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COVERING ALL NORTHEAST U.S. SHALE PLAYS

M AI L E D F

SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE FREE!!!

PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID BECKLEY, WV 25801 PERMIT NO.19

APRIL 2013


THE NORTHEAST ONG MARKETPLACE

APRIL 2013

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“Staffing problems have you puzzled? Let us help find the missing piece?”

INTEGRITY

TECHNICAL SERVICES INC.

Your premier Engineering, IT and Technical Staffing partner Technical Recruiting & Staffing Temp, Temp to Hire, Direct Hire Executive Search & Payroll

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E M A I L : I N F O @ O N G M A R K E T P L AC E . C O M


THE NORTHEAST ONG MARKETPLACE

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APRIL 2013

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Premium Quality  Built To Last Serving the Marcellus, Utica & U.S. Shale Plays

Solutions . . . ITL  + ..(      

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Rapid Delivery (West & East Coast Fabrication & Distribution Centers) CWPE LINERS: 12 mil, 16 mil, 20 mil, 24 mil, 30 mil, 30LT mil and New . ... +... +  LLDPE: 20 mil, 30 mil, 40 mil & 60 mil smooth and 30 mil textured anti-skid surface HDPE: 20 mil, 40 mil, 60 mil & 80 mil GEOTEXTILES: 4 oz. to 16 oz. non-woven felt (8 oz. felt readily stocked in fabricated or roll form)

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Multiple Foam Profiles & Heights

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THE NORTHEAST ONG MARKETPLACE

APRIL 2013

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A LOOK AHEAD AT OUR UPCOMING EDITORIAL AND CONFERENCE SCHEDULES

OHIO

KENTUCKY

APRIL 24-25, 2013 ~ MARIETTA, OH

SOOGA SPRING MEETING

KOGA EASTERN KENTUCKY MEETING

WWW.SOOGA.ORG

WWW.KYOILGAS.ORG

TENNESSEE

TENNESSEE

EDITORIAL FOCUS / CONFERENCE

APRIL 24, 2013 ~ PRESTONSBURG, KY

MAY 15, 2013 ~ FRANKLIN, TN

May

SCADA EGCR

June

Completion Strategies

July

HSE WV Oil & Gas Equipment

August

New Technology PIOGA Eastern Oil & Gas Proppants YOUNG / Shale Insight

JUNE 5-7, 2013 ~ MEMPHIS, TN

TENNESSEE OIL & GAS ASSOC. TENNESSEE GAS ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING ANNUAL MEETING WWW.TENNOIL.COM

WWW.TNGAS.ORG

NEW YORK

KENTUCKY

JUNE 26-27, 2013 ~ FINDLEY LAKE, NY

JUNE 18-20, 2013 ~ COVINGTON, KY

KOGA’S ANNUAL MEETING

IOGA OF NY ANNUAL SUMMER MEETING

September

WWW.KYOILGAS.ORG

WWW.IOGANY.ORG

October

VIRGINIA

More Water WV Oil and Gas Expo

WEST VIRGINIA

November

Environment DUG East

December

Cold Weather OOGA Oilfield Expo

JUNE 26-28, 2013 ~ VIRGINIA BEACH, VA

AUGUST 4, 2013 ~ WHITE SULPHER SPRINGS, WV

VA OIL & GAS ASSOCIATION SUMMER MEETING

IOGA WV SUMMER MEETING

WWW.VAOILANDGAS.COM

WWW.IOGANY.ORG

ARTICLES Business Profile - STICK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 & 17 Focus; Waste Mgmt - Liner Recycling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 & 11 Focus; Waste Mgmt - NORM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 & 15 Focus; Waste Mgmt - Options & Risks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 & 7 Press Release - Beitzel Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Press Release - B.F. Environmental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Press Release - McCutcheon Ent. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Safety On The Job - A Clean Job Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24

CALENDARS Association Meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Job Fairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Networking Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Other Industry Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Training and Workshops Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Upcoming Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 & 18

EVENTS Eastern Gas Compression Roundtable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Elite Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 NAPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Ohio Valley Oil & Gas Expo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Tri-County Oil & Gas B2B Expo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Utica Congress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

ADVERTISER INDEX PAGE Adler Tank Rentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Asayo Creative. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Bare’s Fence Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Beitzel Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Blanc Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Blue Rock. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Bri-Chem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Bruce Allen Pipeline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Cam-Tek Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 ContactPointe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Drill Baby Drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 ECOM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Energy Training Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 ETC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Facteon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Fisher Welding LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 GapVax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 GexPro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Godwin Pumps - Xylem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Hapco Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 HydroRecovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Integrity Technical Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Iron Eagle Enterprises LLC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 ITL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 LEC Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Lee Reger Builds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Lyden Oil Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Mansfield Crane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Mustang Ariel Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Neel’s Fence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 New Pig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

New River Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 North American Field Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Oil & Gas Safety Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Oil Center Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Pennington Seed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 PSB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Rig Maids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 STICK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Sunnyside Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Truss Tank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Top Notch Enterprises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Total Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Unit Liner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Veyance Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Viking Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Weavertown Environmental Group . . . . . . . . . . . 23

CONTACT US FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION OR MAILING LIST CHANGES:

THE NORTHEAST ONG MARKETPLACE P. O. BOX 1441 • OAK HILL, WV 25901 1-855-269-1188 FAX: (304) 465-5065 E-MAIL: INFO@ONGMARKETPLACE.COM The Northeast ONG Marketplace will not be liable for any misprint in advertising copy which is not the fault of The Northeast ONG Marketplace, and if a misprint should occur the limits of our liability will be the amount charged for the advertisement. We do not assume responsibility for the content of advertising or articles herein. Any warranties or representations made in the advertisements are those of the advertisers and not The Northeast ONG Marketplace.


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APRIL 2013

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Bri-Chem Supply Corp. is in the business of warehousing and delivering products used for drilling, cementing, completing and producing oil & gas wells. Bri-Chem Supply also provides products in the mining, water treatment, water well drilling, environmental remediation and construction industries. Our facility in the Northeast is located at 59 Leetsdale Industrial Drive, Leetsdale, Pennsylvania. Facility Manager: Ken Hicks Phone: 724-318-8153 Fax: 724-385-0471 Cell: 570-637-6530 Northeast Sales & Marketing Manager: James Browder Cell: 512-587-5701 This facility has a complete Liquid Mud Mixing Plant for Oil Mud Based Fluids.

We handle a wide range of products: • • • • •

Weighting Agents Viscosifiers Shale Control Inhibitors Lost Circulation Materials Defoamers

• • • • •

Filtrate Control Additives Lubricants Flocculants Thinning-Dispersants Oil Mud Products

Bri-Chem Supply aims to be your source for all of your drilling fluids additive needs. Visit our main web site at: www.brichemsupplycorp.com Product Data & MSDS: https://sites.google.com/site/brichemsupplycorpllc/ Soda Ash Direct: www.sodaashdirect.com Bentonite Direct: www.bentonitesupplier.com CaNitrate Direct: www.canitratedirect.com

CONTACT US TODAY FOR A PRICE QUOTE. PHONE: 303-722-1681 DENVER, CO GRAND JUNCTION, CO MYTON, UT CASPER, WY BELFIELD, ND

FARMINGTON, NM ALICE, TX TYLER, TX BIG SPRING, TX CLINTON, OK

CLICKASHA, OK ENID, OK LEETSDALE, PA BAKERSFIELD, CA

E M A I L S U B S C R I P T I O N S - - S T I L L F R E E - - L E S S PA P E R


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FOCUS WASTE MANAGEMENT

Waste Management — Options and Risks. By Ed Becker, Senior Writer, TheMarcellusShale.com Edited by Chris Stroyne, Editor, The MarcellusShale.com Perhaps no issue carries greater risk and potential, or the need for regulatory compliance, than waste management at a gas well site. How this waste is handled, transported, disposed of or recycled is an integral part of the process.

