recorder of San Diego County , California, Date of Sale:2/1/2013 at 10:30 AM Place of Sale: AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE EAST COUNTY REGIONAL CENTER BY STATUE, 250 E. MAIN STREET, EL CAJON, CA 92020 Est imated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $193,545.12 Note: Because the Beneficiar y reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total de bt owed. Street Address or other common designation of real property: 543 LIME TREE WAY OCEANSIDE, CA 92054 Described as f ollows:"AS MORE FULL Y DESCRIBED ON SAID DEED OF TRUST"A.P.N #.: 158-292-01-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiar y within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bid ding on this property lien, you should und erstand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the property. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be r esponsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that inf ormation about trustee sale postponements be made available to y ou and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether y our sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this pr operty, you may call (714) 848-9272 or visit this Internet Website www.elitepostandpub.com, using the file n umber assigned to this case 12-21242. Information about postponements that are very short in dur ation or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Dated: 1/7/2013 Law Offices of Les Zie ve, as Trustee 18377 Beach Blvd., Suite 210 Huntington Beac h, California 92648 For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (714) 848-7920 For Sale Inf ormation: (714) 8489272 www .elitepostandpub.com Christine O'Brien, Trustee Sale Officer THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. EPP 8076. 1/11, 1/18, 1/25/2013. CN 14451 T.S. No. 12-2344-11 Loan No. 0145464442 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 11/7/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bid der for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or feder al credit union, or a check drawn by a state or feder al savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authoriz ed to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and no w held by the trustee in the her einafter described pr operty under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be

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Coast News Legals From Page B7 made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount ma y be greater on the da y of sale. See attached Exhibit "A" f or Legal Description 12-2344-11 Exhibit "A" PARCEL 1: THE WEST 70 FEET OF LOT 11, THE EAST 170 FEET OF LOT 12, AND THE WEST HALF OF LO T 14 OF RAINBO W, IN THE COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, STATE OF C ALIFORNIA, ACCORDING TO AMENDED MAP NO. 880, FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY , FEBRUARY 7,1902. PARCEL 2: AN EASEMENT FOR R OAD PURPOSES OVER THE EAST 10 FEET OF LOT 13 OF RAINBO W, IN THE COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO , STATE OF CALIFORNIA, ACCORDING TO MAP THEREOF NO. 880 FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY, FEBRUARY 7, 1902. Trustor: ROBERT F DE RIEUX AND, JEANETTE P DE RIEUX, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS Duly Appointed Trustee: The Wolf Firm, A Law Corporation Recorded 11/15/2006 as Instrument No. 2006-0810373 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Diego County , California, Date of Sale: 2/1/2013 at 10:00 AM Place of Sale: At the entrance to the east county regional center b y statue, 250 E. Main Street, El Cajon, CA 92020 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $1,197,830.19, estimated Street Address or other common designation of real property: 1917 RAINBOW VALLEY RD F ALLBROOK, CA 92028 (AS TO PARCEL 1) RAINBOW VALLEY BLVD FALLBROOK, CA 92028 (AS TO PARCEL 2) A.P.N.: 102-670-24 AS TO PARCEL 1 AND 102-670-15 AS TO PARCEL 2 The undersigned Trustee disclaims an y liability for any incorrectness of the str eet address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiar y within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the property. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be r esponsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the

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county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that inf ormation about trustee sale postponements be made available to y ou and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether y our sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this pr operty, you may call (714) 573-1965 or visit this Internet Web site www .priorityposting.com, using the file number assigned to this case 12-2344-11. Information about postponements that are very short in dur ation or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best w ay to v erify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 1/4/2013 The Wolf Firm, A Law Corporation 2955 Main Street, 2nd Floor Irvine, California 92614 F oreclosure Department (949) 720-9200 Sale Information Only: (714) 573-1965 www.priorityposting.com Frank Escalera, Team Lead P1013163 1/11, 1/18, 01/25/2013 CN 14441

interest. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the beneficiary, the Trustor or the trustee. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bidding on this pr operty lien, you should understand that ther e are risks involved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee f or this inf ormation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be a ware that the same lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or mor e times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the Calif ornia Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made a vailable to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not pr esent at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and if applica ble, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this property, you may call 877-4849942 or visit this Internet Web site www.USA-Foreclosure.com or www.Auction.com using the file number assigned to this case 7301.29303. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be r eflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement inf ormation is to attend the sc heduled sale. Date: December 27, 2012 NORTHWEST TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC., as Trustee Da vid Ochoa, Authorized Signatory 1241 E. Dyer Road, Suite 250, Santa Ana, CA 92705 Sale Inf o website: www.USA-Foreclosure.com or www.Auction.com Automated Sales Line: 877-484-9942 Reinstatement and P ay-Off Requests: 866-387-NWTS THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE ORDER # 7301.29303: 01/04/2013,01/11/2013,01/18/2013 CN 14424

and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the F inancial Code and authoriz ed to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or w arranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the inde btedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as pr ovided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as pr ovided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. If required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the Calif ornia Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the duly recorded with the appropriate County Recorder's Office. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If y ou are considering bid ding on this property lien, you should under stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the property. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be r esponsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or mor e times b y the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the Calif ornia Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made a vailable to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not pr esent at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-2818219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 11-0101313. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be r eflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement inf ormation is to attend the sc heduled sale. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-0194 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: -- Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a de bt. Any information obtained will be used f or that purpose. A-4345661 01/04/2013, 01/11/2013, 01/18/2013 CN 14422 ,

the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or w arranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee`s Sale is estimated to be $433,792.56 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will incr ease this figur e prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a c heck drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Calif ornia Financial Code and authoriz ed to do business in Calif ornia, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the trustee. In the e vent tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endor see as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is unable to convey title f or any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and e xclusive remedy shall be the r eturn of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Notice to P otential Bidders If you are considering bidding on this pr operty lien, you should understand that ther e are risks involved in bid ding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auc tioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same Lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the pr operty. Notice to Property Owner The sale date shown on this Notice of Sale may be postponed one or mor e times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that inf ormation about Trustee Sale postponements be made available to y ou and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether y our sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this pr operty, you may call Auction.com at 800.280.2832 for information regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet Web site ad dress on the pr evious page for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, CA09000475-12-1. Information about postponements that are very short in dur ation or that occur close in time to the sc heduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to v erify postponement inf ormation is to attend the sc heduled sale. DATE: 12/26/2012 TRUSTEE CORPS TS No. CA09000475-12-1 17100 Gillette Ave, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-8300 Lupe Tabita, Authorized Signatory SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.Auction.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL AUCTION.COM AT 800.280.2832 TRUSTEE CORPS MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1011906 1/4, 1/11, 01/18/2013 CN 14420

YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEX WEST, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 08/02/2007 as Instrument No. 2007-0516545 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of SAN DIEGO County, State of C ALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: MURIEL T. GREGORY, AS TRUSTEE OF THE MURIEL T. GREGORY SEPTEMBER 7, 2004 REVOCABLE TRUST, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other f orm of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in la wful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 01/28/2013 TIME OF SALE: 10:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE EAST COUNTY REGIONAL CENTER BY ST ATUE, 250 E. MAIN STREET, EL CAJON, CA 92020 STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described a bove is purported to be: 3228 CORAL DRIVE, OCEANSIDE, CA 92056 APN#: 165-393-14-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any , shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and e xpenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secur ed by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $234,552.43. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and deli vered to the undersigned a written Declar ation of Default and Demand f or Sale, and a written Notice of Def ault and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Def ault and Election to Sell to be r ecorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that ther e are risks in volved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automati cally entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale ma y be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that inf ormation about trustee sale postponements be made available to y ou and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether y our sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this pr operty, you may call 714-573-1965 f or information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com for information regarding the sale of this pr operty, using the file n umber assigned to this case 20120191200724. Information about postponements that are very short in dur ation or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best w ay to v erify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: PRIORITY POSTING & PUBLISHING, INC. 17501 IRVINE BLVD., SUITE ONE TUSTIN, CA 92780 714-573-1965 www .priorityposting.com NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 12/31/2012 P1011155 1/4, 1/11, 01/18/2013 CN 14419

CASE NO: 37-2012-00152187-PRTR-CTL ROA#15 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO , 1409 FOURTH AVENUE, SAN DIEGO, CA 92101 the matter of the In MILLINBROOK TRUST Dated 29 April 2010 Notice is hereby given to the creditors and contingent cr editors of JAMES J MCMILLIN, that all persons having claims against the decedent are required to file them with the Superior Court, in the current case and mail a cop y to Bryan Ridgway, the trustee of the MILLINBROOK TRUST, dated 29 April 2010 wher ein the decedent was the settlor/trustor/g rantor, at 1767 S 141st Place, Gilbert, AZ 85295, within the later of f our months after the date of the fir st publication of notice to cr editors or, if notice is mailed or per sonally delivered to you, 30 days after the date this notice is mailed or personally delivered to y ou. A claim form may be obtained fr om the court clerk at the a bove named court, located at Pr obate Clerk, 1409 Fourth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101. For your protection, you are encouraged to file y our claim b y certified mail, with return receipt requested. Filed Dec 24, 2012 By: T Cutts, Deputy DATED: January 2013 Michael G Perdue, Esq. 1901 Camino Vida Roble, Ste 110 Carlsbad, CA 92008 (760) 930-9668 01/18, 01/25, 02/01/13 CN 14485

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE File No. 7301.29303 Title Order No. 6933251 MIN No. APN 105-292-2700 YOU ARE IN DEF AULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 01/22/07. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or feder al credit union, or a check drawn by a state or feder al savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in §5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held b y duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or w arranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. Trustor(s): WILLIAM R. SOUSA AND NANCY BETH SOUSA, HUSBAND AND WIFE, AS JOINT TENANTS Recor ded: 02/02/07, as Instrument No. 2007-0074228, of Official Records of SAN DIEGO County, California. Date of Sale: 01/24/13 at 10:00 AM Place of Sale: On the g rounds of the Scottish Rite Event Center, located at 1895 Camino Del Rio South,, San Diego, CA The purported property address is: 639 TUMBLE CREEK TERRACE, FALLBROOK, CA 92028 Assessors Parcel No. 105-292-27-00 The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and r easonable estimated costs, expenses and ad vances at the time of the initial publica tion of the Notice of Sale is $1,006,825.68. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid, plus

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 11-0101313 Doc ID #0001191516582005N Title Order No. 11-0081942 Investor/Insurer No. 119151658 APN No. 256-110-7600 YOU ARE IN DEF AULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 04/03/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is her eby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by PATRICIA DIANNE B ARMER, A SINGLE WOMAN, dated 04/03/2006 and recorded 4/10/2006, as Instrument No. 2006-0244068, in Book , Page 418, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of San Diego County , State of Calif ornia, will sell on 02/04/2013 at 9:00AM, Sheraton San Diego Hotel and Marina, 1380 Harbor Island Drive, San Diego, CA 92101, Auction.com Room at public auction, to the highest bid der for cash or c heck as described belo w, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and no w held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described a bove is pur ported to be: 513 HERMES AVENUE, ENCINITAS, CA, 92024. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the str eet address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $1,270,359.01. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total inde btedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a c heck drawn by a state or federal savings

APN: 125-273-50-00 TS No: CA09000475-12-1 TO No: 1092341 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 4/9/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 1/25/2013 at 09:00 AM, Auction.com Room at Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina, 1380 Harbor Island Dri ve, San Diego, CA 92101, MTC FINANCIAL INC. dba TRUSTEE CORPS, as the dul y Appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on 04/16/2007 as Instrument No. 2007-0252118 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of San Diego County , California, executed by CHRISTOPHER A BILL AND TARAH A BILL, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, as Trustor(s), in favor of FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB. as Lender and MOR TGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as nominee for Lender, its successors and/or assigns as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: As more fully described in said Deed of Trust The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described a bove is pur ported to be: 3403 LAKE P ARK AVE , FALLBROOK, CA 92028 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of

Trustee Sale No .: 20120191200724 Title Order No.: 120199178 FHA/VA/PMI No.: NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 07/27/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST

PROPOSED NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF JAMES J MCMILLIN Deceased PROBATE CODE 19002, et seq.

