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CONTENTS 3 CALENDAR OF EVENTS...22 3 New Map of Upstate NY...............26-27

Cookie Bonanza Whip up a few batches of cookies for a cookie exchange, potluck, gifts or to satisfy your household’s sweet tooth. See new recipes on page 47.

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10 Tips to Chase Away the Winter Blues.....7 10 Things You Need to Do This Winter ...............10 Winter: No Fun or Snow Fun? .............12 This Winter, Get Into Factory Tours ..............14 Animal Tracking..........16 Winter Bird Land ....................17 Get a Little Wild This Winter ........................18 Snowmobilers Gear Up for New Season.............19 Sensational Sledding! .............20 My Top Ten Things to Try This Winter ...............21 The Winter Fisherman...................................49 Snow 101 —All You Need to Know........50

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Our Advertisers ATTRACTIONS Experience Oswego................... 21 Flamingo Bowl.............................. 3 Long Lake Town of..................... 39 Oswego Co. Promotion ............... 2 Oswego Food and Hist. Tours.... 25 Pole Position Raceway............... 49 Suggett House Museum............. 23 Town of Inlet............................... 39 Woods Valley Ski Area................. 5

AUTOMOTIVE Dick’s Auto Specialties............... 33 Fuccillo’s Auto Mall..................... 50 Ken’s Body Shop........................ 28 Longley Dodge........................... 31 Roger Phelps Used Cars.............. 9

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CHURCHES Christ Our Light Cath. Church.... 33

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Amerigas.................................... 24 Johnston’s Gas........................... 30

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WHERE TO EAT Burger King................................. 27 El Rincon Mexicana.................... 34 Grist Mill...................................... 37 Little Sodus Inn........................... 34 Mill House Market....................... 32 Mimi’s Drive-In............................ 30 RiverHouse Restaurant.............. 34

SHOPPING Eastview Mall................................ 2 Friendship Thrift Shop................ 33 Lowville Cheese Producers.......... 5 Make Sense Shop...................... 32

SKI Woods Valley Ski Area................. 5 Toggenburg Mountain................... 5

TRAILERS Jim’s Trailer World...................... 37

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WHERE TO STAY All Seasons Inn / Beacon Hotel .29 Butternut Cove Cottages............ 23 Little Sodus Inn........................... 34 Parks Alumni House..................... 9 Port Lodge Motel........................ 32 Tailwater Lodge.......................... 49

Advertisers by Alphabetical Order All Seasons Inn / Beacon Hotel ...... 29 Amerigas......................................... 24 Associated Dental Arts.................... 24 Berkshire/Hathaway CNY Realty....... 9 BobCat of CNY................................ 23 Burger King...................................... 27 Burkes Home Center....................... 25 Butternut Cove Cottages................. 23 Canale Insurance and Accounting... 25 Cazenovia Chamber of Commerce.23 Century 21 Leah’s Signature........... 31 Century 21- Galloway...................... 25 Christ Our Light Catholic Church..... 33 Compass Federal Credit Union....... 29

Country Gentleman Kitchen.............. 3 Dick’s Auto Specialties.................... 33 Eastview Mall..................................... 2 El Rincon Mexicana......................... 37 Experience Oswego........................ 21 Flamingo Bowl................................... 3 Friendship Thrift Shop..................... 33 Fuccillo’s Auto Mall.......................... 50 Grist Mill........................................... 34 Jim’s Trailer World........................... 37 Johnston’s Gas................................ 30 JP Jewelers..................................... 24 Ken’s Body Shop............................. 28 Krell Distributing.............................. 23

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Lakeshore Hardwoods..................... 34 Little Sodus Inn................................ 37 Long Lake Town of.......................... 39 Longley Dodge................................ 31 Lowville Cheese Producers............... 5 Make Sense Shop........................... 32 Mill House Market............................ 32 Mimi’s Drive-In................................. 30 NTTS – Natl Tractor Trailer School.... 9 Oswego Co. Fed. Credit Union........ 13 Oswego Co. Promotion & Tourism.... 2 Oswego County Stop DWI............... 31 Oswego Food and History Tours..... 25 Oswego Health................................ 28

Parks Alumni House.......................... 9 Peter’s Reality................................. 30 Pole Position Raceway.................... 49 Port Lodge Motel............................. 32 RiverHouse Restaurant................... 34 Roger Phelps Used Cars................... 9 Starkey’s Lookout............................ 23 Suggett House Museum.................. 23 Tailwater Lodge............................... 49 Toggenburg Mountain........................ 5 Town of Inlet.................................... 39 Tug Hill Vineyards.............................. 5 Woods Valley Ski Area...................... 5


Guests to Mirbeau Inn & Spa in Skaneateles can enjoy its luxurious spa with an indoor/ outdoor pool.

10 Tips to Chase Away the Winter Blues

Fine tune your golf expertise at Turning Stone’s indoor practice area

Playing golf, spending time at the pool are some of the options to enjoy the season By Sandra Scott

T

he outdoorsmen can enjoy snowmobiling, skiing and other outdoor activities while the “indoorsmen” are being pampered, learning a new skill, and staying warm and toasty; but even snow-lovers need to escape for a day or more. Here are 10 suggestions:

1

Have a pool party. Get your

friends together and head to the newly opened Holiday Inn Express in Oswego for a pool party. They have a

heated indoor pool and whirlpool. The four-hour pool package includes use of the banquet room (bring your own food or order delivery). Towels are provided. Looking for some alone time? Grab a book and head to the hotel’s pool and forget the snow.

2

Be pampered. Bask in luxury at

Mirbeau Inn & Spa in Skaneateles. With gardens inspired by Monet, Mirbeau guests can enjoy its luxurious spa with an indoor/outdoor pool. While it may be snowing, guests won’t mind 2016 / 2017

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as they snuggle by the fireplace. A spa treatment will soothe away the winter blues and one can revitalize with a yoga class.

3

Play golf. Fine tune your golf

expertise at Turning Stone’s indoor practice area with 40 hitting stations, a practice green and play world-famous golf courses on their golf simulators. There is also an indoor tennis court and one for racquetball.

4

Cooking getaway. Get warm and comfy at the historic River Edge Mansion in Pennellville where some weekend packages include learning how to make quick breads, scones, muffins, cinnamon rolls, bread and pizza dough. Other options include pairing wine with foods, cooking with herbs, gingerbread house making, and learning to make Asian fare.

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The Harbor Hotels in Clayton and Watkins Glen feature fire & ice packages in February with a riverfront ice bar extravaganza.

Spend the day at Syracuse’s MOST. It is a learning day for people of all ages and it stays open late one night a week.

Learning at the MOST. Spend

the day at Syracuse’s Milton J. Rubenstein Museum of Science & Technology. It is a learning day for people of all ages and it stays open late one night a week. Learn from their many hands-on science displays and demonstrations. Planetarium presentations are available on specific days. End the day with an IMAX movie. A wonderful family day.

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Create a family quilt. Winter is

the perfect time to learn how to quilt, or if you know how, to become more skillful. JoAnn Fabrics in Clay offers a variety of quilting classes. They also offer classes in sewing, knitting, cake-decorating, paper-crafting and jewelry making.

7

Get active. Join the YMCA. Don’t

let the winter be a time of inactivity. The YMCAs offer exercise classes for all ages and all levels from low-impact to water exercise. Try its yoga class. The Ys have personal wellness training. Learn to play pickleball — a lively racket game for all ages.

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Fire & Ice: The Harbor Hotels in

Clayton and Watkins Glen feature fire & ice packages in February with a riverfront ice bar extravaganza. Guests can stay toasty warm while

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enjoying their favorite libation from a bar made completely of ice and marvel at 20,000 lbs. of ice sculptures. Guests will be dazzled by the fireworks and enjoy wine tasting and hors d’oeuvres in the ballroom before taking a dip in their heated indoor pool.

9

Get artsy. Painting classes are offered at Pulaski’s Salmon River Fine Arts Center. Lakeside Artisans in Oswego also offers learn to paint classes. Check out the nature workshops offered at Amboy 4-H

Environmental Education Center in Williamstown.

10

Play ball: Avoid the summer crowds in Cooperstown and book the baseball package at The Inn in Cooperstown, a historic landmark. The package includes a one-year membership at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum plus a personalized commemorative bat from the Cooperstown Bat Company and many more unique additions.