According to Johns, a vast majority of sites handle waste in an environmentally appropriate manner. However, he says the key to minimizing the risk beyond regulation and industry best practices is to promote early detection and rapid responses to releases.

Exactly what is meant by ‘waste’ is critical to the larger understanding of the issue. There are two clear distinctions that are often confused by the public at large. Danny Johns, Ph.D., an Environmental Scientist at Titanium Environmental Services, LLC in Longview Texas, explains there are essentially two different operations that produce distinctly different waste streams. The issue can be a source of misinformation.

“Fixed tanks and flow systems should have meters or level alarms in place to detect leaks and changes in conditions. Operator inspection of containments, piping connections and associated equipment on active sites is critical,” explained Johns.

“The public often lumps drilling activity, particularly horizontal drilling, into the mix with hydraulic fracturing,” says Johns. “They are different operations, and produce distinctly different waste streams. During drilling, operators may use a variety of mud systems, including waterbased muds, oil-based muds and synthetic muds. After drilling, hydraulic fracturing generates another potential waste stream which is liquid dominated. A large portion of the fracturing fluid is flowed back to the surface for collection and then recycled, or sent to disposal.” In a literal sense, drilling mud isn’t what most people typically think of as the clay-like substance that seems to attract kids and dogs on rainy days. In fact, drilling mud isn’t even necessarily organic in nature. It may be a combination of synthetic compounds. As explained by the Drilling Waste Management Information System, “drilling muds are made up of a base fluid (water, diesel or mineral oil, or a synthetic compound), weighting agents (most frequently barium sulfate [barite] is used), bentonite clay to help remove cuttings from the well and to form a filter cake on the walls of the hole, lignosulfonates and lignites to keep the mud in a fluid state and various additives that serve specific functions.” http://web.ead.anl.gov dwm/ techdesc /lower/index.cfm

“If a release is detected, prompt, professional response helps minimize impacts. Where possible, companies should conduct drills with their response organization to ensure a timely response that is appropriate for the local conditions. Statistics show the rate of accidental releases is low, and frequently related to transfer or transport operations. When promptly cleaned up, these releases have limited environmental impact.” Johns says that one of the most important regulatory considerations for waste is exemption from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) pertaining to waste streams derived from oil and gas production. This exemption offers states greater flexibility in managing how wastes are handled within their borders, but has also lead to variable regulations between states and consequent occasional confusion. Despite the exemption, Johns says federal involvement is increasing. One example is implementation of new 40 CFR 60 Subpart OOOO emission rules, which require ‘green completions’ during field development. “This means that the stream coming from the well will have to be handled in a way that allows for capture of Volitile Organic Compounds and directing them to a sales line,” explained Johns. “Fluids and any solids are captured in a tank, and either transferred to other frac tanks or pits prior to transfer off-site or reuse.” Chad McCutcheon, M.A., is a Communications Professional with MEI, a comprehensive waste management company in Apollo, PA. He says the key is to separate the liquids from the drilling muds. “MEI’s process of waste reduction enables the liquids to be separated from the drilling muds and those liquids are then processed in for reuse on well sites. The remaining drilling mud solids are sent to the landfill. We are not aware of any reuse of the drilling muds other than them being reused onsite,” said McCutcheon.

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FOCUS WASTE MANAGEMENT Drilling mud cuttings are a specific source of potential re-use. What are these cuttings? Drill cuttings are made up of ground rock coated with a layer of drilling fluid. Most drill cuttings are managed through disposal, although some are treated and beneficially reused. Before the cuttings can be reused, it is necessary to ensure that the hydrocarbon content, moisture content, salinit, and clay content of the cuttings are suitable for the intended use of the material. Some cuttings, particularly when a saltwater-type mud was used to drill the well, may need washing to remove dissolved salts prior to beneficial use. http://web.ead.anl.gov/dwm/techdesc/reuse/index.cfm Drill mud cuttings offer a number of potential useful “after-life” options. They can be recycled and applied to a number of different areas such as use in construction materials, road spreading and even in an unlikely environmental way---using the cutting in restoration of wetlands. “Water based mud and cuttings high in bentonite may also be used to seal or create pond bottoms, where allowed by regulation. Wetland use is not particularly common, but has been studied,” explained Johns.

“In some instances, with careful selection of the mud system, it appears the cuttings can be used in coastal marsh restoration. However, current wetland regulations favor creation of large mitigation banks, and it may be difficult to gain regulatory approval for using cuttings for a particular bank. Large, commercial scale volumes would be needed, with significant testing to prevent inappropriate material from being used in the construction.” Photo’s: Tejas Gosai, TheMarcellusShale.com, TheUticaShale.com Read an in-depth interview about waste management regulation and new waste reuse technologies on the horizon with environmental scientist, Danny Johns, at TheMarcellusShale.com and TheUticaShale.com. TheMarcellusShale.com, TheUticaShale.com, TheEagleFordShale.com, and ShaleAdvantage.com are educational resources that feature the latest, “need-to-know” news, information and mapping. Also, to keep on top of the developing energy industry, listen to Tejas Gosai, host of the “All Energy Now,” Radio Program broadcasting in Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virgina. Visit AllEnergyNow.com for previous podcasts and expert interview.

John Kissella

Dan Cosgrove

Project Manager

Territory Manager

jkissella@lrbuildswv.com Pennington Seed, Inc. Custom and Native Seed Mixes Virginia Division Hydroseeding Products 900 Main Street Rolled Erosion Products Hwy. 40 West Geosynthetics Kenbridge, VA 23944 We help find the right solution. Oce: 800-999-7333 Fax: 434-676-6492 Mobile: 434-480-1016 dcosgrove@penningtonseed.com

LEE REGER BUILDS, INC. GENERAL CONTRACTOR COMMERICAL & INDUSTRIAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTION WV Lic. #000081 ISNetwork Participants Visit our website @ lrbuildswv.com One Railroad Street • P.O. Box 1872 • Shinnston, WV 26431 (304) 592-2083 • 1-800-564-1413 • Fax: (304) 592-3920 • Cell: (304) 677-7563

Phone: 570-662-3997 Toll Free: 1-800-3600170 Fax: 570-662-7087 7 9 We s t g a t e R o a d M a n s f i e l d , PA 1 6 9 3 3

NY Licensed and CCO certified operators.www.mansfieldcrane.com Cranes meet OSHA/ASNI standards.

HEAVY LIFT and RIGGING ENGINEERS


THE NORTHEAST ONG MARKETPLACE

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THE NORTHEAST ONG MARKETPLACE

APRIL 2013

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BARE’S FENCE COMPANY, LLC 304.273.9830 / 304.532.5985 1484 UTAH ROAD RAVENSWOOD, WV 26164 jim011969@hotmail.com

JIM BARE OWNER

Commercial, Industrial, and Residential OSHA AND HAZEMAT CERTIFIED GATE OPERATOR INSTALLER 25 YEARS OF SERVICE

Growth Capital for Small Production-Based Oil & Gas Ventures • Client retains upside and control of project • Provides more capital than a bank • No personal or corporate guarantees • Simple deal structure and reporting • Investment team: engineers, geologists & landmen Robert N. Hart, Appalachan Consultant Phone: (304) 542-0036 BlueRockWV@gmail.com

Let us help your company grow...