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JEAN A. MILNE CASE NO. 372013-00029463-PR-PW-CTL ROA #: 1 (IMAGED FILE) To all heir s, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who ma y otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Jean A. Milne A Petition for Probate has been filed by Victoria L. Montgomery and Marlene M. Merzbacher in the Superior Court of Calif ornia, County of SAN DIEGO. The Petition for Probate requests that Victoria L. Montgomery and Marlene M. Merzbacher be appointed as per sonal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The Petition requests the decedent's will and codicils, if any, be admitted to pr obate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file k ept by the court. The Petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the per sonal representative to take many actions without obtaining court appr oval. Before taking certain v ery important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court on Feb 21, 2013 at 1:30 PM in Dept. PC-2 located at 1409 4th Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101-3105 Central Division/Madge Bradley Building. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state y our objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the per sonal representative appointed b y the court within the later of either (1) f our months from the date of fir st issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Calif ornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 da ys from the date of mailing or per sonal delivery to y ou of a notice under section 9052 of the Calif ornia Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file k ept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request f or Special Notice (f orm DE-154) of the filing of an in ventory and appraisal of estate assets or of an y petition or account as pr ovided in Probate Code section 1250. A

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B9

THE COAST NEWS

JAN. 18, 2013

MiraCosta College student named Miss San Diego OCEANSIDE — MiraCosta College student Kelsey Schwarz is the ne w Miss San Diego. The 20-year-old Valley Center resident earned th e title on Jan. 5, securing the right to compete in the Miss California Pageant in June, the last stop bef ore the annual Miss America Pageant. “It feels amazing and it is such an honor,” Schwarz said. Schwarz, who is w orking at two jobs while attending MiraCosta College’s Oceanside Campus, said she got the pageant itc h when she met Miss Valley Center who painted Schwarz’s face at a softball game when Schwarz was just 6 y ears old. Some 11 y ears later, Schwarz won the title of Miss Valley Center f or herself, earning a $3,500 scholarship in the pr ocess. Since then, she also won the Miss Teen California World Pageant. Schwarz works as a student ambassador at MiraCosta College. “Our job is to build a relationship with prospective students in order to make the transition from high school to col lege as smooth as possible ,” she said. “We want to encourage people out in the community to pur sue higher educa-

North County student Kelsey Schwarz was crowned Miss San Diego. Courtesy photo

tion with Mir aCosta College." Schwarz also works for Royal Entertainers as a Disney princess at c hildren’s parties. She says pageants offer young women a number of benefits, including college sc holarships, networking opportunities, and an opportunity to be a mentor and r ole model f or younger children. Contestants must be wellversed in curr ent events while effectively communicating their thoughts. “You really have to be

on top of y our intellectual game,” she said. “It’s very easy to look at it as being skin deep and shallow, but that really is not the case.” Miss San Diego and Miss California fall under the umbrella of the Miss America Pageant organization. The four points of the Miss America crown symbolize scholarship, service, style, and success. In the upcoming Miss Calif ornia Pageant, 25 percent of a contestant’s score will be based on how well they do on an interview before they take the stage. Schwarz is a communications major who will b e transferring to Cal State San Marcos next fall. She has an associate’s degree in liberal arts and humanities, and she will earn a second AA in comm unications this spring. Her hope is to e arn a master’s degree in education and work as an inspirational speaker while teac hing college communications courses. Schwarz is looking f or potential sponsors in her Miss California effort. Those interested can write to inf @ o misssandiego.org or donate directly to the Childr en’s Miracle Network at missamericaforkids.org /donate/Schwarzschwarz.

ALADDIN ON STAGE Oceanside youth, from left, Tanner Vidos, Anton Maroun, Colt Apodaca, and Kelly Zimbelmann are among the stars of STAR Repertory Theatre’s presentation of “Disney’s Aladdin Jr.” from Oceanside. The show will be staged Jan. 24 through Jan. 27 at the California Center of the Arts, 340 North Escondido Blvd., Escondido. Tickets are on sale at the CCAE Box Office for $16.50. For more information, or to purchase pre-sale tickets, visit STARrepertorytheatre.com. Courtesy photo

Hospice seeks caring volunteers COAST CITIES — The Elizabeth Hospice seeks caring people to participate in the Winter Volunteer Training that will be held three consecutive Saturdays, Feb. 2, Feb. 9 and F eb. 16 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p .m. at The Elizabeth Hospice Administrative Office 150 W. Crest St., Escondido. Volunteer training is free and open to the public. Bilingual volunteers, pet therapy volunteers and military veterans are needed. To

teer training will serve hospice patients and their family members that li ve in the graduate’s community. Another training will be offered in the spring. The Elizabeth Hospice has a 34year tradition as the premier provider of medical, emotional and spiritual support to the terminally ill and their families. To learn more about The Elizabeth Hospice, call (760) 737-2050 or visit elizabethhospice.org.

ensure a place in the v olunteer training, contact the Volunteer Department at (760) 737-2050, no later than Jan. 25. Professional staff at The Elizabeth Hospice teach the comprehensive training classes, addressing issues such as the volunteer role in hospice care, working with non-verbal patients, cultural diversity, complementary therapies, and active listening. Graduates of this volun-

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OCEANSIDE $769,000 Oceanfront & Marina Penthouse.Oceanfront balcony. This Coastal Condo includes 3 parking spaces, and a huge storage room. MLS# 120041378

OCEANSIDE $849,000 Ocean view coastal condo.1519SF at San Miguel. Steps from surf and sand. Short stroll pier, shops, dining. FullTime residence or beach get-a-way. MLS# 120055353

OCEANSIDE $2,595,000 Nestled amid the Lagoon.The 2nd Level hosts the Master Retreat w/Lagoon View. Above the 3-Car Garage, 2Br & Large Bath. This Fabulous Home has All You Could Ever Want. MLS# 120043455

VISTA $384,500 Single story home.Walk or ride your bike to Vista Village! Close to Moonlight Amphitheater. Back yard complete with pool/spa. Easy freeway access! MLS # 120054033

OCEANSIDE $445,000 Single-Level El Camino Estates home. Golf Course views. Landscaped Grounds. Spacious LR & FR. Close to Shops, Dining & Freeways. Quiet Neighborhood. MLS# 120060477

CARLSBAD $1,400,000 Prime land for develpment - almost an acre in Old Carlsbad. West of I-5. Walking distance to the beach. Whatever your imagination leads you! MLS# 120012408

OCEANSIDE $2,895,000 Wonderful ocean front family compound. Situated on prime beach frontage. Features two oceanfront units, plus an owners retreat.Two-Car Garage.MLS# 120053244

CARLSBAD $935,000 Remodeled single story in Spinnaker Hill. Panoramic ocean views. Great floor plan. Large backyard. Walk, Bike, Skateboard to the beach. MLS# 130000094

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B10

THE COAST NEWS

You can have better joints without surgery

PET WEEK OF THE

Tosca is at Rancho Coastal Humane Society. She’s a 2-y ear-old, 9pound, Blue Cream Tabby cat with a beautiful, short, fur coat. On the outside Tosca seems independent and mellow, but will do “kitty zooms� around her house. Then she’s ready to sit on your lap and purr while you pet or brush her. The $145 adoption fee for Tosca includes her medical exam, up to date vaccinations, spay, and microchip identification. For more informa-

tion about other do gs, cats, and rabbits that need families call (760) 753-6413, log on to sdpets.org, or visit Rancho Coastal Humane Society at 389 Requeza St.

SAN DIEGUITO ART GUILD Off Track Gallery

SHOP THE BIGGEST LITTLE GALLERY IN TOWN Art . Photography . Jewelry Gourds . Glass Ceramics & More

Free Mosaic Demo Feb. 7th, 1:30pm Don Myers, Artist at SD Botanic Gardens, Enc. offtrackgallery.com (760) 942-3636 937 S. Coast Hwy 101, C-103 , Enc.

Kenneth Altschuler, M.D.

JAN. 18, 2013

Americans are wearing out their joints, Consumer Reports notes. Knee replacement is no w among the most common major surgeries, up 162 percent in the last two decades, according to an analysis of Medicare data published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The increase is partl y due to the population growth of aging ba by boomers. It also reflects rising rates of obesity and the fact that a more active group of people is unwilling to live with the pain and disa bility of osteoarthritis. Surgery to r eplace joints is a good option if your condition has become disabling, but it’s possible to delay or pr event the need for surgery. Consumer Reports offers this roundup of evidence-based approaches that can help pr otect joints and minimiz e the painful symptoms of arthritis. — Achieve a health y weight. Being overweight increases the stress on joints and might even hasten the breakdown of cartilage. Obesity can ha ve systemic effects that ar e not w ell understood. Research suggests that it e ven increases the risk of developing arthri-

The Doctors You Trust... The Care You Deserve.

People have a higher likelihood of ending up disabled from arthritis if they’re sedentary, according to Consumer Reports. Photo courtesy of Consumer Reports

tis in joints that don’ t bear weight. Fortunately, even modest weight loss — as little as 5 percent of body weight — has been sho wn to r educe the risk of arthritis later. Research suggests that losing weight reduces pain in people who already have the disease. — Stay active. Because osteoarthritis can arise from the overuse of joints or sports injuries, some people who have the condition worry that e xercise will make it w orse. In fact, the opposite may be true. Limited evidence suggests

that routine physical activity is linked to healthier cartilage in the knees, according to a 2011 r eview of 28 studies. People have a higher likelihood of ending up disabled from arthritis if they’re sedentary. — Treat injuries promptly. Left untreated, injuries such as a small tear in the knee cartilage or a shoulder tendon can set in motion a w ear-and-tear process that leads to joint deterioration. See a doctor for any injury that causes severe pain or swelling, or minor pain that doesn’ t resolve after a w eek or so .

Russel Buzard, D.O.

NEW PATIENT SPECIAL

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Mark Hubbard, M.D.

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Health Care Where You Are Thomas Naegeli, M.D.

Arch Health Partners (AHP) is growing to meet your needs! With the opening of Arch Health Partners Family Medicine Escondido and the addition of seven family medicine physicians, AHP is bringing high-quality health care to you.

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Plus, by choosing an AHP primary care physician there’s no longer a need to travel to the coast for emergency or hospital services. All AHP patients have access to the New Palomar Medical Center, as well as all other Palomar Health facilities.

Richard Ricci, M.D.

Whether you are currently a patient of one of our new providers, or if you are looking for a new primary care physician that offers personal comprehensive care in your neighborhood, choose Arch Health Partners. Visit www.ArchHealth.org or call 760.294.2266.

Pany Robinson, M.D.