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10 Things You Need to Do this Winter For those who find winter less than motivational, here are some fun things to try By Melissa Stefanec

W

inter is often a time to slow down. It’s a time for family and friends. The trays of grilled meat and veggies are replaced with slow-cooker creations and holiday cookies. Things are a little less frantic, and there seems to be a little more time to do all the things you’ve been meaning to do. However, if your to-do list this winter includes activities like closet organizing, basement cleanout and holing yourself up until there are buds on the trees, your winter is in need of a makeover. Here are 10 things you need to do this winter to keep things fun, interesting and productive.

1. Make a to-do list There’s no denying the winter months are a great time to get inside projects done. Make a list of the projects that you want to complete. Then prioritize that list. Be realistic about what you want to do and can

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realistically achieve. You deserve playtime in the winter just as much as you do in the summer. Don’t make your winter all work and no play.

2. Do something you’ve always wanted to do, but have never gotten around to doing Maybe it’s taking a snowboarding lesson. Maybe it’s traveling to a renowned snowshoeing trail. Maybe it’s putting a ski on your boot for the first time. Maybe it’s taking a night class for a hobby you always thought you would like. Whatever that something is, winter is the perfect time to try it. Sometimes a standing commitment is the best way to motivate and get out of the house.

3. Invest yourself in one, big project Maybe you’ve wanted to do something with 10 years’ worth of family photographs. Maybe you’ve

wanted to bring your bathroom from the 1970s into the modern age. Maybe you’ve wanted to do something with all of your kids’ crafts. Maybe you’ve wanted to perfect homemade hollandaise. Whatever that big project is, turn yourself over to it.

4. Skype or Facetime with loved ones

Winter travel can be difficult, so set a standing date to converse with a family member or friend who lives far away. A connection with a loved one can warm your soul more than sitting in front of a fireplace.

5. Read two books When the waning daylight hours make you want to turn in early, spend a little time with a book. In the age of the Internet, many of us have forgotten the joys of reading a book. Put together a small winter reading list and indulge your urge to stay put, by doing just that


with a book (or two).

6. Actually go to one of those winter festivals you see advertised all over They pop up online, on our newsfeeds, via flyers, and in newspapers. There are tons of great winter festivals in Upstate New York. Actually go to one or two this year. The sunshine will feel good, no matter what the temperature is.

7. Turn off the television and put away your phone or tablet Being in the house can draw you to your electronic devices. Don’t spend half of your free time this winter on your device. See this list for ideas on what else you can do with your time.

8. Get outside and walk at least once a week A walk, even when it’s cold, is rejuvenating and a great opportunity to make some vitamin D. Fresh air and exercise can be just the cure for whatever is ailing you.

9. Play in the snow like you are 5 years old again

A walk, even when it’s cold, is rejuvenating and a great opportunity to make some vitamin D. Remember when you couldn’t wait to get outside after a snowstorm? Rekindle the passions of your youth, and take the time to go sledding or build a snowman

Remember when you couldn’t wait to get outside after a snowstorm? Rekindle the passions of your youth, and take the time to go sledding or build a snowman. Make snow angels. Have a snowball fight or build a fort. Play is good for the brain at any age.

10. Make friends with winter Many of us get caught up griping about the horrors of winter. We should redirect our energy to finding beauty and respite during the cold months. We should find things to do in the winter that make us happy. Then, all that snow, cold and ice isn’t so bad. It can actually be kind of nice. 2016 / 2017

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I love snow: Mike Schmid

I hate snow: Karen Swartz

Winter: No Fun or Snow Fun? With winter, you either love it or hate it By Deborah Jeanne Sergeant

D

epending upon who’s measuring, Buffalo, Oswego, Syracuse and the North County are among the nation’s top snowfall areas. Living in New York offers plenty of recreational opportunities for people who can’t get enough snow. Count Mike Schmid, trail boss of the Fulton Area Snow Travelers, as one of them. Formerly a downhill skier and now focusing on snowmobiles, he said simply, “I enjoy winter.” He loves the feeling of zipping down trails on his sled, enjoying the scenery while experiencing the sensation that no one else knows he’s out there. “During the summer, people know you when you go by their houses, since their windows are open,” he said. “It’s different in the winter. The windows are shut and the snow muffles everything.” Though sub-zero temperatures have begun bothering him in recent years, he’s usually game to get out and enjoy

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the snow whenever he can. Candace Searing, administrative specialist with the Skaneateles Area Chamber of Commerce, is a fellow fan of the white stuff. “I love the snow!” she said. “I love being outdoors.” In honor of the first snow of the season, she wore a vest sporting snowflakes, even though it was before Halloween. Searing walks and runs in the snow, cross-country skies, snowshoes, and participates in a polar bear plunge as part of the Skaneateles Winterfest. The icy dip benefits Skaneateles Ambulance Volunteer Emergency Services, Skaneateles Fire Department and Skaneateles Education Foundation. But it’s not just a big heart for charity that drives Searing to want to join in the frosty event. “I’ve always liked snow and the cold,” she said. “It’s been a big part of my life since I was small.” As a youngster, she ice-skated and,

like many children, spent many winter days sledding. Searing said that as an adult, cold and snow also mean shoveling. The hassle of putting on heavy clothing, boots and a hat is a pain that she somehow didn’t notice as a child. “But I still don’t mind it much,” she said. Some people living in the region enjoy winter from the other side of the window glass, preferably with a warm beverage in hand. Karen Swartz, children’s program coordinator at Oswego Public Library, would prefer spending her winter knitting, reading, cross stitching or cooking. But her dog needs daily walks and “he’s a slow walker,” she said, so she dons her winter gear and troops out with her pooch. “I’m not thrilled about walking in it,” she said. “Outside of walking my dog, I don’t go out. I don’t like winter activities.” She wears insulated pants and other cold weather gear starting in late October, which amuses coworkers and, at times, confuses library patrons. Once, a woman mistakenly took home Swartz’s snow pants, thinking they were her child’s. “Most adults don’t have snow pants or wear them to work,” Swartz said. “I just smile about it and try to get through the winter.”


Warm and Ready Take on winter equipped to stay warm and comfortable By Deborah Jeanne Sergean

T

he right winter clothing means the difference between enjoying a day in the white outdoors and heading in early to warm up. Tossing on a heavy coat is no way to bundle up strategically. At The Ski Company in Syracuse, store manager Doug Prevost advises customers to dress in layers so as they become warm during an activity, they can remove them. Starting with a synthetic or wool base layer is the most important step. While cotton long underwear used to provide active people the go-to base, Prevost steers customers away from it. “Wear merino wool or Under Armour instead of cotton to wick moisture away from the body,” Prevost said. If you choose cotton, it traps perspiration on the skin, which makes you cold faster. The same goes for socks: Cotton can make feet sweaty, which leads to clammy cold. Middle layers could include fleece or another synthetic layer. Dan Wright, supervisor at Eastern Mountain Sports in Fayetteville, suggests layers made with PrimaLoft, which is similar to down. Found in many brands of outerwear, PrimaLoft is lightweight and “it traps pockets of warm air,” Wright said. “It’s smooth on the surface so it makes it easy to put on or take off. Fleece can stick when it’s layered.” That’s important if you want to keep up with your cross-country skiing group instead of falling behind as you wrestle out of a layer.

“You have to find the right style so if you have to put it in a backpack to put it away awhile, it will pack down,” he said. He likes Gore-Tex® material, “as it has micro pores to let vapors escape,” Wright said. “You stay warm and dry.” Gore-Tex also lends warmth and breathability to ski pants. Most new ski pants features insulating material between two layers to improve heat retention. Single layer coveralls won’t help you stay as warm. If you’re tall, bibs can help keep you pulled together.

Don’t buy boots based on looks alone. Look for waterproof boots with thick soles. As with ski pants, insulated boots will keep your feet warmer. A high profile boot will help your legs stay warmer than ankle-height boots. A balaclava face mask in a synthetic material or wool works on the same principle as socks and base layers for wicking moisture away from your skin while keeping you warm. Top off your outfit with a hat that covers your ears and you’re ready to stay out a long, long time.