OTHER INDUSTRY EVENTS May 13-14, 2013 2013 APPALACHIAN BASIN NGV EXPO AND CONFERENCE Charleston, WV www.ngv-expo.com May 29-30, 2013 UTICA & MARCELLUS NGL & GAS MARKETS 2013 Columbus, OH www.utica-marcellus-nglmarkets-2013.com June 9-11, 2013 WV MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING Glade Spring, WV www.wvma.com June 18-19, 2013 SHALE GAS: PROMISES AND CHALLENGES Cleveland, OH www.naeshalegas.com September 18-19, 2013 GREAT LAKES TRUCK EXPO Cleveland, OH www.greatlakestruckexpo.com VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR LINKS TO THESE EVENTS AND MORE

WWW.ONGMARKETPLCE.COM

A L L O U R A D S A R E F U L L C O LO R

INCLUDE YOUR EVENTS HERE. info@ongmarketplace.com


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APRIL 2013

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FOCUS WASTE MANAGEMENT

Reducing Drilling Related Waste - Plastic Wellpad & Impoundment Liner Recycling in the Marcellus and Utica Stephen N. Valero, P.E. - Consultant - Valero Environmental, LLC

Impoundment Liner

Secondary Containment Liners

Well Pad Liner Frac Tank Liners Disposal of plastic liner waste generated during the drilling and completion process is rapidly becoming a problem in the oil and gas business. It is estimated that at least 150 million pounds of this material was installed at well sites across Pennsylvania in 2012. Including West Virginia and Ohio, the total Marcellus and Utica liner usage is likely between 200 and 300 million pounds per year. All of this material will eventually be taken up and removed from the drilling site then most of it will find its way into regional landfills. However, there is a better alternative. Recent advancements in cleaning and processing technology now make it possible to recycle most types of used liners. If processed properly, these sheets of dirty plastic can be transformed into new liners, railroad ties, pipe, other construction materials and even consumer products with great benefit to all involved. LINER MATERIALS AND WHERE THEY ARE USED ON DRILL SITES Plastic liners of various types are used to contain liquids and/or accidental spills during the drilling and completion process. There are multiple product types used in these applications including: single polymer geomembranes (usually polyethylene); woven coated liners; scrim reinforced liners and composite layered products. Regardless of type, the liner material is either field or factory seamed into large, continuous sheets that are laid on the ground to act as a barrier to flow of liquids. The liner is generally protected from abrasion and damage with adjacent layers of nonwoven geotextile (also called “geo” or “felt”) that may be deployed separately or as part of a composite layered product.

These materials are often the same or very similar to those used to permanently line landfills with an important distinction. Liners used in oil and gas exploration are temporary and must be removed then disposed after completion of a well. In the well pad liner application, this process is often repeated three or more times during the drilling and completion process due to operational damage. Overall, it is estimated that an average of about 20,000 pounds of liner material is used at each drilling site. This means that over the next several decades, literally billions of pounds used plastic will be generated in the region. Continuing the current practice of dumping this material into landfills is not a viable option. ADVANTAGES OF LINER RECYCLING Recycling in any capacity has the obvious advantage of being the “green” alternative to disposal. However, in the case of recycling drill site liners, there are many more benefits. For example, liner recycling: Is cost effective - Unlike post-consumer product recycling, liner recycling involves large quantities of plastic coming from single locations. Although this material is often covered in dirt, the added cost of cleaning and processing is generally offset by collection and transportation efficiencies as well as the value of the end product. If done properly, liner recycling is less expensive to owner than disposal.

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FOCUS WASTE MANAGEMENT Saves landfill space - Beyond the obvious fact that recyclable materials need not be landfilled, plastic liners present other problems when placed into landfills. These large sheets of material are bulky and light compared to normal municipal waste. This makes them difficult for landfill operators to handle and effectively compact into the waste mass. Therefore, liners actually waste significantly more landfill space than other recyclables. Overall, this negatively impacts the community being served by the landfill, the landfill operator and the public’s opinion of oil and gas exploration. Reduces liability - The owner’s environmental liability ends when a properly operated recycling company receives the liner material. This is not the case with disposal where the owner retains environmental liability for what is considered “residual waste” in most cases. Therefore, a focused liner recycling program can provide a significant reduction in long term liability exposure. Improves public image of energy recovery - There is a lot of good and bad publicity surrounding recovery of oil and gas in the Marcellus and Utica regions. Reduction of drilling associated waste and thereby impact on the local community is a great way to help improve the public’s image of energy related operations. In addition, the recycling process creates local jobs and increases the tax base while reducing the cost of products made with recycled resins. Energy companies who employ liner recycling as part of their overall environmental program can easily quantify the benefits to their stock holders, regulators and the public. Save natural resources - Recycling millions of pounds of plastic reduces the demand for raw materials by millions of pounds on a macro level. In addition, the amount of energy required to produce plastic products from recycled material is much lower than required to produce the same product using raw materials. LIMITATIONS As with any good thing, there are some limitations to liner recycling. First and foremost, liners that are contaminated with hydrocarbons or other drilling related wastes are generally not recyclable. Those portions of the liner that are contaminated must be cut away and properly disposed as residual waste. However, the vast majority of liner materials never come into contact with anything but fresh water and/or soil. A qualified recycling collection company will assist the tear down contractor with segregating these materials by providing clearly marked disposal and recyclable containers and/or training. Considering transport, cleaning and processing and end-product value, some liner materials are more challenging to recycle than others. With the right infrastructure and processing technology, single polymer geomembranes and woven coated materials are readily recyclable today. Most composite layered liners can also be recycled, although the efficiency is less than geomembrane and varies by product. Currently, liners with polyester scrim reinforcement and nonwoven geotextile cushion materials present the biggest recycling challenge. The best way to determine what can be recycled is to consult with a recycling company specializing in oil and gas liner collection and recycling. They can provide assistance and answer questions about recycling specific liner materials. More importantly, they can help to tailor a comprehensive liner recycling program targeted to achieve waste stream reduction goals. Of course, an effective program will cover liner removal, collection, transporta-

tion and processing post-use. However, it is just as important that the program consider liner purchasing, site design and installation to achieve the maximum benefit. CLOSING THOUGHTS It is estimated that only two to three million of the more than 100 million pounds of liner material used in the Marcellus and Utica region last year were recycled. This represents a looming problem that must be addressed. However, it also represents a great opportunity for those involved in oil and gas exploration and operations, landfill operators and regulators to develop a rare win-win solution. About the author: Stephen N. Valero is a registered professional engineer in OH, WV, PA and multiple other states. He has over 20 years experience in developing and designing with geosynthetics including liner materials. As a consultant to Valero Environmental, LLC, Mr. Valero assists companies involved in energy recovery operations with waste stream reduction strategies including selection, design, installation, removal, collection, transportation and recycling of well pad and pond liner materials. Recently, Valero Environmental has launched a website dedicated to providing liner recycling guidance and information (www.recycleliners.com) and has teamed with Wellspring Environmental (www.getwe.co) and Ultra-Poly Corporation (www.ultra-poly.com) to provide liner collection and recycling capability in WV, Western PA and Eastern OH.