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Take steps to minimiz e the risk of injur y in the fir st place. For example, don’t wear running shoes, which are designed to k eep your weight from shifting sideways, to play tennis. — Consider nondrug options. Finding effective ways to alle viate pain, swelling and stiffness is critical to staying active. Many people find that one or more of these nondrug measur es can reduce the need for pain medication: acupuncture; heat and cold, including moist heating pads f or stiff joints and ice pac ks for acute pain and s welling; massage; and mec hanical aids such as a cane,crutch or walker. — Simplify drug tr eatment. Newer, heavily advertised name-brand drugs such as dulo xetine (Cymbalta) — whic h is approved for treating chronic musculoskeletal osteoarthritis pain — often don’t work better than basic pain relievers, but they cost more and can carry a greater risk of side effects. Instead, start with a tried-and-true pain reliever, such as o verthe-counter acetaminophen (Tylenol and generic). Consumer Reports also suggests talking with your doctor about the topical version of the NSAID diclofenac (Pennsaid and Voltaren Gel). Finally, shots of anti-inflammatory steroids are an effective short-term r emedy for moderate to severe pain and swelling in the knees and hips. — Use supplements wisely. Despite mixed evidence and a lac k of support from major health groups about the role of the supplements glucosamine and chondroitin in tr eating osteoarthritis, some people think they help. But if y ou don’t experience relief within three months, there’s no point in contin uing to tak e them. — Skip unproven treatments. In particular, the most recent data suggests that injections of hyaluronic acid (Synvisc) directly into a joint, known as viscosupplementation, isn’t worth the risk. In an Aug. 2012 review of 89 clinical trials involving more than 12,000 patients, the authors concluded that viscosupplementation did little or nothing o verall to relieve pain or incr ease function in people with knee osteoarthritis.


community CALENDAR Got an item for the calendar? Send the details via email to calendar@coastnewsgroup.com.

SimplyTheBestSingles.com or call (818) 577-6877. WELLNESS FAIR Leucadia 101 Main Street is joining Downtown Encinitas Main Street for a Wellness Week Festival beginning 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 19 from at the Encinitas Library, 540 Cornish Drive, Encinitas.

JAN. 22

JAN. 18

LEARN CHINESE Immerse KEEP LEARNING LIFE at yourself in the f ar East b y

MiraCosta College, the lifelong learning g roup will discuss “Martin Luther King” and “Corruption: How Do We Stop It?” at 1 p.m. Jan. 18, at the Oceanside Campus, 1 Barnard Drive, Admin. Bldg. 1000, Room 1068. Call (760) 721-8124.

JAN. 19

SCOUTS FIGHT BULLYING All children first-

through eighth-grade are invited, as Girl Scout Troop 1300 will be part of sk its 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Jan. 19 at the Encinitas Library, put together to pr event bullying and help teach how to treat others fair. LEGION MEETS American Legion Post 146 meets at 9 a.m. every third Saturday of the month at the Senior Citizen Center, 455 Country Club Lane, Oceanside. For information, call (760) 7549633.

BEER AND BOOKS Join

the Beers for Books event, 5:30 to 8:30 p .m. Jan. 19 at the Lumberyard Tavern and Grill, 967 S. Coast Highway 101, Encinitas to benefit Room to Read. SUPPORT THE BAND La Costa Canyon High Sc hool band and color guard will host a free electronic Waste Recycle Drive from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Jan. 19 and Jan. 20, rain or shine, at the high sc hool, 1 Maverick Way.

GARDEN

learning Mandarin Chinese every Tuesday at 2 p.m., taught by a Native speaker at the Del Mar Library, 1309 Camino Del Mar, Del Mar. Call (858) 7551666 for details. FINDING HISTORY “The Identity of the Unknown Child on the Titanic” will be di scussed by forensic scientist Colleen Fitzpatrick at the North San Diego County Genealogical Society meeting, 10 a.m. Jan. 22, in Carlsbad City Council Chamber s, 1200 Carlsbad Village Drive, Carlsbad. For additional information, contact tgordinier35@gmail.com.

JAN. 24

MAKE THE MOVE Attend

the free “Joy of Do wnsizing” seminar for adults 50 and older fr om 10 to 11:45 a.m. Jan. 24 with pr ofessional organizer Denise Levine at the Carlsbad Senior Center , 755 Pine Ave. For more information, visit carlsbadca.gov/parksandrec or call (760) 602-4650.

JAN. 25

LGBTQ MEETS North County LGBTQ Resour ce Center is hosting a Town Hall meeting at 6:30 p .m. in the Community Rooms of the downtown Oceanside Libr ary, 300 N. Coast Highway Jan. 25. For further information, email to info@ ncresourcecenter.org, or call Max Disposti, at (760) 672-1848.

JAN. 26

GOINGS-ON SUBSTITUTE SUPPORT If

Mira Costa Gar den Club will host a noon w orkshop and meeting Jan. 19, with Cynthia Fenimore of “Solutions FarmsAquaponics” at the MiraCosta College Student Union, Atzlan Rooms A & B, 1 Bernard Way, Oceanside. Call Shelley Grossman at (760) 518.1387 or email shelceleste@gmail.com.

SINGLES

B11

THE COAST NEWS

JAN. 18, 2013

MINGLE

“Simply The Best Singles, ” presents a dance/mixer f or ages 40 to 60-ish from 7:30 p.m. to 11:30 p .m. Jan. 19 at the Del Mar Marriott,11966 El Camino Real, Carmel Valley with the Br okers Band. Upscale casual dress (no jeans or shorts). $20 door, $5 self parking, $10 valet. Sign up at

you have ever considered substitute teaching, learn pros and cons, the typical day, classroom management strategies, and employment opportunities plus handouts, filler activities, resources, toolbox creation, and more from 2 to 4 p.m. Jan. 26 at the Encinitas Community/Senior Center, 1140 Oakcrest Park Drive, Encinitas. The cost is $15. Register by emailing substituteinfo@gmail.com.

DEL MAR GARDENERS

Friendship Gardeners of De l Mar meet at 1 to 3 p .m. Jan. 26. Author Frank La Rosa will present “The Spirit of Gardening.” Call (858)7556570 for location information.

NEDA NOURANI Professional, knowledgeable and responsive

Neda can be reached at the Olivenhain office

760.944.1112 www. sdseacoast.com

Organization continues to aid Academy COAST CITIES — The past season for the Friends of San Pasqual Academy continued to bring a v ery special dimension to the li ves of the foster children who ar e students at San Pasqual Academy. It began with Shop ‘Til You Drop - Back To School Day, then “Teens, Jeans and Dreams” team penning event, the “Celebration of F riends” evening at J ohn and Gina Daley’s home, Sports Banquets for the football and volleyball players; birthday parties, refurbishing cottages, the annual Holiday Party and New Year’s Eve party, and more. Members are currently planning the “Tee It Up F or Foster Teens” golf tournament to be held April 22 at The

Santaluz Club. Dave Scherer will be chairperson again this y ear joined a w onderful group of volunteers already hard at work on the tournament and dinner. If you would like to join the committee, be a sponsor, or golf in this tournament, e-mail Joan at joscott24@hotmail.com. Karen Ventura is once again, in charge of the evening’s auction. If you would like to donate an auction item, contact Karen at Karenventura@kirkwoodpartners.net. “Tee It Up For Foster Teens” invitations will go out as soon as the y are available. Start putting your foursomes

Learn winter garden care with free classes COAST CITIES — Armstrong Garden Centers is hosting free classes at all its locations to teac h skills in pruning, planting and growing. Thanks to Southern California’s warm winter climates, now is the best time to begin pruning deciduous fruit trees and roses. Upcoming classes include Rose Pruning at 9 a.m. Feb. 2 and F ruit Tree Pruning at 11 a.m. Feb. 2. North County Armstrong Garden Center locations include 701 N. El Camino Real, Encinitas; 5702 Paseo Del Norte, Carlsbad and 2840 Via de la Valle, Del Mar. All classes are free and any skill set is welcome. No registration is required. “Our rose pruning class brings the best tips on how to prune, plant, and care for roses throughout the winter season,” said Sean Sturgeon, North Regional manager of Armstrong Garden Centers. “Southern Californians love growing their own fruit trees and our pruning class will assist them in bearing the best fruit when they bloom.” Continuing their mission to take the guesswork out of gardening, Armstrong is set on

helping others garden like pros. It is important that roses and dormant fruit trees, such as low-chill apples, pears, peaches, nectarines, and plums are pruned this season and these classes are perfect to get you started. Armstrong has additional free workshops year-round that reflect the seasons, which include vegetable gardening, orchid care and more. Contact your local Armstrong Garden Centers or lo g on to armstronggarden.com/pages/class es to see a list of all future workshops.

together today. Upcoming activities of Friends of San P asqual Academy include Valentine’s Day bags, Easter goodies, Prom, Grad Night and Brunch, more birthday parties, sports

banquets for the bask etball teams, track, baseball and softball teams, athletic uniforms, music, art and agricultural programs, college scholarships, computers for the g raduates and the graduation ceremony.


B12 SIGNATURES

CONTINUED FROM B1

courts have sided against digital signatures being used in statewide elections. Moreover, state election offici als like Secretary of State Debra Bowen have said digital signatures currently present too many security concerns. For digital signatur es to move forward, Stern said it could take an initiati ve, not lawmakers’ efforts. “I don’t see the legislature approving this,” Stern said. “They’re typically not in favor of the initiati ve process. It could r equire an initiati ve from voters for electronic signatures to become law.” The paid-signature industry has opposed digital signatures,because it could damper business by driving down the price of signatur es. Michael Arno, founder and pr esident of Carlsbad-based Arno Political Associates, said his company is the only one in the industry that supports the movement. In the last election, Arno Political Associates helped Propositions 37 and 33 qualify with paid-signature gatherers at places like grocery stores. Yet Arno said digital sig-

GENEALOGY

CONTINUED FROM B2

ries you have heard.” The protocol in conducting genealogy research is to begin with your own birth and work your way back in time, documenting each event using family bibles and other private and public documents such as birth, marriage and death certificates. “It used to be that y our best friend w as the postman who would deliver them in the mail,” Baird recalled. “Then came the computer with online databases and email that made it possible to contact families faster. “Families are not clustered together like they used to be but no w there is Skype and Google Chat to bring y ou together. I found a cousin on Facebook.” The other r evolution in genealogy research is DN A. “Family stories can distort the truth, deceive and be outright wrong,” she said. “DNA doesn’t care about stories, it cares about facts.” Today technology has ignited an interest in genealog-

THE COAST NEWS natures will help e ven the playing field. “Whether it be a populist environmental group or taxpayer group, they don’t have the money,” Arno said. “Electronic signatures would empower them.” And he counter ed those who say the electr onic signatures would create too m uch direct democracy. “The California legislature looks at 6,000 bills e very year,” Arno said. “We would be overloaded with 100, but don’t think a reasonable number of additional petitions would hurt anyone,” Arno added. As for the companies that make money off paid signatures, Arno said the y could actually benefit fr om digital signatures. “A lot of industry people are scared about it,”Arno said. “I don’t know why, it may reduce how many you collect for an individual petition. But it will open up the door f or a lot more petitions.” Specifically, Arno cited Europe as an example. Digital signatures can be legally attached to initiatives in countries like Finland. But many grassroots groups have trouble converting enthusiasm f or a

cause into actual signatur es, despite the process being more convenient for many. That’s where political consultants come in, he said. “There’s a mar ket that wasn’t there before,” Arno said. Joe Mathews, author of the California Crackup,a book that advocates for ballot initiative and other r eforms, said digital signatures are “nice, but not a game-changer.” “This would make it somewhat cheaper for grassroots organizations to get signatures, which I applaud,” Mathews said. But Mathews said California could benefit fr om also looking at a host of issues connected to initiative reform, including extending the 150day time limit to give citizendriven groups more time. “In Switzerland they mull over initiatives for four years,” Mathews said. “For some reason we’re addicted to short elections wher e people aren’t adequately educated on what they’re voting for.” Input during the e vent, and at similar e vents across the state, will aid the League of Women Voters in cr afting possible reform recommendations for the initiative process.

ical research. The Family History Room of the Cole Library boasts one of the largest genealogical collections in Southern California. Mary Van Orsdol is senior librarian of the Genealogical & Carlsbad History Division. “We have a cr oss-stich that reads, ‘I shall never see a finished genealogy,’” she said. “In general, genealogy is a hobby for those who have a lot of time and ar e willing to make a lot of effort.” The library offers free access to fee-based online databases including Access Newspaper Archive,American Ancestors, Ancestry Library Edition, Fold3 (military), HeritageQuest and World Vital Records. In addition, private genealogy consultations are available by appointment as well as free classes on a variety of genealogy subjects. The next one, focusing on the website findagrave.com, is scheduled from 2 to 4 p.m. Jan. 29. The North San Diego County Genealogical Society offers beginning, refresher and specialized classes in genealogy research in partnership with the Car lsbad City

Library on Wednesday evenings and Saturday mornings. For information, visit nsdcgs.org. The NSDCGS is pr esenting a talk b y famed forensic genealogist Colleen Fitzpatrick between 10 and 11:30 a.m. Jan. 22 at the Carlsbad City Council Chambers at 1200 Car lsbad Village Drive. Fitzpatrick has earned an international reputation for her work using DNA to solve crimes. She located the Y-reference for Sidney Leslie Goodwin, the previously unidentified child who w as found on the Titanic, and worked on the Amelia Earhart case. Seating is limited. The San Diego Jewish Genealogical Society meets the second Sunda y of most months at the Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center in La Jolla. For more information, visit sdjgs.org. The Cole Libr ary is at 1250 Carlsbad Village Drive, Carlsbad. For more information, visit carlsbadlibrary.org or call (760) 434-2931.