Protect against wind The top layer should block the wind. Some prefer a puffy coat on top. Others wear a hard shell under their puffy coat. Wright said either way works; it’s just a matter of preference. He advises outdoors adventurists to choose their thickest coat carefully. 2016 / 2017

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Industrious Pursuits This winter, get into factory tours

By Deborah Jeanne Sergeant

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Yorkville offers the 2nd Ave Lighting factory tour, 55 Oriskany Blvd., where visitors may see how lighting products are made, including sconces, chandeliers, and pendant lights.

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hough manufacturing has declined in recent decades in Upstate New York, many factories in the region still make everyday goods. Of those, several offer factory tours to give visitors a look at how they make their products. If you want to get out and try something different, experience a factory tour. You may learn a lot in a few hours. • L. & J.G. Stickley, 1 Stickley Drive, Manlius, grew to become a world-famous furniture maker that began the American craftsman style and mission style. Generations can appreciate the clean, classic lines and solid workmanship. The factory tour offers a look at how workers create these handcrafted pieces. Admission is free. Ask about group reservations. For more information, call all 315-6825500 or visit http://stickleymuseum. com. • McConnellsville is home to Harden Furniture, 8550 Mill Pond Way. Like Stickley, tourists on the factory tour may see how furniture is made. Harden creates both mass-produced and custom home furnishings in cherry, maple and walnut. Admission is free. Ask about group reservations. For more information, call 315-2451000 or visit www.hardenfurniture. com/tour. • In Port Jervis, Gillinder Glass, 39 Erie St., demonstrates the development of the glass industry from glass chimneys for candles to highly advanced glass used in airport runways. But just as in the 1860s, Gillinder still produces glass gift items. The factory tour highlights the glass-making process with special demonstrations on weekends. Admission is $5 for adults and $4


for children and seniors. Ask about group rates. For more information, call 845-856-5375 or visit www.gillinderglassstore.com. • Yorkville offers the 2nd Ave Lighting factory tour, 55 Oriskany Blvd., where visitors may see how lighting products are made, including sconces, chandeliers, and pendant lights. The tour follows the process from design to packaging and all the steps in between. If you’re in the market for commercial or home lighting, stop in at the factory show room before you leave. Admission is free. Group reservations appreciated. For more information, call 800-843-1602 or visit www.2ndave.com. • Want to visit the only functioning metal kazoo factory in the nation? It’s Eden at The Original American Kazoo Co., 8703 S. Main St. Learn how kazoos are made in the original 1916 factory and on the original equipment and pick up a few treasures at the gift shop. Admission is $1. For more information, call 716-992-3960 or visit www.edenkazoo.com. • Love carousels? Don’t miss the Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St., North Tonawanda. Though this tour leans more toward a museum than functional factory tour, it includes historic images, the carousel carving shop, music roll production area, and a display of 20 carousel animals. Wrap up your visit with a ride on either of the carousels. The factory offers one for kids and another for adults. Admission is $4 for adults; $2 for children through age 12, and free for teachers and Scout leaders. Ask about group rates. For more information, call 716-693-1885 or visit info@ carrouselmuseum.org. To make your factory tour outing more enjoyable, call the factory to ensure the dates and times the tour operates and cost. Websites may not be up-to-date. Dress appropriately. Since most of these tours walk visitors through portions of a functional factory, it’s important to wear closed footwear. Ask in advance about accessibility or any other special needs. Keep in mind the attention span of your small children and ask if this tour is appropriate for children their ages.

In Port Jervis, Gillinder Glass, 39 Erie St., demonstrates the development of the glass industry from glass chimneys for candles to highly advanced glass used in airport runways.

Love carousels? Don’t miss the Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum, 180 Thompson St., North Tonawanda. 2016 / 2017

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Animal Tracking

Stories in the snow: Get your kids hooked on tracking

By Matthew Liptak

T

here is a whole world out there beyond the video screen and some kids don’t get much of a chance to experience it, especially in winter. Animals prints in the snow often reveal these creatures’ daily winter routines along with hidden life and death dramas that the best video game designer could only dream of. It’s a skill often ignored nowadays, but classes are still offered at many area state parks and nature centers each year. “Too many of us just stay holed up in our houses,” said Katie Mulverhill, an environmental educator for the New York State Department of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. To be health, to be active, have a good time, you need to get outside.” And kids love it, she said. It gets their eyes off the screen and on the real world around them. “I think they really like that chance

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to be that detective and look at the clues and figure out the stories...the stories in the snow,” Mulverhill said. It can be a great family bonding experience and parents don’t need to be experts to go out and track with their children. It’s a process of narrowing down the possibilities. “The three Ps are the place, the pattern, and the print,” she said. “That’s the method of tracking that I use when I go out with these groups. When we find some tracks out in the park, the first thing we do is take a look around us at what type of place that we’re in. You have to start narrowing down our choices. There’s around 80 different mammal species that can be found in New York state. If we just started picking random guesses, we’d probably get it wrong.” After that, Mulverhill said to examine the pattern of prints. In the animal kingdom there are bounders, hoppers,

straight-walkers and waddlers. Hoppers land with their back feet in front of their front feet. Bounders land with their back feet in back of their front feet, sometimes forming a neat little Katie Mulverhill, square. Examan environmental ples of hoppers educator for the New are squirrels and York State Departrabbit. Bounders ment of Parks, Recinclude weasels reation and Historic and mink. Preservation. Mulverhill said the best time to track is in the morning, just after a dusting of snow — much later and the prints may get distorted; if the snow’s much deeper you may not see the print. However snowshoeing can often be a fun activity to accompany tracking in deeper snow. The best places to track can be the area’s multiple state parks, but you even can go look in your own back yard. When you do get clear prints, you’ve hit paydirt. You can often determine what species the animal is by using a field guide. Mulverhill said she uses small pocket guides with laminated pages to protect against the snow. If you’re persistent, you may find signs of a drama playing out right before your eyes that happened when you were snug in bed. “Sometimes if you’re really lucky you might get to follow some little mammal tracks...like a mouse.. and then all of the sudden you’ll see this disturbance in the snow and if you look carefully you can see actual feather marks from the wings of a bird of prey that grabbed it right out of the snow,” Mulverhill said. “I’ve only gotten to see that a handful of times, but when you do, it’s really cool.” So put down the apps and pick up some tracks. You may plant a seed that grows into a life-long love of nature.


Birds spotted at Beaver Lake Nature Center in Baldwinsville. The center offers a place for people to come and bird watch. Among them are a male downy woodpecker, male northern cardinal and a white-breasted nuthatch. Photo courtesy of Meg Valovage, naturalist at Beaver Lake Nature Center in Baldwinsville.

Birds spotted at Beaver Lake Nature Center in Baldwinsville. The center offers a place for people to come and bird watch. Among them are a male downy woodpecker (left), male northern cardinal. Photo courtesy of Meg Valovage, naturalist at Beaver Lake Nature Center in Baldwinsville.

Winter Bird Land Learn to master art of winter bird watching, feeding By Melissa Stefanec

A

s Upstate New Yorkers, we grow accustomed to winters that entail a lot of white, gray and brown. When we look outdoors, our winter pallets are often lacking in diversity and liveliness. One way to add a little winter color to your life is to invite more nature into your back yard. Bird watching is a way to liven up the world around you during the winter. Meg Valovage is a naturalist at Beaver Lake Nature Center in Baldwinsville. The center offers a place for people to come and bird watch. During the winter months, you can find many a visitor in front of a wall of windows

on one wall of the center. Outside the windows, an array of feeders attracts birds and other wildlife. Valovage has some tips for people who want to bring birds into their yards. As with any pastime, a little knowhow goes a long way.

The Food Not all bird food is created equally, according to Valovage. She sings the praises of one food in particular. “Black-oil sunflower seeds are the single best thing to feed to birds in the wintertime,” she said. This is because these seeds are high in fat and have small, thin shells.

She recommends staying away from songbird mixes, because these feeds are often high in fillers. If you want to use a mix, she recommends making your own by combining a 10-pound bag of cracked corn, a 10-pound bag of millet and a 25-pound bag of black-oil sunflower seeds. She recommends storing the mix in a metal trashcan to keep mice and other small critters out. She also recommends using beef suet. Although you can buy suet at a variety of retailers, she recommends getting it straight from a butcher. “In the wintertime, suet is one of the best things to have. Birds need a high-fat diet because they are burning 2016 / 2017

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so many calories,” said Valovage. Suet and black-oil sunflower seeds will lure a variety of birds to your feeders.

using a mild dish soap and hot water. After the feeder dries, wipe it down with a 1:9 bleach-to-water solution.