THE NORTHEAST ONG MARKETPLACE

APRIL 2013

N Y P A O H N Y M I O H O H

APRIL 8-9, 2013 ~ NEW YORK, NY

IADC ENVIRONMENTAL CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION WWW.IADC.ORG/EVENTS/ APRIL 10-12, 2013 ~ PITTSBURGH, PA

NAPE EAST WWW.NAPEEXPO.COM APRIL 10-12, 2013 ~ CANTON, OH

AIPG 4TH ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM WWW.AIPG.ORG

P A P A P A

MICHIGAN PETROLEUM CONFERENCE WWW.MICHIGANOILANDGAS.ORG APRIL 24, 2013 ~ ST. CLAIRSVILLE, OH

OHIO VALLEY REGIONAL OIL & GAS EXPO 2013 WWW.OHIOVALLEYOILGASEXPO.COM APRIL 30 - MAY 1, 2013 ~ COLUMBUS, OH

UTICA SHALE CONGRESS 2013 WWW.UTICA-SHALE-CONGRESS-2013.COM

PAGE 12

MAY 14-16, 2013 ~ MOON TOWNSHIP, PA

EASTERN GAS COMPRESSION ROUNDTABLE WWW.EGCR.ORG MAY 17-18, 2013 ~ WASHINGTON, PA

TRI-COUNTY OIL & GAS B-TO-B EXPO WWW.TRICOUNTYOILANDGAS.COM MAY 19-22, 2013 ~ PITTSBURGH, PA

AAPG ANNUAL CONVENTION & EXHIBITION WWW.AAPG.ORG/PITTSBURGH2013

JUNE 2013

OGIS NEW YORK APRIL 18, 2013 ~ TRAVERSE CITY, MI

APRIL 2013

MAY 2013

APRIL 15-16, 2013 ~ NEW YORK, NY

WWW.IPAA.ORG

P A P A

JUNE 3-4, 2013 ~ FARMINGTON, PA

SHALE ENERGY CONFERENCE WWW.NEIENERGY.ORG/EVENTS.HTM JUNE 21, 2013 ~ TROY, PA

NORTHERN TIER MARCELLUS BUSINESS EXPO WWW.NTMARCELLUSEXPO.COM

VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR LINKS TO THESE EVENTS ONGMARKETPLACE.COM EVENTS CONTINUED ON PAGE 18


THE NORTHEAST ONG MARKETPLACE

APRIL 2013

PAGE 13

• IP Video Systems • View Live Steaming Video from any Well Site • Record and Review Video on site or remotely • Fiber Optic, Copper, or Wireless Systems • Explosion Proof Systems available • Site Surveys, System Design, Integration, Service • Operators, Owners, Property Managers • Panasonic Authorized Video Dealer

INFO @ ONGMARKETPLACE.COM

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THE NORTHEAST ONG MARKETPLACE

APRIL 2013

PAGE 14

FOCUS WASTE MANAGEMENT

NORM Impacted Waste by Andrew J. Lombardo, CHP - Vice President Technical Services - Perma-Fix Environmental Services, Inc. NORM is an acronym for naturally occurring radioactive material and in the most basic sense differentiates radioactive material that occurs naturally (in background) from man-made radioactivity. All soil types and rock and shale and anything that makes up the Earth’s solid material contain some level of NORM, primarily uranium, thorium and radium, and are therefore radioactive. In addition, some of the NORM radionuclides, mainly radium, dissolve in the groundwater in contact with soil and rock. The NORM concentration in groundwater varies also and is dependent on many factors effecting solubility. Therefore, when water and equipment that is used in unconventional oil and gas production activities come in contact with NORM in soil, rock and water, they become impacted with NORM. Consequently, when recycling or disposing of the water or equipment/piping, there is an additional component of contamination to address, which is radioactivity. A common misconception about NORM is that it is physically not the same as man-made radioactivity; which is not true. NORM radionuclides decay and produce alpha and beta particles as well as gamma rays, the same way man-made radioactive material does. The difference is that the activity concentration of NORM is many times lower than most man-made sources of radiation. Lower activity concentration means lower exposure/risk to humans and the environment and therefore more options for treating and or disposing of water or equipment impacted by NORM. NORM associated with unconventional oil and gas production such as Marcellus Shale fracking is primarily radium-226 (Ra-226) a member of the natural uranium decay series. Conventional production produces both Ra-226 and Ra-228, both of which are radioactive. The isotopes of radium are the only natural uranium or thorium decay progeny with enough solubility to be dissolved in formation water along with other natural salts and minerals. The formation water is mixed with produced and flowback water extracted from the well. The produced and flowback water are a source of technologically enhanced NORM (TENORM) once extracted from the well. Scale, the deposition of solids within water on pipes or interior surfaces of equipment, is also a source of NORM/TENORM impacted materials that may result in waste. Unconventional production requires a large volume of water to be inserted into each well drilled, e.g. a million gallons per well. When the water is extracted from the well, the water contains high levels of total solids including radium. Because of the incredibly large volume of water used for each unconventional production well, recycling as much of this water as possible is necessary. Because of the relatively high (as compared to conventional production) radium activity concentration of the water, treatment of the water results in radium concentrating in sludges, filters and other byproducts, all are NORM waste. Traditionally centralized waste water facility sludges have been disposed of in municipal landfills. Since nearly every solid waste facility in the country, including landfills monitor for radioactivity when receiving waste, the sludge produced from cleaning flowback water from unconventional drill sites often trips the radioactivity monitor alarm. In Pennsylvania, monitoring for radioac-

Perma-Fix technicians survey a tank impacted with NORM on a retired O&G production site

Continued e


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FOCUS WASTE MANAGEMENT tivity at solid waste facilities is mandatory, i.e. is a regulation. There is an exemption for low levels of NORM impacted waste causing a Level 1 (lowest level equal to 10 micro-rem/hour above background) alarm at landfills. The exemption is basically set at less than 5 pico-Curies per gram of radium above background. Activity levels higher than this may be exempted on a case by case basis that includes an evaluation of risk from placement of the NORM into the landfill. The risk assessment is sensitive to both the activity concentration of the NORM impacted waste and the total volume of NORM impacted waste in the landfill. Some of the NORM impacted sludge meets the exemption criteria. Some of the sludge does not. Since there is essentially a limit on the total volume of NORM placed in a landfill, the more NORM impacted sludge produced, the more sludge will be rejected for landfill disposal.

Likewise, equipment and piping with radium scale plated on internal surfaces may cause Level 1 alarms at landfills. Recycle facilities, where steel equipment and piping are often sent to after use, also monitor for radioactivity. Recycle facilities generally reject any material that alarms at the lowest setting (statistically different than background). Again, the result is a waste stream impacted with NORM. Piping and equipment can be decontaminated by removing the radium scale with common techniques such as pressurized water power washing. The water and resulting solids from the decontamination effort must be contained and properly disposed of as NORM impacted waste, subjected to the same restrictions as the other NORM impacted wastes.