HEALING

CONTINUED FROM B1

densities, and that ph ysical resonance occurs when those densities respond to different sound frequencies. As such, he can tar get and heal different parts of the body by making them vibrate when exposing them to certain sound frequencies. Physical resonance is capable of healing including relieving sore muscles and joints, as well as adjusting vertebrae for chiropractic patients, said Thompson. Thompson’s practice and research also w orks a great deal with brainwave entrainment. In simple terms, brainwave entrainment involves changing brainwave patterns and states of consciousness with sound frequency vibration patterns. Calling it “a brain gym to enlightenment,” Thompson said that through brainwave entrainment, sound can alter a per son’s state of mind, helping them be more focused or more relaxed, and can even help a person enter a trance-like state. Mandle has her own way of e xplaining the phenomena of sound’s effects on the body. She specializes in pla ying authentic Tibetan instruments, and said that when used properly, “You are awakening dormant energies to better balance the wholeness of a person.” Mandle has studied primarily Tibetan teachings

SMALL TALK

CONTINUED FROM B1

I will worry. I have lived as part of the military long enough to know that he will be in harm’s way long before he is ever assigned to a w ar zone. It’s part of the job description and, as my very pragmatic pilot father used to say, “That’s why the give us flight pa y.” I will ne ver whine, but I will a bsolutely fret. This task falls to us, his mom, his grandmother and his godmother, and we will be doing a thorough and continuous job of it. As I comf ort his mom, who is facing the emptynest syndrome as well as the

JAN. 18, 2013 about energy and sound healing for about the past 20 years, and with that training and experience she can feel how sound affects people and uses it to promote physical and spiritual healing. She has focused her work on Tibetan instruments and Bud dhism because she believes that they are the original and most effective tools f or sound healing, calling them “the real McCoy.” Mandle plays her Tibetan singing bo wls by rubbing the edges with mallets or striking them gentl y. She said that as she pla ys she can sense when energies are awakened and when her instruments indicate that a part of the bod y is bloc ked or injured when w orking with an individual. By playing her instruments and using guided meditations, she helps people find the cor e issues needing to be ad dressed to experience physical and spiritual healing. She bases her sound energy healing pr actice on the belief that true healing is “a spiritual awakening that impacts the physical body.” While she per sonally does not have the funds to conduct scientific r esearch about how sound heals people, she said that she encourages her clients to measure the c hanges in their own bodies. But she said she doesn’t need scientific measur ements to know that sound helps people. “Things happen, people

get better. I don’t need an y more proof than that, ” Mandle said. Though one relies on scientific measurements and the other intuition, Thompson and Mandle said that the feedback they have received from clients has been overwhelming. Both said that they regularly have clients who ar e amazed by the healing in their own bodies, and both said that the y have had people r equest treatment from around the world. In spite of this, Thompson and Mandle said that sound healing is still being used far too infrequently. Mandle said that when she moved to Encinitas in 2000, “Nobody knew what (sound healing) was.” “Sound healing has a black eye because of all the flaky-wakies out there. So once you announce that you are doing sound ther apy, everyone in the medical field turns a way,” said Thompson. To see a video of Mandle playing her Tibetan bowls, visit thecoastnews.com. More information about Thompson’s work can be found on the Center f or Neuroacoustic Research’s website at neuroacoustic.com. Mandle will be pla ying a concert as part of Encinitas’ Wellness Week at the Encinitas Libr ary Jan. 25 at 6:30 p .m. More information about her w ork can be found at soundenergyhealing.com.

fact that her ba by boy is being cloistered in boot camp, I find m yself getting pretty verklempt, too. I will never forget that moment when my child was suddenly swallowed up b y an entir e new world in which I had no part. These are life’s rites of passage, but it is a cold realization that life is mo ving on, changing, doing what it is supposed to do . It is also what, since the beginning of time, has made women pace the widow’s walk, count the days, make unnecessary cookies and r each out with our hearts when no other connection is possible. I do not mean to diminish those whose children are

fighting somewhere truly dangerous, but rather I honor them. In this age of general self-absorption, seeing someone offer themselves up to be our true protectors, is nothing short of extraordinary. My adorable godchild presented me with a scarf bearing the “EGA,” which I now know is the eagle, globe and anchor Marine emblem. I will tie it to m y purse in hopes anyone will ask about it, to which I will proudly reply, “My godson is a Marine!”

BEFORE

AFTER

Jean Gillette really does love a man in uniform. Contact her at jgillette@coastnewsgroup.com


Legals 800

Coast News Legals From Page B8 Request for Special Notice f orm is available from the court cler k. Attorney for Petitioner: Jennett Maniscalco 144 E. Washington Avenue, Escondido, CA 92025, Telephone: 760-796-4030 1/18, 1/25, 2/1/13 CNS-2433814# CN 14484 NOTICE OF SALE Notice is herby given that pursuant to Sections 21701-21715 of the Business and Pr ofessional Code and Section 2328 of the Commercial Code of Calif ornia, that Stor Mor Stor age Facility 470 N. Midway Dr., Escondido, CA 92027 will sell pr operty listed below by competitive bidding on or after February 2, 2013. Auction to be held at above address. Property

B13

THE COAST NEWS

JAN. 18, 2013

Legals 800 to be sold as f ollows: Personal items, automotive, furniture, tools, clothing, & any misc. items belonging to the following:

Legals 800

least two days before the matter is scheduled to be hear d and m ust appear at the hearing to sho w cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection Paul E. Provence & Theodore T. Risen #53,#166,#167 is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Auction to be conducted b y: Jack NOTICE OF HEARING: In Dept NJung Auctions Bond# 00105239610 03 of the Superior Court of 01/18/13, 01/25/13 CN 14465 California, County of San Diego , North County Di vision, 325 South Melrose Drive Vista, CA 92081 on ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR February 19, 2013 at 8:30 a.m. CHANGE OF NAME Date: December 28, 2012 AARON CASE NUMBER H. KATZ / TF Judge of the Superior 37-2012-00059324-CU-PT-NC Court 01/11, 01/18, 01/25, 02/01/13 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: CN 14442 Petitioner(s): Daniel Leonhar d filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR a. Present name Daniel Gr egory CHANGE OF NAME Leonhard changed to pr oposed CASE NUMBER name Gregory Vahram Diehl THE 37-2012-00059336-CU-PT-NC COURT ORDERS that all per sons TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: interested in this matter appear Krista Michelle Petitioner(s): before this Court at the hearing Lafferty Romley filed a petition indicated below to sho w cause, if with this court f or a decree changany, why the petition f or a change ing names as f ollows: a. Present of name should not be g ranted. name Krista Michelle Lafferty Any person objecting to the name Romley changed to proposed name changes described above must file Krista Michelle Confer THE a written objection that includes COURT ORDERS that all per sons the reasons for the objection at interested in this matter appear

Legals 800 before this Court at the hearing indicated below to sho w cause, if any, why the petition f or a change of name should not be g ranted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be hear d and m ust appear at the hearing to sho w cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: In Dept 3 of the Superior Court of California, County of San Diego, North County Division, 325 South Melr ose Drive Vista, CA 92081 on February 19, 2013 at 8:30 a.m. Date: December 28, 2012 AARON H. KATZ Judge of the Superior Court 01/04, 01/11, 01/18, 01/25/13 CN 14428

Legals 800

Jason Allen Thompson, IN RE: Chelsea Ray Thompson DOB: 05/13/2004 and P aige Nickole Thompson DOB: 05/20/2005, minors under The age of 10 y ears Defendants NOTICE TO DEFENDANT(S) ABOVE NAMED: JASON ALLEN THOMPSON, CHELSEA RAY THOMPSON, PAIGE NICKOLE THOMPSON YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to ans wer the Complaint in this action a cop y of which is herewith served upon you, (which was filed in the Office of the Clerk of this Court on the 1st day of October, 2012, and to serve a copy of y our answer to the Complaint upon the subscriber at Post Office Bo x 4025, Anderson, South Carolina within thirty da ys after the ser vice hereof, exclusive of the da y of suc h service. If you fail to answer the Complaint within that time, the Plaintiff(s) will apply to the Court f or the r elief demanded in the Complaint. SUMMONS AND NOTICE TO INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN IN THE FAMILY COURT CASE YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON): You are further NUMBER 2012-DR-04-2021 summoned and r equired to appl y STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA for the appointment of a guar dian COUNTY OF ANDERSON, Michael Christopher Burdette and ad litem to r epresent you in this Jayme Burdette, Plaintiffs, Vs. action within thirty days after serv-

Legals 800 ice of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so , this application for such appointment will be made b y the Plaintiff(s) herein. TO INFANTS UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE INCOMPETENT OR INSANE AND TO _____, (GENERAL OR TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN) (COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM (S)HE (THEY) RESIDE(S): You are further summoned and notified to appl y for the appointment of a guar dian ad litem to r epresent said inf ant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane per son) within thirty days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. The name, address, and telephone number of petitioner’s attorney, or petitioner without an attorney, are: Nancy Jo Thomason Attorney for the Plantiffs 303 East Greenville Street Post Office Box 4025 Anderson, South Carolina 29622 Telephone (864) 226-7222 Date: October 01, 2012 Richard A Shirley Clerk of Court 01/04, 01/11, 01/18/13 CN 14427 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF ANTHONY JASON KERCKHOFF, AKA JASON KERCKHOFF, AKA A. JASON KERCKHOFF, AKA ANTHONY WAYNE GRANT CASE NO. 37-2012- 00152801-PRPW-CTL ROA #: 1 (IMAGED FILE) To all heir s, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who ma y otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Estate of Anthony Jason Kerckhoff, aka Jason Kerckhoff, aka A. Jason Kerckhoff, aka Anthony Wayne Grant. A PETITION FOR PR OBATE has been filed b y Alice Anne HillKerckhoff in the Superior Court of California, County of San Diego. THE PETITION FOR PR OBATE requests that Alice Abbe GukkKerckhoff be appointed as per sonal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent's WILL and codicils, if any, be admitted to pr obate. The will and an y codicils are available for examination in the file k ept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the per sonal representative to take many actions without obtaining court appr oval. Before taking certain v ery important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority . A HEARING on the petition will be held on Feberuary 5, 2013 at 11:00 am in Dept. PC-1 located at The Madge Bradley Building, 1409 4th Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101. IF YOU OBJECT to the g ranting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state y our objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent cr editor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the per sonal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of fir st issuance of letter s as pr ovided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed a bove. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file k ept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request f or Special Notice (f orm DE-154) of the filing of an in ventory and appraisal of estate assets or of an y petition or account as pr ovided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice f orm is available from the court cler k. Attorney for Petitioner: Susan Stricklin Wilson 416 Second Street, Encinitas, CA 92024, Telephone: 760-942-1278 1/11, 1/18, 1/25/13 CNS-2428325# CN 14440 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001209 The name(s) of the business: A. RPM Pool Service Located at: 1714 Catalpa Rd. Carlsbad, CA San Diego 92011. Mailing Address: PO Box 130482 Car lsbad, CA 92013. This business is conducted b y: A Married Couple. The transaction of business began: 04/01/10. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Petr A. Mastny 1714 Catalpa Rd. Carlsbad, CA 92011 2. Marcela A. Mastny 1714 Catalpa Rd. Carlsbad, CA 92011. This statement w as filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 14, 2013. S/Petr A. Mastny 01/18, 01/25, 02/01,