Feeder 101

A bird has to keep its feathers clean regardless of the season. During the winter, it’s harder for birds to find water to drink and bathe in. To this end, you can install a heated birdbath in your yard. The baths are relatively inexpensive (they can be found around $50) and will give your yard added allure to your feathered friends. A bird is better able to insulate itself from the cold when its feathers are clean.

Different styles of feeders attract different kinds of birds, so using a variety is key. Some have perches, and some have fly-through platforms. According to Valovage, no matter what type of feeder you use, you have to clean it about every two weeks. “If your feeders are full and there are no birds near them, you should clean them out. They might have mold in them,” she said. To clean a feeder, she recommends

The Luxury Items

Unwanted Visitors Bird feeders are also a great way to

Get a Little Wild This Winter Make wildlife observation a wintertime activity By Deborah Jeanne Sergeant

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now and colder temperatures don’t mean we have to wait until spring to enjoy wildlife. Though many species hibernate or migrate, some stay put for your viewing pleasure — if you know where to go. • Beaver Lake Nature Center, 8477 E. Mud Lake Road, Baldwinsville, offers an observation tower, observation deck and wildlife blind, along with nine miles of trails accessible by hiking, snowshoeing and cross country skiing. The visitor’s center provides not only a place to warm up, but also an educational children’s play area, elevated viewing area and numerous exhibits. Call 315-638-2519 for more information. • Baltimore Woods Nature Center, 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus, covers 180 acres for hiking and snowshoeing. Its pond and wetland area attract winter birds and whitetail deer. The interpretive center offers special programs all winter long. Call 315-673-1350 for more information. • Derby Hill Bird Observatory, 36

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Grand View Ave., Mexico, spans 90 acres and is the place to watch hawk migration in early spring. Catch a glimpse of 30 or so different species as they wing their way northward. • Finger Lakes National Forest is the only national forest in the state. Spanning 16,212 acres, the site offers 30 miles of trails and several types of habitat. Visitors may hike, snowshoe or cross country ski. For more information, call the Hector Ranger Station, 5218 state Route 414, Hector, at 607-546-4470 or visit www.fingerlakes. org/things-to-do/nature-parks/national-forest. • Green Lakes State Park in the town of Manlius boasts more than 18 miles of trails. Cross-country ski, snowshoe or hike the trails to observe numerous bird species, white tail deer, mink, and more. Stop at the interpretive center to learn more about the park and its wintertime inhabitants. For more information, call 315-637-6111. • Montezuma Wetlands Complex, 2295 state Route 89, in Savannah/Seneca Falls is a must-do for any avid birder.

attract small mammals. Animals such as squirrels, can wreak havoc on birdfeeders. Valovage offered a few tips on keeping your feeders safe from squirrel mischief. “Baffles work pretty well, as long as they aren’t too near overhanging trees,” she said. “A baffle is a tube the squirrel can climb inside but can’t climb up.” She also suggested keeping feeders high enough off the ground and far enough away from trees that squirrels can’t jump on the feeders. You can also purchase squirrel-proof bird feeders. To keep squirrels and other critters away from the feeders, you can also consider installing a feeder table for these hungry winter guests. As an Atlantic Flyway route, Montezuma is like an international airport for birds, with over 240 species flying through or making their home on its 7,068 acres of marshes. With trails, observation tower and ground-level observation decks, you can choose where you want to watch. Call 315365-3580 for more information. • Salmon River Fish Hatchery, 2133 county Route 22, Altmar is where you want to be in late March to watch the salmon jumping. Stop by the visitors’ center to look at mounted specimens and learn more about the hatchery’s salmon and trout. For more information, call 315-298-5051. • In the spring, Nelson Swamp, Stone Quarry Road, Cazenovia offers a terrific venue for viewing migrating birds. In addition to other hiking trails, the 0.07-mile interpretive trail is handicapped accessible. Call 607-6744017 for more information. To preserve the beauty of our region’s parks, respect the rules of each park. In general, take out what you take in. Use parks and trails how they’re intended, such as snowshoeing only where permitted. Don’t disturb wildlife and feed only where allowed. To discover more wildlife viewing venues, visit www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/55450.html#central. To learn more about winter bird species in the area, visit https://nysparksnaturetimes.com/2015/02/10/ snow-birds-new-yorks-winter-birdpopulation.


Snowmobilers Gear Up for New Season Enthusiasts hoping for a better, snowier winter this year By Deborah Jeanne Sergeant

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ith last winter’s scant snowfall still haunting him, Ed Montieth, president of the Oswego County Snowmobile Association, hopes this year brings more. “The lake kept pretty warm over the summer so we could get some lake effect,” he said. His group numbers around 600 to 700 during good seasons. “I don’t know what it will be like this year. If people think the weather will be like last year, they might not join until we’re sure we have snow,” he said. Mike Schmid, trail boss for the Fulton Area Snow Travelers, also hopes that winter 2016-2017 proves snowier than 2015-2016. Lack of snowfall decreased his club’s membership from its usual 350 to 76 last winter. “I feel like global warming is messing things up for us,” he said. “Everyone’s waiting for the snow before they sign up. If we get the snow, we’ll

definitely see people come out.” A snowy season ensures better turnouts and new snowmobilers, too. Schmid said most people new to the activity won’t spend $100 for a registration, $400 for gear and $10,000 for a sled if they don’t have the chance to use their snowmobiles frequently during a season. Schmid said joining a club provides numerous benefits to members. For people new to snowmobiling, they can learn tips for improving safety, land stewardship and laws. Clubs plan snowmobiling trips and activities to share in the fun and meet like-minded enthusiasts. Club members share responsibilEd Montieth is the president of the Oswego ity for grooming County Snowmobile Association. trails to provide 2016 / 2017

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better places for riders to enjoy the activity. Taking part in stewardship promotes good relationships between riders and landowners. Joining a club also helps defray the cost of registration. “A few years back, we talked the state into raising the registration price and you get a discount if you join a club,” Schmid said.

Abide by the law He added that joining a club helps reinforce laws regarding operating snowmobiles. “We’re getting better with not drinking and driving,” he said. He also reminds snowmobilers to remain on trails or obtain permission from landowners before taking their sleds off-trail. “The clubs take care of a lot of that for establishing trails and they insure the trails,” Schmid said. “If you’re new to snowmobiling, a club can show you where the trails are and how to follow them. They know where to go and tips for safe travel.” From www.visitoswegocounty. com/snowmobile: — Snowmobiles must be registered and insured while using public trails, and snowmobilers must wear helmets at all times. Riders must stay to the right on the trail. The trail speed limit is 55 mph unless posted otherwise. — Children between 10-17 must take a snowmobile safety course and receive a certificate of completion. — Youth aged 10-13 may operate a snowmobile off their own property while accompanied by (within 500 feet of) a person at least 18 years of age. — Youth aged 14-17 may operate a snowmobile off their property without an adult. — For safety’s sake, stay on designated trails and stay off rivers and lakes. For trail conditions, call the Oswego County FISH-N-FUN line at 1-800-248-4FUN (4386). The website includes a map of the region’s snowmobile trails and a free trail map app for Android and iPhones to help plan snowmobile trips. Or, you can print a PDF copy of the map, which includes trailheads, various club trails, other trails, service information and points of interest.

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Sensational Sledding!

Take on snowy hills with excitement By Deborah Jeanne Sergeant

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hen you’re ready to hit the slopes — the sledding slopes, that is — using the right sled can make your outing a hit. Review these types of sleds to make sure you have what you need. • Classic wooden runner sled: This sled wins top points for nostalgia, but unless you have a thick crust on top of the snow or a thin, hard layer of snow, runners sink into the snow. Still, with the right conditions, runner sleds give a fast ride and if you use the cord attached, you can steer them where you want. Depending upon the length of the sled, several may ride on it. • Toboggan: When you have a big group riding, toboggans are the way to go. Just make sure little ones are secure or stick with small hills — just in case you take a spill. Toboggans work on most kinds of snow. Wooden ones last longer than plastic typically, but wooden toboggans cost more. • Saucer: Regardless of the type of snow, the saucer gives a good fast ride. They can be tricky to control, but some enjoy the dizzy, spinning ride. One to two people can fit on them.