The radium activity concentration in water treatment sludge routinely exceeds the Department of Transportation (DOT) threshold for labeling as radioactive material (UN2910) of 270 pico-Curies per gram (pCi/g). When disposing of the sludge the future risk from the radioactive material is generally proportional to the total activity (activity concentration times the volume), so even though the activity concentration of NORM/TENORM in the flowback and process water is low, when combined with the incredibly high volume results in total activity that exceeds what a municipal landfill can accept. The next possible disposal facility would be a RCRA C Landfill.

SunnySide Supply

Well casting potentially impacted with NORM surveyed for unrestricted release by Perma-Fix technicians

Your FR Clothing Outlet serving the tri-state area! What we can do for you! H Large, deep inventory of many different sizes, colors, styles and manufactures! H Value Priced for the Individual H Volume Pricing for the Corporations H We can do onsite fitting sessions for Corporate Customers H Industry Trained Staff…. We know why Inherent Fabric is your safest choice! H In House Embroidery Service H Website catalog www.sunnysidesupply.com H We have Boots, Gloves, Tools and other oil field safety items.

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Finally, some of the cuttings produced during the drilling of the unconventional well may be NORM impacted. Specifically, the vertical cuttings produced while drilling within the Marcellus Shale layer are elevated with uranium decay series radionuclides. This NORM impacted waste stream is different than from the waste water sludge and equipment scale, in that it contains all of the uranium series radionuclide, including uranium 234, 235 and 238 (U-234, U-235 and U-238) as well as Ra-226. A risk assessment in support of disposal of these cuttings onsite or in a landfill would include all of these radionuclides. Deep well injection may be an option for disposal of elevated cuttings and high activity water from unconventional production activities. However there are no wells permitted for deep well injection in Pennsylvania and Ohio has a moratorium in place on all deep well injection currently.


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STICKING IT TO THE VAN: Company combines creativity and technology to raise brand awareness Think of the term “wrap” and one of two images comes to mind. Typically, the first association is a rolled up tortilla stuffed with meat. The second image may not be as obvious; it could actually be a vinyl image of that particular sandwich on the side of the van that delivers those sandwiches. This type of wrap is a colorful, eye-catching piece of art that can appear on everything from cars, floors, walls or trailers with the intent of promoting a company. Wraps are a great way to create a moving billboard for your company while drawing thousands of impressions daily. If you want your brand to be recognized and have your client’s top of mind awareness, then you have to stay in front of them every day. At STICK our motto is, “We STICK Anything”. Over the last five years we have been challenged to combine creativity and advanced printing technologies to create and apply wraps for a wide range of customers in numerous industries. We’ve wrapped hundreds of vehicles with company logos. We have designed and applied huge wraps that appear on the walls and floors of businesses who want to ensure their branding can’t be missed.

Although we service a diverse group of industries and businesses, we have steadily developed a robust market for our wrapping services in the shale gas/industrial industry. We have done decals for entire trucking fleets such as Fairmont Supply and Elite Oilfield. Moreover, our wraps appear on vehicles for Consol Energy, Black Diamond Equipment Rental, Anderson Excavating and Oakland Oil. In addition to our wraps and decals, STICK has expanded its services to the oil and gas industry to include jobsite and safety signage, hardhat STICKers, tradeshow displays, DOT and asset numbers and more. Our evolution as a company has been on a steady arc upward, and the oil and gas industry has been a large contributor.


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Once the design is completed, STICK takes the project to the production phase. As a Feller’s Certified wrap company, our installers have been trained by the best to guarantee an impressive final product. Our wrap artists take great pride in their work and put great care and detail into each project.

STICK was created in 2008 by Damian Ferek, owner of sister company, Asayo Creative. He was designing wraps for clients and farming out the installation to other wrap companies in the area. Recognizing an opportunity to create a one-stop shop for his clients, Damian purchased equipment and started STICK LLC. We started out working from our original location in the basement of an office building, to a residential garage in Cheat Lake, and finally to our current location in an industrial garage facility in the outskirts of Morgantown and new storefront in Martins Ferry, Ohio.

The wrap process usually begins before the vehicle even arrives at our shop. STICK takes measurements and creates custom templates for the client’s vehicle to ensure accuracy in the design. The files are then printed on a state-of-the-art printer/plotter and covered with a protective overlaminate to protect from fading and scratching. This extra layer of material also helps protect the paint under the wrap from normal wear and tear of the road. The wrap is then lined up on the vehicle to match the proof and taped securely into place. Application to the vehicle is executed with an array of specialized tools to ensure the vinyl is wrapped over, under, and around any obstacles in the way. The final step is to cure the wrap. Once everything is on, we go over it with a propane torch to ensure the wrap adheres to the vehicle as strongly as possible.

Our growth into Ohio is to better serve our growing clientele and increased demand from the oil and gas industry. The new office is one of a few planned locations over the next two years. Today we employ 7 people and we wrap over 100 vehicles per year. How best to explain a wrap? Consider a wrap a tattoo for your vehicle with endless creative ideas, but can be removed or updated down the road. If you have the idea, we can create it using the highly creative team of professionals in our partner company, Asayo Creative. As a marketing and design company, Asayo provides their knowledge of brand recognition and continuity while presenting the client with the most creative and jaw-dropping designs in the area. With the combination of STICK and Asayo, we offer our clients specialization at all phases in the vehicle wrap process.

STICK specializes in six key areas: • Vehicle and Wall Wraps • Custom Decals • Fleet Management • Tradeshow Exhibits • Custom Graphics • Posters and Banners We retain and gain new clients because each customer’s satisfaction is key to our reputation. Our staff is a team of creative artists with years of technical experience whose work will be seen every day. Our mission at STICK is to provide our customers with a superior design that will help increase their brand awareness and promote new business through appealing wraps that showcase our clients’ products or services.

STICK MORGANTOWN, WV • MARTINS FERRY, OH WESTICKANYTHING.COM


THE NORTHEAST ONG MARKETPLACE

JULY 2013

W V P A

JULY 10-11, 2013 ~ BUCKHANNON, WV

WEST VIRGINIA OIL AND GAS EQUIPMENT SHOW WWW.IOGAWV.COM JULY 24, 2013 ~ INDIANA, PA

PA GAS EXPO 2013 WWW.PAGASEXPO.COM

AUGUST 2013

P A P A

AUGUST 20-22, 2013 ~ PITTSBURGH, PA

SOCIETY OF PROFESSIONAL ENG. EASTERN REGIONAL MEETING WWW.ERM-2013.ORG AUGUST 27, 2013 ~ MONROEVILLE, PA

PIOGA’S EASTERN OIL & GAS CONFERENCE AND TRADE SHOW WWW.PIOGA.ORG

SEPTEMBER 2013

O H

SEPTEMBER 11-13, 2013 ~ YOUNGSTOWN, OH

P A

SEPTEMBER 25-26, 2013 ~ PHILADELPHIA, PA

YOUNG 2013 WWW.YOUNG2013EXPO.COM

APRIL 2013

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NATIONAL EVENTS

T X T X C A T X T X T X

MAY 6-9, 2013 ~ HOUSTON, TX

OFFSHORE TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE WWW.OTCNET.ORG/2013 MAY 16, 2013 ~ HOUSTON, TX

IADC DRILLING ONSHORE CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION WWW.IADC.ORG/EVENTS JUNE 23-24, 2013 ~ DANA POINT, CA