Legals 800 02/08/2013 CN 14481 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001321 The name(s) of the business: A. BWG Appraisals Located at: 442 Summer View Circle Encinitas, CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 01/24/07. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. William A. Grow 442 Summer View Circle Encinitas, CA 92024. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Jan. 14, 2013. S/William A. Grow 01/18, 01/25, 02/01, 02/08/2013 CN 14480 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-000410 The name(s) of the business: A. Aloha Taxi Located at: 1614 Wesley Way Vista, CA San Diego 92081. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted b y: An Individual. The transaction of business began: Not Yet Started. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Chris Powell 1614 Wesley Way Vista, CA 92081. This statement w as filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Jan. 07, 2013. S/Chris Powell 01/18, 01/25, 02/01, 02/08/2013 CN 14479 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001357 The name(s) of the business: A. Heavenly Asphalt Located at: 1076 N. Coast Hwy. 101 Luecadia, CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 01/14/13. This business is hereby registered by the f ollowing owner(s): 1. LeGrande Cooper 1076 N. Coast Hwy. 101 Luecadia, CA 92024. This statement w as filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 15, 2013. S/LeGrande Cooper 01/18, 01/25, 02/01, 02/08/2013 CN 14478 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-033155 The name(s) of the business: A. Balardeta Racing LLC Located at: 659 L ynwood Drive Encinitas, CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted by: A Limited Lia bility Company. The transaction of busi ness began: 11/15/12. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Balardeta Racing LLC 659 Lynwood Drive Encinitas, CA 92024. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Dec. 21, 2012. S/Joseph J. Balardeta 01/18, 01/25, 02/01, 02/08/2013 CN 14477 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001183 The name(s) of the business: A. Synapco Services Group B. Synapco Services c) Synapco Located at: 2811 Via Topacio Carlsbad, CA, San Diego 92010. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted b y: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 12/18/02. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Stephen H. Hinkle 2811 Via Topacio Carlsbad, CA 92010. This statement w as filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 14, 2013. S/Stephen H. Hinkle 01/18, 01/25, 02/01, 02/08/2013 CN 14476 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001216 The name(s) of the business: A. Carlsbad Performing Arts Academy Located at: 6106 Avenida Encinas Ste. F Carlsbad, CA, San Diego 92011. Mailing Address: 4028 Vista Calaveras St. Oceanside, CA 92056. This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 07/21/07. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Mary White 4028 Vista Calaveras St. Oceanside, CA 92056. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 14, 2013. S/Mary White 01/18, 01/25, 02/01, 02/08/2013 CN 14475 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001130 The name(s) of the business: A. Matrix Light Institute B. Art Of Heartful Living Located at: 7955 La Selva Way Carlsbad, CA, San Diego 92009. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted

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THE COAST NEWS Legals 800

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Address: SAME. This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: NOT YET STARTED. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Kurt Luoni 218 West D Street Encinitas, CA 92024. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 07, 2013 S/Kurt by: A Corporation. The transaction Luoni 01/11, 01/18, 01/25, 02/01/13 of business began: 12/28/95. This CN 14454 business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Matrix FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME Universalis 7955 La Selva Way STATEMENT FILE #2012-032849 The name(s) of the business: Carlsbad, CA 92009. This stateA. DEMCCO Located at: 6753 ment was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Lonicera St. Carlsbad, CA, San Diego on J an. 11, 2013. S/James Diego 92011. Mailing Address: PO Woeber 01/18, 01/25, 02/01, Box 871 Oceanside, CA 92049. This business is conducted b y: An 02/08/2013 CN 14474 Unincorporated Association-Other FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME than a Partnership. The transaction STATEMENT FILE #2013-000657 of business began: 01/01/90. This business is hereby registered by The name(s) of the business: A. Homestead Toolbox Located at: the following owner(s): 1. Kenneth 4 Lynn Lane Oceanside, CA, San Clarence 6753 Lonicera St. Diego 92058. Mailing Address: Carlsbad, CA 92011 2. Mary SAME. This business is conducted Meyers 3009 Corte Boldre by: An Individual. The transaction Carlsbad, CA 92009. This stateof business began: NO T YET ment was filed with the STARTED. This business is hereby Recorder/County Clerk of San registered by the f ollowing Diego on Dec. 18, 2013. S/Mary owner(s): 1. LuEllen Raymor 4 Meyers 01/11, 01/18, 01/25, 02/01/13 Lynn Lane Oceanside, CA 92058. CN 14453

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registered by the f ollowing owner(s): 1. Color Farm Inc. 695 Normandy Rd. Encinitas, CA 92024. This statement w as filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Dec. 27, 2012. S/Oliver Storm 01/11, 01/18, 01/25, 02/01/13 CN 14449

Marcos, CA 92028. 2. Taryn Dodd 2704 Palmetto Dr. Carlsbad, CA 92009. This statement w as filed with Ernest J . Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego County, on Jan 02, 2013. S/Taryn Dodd 01/11, 01/18, 01/25, 02/01/13 CN 14445

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2012-032801 The name(s) of the business: A. Blossom Music Together Located at: 1163 S Coast Hwy 101, Encinitas, CA, San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: 3471 Jefferson St, Carlsbad, CA 92008. This business is conducted by: An Individual The transaction of business began: 08/15/12. This business is hereby registered by the f ollowing owner(s): 1. Daveen Degiacomo, 3471 Jefferson St, Carlsbad, CA 92008. This statement w as filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Dec 18, 2012. S/Daveen DiGiacomo 01/11, 01/18, 01/25, 02/01/13 CN 14448

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-000093 The name(s) of the business: A. Love Child Located at: 1002 N . Coast Highway 101 Suite 6 Encinitas, CA, San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: SAME. This business is conducted b y: A Married Couple. The transaction of business began: 01/02/13. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Mordi Hulsing 2823 Cebu Place Carlsbad, CA 92009 2. Andrew P. Wehe 2823 Cebu Place Carlsbad, CA 92009. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Jan 02, 2013. S/Andrew P. Wehe 01/11, 01/18, 01/25, 02/01/13 CN 14444

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-000212 The name(s) of the business: A. Paul C Garner / Daryl J Brooks Associates Located at: 120 Breakwater Rd, Carlsbad, CA, San Diego 92011. Mailing Address: SAME. This business is conducted by: Joint Venture. The transaction of business began: 03/11/11. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Daryl J Brooks, 120 Breakwater Rd, Carlsbad, CA 92011 2. Paul C Garner, 76-515 Sweet Pea Way, Palm Desert, CA 92211. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on J an 03, 2013. S/Daryl J Brooks 01/11, 01/18, 01/25, 02/01/13 CN 14447

This statement w as filed with the FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 08, 2013 S/LuEllen STATEMENT FILE #2013-000478 The name(s) of the business: Raymor 01/18, 01/25, 02/01, A. SPI4U B. Daryl J. Brooks 02/08/2013 CN 14463 Investigative Consultant Located FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME at: 120 Br eakwater Rd. Carlsbad, STATEMENT FILE #2012-032913 CA, San Diego 92011. Mailing Address: SAME. This business is The name(s) of the business: A. JR Alliance Located at: 307 A conducted by: An Individual. The Hillcrest Dr. Encinitas, CA, San transaction of business began: Diego 92024. Mailing Address: 01/01/07. This business is hereby SAME. This business is conducted registered by the f ollowing by: An Individual. The transaction owner(s): 1. Daryl J. Brooks 120 of business began: 09/27/12. This Breakwater Rd. Carlsbad, CA business is hereby registered by 92011. This statement w as filed FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME the following owner(s): 1. Julie F. with the Recorder/County Clerk of STATEMENT FILE #2012-032717 Regan 307A Hillcrest Dr. San Diego on Jan. 07 2013. S/Daryl The name(s) of the business: Encinitas, CA 92024. This state- J. Brooks 01/11, 01/18, 01/25, A. Darton Sleeves B. Brass 02/01/13 CN 14452 ment was filed with the Grippers Located at: 2380 Camino Recorder/County Clerk of San Vida Roble Car lsbad, CA, San Diego on Dec. 19, 2012 S/Julie F. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME Diego 92011. Mailing Address: Regan 01/18, 01/25, 02/01, STATEMENT FILE #2013-000122 SAME. This business is conducted The name(s) of the business: 02/08/2013 CN 14462 A. Wanted Public Relations B. by: A Corporation. The transaction Wanted Marketing C. Wanted PR - of business began: 12/01/12. This FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME business is hereby registered by STATEMENT FILE #2013-000406 Marketing Located at: 2441 Bella the following owner(s): 1. Darton Vista Drive Vista, CA, San Diego The name(s) of the business: International Inc. 2380 Camino A. Home Chef Private Chef Service 92084. Mailing Address: SAME. Vida Roble Carlsbad, CA 92011. This business is conducted b y: A Located at: 404 Encinitas Blvd. This statement w as filed with the #380 Encinitas, CA, San Diego Corporation. The transaction of Recorder/County Clerk of San This 92024. Mailing Address: SAME. business began: 01/03/13. Diego on Dec 18, 2012. S/David L. This business is conducted b y: An business is hereby registered by Clinton 01/11, 01/18, 01/25, 02/01/13 Individual. The transaction of busi- the following owner(s): 1. Wanted CN 14446 ness began: 05/03/09. This business Marketing, Inc. 2441 Bella Vista is hereby registered by the follow- Drive Vista, CA 92084. This stateSTATEMENT OF ABANDONing owner(s): 1. Alahyar Andre ment was filed with the MENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS Ghaffary 404 Encinitas Blvd. #380 Recorder/County Clerk of San BUSINESS NAME Encinitas, CA 92024. This state- Diego on J an. 03, 2013. S/Victoria FILE #2013-000090 A. Cornett 01/11, 01/18, 01/25, ment was filed with the A. The name(s) of the business: Recorder/County Clerk of San 02/01/13 CN 14450 Love Child Located at: 1002 N . Diego on J an. 07, 2013 S/Alahyar Coast Hwy 101 Ste. 6 Encinitas, CA Andre Ghaffary 01/11, 01/18, 01/25, FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME San Diego 92024. Mailing STATEMENT FILE #2012-033460 02/01/13 CN 14456 Address: 1820 Windriver St. San The name(s) of the business: Marcos, CA 92028. The Ficititious FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME A. Weidners Gardens Located at: Business Name r eferred to a bove STATEMENT FILE #2013-000489 695 Normandy Rd. Encinitas, CA, was filed in San Diego County on: San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: The name(s) of the business: 04/22/10 and assigned F ile No. A. Quattro Sports Group Located SAME. This business is conducted 2010-011217 is a bandoned by the at: 218 West D Str eet Encinitas, by: A Corporation. The transaction following registrant(s): 1. Jen T YET CA, San Diego 92024. Mailing of business began: NO STARTED. This business is hereby Wilson 1820 Windriver St. San