• Mini-saucer: This diminutive style is definitely for one at a time, as they’re the size of the seat of a chair with a handle or two attached. They store and transport easily. On a slick, hard surface, they can go fast. But, they can also be hard to control. • Tube: The tube offers a fast ride and a little shock absorption in case of collision or jump. Tubes with handles are easier to control and keep with you as you careen down the hill. Tube capacity depends upon its size. • Infant sleds: Several styles include seatbelts and high sides and backs to help keep little ones onboard and safer. Cushioned seats also keep them more comfortable, but it’s also important to choose mild inclines so the sled won’t tip. • Ski scooter: Think of it as a beginner snowboard or a scooter for winter. Bigger kids bored with sledding would likely enjoy a ski scooter and perhaps move on to a snowboard or skis eventually. Plus, a ski scooter works on level areas even with thin snow or ice.


My Top Ten Things to Try This Winter By Deborah Jeanne Sergeant

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Attend a big lights display.

2

Learn something. Many community resources offer educational opportunities to create something (Cooperstown’s Wassailing Weekend) or take a guide-led tour (Yuletide in the Country tour in Mumford).

3

Ride a sleigh. Horse drawn

sleigh rides in Fabius and other venues offer the fun of “Jingle Bells” and a pleasant reason to get outdoors.

7

Recreate in the snow. Snow-

shoeing, skiing, snowboarding, sledding, skating, skijoring, ice climbing, ice fishing, snowmobiling: New Yorkers have plenty of ways to get outside. With the right gear, staying toasty warm (well, mostly toasty) is no problem.

inter’s cold can tempt us to hibernate, but with all the great events and activities going on, why would we want to? Try some of these to enliven your winter. Neighborhood displays brighten communities, but there’s nothing like the awe of seeing thousands of twinkling lights in one place. The Winter Guide Events Calendar lists several, including Liverpool’s Lights on the Lake, Albany’s 20th Annual Price Chopper Capital Holiday Lights, Fatima Shrine Festival of Lights in Lewiston and Hamburg’s Fairgrounds Festival of Lights.

6

Attend a community festival.

From tree festivals to winter carnivals, a wintertime frolic such as Warm-Up Oswego or Old Forge’s Snodeo shake off the doldrums and meet up with friends and neighbors.

4

Polar Plunge. Maybe this idea

is for those with a serious case of cabin fever. But anyone with a big heart won’t want to miss a chance to raise some serious money for worthy causes. Search www.PolarPlungeNY. org to find nearby events.

5

Hear a live concert. Whether the ethereal sounds of Handel’s Messiah by Symphonia in Syracuse, the modern sounds of Mannheim Steamroller Christmas, which is coming to Rochester, or Kenny G’s cool jazz in Tonawanda, live concerts can give anyone a good reason to get out of the house. The Events Guide offers numerous opportunities each month.

Attend a live play. Syracuse

Stage’s production of “Mary Poppins,” and Oswego Players’ “Yes, Virginia, There Is a Santa Claus,” sound like great ways to spend time with the family.

9

Tour a maple farm. As winter

cold gives way to warmer daytime temperatures in mid-March, it’s maple sugaring time. Tasty samples, educational tours, and gift shops offering maple everything: what’s not to love? Anyone can find a maple farm nearby by visiting www.nysmaple. com/nys-maple-weekend.

10

Eat breakfast with Santa.

You may have outgrown the Jolly Old Elf, but many community organizations’ breakfasts with Santa, such as the one in Syracuse’s Rosamond Gifford Zoo at Burnet Park, are a lot of fun for children and include admission, too.

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Events

GUIDE DECEMBER ALL MONTH Syracuse. Mary Poppins. Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious! Winner of multiple Tony Awards, Mary Poppins runs two hours, 40 minutes. A Musical is based on the stories of P.L. Travers and the Walt Disney film. Original music and lyrics by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman. Book by Julian Fellowes. New songs and additional music and lyrics by George Stiles and Anthony Drewe. $20 to $44. Various dates and times. Check website. Archbold Theatre at Syracuse Stage, 820 E. Genesee St. www. syracusestage.org. 315-443-3275. Syracuse. 31st Annual Gingerbread Gallery. Dozens of imaginative creations by families, individuals and professional bakers using a variety of edibles adorn the Erie Canal Museum. Works are displayed in 1800s-looking storefronts and feature a variety of themes including the historic Erie Canal. Closed Christmas and New Year’s Day. 10 a.m. $7; $5 seniors; $2 ages 12 and younger; free museum members. Erie Canal Museum, 318 Erie Blvd. E. eriecanalmuseum.org. 315-471-0593. Liverpool. Lights on the Lake. Lights on

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the Lake is a two mile long drive through lights show featuring huge holiday display, the Land of Oz, Twinkling Fantasy Forest, Colorful Section Arches, Victorian Village, Fairytale Magic Grand Finale, and Animated Scenes. Discount advance sale tickets, $6 per vehicle, available at area Wegmans. Volume discounts on tickets. Check website for special discount dates. 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Onondaga Lake Park, 106 Lake Drive. olp@ ongov.net. www.lightsonthelake.com. Auburn. Fourth Annual Festival Of Trees. Museum decorated with more than 50 Christmas trees through Dec. 23. Dress warmly. Weekdays 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. Weekends 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Ward O’Hara Agricultural, 6880 NY-38A. tquill@cayugacounty.us. 315-252-7644. Lyons. Humane Society Tree of Lights for the Animals. Help the organization decorate its holiday tree by purchasing lights and ornaments in memory of a beloved pet. Tues., Wed., Fri. 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Thurs. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; closed Sun. and Mon. 1475 County House Road. www.hswaynepets.org. 315-946-3389. Rochester. Sweet Creations. The 21st anniversary of Sweet Creations, a display of dozens of decorated gingerbread houses and objects located throughout the Eastman Museum. Sweet Creations comple-

ments the holiday decor and festive spirit at the museum, which also displays a supersized gingerbread creation in the museum’s Palm House. Daily through Dec. 14. Eastman Museum, 900 East Avenue. www.eastman. org. 585-271-3361. Buffalo. Poinsettias Show. The whole family will enjoy the snow globe of beautiful poinsettias, vibrant colors and lots of playful surprises. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. $9 adults; $8 seniors & students; $5 kids 3-12; Garden Members & kids 2 and under free. Through Jan. 8. Buffalo & Erie County Botanical Gardens, 2655 South Park Avenue. 716-8271584.

EVERY SUNDAY West Henrietta. Holly Trolley Rides. Visitors to the New York Museum of Transportation can ride an authentic vintage trolley car with Santa. No reservations are required. The only trolley railroad in New York state provides a two-mile round-trip ride, recalling another era when families rode the big trolleys from their rural homes to do their holiday shopping in the city. Rides begin every half hour at 11:30 a.m. through 4 p.m. through Dec. 18. Museum open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Ride is free with admission to the museum: $8 adults; $7 seniors age 65+; $6 ages 3-12. New York Museum of Transportation,


6393 East River Road. www.nymtmuseum. org. 585-533-1113.

EVERY TUESDAY Auburn. Open Mic Night. Perform or just listen. Original music and covers, spoken word, comedy, dance, and more. Snacks and wine/beer available as well as a chance to win a pair of free cinema tickets. $2. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St. www.auburnpublictheater.org. 315-253-6669.

TUES. THROUGH SAT. (EXCEPT CHRISTMAS DAY) Syracuse. Open Ice Skating. Offered by

the City of Syracuse Department of Parks, Recreation and Youth Programs. Children are required to wear helmets. $3 or $2 (12 & under and 55+). $3 skate rental. 12 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., plus 7:15 p.m. to 1 p.m. Fridays. 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturdays. Call ahead to confirm hours. Meachem Ice Rink, 121 W. Seneca Turnpike. www.syrgov.net/ parks 315-492-0179.