IPAA MIDYEAR MEETING WWW.IPAA.ORG JUNE 24-25, 2013 ~ HOUSTON, TX

PERFORMANCE EXCELLENCE FOR OIL & GAS WWW.PEXOILANDGAS.COM AUGUST 14-16, 2013 ~ HOUSTON, TX

SUMMER NAPE EXPO WWW.NAPEEXPO.COM AUGUST 20-12, 2013 ~ GALVESTON, TX

IADC WELL CONTROL CONFERENCE OF THE AMERICAS WWW.IADC.ORG/EVENTS

SHALE GAS INSIGHT 2013

VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR LINKS TO THESE EVENTS

WWW.SHALEGASINSIGHT.COM

ONGMARKETPL ACE.COM


THE NORTHEAST ONG MARKETPLACE

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PRESS RELEASE BEITZEL INTRODUCES THE MUDSTER TO REDUCE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT With increased focus on safety and environmental stewardship since the start of the Marcellus boom, drilling and exploration companies have searched for safer and more environmentally responsible methods of managing wastes and solids. One area of particular concern is using an excavator to handle drill cuttings for treatment or disposal. This process is inherently dangerous, creating multiple pinch points and expanding the back yard footprint by requiring extensive red zones. This process also exposes the drillers to increased environmental risk as dripping and spills are possible. Additionally, in some applications, processing equipment is not able to run at peak efficiency as the equipment is fed a bucketful of material at a time rather than a steady and consistent flow of material. As these risks and drawbacks have become more unacceptable, many companies have sought an excavator-less backyard for the disposal of cuttings. The innovative team at Beitzel Corporation is pleased to announce that they have developed the Mudster system to provide a safe, cost-effective solution that eliminates the excavator from the backyard and reduces the required footprint. Additionally, Beitzel provides custom tank and conveyance solutions to best meet rig needs and configurations. The patent pending Mudster system is a revolutionary design that will transform the backyard with greater layout flexibility than what was previously possible.

The Mudster system operates with the push of a few buttons and is comprised of three primary features. A mud tank, while customizable, is typically large enough to hold up to 140 barrels of material. This tank collects cuttings from the rig shaker allowing the rig to continue drilling even if the backyard processing equipment is shut down for maintenance. This storage tank functions as a flow control buffer feeding fluids recovery equipment at an optimal rate. The second feature of the system is an infinitely variable positive displacement pump. By metering the feed rate, Beitzel Corporation is able to feed processing equipment at an optimal rate improving processing time and efficiency. The pump is capable of pushing cuttings over 200 feet horizontally and over 30 feet vertically. Cuttings processing equipment can now be placed at a convenient location on the pad. The third key component of the system is an elevated platform that is designed to house processing equipment up to 15 feet above the surface of the pad for direct discharge into haul off equipment. The stand is designed to accommodate roll-off boxes, dump trucks, or semi-trailers. By collecting, pumping, and discharging cuttings directly into the haul off equipment, the excavator is no longer needed to process or dispose of cuttings.

In addition to eliminating the excavator, operators can also eliminate the extra storage boxes that increase the footprint and cost of the operation. By eliminating the excavator and extra storage, the Mudster is cost competitive with current backyard setups while increasing safety, reducing environmental risk, reducing the risk of rig shut down, and providing a more flexible and convenient rig setup. When paired with the correct solids control equipment, the Mudster provides cuttings disposal without an excavator or additional solidification costs. Please contact Jared Fike for more information regarding The Mudster system or for other Beitzel Corporation services. 301.661.2454 or Jaredfike@beitzelcorp.com. For over 35 years Beitzel Corporation has provided a diversified portfolio of products and services to meet the needs of heavy industry. Combined with wholly owned subsidiary Pillar Innovations, Beitzel Corporation is solving some of the most complex problems in the industry.


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MARCELLUS UTICA ANTRIM NEW ALBANY Each month over 10,500 professionals receive a free copy of The Northeast ONG Marketplace, the only publication that covers all of the shale plays in the northeast U.S. oil and gas industry. Our affordable rates allow large and small businesses alike to let the industry know that you are here to do business.

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THE NORTHEAST ONG MARKETPLACE

APRIL 2013

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PRESS RELEASE

Waste Reduction: A Greener Alternative For Treating Drilling Muds Since 1947, McCutcheon Enterprises, Inc. (MEI) has been delivering complete waste management solutions to a diversified list of clients in the energy, industrial and municipal sectors. In order to keep pace with the ever changing regulations in the waste industry, MEI has remained steadfastly dedicated to providing our clients with solutions that live up to MEI’s motto: “protecting our environment for tomorrow’s generations.” One such effort has been the expansion of our cutting-edge municipal and residual waste treatment facility located at our headquarters in Apollo, PA.

fload the waste into our facility where it will pass through a process that separates the liquids from the solids and produces a smaller volume of solid waste to be disposed of at the landfill. What happens to the liquid waste from drilling muds/cuttings? It will be sent to the reuse area of our facility. So not only does the environment win once, with less waste being sent to the landfill, but twice by treating the water for reuse. “Waste reduction is a win, win, win scenario for MEI, our clients, and the environment,” said Tim Dobrosky, Facility Manager at MEI. “The environment wins twice with less waste to the landfill and the liquids processed for reuse,” Dobrosky continued. “Our clients win twice by using a treatment process that doubly protects the environment, and in bringing the waste to our facility from sites within a 100 plus mile radius, are saving money when compared to backyard on-site services,” Dobrosky concluded. “MEI is excited to launch this new form of treatment for all of our clients,” said Calvin McCutcheon, president of MEI. “Clients from all industries will know they are protecting the environment by utilizing this new waste reduction process,” McCutcheon continued. “At MEI, that’s what we’re all about-protecting our environment for tomorrow’s generations by providing our award-winning complete waste management solutions,” McCutcheon concluded. Purchasing this equipment is an investment in our future and in our environment. Tomorrow’s generations will benefit from treatment solutions like this which reduce the amount of waste in landfills and protect a vital natural resource by enabling our clients to reuse it. Our facility is capable of treating up to 6,000 barrels per day of production waters and liquid wastes. The expansion of our treatment facility will triple our solidification mix pit capacity allowing us to process a higher volume of waste in a shorter amount of time.

MEI’s waste treatment facility provides a variety of waste treatment solutions for our clients in the energy sector. For instance, our reuse area focuses on the processing of production waters for reuse on drilling sites. Our solidification area can handle all types of drilling muds, cuttings, etc. In fact, it is this area where we are making our waste treatment solutions greener. Currently, when processing drilling muds/cuttings, or other solid wastes, the wastes are dumped into one of our solidification pits, mixed with a solidifying agent and hauled off to the landfill for disposal. This process creates more volume to our waste with the addition of the solidifying agent. More waste equals more expense for us and for our clients, as well as more waste buried in a landfill. In our quest to be the beacon of what it means to be protecting our environment for tomorrow’s generations, we knew there was a greener way to process this waste stream. That is why we are expanding our facility and, beginning in April 2013, will be using the process of waste reduction to treat these waste streams. What is waste reduction and how does it make the process greener? It is quite simple really-by separating the liquids from the solids and, in turn, sending a lesser volume of waste to landfills for disposal. The truck will of-