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2012-033549 The name(s) of the business: A. Sove Creations Located at: 7316 El Fuerte St. Carlsbad, CA, San Diego 92009. Mailing Address: SAME. This business is conducted by: A General Partnership. The transaction of business began: 12/12/2012. This business is hereby registered by the f ollowing owner(s): 1. Aleksandr Kartsub 7316 El Fuerte St. Carlsbad, CA 92009. 2. Valentina Kartsub 7316 El Fuerte St. Carlsbad, CA 92009. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Dec 28, 2012. S/Aleksandr Kartsub 01/11, 01/18, 01/25, 02/01/13 CN 14443 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2012-033080 The name(s) of the business: A. Vista Vision Associates in Optometry Located at: 931-B Anza Ave. Vista, CA, San Diego 92081. Mailing Address: SAME This business is conducted b y: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 03/01/90. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Bruce D. George 1323 Hermana Ct. Vista, CA 92084. This statement w as filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Dec. 20, 2012. S/Bruce D. George 01/04, 01/11, 01/18, 01/25/13 CN 14438 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2012-033331 The name(s) of the business: A. Audio Video San Diego Located at: 300 Car lsbad Village Dr. Suite 1080-328 Carlsbad, CA, San Diego 92008. Mailing Address: SAME This business is conducted b y: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 03/01/10. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. David Troisi 2139 Via Esmarca #1 Oceanside, CA 92054 This statement w as filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Dec 26, 2012. S/David Troisi 01/04, 01/11, 01/18,

01/25/13 CN 14437

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Legals 800

Mailing Address: 757 Santa Barbara Dr. San Marcos, CA 92078. This business is conducted b y: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 12/28/12. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Jens Stephan 757 Santa Barbara Dr. San Marcos, CA 92078. This statement w as filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Dec 28, 2012. S/Jens Stephan 01/04, 01/11, 01/18, 01/25/13 CN 14432

Sudakow 12/28/12, 01/04, 01/11, 01/18/13 CN 14410

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2012-033383 The name(s) of the business: A. Cornerstone Appraisal Services Located at: 7211 Wisteria Way Carlsbad, CA, San Diego 92011. Mailing Address: SAME This business is conducted b y: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 11/01/11. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Gordy A. Spires 7211 Wisteria Way Carlsbad, CA FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME 92011 This statement w as filed STATEMENT FILE #2012-032114 with the Recorder/County Clerk of The name(s) of the business: San Diego on Dec 26, 2012. A. JHB California Properties DBA S/Gordy A. Spires 01/04, 01/11, Westwood Village Apartments Located at: 2502 Oceanside Blvd. 01/18, 01/25/13 CN 14436 Oceanside, CA, San Diego 92054. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME Mailing Address: SAME. This busiSTATEMENT FILE #2012-032868 ness is conducted b y: A Limited The name(s) of the business: Liability Company. The transaction A. Bee Healthy Vending Located of business began: 12/06/96. This at: 1121 Cottontail Rd. Vista, CA, business is hereby registered by San Diego 92081. Mailing Address: the following owner(s): 1. JHB SAME This business is conducted California Properties, LLC. 2630 by: Husband and Wife. The transac- Via De La Valle G426 Del Mar, CA tion of business began: NO T YET 92014. This statement w as filed STARTED. This business is hereby with the Recorder/County Clerk of registered by the f ollowing San Diego on Dec 11, 2012. S/Joyce owner(s): 1. Richard Rhodes 1121 Chilingirian 01/04, 01/11, 01/18, Cottontail Rd. Vista, CA 92081 2. 01/25/13 CN 14431 Barbara Rhodes 1121 Cottontail Rd. Vista, CA 92081 This state- FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2012-032111 ment was filed with the The name(s) of the business: Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Dec 18, 2012. S/Richard A. RC Construction Located at: Rhodes 01/04, 01/11, 01/18, 01/25/13 3080 Madison St. Carlsbad, CA, San Diego 92008. Mailing Address: CN 14435 SAME. This business is conducted FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME by: An Individual. The transaction STATEMENT FILE #2012-033402 of business began: 06/06/81. This The name(s) of the business: business is hereby registered by A. Gary D. Phillips and Associates the following owner(s): 1. Richard Located at: 5228 P almera Dr. Chilingirian 3080 Madison St. Oceanside, CA, San Diego 92056. Carlsbad, CA 92008. This stateMailing Address: SAME This busi- ment was filed with the ness is conducted b y: An Recorder/County Clerk of San Individual. The transaction of busi- Diego on Dec 11, 2012. S/Richard ness began: 10/01/12. This business Chilingirian 01/04, 01/11, 01/18, is hereby registered by the follow- 01/25/13 CN 14430 ing owner(s): 1. Gary D. Phillips 5228 Palmera Dr. Oceanside, CA FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME 92056. This statement w as filed STATEMENT FILE #2012-033665 with the Recorder/County Clerk of The name(s) of the business: San Diego on Dec 27, 2012. S/Gary A. CARLSBAD ROTARY OKTOD. Phillips 01/04, 01/11, 01/18, BERFEST Located at: 703 Palomar Airport Rd. Ste. 150 Carlsbad, CA, 01/25/13 CN 14434 San Diego 92011. Mailing Address: FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME SAME. This business is conducted STATEMENT FILE #2012-033597 by: A Corporation. The transaction The name(s) of the business: of business began: 10/01/82. This A. Le Passage French Bistro business is hereby registered by Located at: 1155 Hoo ver St. the following owner(s): 1. Carlsbad Carlsbad, CA, San Diego 92008. Hi-Noon Rotary Club Foundation Mailing Address: SAME This busi- Inc. 703 Palomar Airport Rd, Ste. ness is conducted b y: A 150 Carlsbad, CA 92011. This stateCorporation. The transaction of ment was filed with the business began: 11/09/07. This Recorder/County Clerk of San business is hereby registered by Diego on Dec 31, 2012. S/Thomas the following owner(s): 1. Le Applegate 01/04, 01/11, 01/18, Passage French Bistro 1155 Hoover 01/25/13 CN 14429 St. Carlsbad, CA 92008. This stateFICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME ment was filed with the STATEMENT FILE #2012-032326 Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Dec 28, 2012. S/Andrew The name(s) of the business: Reyer 01/04, 01/11, 01/18, 01/25/13 A. CH Consulting Located at: 7248 Mimosa Drive, Carlsbad, CA, San CN 14433 Diego 92011. Mailing Address: FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME Same This business is conducted STATEMENT FILE #2012-033555 by: An Individual. The transaction The name(s) of the business: of business began: 02/01/11. This A. Encinitas Fencing Academy business is hereby registered by Located at: 613 Westlake Street the following owner(s): 1. James Encinitas, CA, San Diego 92024. Sudakow, 7248 Mimosa Drive, Carlsbad, CA 92011 This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Dec 13, 2012. S/James

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2012-032131 The name(s) of the business: A. The Gadget Fairy Located at: 2400 W. Valley Parkway #34 Escondido, CA, San Diego 92029. Mailing Address: Same This business is conducted b y: An Individual. The transaction of business began: Not Yet Started. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Diane Provencal, 2400 W. Valley Parkway #34 Escondido, CA 92029. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Dec 11, 2012. S/Diane Provencal 12/28/12, 01/04, 01/11, 01/18/13 CN 14409 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2012-032806 The name(s) of the business: A. GreenSurf Located at: 2420 Papyrus Ct. Oceanside, CA, San Diego 92054. Mailing Address: Same This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 03/01/12. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Douglas M. Green, 2420 Papyrus Ct. Oceanside, CA 92054. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Dec 18, 2012. S/Douglas M Green 12/28/12, 01/04, 01/11, 01/18/13 CN 14408 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2012-030901 The name(s) of the business: Dental Sleep Medicine A. Education. Located at: 320 Santa Fe Drive Suite 105 Encinitas, CA, San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same This business is conducted by: Joint Venture. The transaction of business began: 11/17/12. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Todd D. Morgan, DMD, 320 Santa Fe Drive Suite 105, Encinitas, CA 92024 2. Michael Simmons, DDS, 18386 Ventura Blvd. Tarzana, CA 91356 This statement w as filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on No v 27, 2012. S/Todd Morgan 12/28/12, 01/04, 01/11, 01/18/13 CN 14407 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2012-033131 The name(s) of the business: A. Corsair Associates Located at: 1490 Schoolhouse Way San Marcos, CA, San Diego 92078. Mailing Address: Same This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: Not Yet Started. This business is hereby registered by the f ollowing owner(s): 1. Victor Edward Calise 1490 Schoolhouse Way, San Marcos, CA 92078. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Dec 21, 2012. S/Victor Edward Calise 12/28/12, 01/04, 01/11, 01/18/13 CN 14406


JAN. 18, 2013

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SOUP TO NUTS by Rick Stromoski

By Bernice Bede Osol

FRANK & ERNEST by Bob Thaves

THE BORN LOSER by Art & Chip Sansom

BIG NATE by Lincoln Peirce

MONTY by Jim Meddick

ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson

THE GRIZZWELLS by Bill Schorr

COW & BOY by Mark Leiknes

FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2013 Your chart indicates that in the year ahead you are likely to have some unusually strong ambitions. This could be due to some special knowledge you’ve acquired that you feel can take you places. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — To be on the safe side, it would be wise to avoid issues on which you and your special someone hold strong, opposing views. It won’t take much to light the other’s fuse. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Harboring a negative attitude will have a strong effect on the results of everything you do. This will include even most assignments that you normally perform by rote. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — You are entitled to have some fun and enjoy yourself, as long as you don’t overindulge or spend too lavishly on your personal pleasures. Both would carry heavy penalties. ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Emphasizing only your interests without any concern for those of others will not only turn off everyone, it will lessen your hopes of getting what you want as well. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Guard against a tendency to make a snap judgment based on incomplete information. An incorrect conclusion will

take you completely off track and only confuse you further. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — It’s never a good day to lend to or borrow from a friend, so don’t start now. Discipline might be required in order to avoid doing so, but it behooves you to muster up the necessary strength. CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Our behavior is always being scrutinized by our peers, opponents and supporters. Don’t try to please them all —just watch your step and do as best you can. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Even if you believe your ideas and methods are better than those of others, they don’t want to hear it, so keep it to yourself. Instead, try to accept others’ points of view with an open mind. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — It behooves you to be extremely cautious about how you use your money, especially if you’re considering a major investment. Make sure you have all the facts at your disposal. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — This could be one of those days when you feel that everyone but you is out of step with the world. Unfortunately, the reverse is likely to be true, and it’s you who is not in sync with the majority. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — The only way you’ll be able to lighten your share of the load is to acquire some assistance. However, your chances of getting others to drop what they’re doing to help you are nil. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — You can be either great or completely horrible about managing your or anybody else’s resources. Be careful, because today it might be the latter.