FRIDAY, SATURDAY AND SUNDAY ALL MONTH Mumford. Yuletide in the Country Tour. This special program is different than a usual daytime visit to the museum. Using the historic village as its canvas, tour guides

Cazenovia, N.Y. Invites you to Shop, Dine and enjoy the Holiday Season. We have a beverage trail for you to enjoy and a new Hampton Inn Suites several Inns and B &B’s www.cazenoviachamber.com

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will lead guests through the snow-covered streets in the year 1849 when New York declared Christmas, Independence Day and New Years Day as state holidays. Enjoy music, dancing and tree lighting visiting village homes and businesses to see how “residents” react to the news of Christmas as a holiday. Reservations are required for this program and are non-refundable (see website to make reservations). $23; $19 members. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays; 2 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Saturdays; 1:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Sundays, through Dec. 18. Be prepared to be walking and standing for the entire length of the tour (approximately 90 minutes). The tour includes uneven walking surfaces and sometimes steep stairways. It is not recommended for guests with walking difficulties. Yuletide Buffet. Tour-goers may also purchase a dinner buffet catered by the Caledonia Village Inn for $30. Reservations are required and non-refundable for the buffet. They may be purchased online. The buffet is served each day from 4:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 1410 Flint Hill Road. Use “Genesee Country Museum, LeRoy, NY 14482” for accurate GPS guidance. info@gcv.org. www. gcv.org/ContactUs.aspx. 585-294-8218.

EVERY WEEKEND Syracuse. Breakfast with Santa. Celebrate the season at this annual holiday event. Dig in to a breakfast buffet and share your holiday wishes with the jolly ol’ elf himself. Children can decorate cookies with Mrs. Claus, create a holiday craft and see the zoo, too. $14, members; $18 non-members; free children 2 and younger. Visit the membership desk for a special $25 Jr. Keeper Ticket prices include post-breakfast zoo admission. 9 a.m. or 11 a.m. Event runs through Dec. 18. Rosamond Gifford Zoo at Burnet Park, 1 Conservation Place. www.rosamondgiffordzoo.org/santa. 315-435-8511, ext. 113. Oswego. Toy Trains And Christmas. Visit the Oswego Railroad Museum to see a display of toy trains going back 40 plus years. Lionel, Marx, American Flyer, Gilbert, and more, along with a collection of Hallmark train related Christmas decorations. $2 for adults, $1 for ages 6 to 12, and under 5 are free. Open every weekend until Dec. 18th. 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. 56 West First St. 315-3432253. Skaneateles. Dickens Christmas in Skaneateles. Join Charles Dickens, Queen

Victoria and their entourage for the 23rd edition of Dickens Christmas through Dec. 18, with an abbreviated production (noon to 3 p.m.) Dec. 24. Merriment for the entire family: Scenes from “A Christmas Carol,” sing-alongs, hot roasted chestnuts, puppet shows, appearances by costumed characters: Scrooge, Tiny Tim, Father Christmas, and Mother Goose. Borrow a costume from the Skaneateles Area Chamber of Commerce and join in the fun. Free. 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. Highlights visit the website for details. Village of Skaneateles, 20 Genesee Street. www.skaneateles.com. 315-685-0552. Fabius. Horsedrawn Sleighrides. Enjoy a 20 minute horse-drawn sleigh ride (or wagon rides) through the wintery woods at Highland Forest. No reservations needed. First come, first served. All rides will take place weather permitting. The park recommends calling the office ahead of time to check on the schedule. Beginning Dec. 17, except for Dec. 25. $6; $3 5 and younger. 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Highland Forest, 1254 Highland Park Road. 315-683-5550. Milford. Santa Express Trains. Celebrate the holiday season with a train ride with Santa and his helpers. The train is decorated, from

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the lights strung along the outside to the garland and ornaments on the inside. Bring a small gift with your child’s name attached to be given as a surprise from Santa himself on the train. Sneak it behind the Depot to the Reindeer Shack the day of your ride. The Leatherstocking Railway Historical Society (LRHS) and the Cooperstown & Charlotte Valley Railroad are pleased to once again be offering two ways to kick off the 2016 Holiday Season with Christmas Train Rides. First, enjoy an afternoon train ride with Trains will be heated if the weather warrants it, but passengers are advised to dress warmly. $20 adults, $19 seniors; $17 children (3-12); free children 3 and under. Reservations and prepayment required. Group discounts available. Most major credit cards are accepted. Train leaves at 2 p.m. through Dec. 17. 136 East Main St. www.lrhs.com 607-432-2429 (leave message for a call back).

Dec. 1 Oswego. O’Tannenbaum. The event features a display of more than 100 Christmas trees, wreaths, and other items, all of which are up for auction. Visitors can enjoy children’s activities, musical performances, and visits with Santa. All proceeds benefit the Tioga County Historical Society. Free 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 110 Front Street. Rochester. A Christmas Carol. Enjoy the

This 3 Hour Walking Tour Shows off Oswego’s Historic buildings and Landmarks Takes you into several shops, A micro-brewery & Restaurants for Samples & tastings Enjoy a walk along historic Franklin Square District, Viewing the Oswego River and The Oswego Lighthouse

famous tale of redemption for the most despised man in London presented in a critically acclaimed adaptation of Dickens’ classic novel. Ebenezer Scrooge discovers the importance of generosity and friendship when in one night’s time, three spirits guide him to view the past, present and future and how his actions affect them. Tickets from $12.50. Various times and dates throughout the month. Check the website. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. www.gevatheatre.org. 585-232-4382. Canandaigua. Granger Homestead Festival of Trees. More than 100 items on display, including trees decked by local exhibitors in a variety of themes, both traditional and creative. The event includes a silent auction for the donated artificial trees and handmade decor and jewelry. More details on the website. 295 North Main Street. www.grangerhomestead.org. info@ grangerhomestead.org. 585-394-1472. Cazenovia. Christmas at Lorenzo. “Dreaming of a White Christmas” will be the theme for this year’s presentation of Christmas at Lorenzo, and following tradition, The Friends of Lorenzo will again showcase the holiday bedecked Mansion at their annual Preview Party. Hosted by the board of The Friends, members and their guests are treated to a special evening of live music and seasonal delights. Contact for admission cost. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. 17 Rippleton

Come join us for a walking tour through Oswego to Learn about local history & sample delicious foods! Please Book Online At: oswegofoodhistorytours.com

Road. www.lorenzoNY.org. 315-655-3200, ext. 100. Rochester. My Son the Writer: A Jewish Tragedy. Direct from Off-Broadway, comedian/actor Brad Zimmerman brings his hysterical, inspiring and acclaimed sensation to Rochester. $29; $27 members; $20 students. 7 p.m. on weekdays; 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays. JCC Hart Theater, 1200 Edgewood Ave. rmeranto@jccrochester.org. www.jccrochester. org. 585-461-2000.

Dec. 2 Oswego. O’Tannenbaum. See Dec. 1. Skaneateles. Skaneateles Sings & Dedication of the creche. Begins at 6 p.m. with visits with Father Christmas; 6:30 p.m. candle light dedication of the creche at the Skaneateles Library followed by caroling with the Dickens Characters to the gazebo. Reception immediately following at the Skaneateles United Methodist Church. Free. Skaneateles Library, 49 E. Genesee Street. www.skaneateles.com/visit/dickens. 315-685-0552. Saratoga Springs. The Polar Express Train Ride. The magical story of The Polar Express comes to life when the train departs Saratoga Springs for a one hour round-trip journey to the North Pole. Ticket prices vary by class and availability. 2016 / 2017