Hard to handle and exempted waste streams are no problem for MEI’s treatment facility. We specialize in working with clients to treat waste streams that others cannot. Our capabilities for waste treatment are vast, and the experience of our staff is second to none. Non-hazardous, hard to handle and/or exempted waste streams are another of our niches. MEI’s employees and facilities are capable of handling any waste management need. Just call us, our philosophy is simple, when you need us, we’ll be there with our award-winning complete waste management solutions. Our position as an industry leader is reinforced by MEI being named the 2012 Drilling & Well Services Company of the Year in the Northeastern United States by the Oil & Gas Awards. We are honored to be recognized and will continue to provide our award-winning complete waste management solutions whenever you need us. For more information on this subject you may contact Chad McCutcheon at McCutcheon Enterprises at Phone: 724-568-3623 ext. 137 or visit their website at www.completewastemgmt.com


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TRAINING AND WORKSHOPS

Cleaning in OH, WV and PA Call 570.560.0682

APRIL 23, 2013 SETTING THE STANDARD IN VAPOR RECOVERY Clarksburg, WV www.hy-bon.com APRIL 29, 2013 OIL AND GAS BASIC TRAINING UPSTREAM IN-DEPTH PLUS MIDSTREAM Houston, TX www.energytrainingresources.com APRIL 29, 2013 OSHA 5810 TRAINING Steubenville, OH www.eidohio.org/osha-5180training-coming-ohio MAY 9, 2013 COMPRESSOR ENGINEERING SEMINAR Coraopolis, PA www.totalequipment.com/ customertraining MAY 16, 2013 PUMP ENGINEERING SEMINAR Coraopolis, PA www.totalequipment.com/ customertraining MAY 17, 2013 PUMP MAINTENANCE SEMINAR Coraopolis, PA www.totalequipment.com/ customertraining June 3-7, 2013 HAZARDS RECOGNITION AND STANDARDS FOR ON-SHORE OIL AND GAS EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION Pittsburgh, PA www.safetyandhealth.ext.wvu.edu

COVERING ALL THE SHALE PLAYS IN THE NORTHEAST

JULY 18, 2013 TRANSPORTATION SAFETY DAY AND FLAGGER TRAINING Coraopolis, PA www.marcelluscoalition.org


THE NORTHEAST ONG MARKETPLACE

APRIL 2013

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SAFETY ON THE JOB

A Clean Job Site Is A Safe Job Site The overall theme of this month’s issue of ONG Marketplace is waste management, and with this in mind, my safety topic of the month is the importance of a clean job site. With construction running full speed in the Marcellus and Utica plays, keeping a clean job site can sometimes be an afterthought. The following article will outline a few of the reasons why keeping your site clean should be considered just as important as any other safety issue while working in the field.

ers of the importance of keeping the site clean, and can also help to create good habits among workers. Other good habits for keeping a clean and safe jobsite include, but are not limited to, developing a routine cleaning schedule, reporting unsafe conditions, clearly marking physical hazards or obstructions, and cleaning as you go. Something that has been made clear throughout this series of articles is that all work will quickly come to a halt when an accident occurs on a job site. Employees who do not feel safe often tend to be overly cautious when performing their work tasks, which can noticeably slow production. A clean and safe jobsite is conductive to maximizing productivity from all employees. It is important for all supervisors to remember that keeping a clean and safe job site is much less expensive than lost productivity, accidents and even fines that can be associated with poor housekeeping. As a worker, if you see a mess, take care of it. Pick up anything you see lying around that could create a hazard. If you find someone’s tools or other equipment lying around, move them out of the way. Remember, if you must move something that does not belong to you, put it somewhere safe, but visible if possible. Try to keep storage areas and walkways free of holes, ruts, and obstructions. Immediately clean up spills (if substance is hazardous, notify supervisor immediately), and coil up extension cords, lines, and hoses when not in use.

Good housekeeping is one of the surest ways to identify a safe workplace. You can tell how a contractor feels about safety just by taking a look around their job site. A good contractor should be cleaning their site on a regular basis, storing materials and tools in an organized fashion, keeping workplaces free from tripping hazards, and ensuring that liquids are stored properly at all times. When you see something lying around where it could trip an individual or fall on them, put it in a safe place. Don’t wait for someone else to do it. If it’s something that he or she will be looking for, you can put it safely where they can see it. Some jobs have walkways, aisles, stairs, and ladders by which you get from one place to another. It’s particularly important that these lines of travel be kept safe and clear of loose objects. Workers often carry loads on these routes. They can’t always pick their steps or look around to be sure that nothing is going to trip them or fall on them. It’s not hard to keep a job clean if all useless materials, boxes, scrap lumber and other trash are picked up and removed regularly. Items left lying around can be damaged, be the cause of damage, or even cause serious injury to workers. Remember, if clutter and unnecessary materials and trash are allowed to accumulate for even a few days, the job becomes a messy and unsafe place to work. Supervisors can keep their sites clean by simply making the clearing of unnecessary clutter, tools or trash a daily function of everyone’s job. Morning tailgate meetings are the best time to remind all work-

I have placed a great deal of emphasis on the fact that a clean job site will help to keep everyone working on site safe, but it is also important to remember the environmental impact of a messy jobsite. Failure to properly manage the waste associated with chemicals, fuels, and even the dirt associated with construction could have a significant impact on the surrounding environment. Remember, damaging the environment where you work means damaging the environment where others live and play. Housekeeping is everyone’s job - every trade, every worker, and every supervisor. Good housekeeping does more than prevent injuries - it can save you time, and it can keep your tools from being lost, damaged, or destroyed. Spending just 5 minutes picking up debris could prevent an injury that keeps a co-employee, or yourself, off work for weeks or even months. By Chris Chadwick, Safety Products Coordinator at SunnySide Supply, Inc. www.SunnySideSupply.com References: “Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.” (n.d.). Web. 22 March 2013. http://www.CDC.gov “National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.” (n.d.). Web. 22 March 2013. www.CDC.gov/NIOSH “Occupational Safety and Health Administration.” (n.d.). Web. 22 March 2013. www.OSHA.gov


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White Papers! If you’re interested in sharing your expertise with 10,000 industry professionals, call us!

855-269-1188 info@ongmarketplace.com

NETWORKING EVENTS April 3, 2013 YPE PITTSBURGH CREW CHANGE Bridgeville, PA www.ypenergy.org April 4, 2013 THE ENERGY GROUP MIXER Wellsboro, PA www.the-energy-group.net April 10, 2013 YPE PITTSBURGH CREW CHANGE Washington, PA www.ypenergy.org April 18, 2013 THE E3 - ELITE ENEGY EVENT Bentleyville, PA www.themarcellusshale.com May 1, 2013 YPE PITTSBURGH CREW CHANGE Bridgeville, PA www.ypenergy.org May 8, 2013 YPE PITTSBURGH CREW CHANGE Washington, PA www.ypenergy.org May 14-15, 2013 PIOGA PIG ROAST AND TECHNICAL SEMINAR Champion, PA www.pioga.org

Neel’s Chainlink Fence Company has been in business for over 30 years. We are ISNetworld Compliant and a member of IOGA WV. Our company belives in SAFETY FIRST. We meet all Safety and First Aid Requirements. Whatever your job; we have what you need. In 2011 NFCI Installed 30 Miles of 6’ High Chainlink Fence In 2012 NFCI Installed 45 Miles of 6’ High Chainlink Fence

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THE NORTHEAST ONG MARKETPLACE

APRIL 2013

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PRESS RELEASE Newpark’s DURA-BASE® Advanced-Composite Mats Save Over 1 Million Trees as 250K Production Milestone Achieved

Newpark’s precision mats provide superior ground stabilization that minimizes the need for aggregate or gravel and enhances worker safety, while preventing soil disturbance and road dust. They are specially designed as a single piece, with no individual parts requiring bolts or fasteners to hold them in place. This one-piece system prevents spills from being absorbed into the mats and greatly aids in preventing spills from contaminating ground soil. The mats’ ease of transport and installation helps oil and gas operations deploy faster, saving time and money. From the frozen tundra of the Arctic, to the blistering heat of the Sahara, DURA-BASE mats’ unmatched strength and reliability make them ideal for maintaining productivity regardless of weather or terrain. Their versatility also makes them perfect for temporary roadways, in addition to worksite padding. This has led to widespread adoption of the advanced-composite mat systems in not only the oil and gas industry, but also in the utilities, pipeline, mining, construction, heavy haul, military, and entertainment sectors.