B16

THE COAST NEWS

JAN. 18, 2013

OVER

100,000

READERS EVERY WEEK!*

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F.Y.I. 100 FRACKING Please use your favorite search engine to search for fracking or fracing to stop polluting our environment. (330) 961-0095

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Health & Well Being

THE COAST NEWS GROUP

MOTHER-DAUGHTER YOGA MOMS Are you looking for a fun, creative way to bond with your daughter in 2013? Join the 8-week class starting on January 27 at Soleil Yoga in Cardiff. Weekly sessions focus on developing your daughterís confidence/ self esteem, Includes art, cooking, journaling, discussion and yoga. $260 per mother-daughter pair. Sundays 1:00-2:30. For more information or to register contact erica@inspire balance.com http:// inspirebal ance4teens.com/?page_id=10958 (858) 344-6334

Lost & Found FOUND - SET OF KEYS By railroad tracks in Encinitas on Monday 12.17.12. Please call to identify (760) 839-3115

INDEX F.Y.I..................................... ..100 HEALTH & WELL BEING ....150 ITEMS FOR SALE................200 BUSINESS SERV.............. ...300 FINANCIAL SERV.................310 HOME SERVICES................325 MISC. SERVICES............. ....350 PERSONAL SERV................375

HELP WANTED................ ....400 JOBS WANTED................ ....450 BUSINESS OPPS.................475 ROOMMATES.......................500 RENTALS..............................600 REAL ESTATE.................... ..700 LEGAL/PUBLIC NOTICE.... 800 AUTOMOTIVE..................... 900

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or stop by office at: 315 S. Coast Hwy. 101, Encinitas

Items For Sale 200

Miscellaneous

Miscellaneous

“TIME AFTER TIME” MOVIE POSTER Perfect Condition, From 1979 $10 (760) 845-3024 24 X 36 POSTER OF OCEAN SIDE Colorful, Downtown Business Section, 1984 Artwork Views, $10 (760) 845-3024

PAIR OF DESIGNER CABINETS Vintage Wood, Excellent Condition, 23”High by 28”W ide. $100 (760 ) 643-1945 PILLOW TOP COMFORTER With Shams, Double Size, Floral Design $50 (760) 758-8958

50 WINNIE THE POOH BEARS and other Pooh Bear Stuf f All for $50 (858) 342-1460

QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET New Serta made Queen Pillowtop mattress set. Still in original factory plastic wrap. $150.00 (619) 985-6259

ATOMIC MANTLE CLOCK Self Adjusting, Handmade Birch Wood Cabinet. A Beautiful Time Piece For Only $49 or best of fer. Please call Shelly (760) 809-4657 BATTLE STAR series, carriers, amphibious, & battleships. 1941 present day. Awesome ship designs onto apparel, mugs, posters,& steins. Honorable gifts. zazzle.com/sgtskullnstein BRIGGS AND STRATTON MOWER Pro Plan Model Briggs and Stratton Power Mower , also Edger and 21 inch regular lawn mower, all in good working condi tion, $100 takes all OBO call Everett (760) 893-9184 CHINESE TANG HORSE Beautiful Tericotta Horse, 17” high/15”long. In Great Condition. A Treasure at $59 OBO. Please call Shelly (760) 809-4657

Items For Sale 200

FIREWOOD FOR SALE Wheelbarrows full, Oak, Pine and Eucalyptus, Avocado & Citrus - $25 per wheelbarrow full (760) 9427430

Antiques

FLANNELL SHEETS 2 Queen Flats, Nice Quality , As New $12 each (760) 643-1945

ANTIQUE CATHOLIC BIBLE Heirloom, Printed in 1950, Leather Binding, Best Offer (858) 759-1154

FREE - PLANTS Huge Lavender, 2 Hawaiian Tree Ferns, Hybrid Day Lilies (760) 643-1945

ROYAL MANUAL TYPEWRITER “Caravan” made in the 1960ís in Holland, Absolute Pristine Cosmetic and Working Condition, A Steal at $69 OBO Please call Shelly (760) 809-4657

HOT WHEELS box of fifty hot wheels in original packaging. ran dom models. $40 (760) 726-8491

Computer/Electronics CELL PHONES Currently offering free cell phones with a new con tract. Visit our website at: http://www.tmiwireless.com/?aid=5 4955 SATELLITE RECEIVER WITH DISH An adth satellite receiver #8800ir for european programming is for sale with a globe cast dish. Includes wireless remote and mem ory card. $95 set (760) 758-8344

Furniture UPHOLSTERED HEADBOARD Twin Size and Sky Blue $50 (760) 758-8958

Miscellaneous DEADLINES

Items For Sale 200

“BALL” APPLE KIT 6 Mason Jars, Lids. Spices, Spatula, Jar Lifter, etc. Makes Apple Butter and Apple Sauce. Unused Boxed $18 (760) 599-9141 “HOME” INCANDESCENT LAMP Mainstays Brand, Silver Finish with White Frosted Shade and Metal Base and Pole, Uses 3 Way Bulb, 6FT High, New in Box $20 (760) 599-9141

LIGHT FIXTURES $20. EA 12” satin nickel w/ opaque glass. includes bulbs. never used & in box. (760) 721-7672

STAINED GLASS ROOSTER LAMP Tiffany Type - Perfect Condition, 12” long and 9” high, A Great Piece at $29 OBO, Please Call Shelly (760) 809-4657 VIETNAM war battle star collec tion: apparel / mugs / key chains Visit Online Store www.zazzle.com/sgtskullnstein WOOL BLANKET - BLUE Queen size, nice weight, fine condition, $30 (760) 643-1945

Items For Sale 200 Wanted To Buy

DIABETIC TEST STRIPS WANTED Any Type, Any Brand. Will pay up to $10 a box. Call Ronda at (760) 593-7033.

Home Services 325

HOUSEKEEPER/NANNY I Provide Housekeeping Services and Child Care/Nanny. Se Habla Espanol. Please call Maria at (760) 688-2637.

VANISHING CHEF AVAILABLE Guys and Girls - Want to impress your date, I will come to your home, cook a 5 star meal and “V anish”. You can say you cooked it! I am a former 5 Star Executive Chef for Ceasarís Palace in Vegas. Call Chef Tristan (760) 893-9184 HAULING I will haul your trash, yard materials, left behind furniture for move outs, construction clean up, help moving, etc. for very affordable rates. call or text Everett at (760) 893-9184

Sporting Goods

Take time for yourself... let us do the dirty work!

TENNIS RACQUET Head Crossbow 10 43/8 grip light weight powerful excellent condition $50 (760) 632-2487

Items Wanted JACK DANIELS Collector looking for old jd or lem motlow bottles and advertising or display items. Up to $149 each (760) 630-2480 OLD COMIC BOOKS WANTED. Local collector will pay you big cash $$$. (858) 999-7905 OLYO’S PIZZA MEMORABILIA Anything considered but would love any pictures or t-shirts (adult size). Wanted for my nephew’ s Christmas present! (760) 994-7265 WANTED Wanted Used Saxophones, flutes, clairnets, any condition, will pay cash. 760-3469931 (760) 705-0215.

ANGEL’S

Cleaning Service Martha Padilla - Owner Deep cleaning in living areas, kitchen, dining, bathrooms, bedrooms & windows

Cell 760-712-8279 Or 760-580-6857 Se Habla Español

ornelas.f.p@gmail.com Licensed (#00026922) and Bonded

LIKE NEW HUNTER AIR PURIFIER. $99.00-hunter 30381 hepatech air purifier features a whisper quiet fan that draws air into the unit without excessive noise. Operational manual included. Pictures available. (760) 842-1970 MUSICIAN LAMP A Wonderful Vintage 14” Piano Table Lamp. Great For Any Room With a Musical Theme. Only $25 OBO Please Call Shelly (760) 809-4657 NATIONAL PARKS DELUXE DVD SET Featuring Yellowstone, Yosemite, Denali, and Grand Canyon. Like New $17 For All Four (760) 599-9141 NAVY aircraft carriers awesome ship battle star designs onto apparel, mugs, posters,& steins. Honorable gifts. zazzle.com/sgtskullnstein ONYX CHESS FIGURES 30 Large Genuine Onyx Figures, 15 Black and 15 White, All for $30 (858) 759-1154 OVER 150 HOUSEHOLD ITEMS Variety of Household Items - One Buyer Takes All $100 (858) 3421460

Place your own FREE print ad at coastnewsgroup.com If your item is under $150 dollars or is a vehicle for sale, you can place it FREE!


B17

THE COAST NEWS

JAN. 18, 2013

Business Opps 475

Business Opps 475

Rentals 600

Real Estate 700

FREE CLASSIFIEDS

Guest House Wanted

Homes

ART Student at watts atelier in Encinitas wanting to rent a fur nished guest house. Start date: january 2013 Serious, professional lady. Quiet, private and cultured. I of fer references. Price to be discussed 619 977 8921

ENCINITAS 4BR SFD HOME $589K Single story on a cul-de-sac and walking distance to parks, ele mentary school, sports & play areas. Nicely updated, fire place, spacious kitchen, vaulted ceilings, and ceil ing fans. Call 760-720-4488 Agent. Ca DRE# #01302799

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760-436-9737 CADNET CLASSIFIED ADS ADOPTION

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? You choose from families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Abby's One True Gift Adoptions. 866413-6292, 24/7 Void/Illinois

AUTOS WANTED

TOP CASH FOR CARS, Any Car/Truck, Running or Not. Call for INSTANT offer: 1-800-454-6951

ELECTRONICS

Direct To Home Satellite TV $19.99/mo. Free Installation FREE HD/DVR Upgrade Credit/Debit Card Req. Call 1-800-7953579

HEALTH & FITNESS

TAKE VIAGRA? SAVE $500! 100mg,/Cialis 20mg. 40+4 FREE, PILLS. Only $99.00 Discreet. 1-888-7979024

MISCELLANEOUS

CASH FOR CARS, Any Make or Model! Free Towing. Sell it TODAY. Instant offer: 1-800-864-5784

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV Authorized 800-4943586 www.CenturaOnline.com

CANADA DRUG CENTER. Safe and affordable medications. Save up to 90% on your medication needs. Call 1-888-7341530 ($25.00 off your first prescription and free shipping.) AIRLINE CAREERS begin here Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call AIM (866)453-6204

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REAL ESTATE

20 Acres Free! Buy 40-get 60 acres. $0Down, $198/mo. Money Back Guarantee No Credit Checks! Beautiful Views. West Texas 1-800-843-7537 www.sunsetranches.com

WANTED TO BUY

CA$H PAID- up to $26/Box for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS. Hablamos Espanol. 1-800-371-1136

Yearbooks Up to $15 paid for high school yearbooks 1900-2012. www. yearbookusa.com or 214-514-1040

DIABETIC TEST STRIPS Wanted Check us out Online! All Major Brands Bought Dtsbuyer.com 1-866-446-3009

Wants to purchase minerals and other oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201

Reader Advisory: The National Trade Association we belong to has purchased the above classifieds. Determining the value of their service or product is advised by this publication. In order to avoid misunderstandings, some advertisers do not offer employment but rather supply the readers with manuals, directories and other materials designed to help their clients establish mail order selling and other businesses at home. Under NO circumstance should you send any money in advance or give the client your checking, license ID, or credit card numbers. Also beware of ads that claim to guarantee loans regardless of credit and note that if a credit repair company does business only over the phone it is illegal to request any money before delivering its service. All funds are based in US dollars. Toll free numbers may or may not reach Canada.

NANI CLASSIFIED ADS ADOPTION

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring adoption expert. You choose from families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6296 Florida Agency #100021542

AUTO DONATIONS

A-1 DONATE YOUR CAR! Breast Cancer Research Foundation! Most highly rated breast cancer charity in America! Tax Deductible/Fast Free Pick Up. 1-800-3996506 www.carsforbreastcancer.org

DONATE A CAR - HELP CHILDREN FIGHTING DIABETES. Fast, Free Towing. Call 7 days/week. Non-runners OK. Tax Deductible. Call Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation 1-800-578-0408

AUTO’S WANTED

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED! Top $$$$$ PAID! Running or Not, All Years, Makes, Models. Free Towing! We’re Local! 7 Days/Week. Call Toll Free: 1-888-416-2330

AUTOMOTIVE

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CABLE TV

Bundle & Save on your CABLE, INTERNET PHONE, AND MORE. High Speed Internet starting at less than $20/mo. CALL NOW! 800-291-4159

ELECTRONICS

*LOWER THAT CABLE BILL! Get Satellite TV today! FREE System, installation and HD/DVR upgrade. Programming starting at $19.99. Call NOW 1-800-9358195

$500 To $1000 WEEKLY MAILING OUR BROCHURES and POSTCARDS + ONLINE DATA ENTRY WORK. PT/FT. Genuine Opportunity! No Experience Needed! www.EasyPayWork.com

HELP WANTED! Make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 888-331-0888 www.howtoworkfromhome.com

FINANCIAL

Do you receive regular monthly payments from an annuity or insurance settlement and NEED CASH NOW? Call J.G. Wentworth today at 1-800-741-0159.