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THE WINTER

WONDERLAND

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5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Saratoga & North Creek Railway, 26 Station Lane. www.sncrr.com. 877-726- 7245. Alexandria Bay. Christmas Tree Lighting. Watch the second annual Christmas Tree Lighting and visit with Santa Claus. Free. 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Upper James Street. www. alexbay.org. 315-482-9531. Auburn. A Charlie Brown Christmas. Kick off the season watching the 1965 holiday classic cartoon at APT’s cinema. Free. 6 p.m. Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange Street. info@auburnpublictheater.org. 315-2536669. Canandaigua. Granger Homestead Festival of Trees. See Dec. 1. Syracuse. John Spillett Jazz/Pop Duo. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Free admission. Bistro Elephant, 238 W. Jefferson St. www.lemongrasscny.com/#about. 315-475-1111. Syracuse. Amahl and the Night Visitors. This enchanting Christmas opera, written by Gian Carlo Menotti in 1951, tells the simple story of a crippled shepherd boy and his destitute mother who are visited by three kings carrying gifts for an unknown newborn. Advance Sales: $18 adults; $13 youth; free under 2. At the door: $20 adults; $15 youth; free under 2. 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays; 4 p.m. Sundays. First English Lutheran Church, 501 James St. www.openhandtheater.org. 315-476-0466. Oswego. Yes, Virginia, There is a Santa Claus. Presented by Oswego Players, Inc. Contact for ticket prices. 8 p.m. Frances Marion Brown Theater, Fort Ontario Park. 315-343-5138. Syracuse. Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. Music by Alan Menken, Lyrics by Howard Ashman and Tim Rice, Book by Linda Woolverton Based on the Academy Award winning animated feature, Disney’s Beauty and the Beast enjoyed a 13-year run on Broadway, has played to over 35 million people worldwide in 13 countries, and will now be brought to life on the Red House stage. Disney’s Beauty and the Beast features all of the beloved songs from the film by Alan Menken and Howard Ashman along with new songs with lyrics by Tim Rice. Redhouse will partner with Hillside Family of Agencies to present Beauty and the Beast. $30. Various times; check website. Red House Arts Center, 201 S. West St. www. theredhouse.org. 315-362-2785. Oswego. Oswego Music Hall Open Mic Friday. Hosted by local talent. The family-friendly event offers light refreshments for sale. Sign-up sheet with 3 song/12 minute time slots. Call for admission and time. Oswego Music Hall, Roy C. McCrobie Building, 41 Lake St. 315-342-1733. Savannah. Sunset Birdwatching Walk. View bald eagles, northern harriers, short2016 / 2017

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eared owls and possibly snowy owls during a 1-mile stroll through the forests, wetlands and grasslands. Admission TBA. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 Route 89. ny.audubon.org/ montezuma. 315-365-3588. Newark. Annual RPO Holiday Concert. Hear light classics and holiday favorites performed by the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra as part of their community concerts. Admission TBA. 7:30 p.m. Newark High School Auditorium, 625 Peirson Avenue.

Dec. 3 Oswego. O’Tannenbaum. See Dec. 1. Oswego. Christmas Nu 2 U Sale & Cookie Sale. Decorate your house for less. Shop the holiday-themed items and listen to holiday music. Browse and buy from a selection of cookies. Part of the proceeds benefit a local charity or food pantry. Free. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Trinity United Methodist Church, 45 E. 4th St., Oswego. 315-343-1715 oswegotrinityumc@gmail. com. Pennellville. Holiday Wreath-Making

Winter

in Oswego

at Camp Talooli. Families get the opportunity to come to camp and make their own holiday wreath, while enjoying a cup of hot cocoa or coffee. $15 per wreath in advance; $20 per wreath at door. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Camp Talooli, 520 Co. Rte. 54. info@campfireusacny.org. 315-934-4051. West Monroe. Country Christmas Craft Sale. Craft sale, cookie walk and tree lighting. Free. 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. West Monroe Fire Dept. Auxiliary, Co. Rte. 11. 315-676-4600. Oswego. Rice Creek Story Hour. Share tales of nature, animals’ wild ways, and how we relate to our world around us. These programs are designed for elementary-aged children, though

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all are welcome. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Admission is free. 11 a.m. Rice Creek Field Station, Thompson Rd. 315-312-6677. Fulton. Ladies Tea at CNY Arts Center. Tea, breakfast, & coloring books. $15. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. CNY Arts Center Downtown Studio, 47 S. 1st St. www.CNYArtsCenter.com. 315-598-2787. Oswego. Food & History Tour. Walk a 2-mile loop and learn about historical places and hear local folklore while sampling food and beverages from up to 9 local shops and restaurants. To book a tour, visit www.OswegoFoodHistoryTours.com. Oswego. Baldwinsville. Natural Holiday Decorations & Ornaments for Kids. Things found in nature take on a new beauty when brought inside during the winter holidays. Learn how to make simple holiday decorations and ornaments using natural materials. Free with nature center admission. 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. 315-638-2519. Beaver Lake Nature Center, 8477 East Mud Lake Road. Canandaigua. Granger Homestead Festival of Trees. See Dec. 1.

Baldwinsville. Breakfast with Santa. Kick off the holiday season with breakfast at Beaver Lake. Enjoy a tasty meal of pancakes, sausage and beverage. There will be a holiday bake sale, as well. $3 to $5. 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. 315-638-2519. Beaver Lake Nature Center, 8477 East Mud Lake Road. Oswego. Oswego Music Hall Presents Seaglass with Andrew VanNorstrand. Seaglass is a dance and concert band that combines the diverse talents of three seasoned musicians. Their unique repertoire ranges from classic New England contra dance tunes to French balfolk and English Country Dance music, weaving in roots-rock grooves and improvisations. $16. 7:30 p.m. Oswego Music Hall, Roy C. McCrobie Building, 41 Lake St. www. oswegomusichall.org. 315-342-1733. Saratoga Springs. The Polar Express Train Ride. See Dec. 2. Syracuse. Amahl and the Night Visitors. See Dec. 2. Syracuse. John Spillett Jazz/Pop Duo. See Dec. 3. Syracuse. The Nutcracker. Tchaikovsky’s classic Christmas ballet performed live by

Syracuse City Ballet. Enjoy this holiday classic suitable for the entire family. $10 to $75. 1 p.m. and 6 p.m.; Sun. 2 p.m. The Oncenter Crouse Hinds Theater, 411 Montgomery Street. syracusecityballet@gmail.com www. syracusecityballet.com. 315-487-4879. Rochester. My Son the Writer: A Jewish Tragedy. See Dec. 1. Syracuse. Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. See Dec. 2. Newark. Park Presbyterian Church Christmas Ceilidh Band. A group of Celtic musicians usher in the season with a performance of Christmas songs from the Celtic nations. For all ages. Admission TBA. 7:30 p.m. 110 Maple Court. www.parkpresbyterian.org. 315-331-2255. Rochester. Mannheim Steamroller Christmas by Chip Davis. Mannheim Steamroller have been innovators of the neo-classical genre for over 40 years, blending the finest orchestral sections with electronic elements and a hint of rock to arrive at their remarkably unique sound. Not only are their live performances sonically robust, but they’re visually stimulating as well, featuring an

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incredible light show and illustrations that dance across giant projection screens. Mannheim Steamroller plays originals like “Catching Snowflakes on Your Tongue” and classics like “Joy to the World.” $35 to $70. 7:30 p.m. Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 855 East Main Street. www.rbtl.org. Mexico. Christmas in Mexico. Enjoy this a family oriented weekend to welcome the Holiday Season. Church Bazaars, shop the village with costumed characters from Dicken’s Christmas Carol, tree lighting, parade, visit with Santa and more. carriagehouseshoppe@yahoo.com. www.facebook.com/ ChristmasInMexicoNY. Romulus. 2nd Annual Currier & Ives Festival. Holiday festival in period costume with equestrian parade, figgy pudding, shopping, caroling, and a nativity play. Free. 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. www.shopsattradersvillage. com. 6128 Rte 89. 315-310-0536.

Dec. 4 Oswego. O’Tannenbaum. See Dec. 1. Fulton. Christmas in Palermo. Santa & Mrs. Claus, crafters and vendors, kid’s Christmas Shoppe, wagon rides, lighting of the community tree, make-and-take crafts, and a live nativity. Free. 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Palermo United Methodist Church, 11 Co. Rte. 35. palermoumc@juno.com. 315598-4888. Pulaski. Light Up Pulaski. Santa Claus will be at the fire hall; village hayrides; lighting of the Memory Tree at 4:30 p.m. in the South Park. Benefit for local food pantries. Free. 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. South Park, Jefferson St. Saratoga Springs. The Polar Express Train Ride. See Dec. 2. Canandaigua. Granger Homestead Festival of Trees. See Dec. 1. Syracuse. OCC Winter Concert. OCC’s singers and jazz band team up in the annual Holiday Concert. Free. 3 p.m. Storer Auditorium, Onondaga Community College, 4585 W. Seneca Turnpike. www.sunyocc.edu. 315-498-2256. Syracuse. The Nutcracker. See Dec. 3. Syracuse. Amahl and the Night Visitors. See Dec. 2. Rochester. My Son the Writer: A Jewish Tragedy. See Dec. 1. Oswego. Yes, Virginia, There is a Santa Claus. See Dec. 2. 2 p.m. Mexico. Christmas in Mexico. See Dec. 3. Lyons. Holiday Boutique. Artisans and crafters fill the museum for two days only. Free admission. Lunch served from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Boutique runs from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wayne County Museum, 21 Butternut Street. Lyons. www.waynehistory.org.