LAFAYETTE, La. (January 28, 2013) — Newpark Mats and Integrated Services, a unit of Newpark Resources (NYSE: NR) and the leading provider of ground protection solutions, commemorated the production of its 250,000th DURA-BASE® Advanced-Composite Mat as it rolled off the company’s world class assembly line in Lafayette, La. With DURA-BASE mats lasting five times longer than wooden mats, and weighing less than half as much, this production milestone also marked the preservation of over 1 million trees (or approximately 1.25 million wooden mats), along with a tremendous savings in transportation costs and emissions. “Worldwide demand for DURA-BASE Advanced-Composite Mat Systems continues to increase across a variety of industries,” said Jeff Juergens, President of Newpark Mats and Integrated Services. “With each of the 250,000 mats we’ve produced to date, Newpark’s precision engineering process and proprietary design ensure that they all possess the extreme ruggedness and advanced performance required for the most demanding jobs.” DURA-BASE mats are produced from a tough non-slip advanced-composite formulation that withstands bearing loads in excess of 600 pounds per square inch. They weigh over 50 percent less than wooden mats, which saves considerable time and transportation cost.

About Newpark Mats and Integrated Services Newpark Mats and Integrated Services is the leading provider of ground protection solutions. Its DURA-BASE® Advanced-Composite Mat Systems are also utilized widely throughout the utilities, pipeline, construction, heavy haul, military and entertainment industries. Newpark is the largest, most experienced manufacturer of ground protection systems globally and are innovators in ground protection technology. The Lafayette-based company is a unit of Newpark Resources, Inc. For more information go to www.newpark.com

IS YOUR GAS DETECTION PROGRAM OSHA COMPLIANT? • Free Consultation • Instrument Rental, Sales, Ser vice • Calibration / Bump Gas • Por table and Fixed Systems • Calibration Ser vices LEC Solutions, LLC Phone 412-841-7901 Fax 724-871-5500 service@lecsolutionsonline.com www.lecsolutionsonline.com

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Phone/Fax: 585-268-5000 Justin Osgood Cell: 716-474-6389 glc6001@verizon.net A+ Rated Western New York BBB

EQUIPMENT • TRUCKING FOR EQUIPMENT, LOGS & GRAVEL PRODUCTS • JARRAFF AVAILABLE FOR CANOPY REMOVAL


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PRESS RELEASE New Well Owners Booklet Answers Many Questions When should you test your water? What should you test it for? What do all the numbers mean? DALLAS, PA — Brian Oram, a professional geologist and soil scientist and founder of B.F. Environmental Consultants, announced today that his firm is making available “The Pennsylvania Guide for Ground-water for Private Well Owners: What Do the Numbers Mean?” through the Water Research Center Portal at: www.water-research.net/ privatewellPA.htm “The goal of this booklet is to help educate and inform citizens on issues related to water conservation, ensuring that private water supply systems produce safe drinking water for your family, protecting the long-term quality of our streams and drink-

ing water sources, and helping you to understand the potential sources of pollution to our water resources,” Oram said. The booklet provides general information explaining certified water testing, chain-of-custody, and drinking water regulations and standards. It provides information related to the health (primary standards) or aesthetic (secondary standards) concerns for each parameter and provides information on water quality parameters that do not specifically have a drinking water limit. “This reference is a guide to understanding water quality that works by providing guidance on selecting water quality testing parameters for baseline testing from a citizen's perspective and by serving as a tool to help interpret water quality data,” Oram added. In some cases, the document provides guidance on what actions a homeowner may want to consider in light of test results. The booklet is part of the effort to support the Citizens Groundwater and Surfacewater Database, a grassroots effort to track change in groundwater quality in Pennsylvania and help to educate private well owners in the region. To learn more about the Citizen Groundwater/Surfacewater Database and other Grassroots Efforts or to schedule an outreach event or to order booklets call Mr. Brian Oram, PG at 570-335-1947 or go to www.water-research.net. B. F. Enviromental Consultants, Inc. 15 Hillcrest Dr. Dallas, PA 18612 (570) 335-1947 www.bfenvironmental.com

Electrical Supplies. Powerful Service.

1-800-339-5601

Pump Panels

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Tank Battery Control & Metering Max Tomlin: 814-449-7479 Max.Tomlin@Gexpro.com

Call Us Today for Your Oil and Gas Solutions

Erika Albano: 814-860-4437 Erika.Albano@Gexpro.com


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TELL OUR ADVERTISERS YOU SAW THEIR AD IN

The Elite Energy Event Hosted By: TheMarcellusShale.com The UticaShale.com ShaleAdvantage.com

Thursday, April 18th, 2013 Bentleyville, PA

Holiday Inn Express

HAVE SURPLUS EQUIPMENT TO SELL? - LIST IT IN THE NORTHEAST ONG MARKETPLACE


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Fisher Welding, LLC Brad Fisher, Owner Custom Purification Systems - Natural Gas Drying & Purification - Regenerative Dryers - Refrigeration Dryers Deliquescent Dryers - Filtration Systems - Custom Fabrication High Pressure Ball Valves - Center Guided Check Valves Specialized Precision Machining Visit us at www.psbindustries.com Call us at 1-814-453-3651

- Specializing in Aluminum Fabrication and Repair - Custom Gas and Oil Fabrication - General Fabrication and Repair 724-422-5255

Home, PA

Natural Gas Opportunities! Assisting companies throughout the Marcellus & Utica region

Class A & B CDL Drivers – Tanker & Hydro Excavator -Industry, PA Senior Pipeline Design Engineer, Engineering Manager, & Land Surveyor – Pittsburgh Experienced Oil & Gas Sales Persons Hydraulic Shop - Laborer/Counter Person – Eighty Four, PA Visit: Drillbabyjobs.com to apply or call 814.224.2866 for more information

JOB FAIRS April 6, 2013 4TH ANNUAL CENTRAL PA MARCELLUS SHALE JOB FAIR DuBois, PA www.centralpamarcellusjobs.com April 11, 2013 WYOMING COUNTY 2013 BUSINESS JOB AND GAS EXPO Mehoopany, PA www.wyccc.com April 20, 2013 NATURAL GAS DIVERSITY HIRING EVENT Washington, PA www.pioga.org April 29, 2013 ENERGY JOB FAIR Youngstown, OH www.ooga.org

A L L O U R A D S A R E F U L L C O LO R


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