HEALTH & MEDICAL

VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS 20mg! 40 Pills + 4 FREE for only $99. #1 Male Enhancement, Discreet Shipping. Save $500! Buy The Blue Pill! Now 1-888-7968870

YOU or a loved one have an addiction? Over 500 alcohol and drug rehab facilities nationwide. Very private/Very Confidential. Inpatient care. Insurance needed. Call for immediate help! 1-800-256-0604 $294 DAILY! MAILING POSTCARDS! Guaranteed Legit Opportunity! www.ThePostcardGuru.com NOW ACCEPTING! ZNZ Referral Agents! $20$60/Hour! www.FreeJobPosition.com BIG PAYCHECKS! Paid Friday! www.LegitCashJobs.com NOW HIRING: Companies Desperately Need Employees to Assemble Products at Home. No Selling. $500 weekly potential. Info. 1-985-646-1700 Dept. NA-7010

MISCELLANEOUS

**OLD GUITARS WANTED! ** Gibson, Martin, Fender, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Mosrite, Rickenbacker. Prairie State, D’Angelico, Stromberg, and Gibson Mandolins/Banjos. 1920’s thru 1980’s. TOP CASH PAID! 1-800-401-0440 AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call AIM (888) 686-1704 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Call 800-510-0784 www.CenturaOnline.com

CA$H PAID - UP TO $28/BOX for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS! 1 DAY PAYMENT & PREPAID shipping. SE HABLA ESPANOL. Emma 1-888-7767771. www.Cash4DiabeticSupplies.com CASH FOR CARS: All Cars/Trucks Wanted. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Any Make/Model. Call For Instant Offer: 1-800-864-5960

MISCELLANEOUS

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WORK ON JET ENGINES – Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified – Job placement assistance. Call AIM (866) 854-6156.

MONEY TO LEND

LAWSUIT SETTLEMENT LOANS Get Cash Before Your Case Settles! Fast Approval. All Cases Qualify Call (866) 709-1100 www.glofin.com

MOTORCYCLES/WANT TO BUY

WANTED JAPANESE MOTORCYCLE KAWASAKI 1967-1980 Z1-900, KZ900, KZ1000, ZIR, KX1000MKII, A1-250, W1-650, H1-500, H2-750, S1-250, S2350, S3-400 SUZUKI GS400, GT380, GT750, Honda CB750 (1969,1970) CASH. FREE PICKUP. 1-800-772-1142, 1-310-721-0726 usa@classicrunners.com

WANTED TO BUY

Diabetic Test Strips Wanted Check us out online! All Major Brands Bought Dtsbuyers.com 1 866 446 3009

Automobiles 900 Cars 2004 MCCORMICK MTX120 Tractor ($19,000), 2wd, 16 speed power shift, left hand reverser , 120 engine hp, 100 pto hp, air seat, am/fm, rear wiper , 3 remotes, toplink, very good condition!. For more info/photo: rog. Perez@aol. Com MAZDA SPORT Miata, mx, turbo, 2 seater, black sof t top with cover , cd stereo, air , manual, (stick 6 speed), performance tires with spare, apprx. 38,000 miles. (760) 207-0073 San Marcos, $15,950.00 0B0.

MARKETPLACE NEWS The Coast News Group is offering local businesses the opportunity to run advertorials on its new Marketplace News page.

Two sizes available! 28” and 14” SPACE COST ONLY - OUR LOWEST RATE

Coast News:

Rancho Santa Fe News:

80,000 readers

30,000 readers

28” $442

28” $386

14” $302

14” $244

Buy Coast, get Ranch

Rancho Santa Fe News Pick-up Rates

1/2

28” $168

OFF!

14”

28”

14” $98 All articles are archived online at:

EDITORIAL COST

www.CoastNewsGroup.com

Story: Client provides, we edit . . . no charge Photo: Client sends photo . . . . . . no charge Story: We write, you approve. . . . . . . . $150 Photo: We take, you approve . . . . . . . . $50

on the home page under the News tab and are

WEB SEARCHABLE!

Editorial charges do not apply to 2nd paper buy. Frequency discount: 6x = 10% 12x = 15% 2013 Publication dates: Nov. 16, deadline Nov. 2 Dec. 14, deadline Nov. 30 Jan. 25, deadline Nov. 11 Feb. 22, deadline Feb. 8 Mar. 22, deadline Mar. 8 April 19, deadline April 5 May 17, deadline May 3

June 14, deadline May 31 July 12, deadline June 28 Aug. 23, deadline Aug. 9 Sept. 20, deadline Sept. 6 Oct. 18, deadline Oct. 4 Nov. 15, deadline Nov. 1 Dec. 13, deadline Nov. 30

Articles are BW only. A 28” article is 700 words. A 14” article is 320 words. For articles with a photo, the word count will be less.* *In the sample above, the 3 col. x 4” photo reduces the word count to 350 (approximately 30 words per column inch size of the photo).

If you are interested in running an article in our MARKETPLACE NEWS page please call

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Place your own FREE print ad at coastnewsgroup.com If your item is under $150 dollars or is a vehicle for sale, you can place it FREE!


B18

THE COAST NEWS

ATTORNEYS

COMPUTER REPAIR

JAN. 18, 2013

FENCING

PAINTING

HANDYMAN

PLUMBING

PERSONAL INJURY • Car Accidents • Slips & Falls • Workers Comp.

FREE CONSULTATION NO FEE TILL RECOVERY!

CONSTRUCTION

WINDOW

MICHAEL MAJDICK, ESQ. A/C AND HEATING

WINDOW WASHING

800-427-4288

cleaning

Free estimates

CONCRETE PHOTOGRAPHY

On time. Done right. Great rates Call Steve Williams

“2nd generation window washer with 37 years experience.” Home Powerwashing & Screen Repair available RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL Providing Comfort to Encinitas and North County Residents Since 1969

760.917.0663

ELECTRICAL HAULING

Make your windows happy!

ATTORNEYS

PSYCHOTHERAPY LANDSCAPING

CLEANING SERVICE • Affordable • Reliable • Trustworthy

OFFICE CLEANING & housecleaning

Weekend and evening service available Specializing in small businesses References available upon request

PUT YOUR AD HERE TODAY! GET RESULTS! MANY AFFORDABLE SIZES AND RATES TO CHOOSE FROM

THIS COULD BE YOUR SPACE FOR AS LITTLE AS Free Estimate Call Rosa

(760) 846-3241 se habla español

nenaluna1127@gmail.com

BUSINESS BROKERING

PLACE YOUR AD TODAY CALL NANCY HENLEY AT

760-436-9737

$20 Per Week! nhenley@coastnewsgroup.com

SUPPORT LOCAL BUSINESSES


B19

THE COAST NEWS

JAN. 18, 2013

Free samples can come in handy SARA NOEL Frugal Living Free product samples let you try before you buy. While some samples ar e full-sized, many are trial-sized or single-use. They’re the perfect siz e for travel, and they make nice add-on gifts or donation items, too. They work well to supplement the products you normally buy. A few product samples can help in a pinc h if you run out of something such as soap or shampoo; they can save you a trip to the store. The first reader tip shares how samples help her budget: Sign up for samples: Get all the fr ee samples y ou can find online, then actually use them! I am always using shampoo and conditioner samples, toothpaste samples, etc. They add up o ver time, so maybe you’re buying one or two fewer tubes of toothpaste a year, one less bottle of shampoo a y ear, etc. Every little bit counts! Also, I play the online instantwin games. I’ve gotten quite a few things this w ay, including a full-size jar of anti-wrinkle cream that arrived via FedEx just this morning! — F .F., Illinois Re-purpose clothing: This week, I cut up some clothing for rag strips, cut up some old handkerchiefs and placemats with ragged lace edgings to make cloth dust masks, and

found some e xcellent leather and fur clothing materials at the thrift shop , which I’m going to mak e into mitts, gloves, slippers and moccasins. I have other clothes in my closet that I’m going to mak e into aprons and baking hats; last year I made some into dishcloths, dishtowels and pot holders. There’s no need to look further than my dressers, shelves and closets when I want something; it’ s usually there in another f orm. — T.P., Canada Pineapple ripeness: Someone who grew pineapple told us to tr y to pull out an inner “leaf” — if it came out easily, the pineapple is full y ripe. We’ve used that method for many years, and it has proven to be true e very time. — Judy S., North Carolina Remove jar labels: I use Goo Gone. A few drops on a paper towel, with some rubbing, removes all glue residue. Stickier residue requires more liquid and mor e rubbing. It leaves an oil y leftover that must be washed off with soap and water. I have been using Goo Gone for years. Since you use so little at a time, a single bottle will last a long time. — Kathy G., Oklahoma

lic ger

2 tablespoons minced gar2 tablespoons minced gin-

2 jalapenos, seeds removed and minced 3 tablespoons chopped anchovies 3 tablespoons tomato paste 2 whole cloves 2 tablespoons freshly cracked black pepper 1/2 cup dark corn syrup 1 cup molasses 3 cups white vinegar 1 cup dark beer 1/2 cup orange juice 2 cups water 1 lemon, thinly sliced 1 lime, thinly sliced

In a large saucepan, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onion and saute until soft, about 6 to 7 minutes. Stir in the tamarind paste, garlic, ginger and jalapenos and cook for 5 more minutes. Add the anc hovies, tomato paste, cloves, pepper, corn syrup, molasses, white vinegar, dark beer, orange juice, water, lemon and lime. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium low and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 2 to 3 hours, or until it naps the back of a spoon. H o m e m a d e Strain the mixtur e and Worcestershire sauce: This refrigerate. Yields 6 cups. — homemade version keeps well Susie, Minnesota. in the fridge. I think it tastes much better than the stor e- Sara Noel is the owner of frugalvillage.com, a website that bought brands! offers practical, money-saving 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 large onions, roughly strategies for everyday living. To send tips, comments or questions, email chopped 1/2 cup tamarind paste sara@frugalvillage.com.

Hi, I'm RedStar Burton with the big paws and this is my happy family; Jim & Joanie Burton & "Doc" Al with his golf hat.  My family is in the business of helping people with their Real Estate needs whether it be buying or selling a house or investment property. Jim's background as a General Contractor with experience in various phases of the Construction Industry & Construction Litigation & Joanie's extensive sales/marketing background along with "Doc's" wisdom of the Real Estate Industry is a real benefit. They believe that communication as well as a caring & optimistic attitude is essential to really understand people's real estate desires & concerns. Oh & by the way, they also volunteer to help my four-legged friends at the animal shelter in Carlsbad by going through the community to  collect  pet donations such as unopened pet food, pet toys & pet supplies. A big thank you to all of those who have donated! Happy Holidays from RedStar & my family. Thanks, Redstar Burton

Joe Moris

Broker/Owner Coastal Country Real Estate Mexican Malibu joe@coastalcountry.net www.coastalcountry.net license 00715369

(760) 436-2105 Ext. 206

Ana Girdner

Mexican Malibu Properties ana@mexicanmalibu.com.mx www.mexicanmalibu.com.mx

1-858-216-4636 in USA 01-329-291-5044 in Mexico


B20

THE COAST NEWS

FORUPTOMONTHS

JAN. 18, 2013

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The Coast News, Jan. 18, 2013