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Syracuse. Festival of Trees. This year’s theme is City Lights in celebration of the renewal of downtown Syracuse and the bright light it casts on all of Central NY. Each decorated tree, wreath, and unique display is generously donated and all items are sold to benefit the Everson. Live music. Admission $5; younger than 10, free. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Everson Museum of Art, 401 Harrison St. www.everson.org/events. 315-474-6064. Rochester. Music from the Polar Express & Frozen. Two holiday favorites come alive for all ages with music and narration. Enjoy the story of a young boy who, on Christmas Eve, boards a magical train to the North Pole. Plus, musical highlights from Disney’s Frozen.

Boon Hua Lien, guest conductor; Steven Stull, baritone; Rush-Henrietta Singers; Christine Sargent, director. $25. 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 108 East Avenue. www.rpo.org. 585-454-2100. Buffalo. 10th Annual Polar Plunge. Benefits Special Olympics Western New York. Raise $100 to jump into the icy cold Lake Erie, receive an official Polar Plunge hoodie and support the 3,000 Special Olympic athletes in Western New York. Check-in at 11 a.m. Plunge at 2 p.m. Woodlawn Beach State Park, 3580 Lakeshore Road. eraepple@nyso.org. www.PolarPlungeNY.org/ Buffalo. 716-909-6444. Rochester. Handel’s Messiah. Join the

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Rochester Chamber Orchestra for a celebration of the holiday season with its annual performance of the Messiah. Guest artists Laura Heimes, soprano; Luthien Brackett, mezzo-soprano; Daniel Curran, tenor and more! $55 reserved; $30 general admission; $20 seniors; $10 students. 7:30 p.m. Hochstein School of Music, Performance Hall, 50 N. Plymouth Ave. Brewerton. 10th Annual CNY Polar Plunge. Help raise money for the athletes of Special Olympics New York by asking your friends, family, and co-workers to support you in taking the plunge. Then, take a dip or slow crawl into the chilly waters of Oneida Shores. Every Plunger that raises $100 receives an official Plunge hoodie, raise more money and receive more great prizes. Check-In 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Plunge 1 p.m. Oneida Shores, 9400 Bartell Road. 315440-0575. Auburn. Tiffany Concert Series: Serenades. Enjoy Christmas music with an Italian flair. $10 adults; free children 12 and younger. 2 p.m. Willard Memorial Chapel, 17 Nelson Street. 315-252-0339. www.willard-chapel. org/Events.html. Syracuse. Symphoria presents Messiah. Symphoria and the Syracuse University Oratorio Society celebrate the season with this inspiring family tradition. Maria Sensi Sellnor, conductor; John Warren, direc-

tor SU Oratorio Society; Bridget Moriarty, soprano; Carolyn Weber, mezzo-soprano; Robert Allen, tenor. $35; $26 seniors; $5 students; free 18 and younger. 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral, 310 Montgomery St. Enter the cathedral from Fayette Street. Parking is available across Fayette Street in a large surface lot, as well as on the street and in other surrounding surface lots. experiencesymphoria.org. 315299-5598.

Dec. 5 Oswego. O’Tannenbaum. See Dec. 1. Syracuse. Festival of Trees. See Dec. 2.

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Canandaigua. Granger Homestead Festival of Trees. See Dec. 1. Oswego. 5th Annual Gingerbread Contest. View entries in the contest or enter one yourself. All entries must be at least 50 percent gingerbread. Judges will award first, second and third prizes in each category. To enter, bring a children’s toy to donate for Toys for Tots. Three categories: Child, 12 and under; Adult, over 12; Professional in the food service industry. Entries may be dropped off at Taste the World Specialty Shop from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. All entries must be received by Dec. 7. Winners will be announced Dec. 16 at 7 p.m. during Holiday Late Night Shopping. Canal Commons, 197 W. First St. Mexico. Christmas in Mexico. See Dec. 4. Oswego. Oswego Music Hall Presents Jacob Johnson. Jacob Johnson performs original songs and Johnny Cash tunes. Light refreshments and homemade desserts sold. $16 advance; $18 door as available. Purchase tickets online or call. Doors open at 6:45 p.m.; show starts at 7:30 p.m. Oswego Music Hall, Roy C. McCrobie Building, 41 Lake St. 315-342-1733. Cazenovia. Christmas by Candlelight at Lorenzo. See Dec. 4. Newark. Park Presbyterian Church Christmas Bazaar. Artisans, crafters and treasures; baked goods, books and more. Morning

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treats from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and lunch from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 110 Maple Court. www. parkpresbyterian.org. Newark. Park Presbyterian Church Christmas Ceilidh Band. A group of Celtic musicians usher in the season with a lively performance of Christmas songs from the Celtic nations. For all ages. Tickets $5 in advance, $8 at the door. 7:30 p.m. Park Presbyterian Church, 110 Maple Court. www.parkpresbyterian.org. Newark. Holiday Open House at the Humane Society. Stop in for coffee, cider and cookies to visit the animals and browse the gift area to purchase something for your furry friends. Free. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 1475 County House Road. www.hswaynepets.org.

Dec. 6 Oswego. O’Tannenbaum. See Dec. 1. Rochester. My Son the Writer: A Jewish Tragedy. See Dec. 1. Oswego. 5th Annual Gingerbread Contest. See Dec. 5 Canandaigua. Granger Homestead Festival

of Trees. See Dec. 1. Syracuse. The Nutcracker. See Dec. 5. Cazenovia. Christmas by Candlelight at Lorenzo. See Dec. 4. Oswego. SUNY Oswego Music Department’s Holiday Concert. Christmas songs from around the world sung by local high school and SUNY Oswego choirs. Free. 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. St. Mary’s of the Assumption Church, 103 W. 7th St. www.oswego. edu/arts. 315-312-2130.

Dec. 7 Oswego. O’Tannenbaum. See Dec. 1. Buffalo. Cirque Musica Holiday Spectacular. Celebrate the holidays as the cast of Cirque Musica performs incredible feats of strength, skill and grace to holiday music favorites performed by the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra Celebrate. $29 to $75. 8 p.m. Kleinhans Music Hall, 3 Symphony Circle. Rochester. My Son the Writer: A Jewish Tragedy. See Dec. 1. Oswego. 5th Annual Gingerbread Contest. See Dec. 5.

Winter in Northern

Oswego County

Canandaigua. Granger Homestead Festival of Trees. See Dec. 1. Syracuse. Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. See Dec. 2.

Dec. 8 Oswego. 5th Annual Gingerbread Contest. See Dec. 5. Syracuse. Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. See Dec. 2. Canandaigua. Granger Homestead Festival of Trees. See Dec. 1. North Syracuse. Selah in Concert. Selah-Todd Smith, Allan Hall and Amy Perry--bring their inspirational music tour to Syracuse for Christmas. $20 to $24.50. North Syracuse Baptist Church, 420 South Main St. info@ tgponline.org. tgponline.org. 315-458-0271. Cazenovia. Christmas by Candlelight at Lorenzo. Inspired by the beloved Irving Berlin song, “White Christmas,” this year’s holiday celebration will play upon the winter imagery of crystallized trees, a mantle of snow, frozen lakes and crisp winter skies. Bedecked in holiday finery, and with support from the Friends

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32 Years of Service as “The Best Damn Garage in Town” of Lorenzo, this perennially favorite December program will also feature holiday refreshments and live music; sleigh rides (weather permitting) will be available throughout the weekend, and ornamental crafts and holiday treats will also be featured at the Rippleton Schoolhouse on Sunday. $6 per person; $2 children 12. 7 p.m. 17 Rippleton Road. www. lorenzoNY.org. 315-655-3200, ext. 100. Syracuse. Famous Artist Broadway Theater Series presents Mannheim Steamroller Christmas. Grammy Award winner Chip Davis has created a show that features the beloved Christmas music of Mannheim Steamroller along with dazzling multimedia effects performed in an intimate setting. Check websites for tickets and to confirm times. 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Landmark Theatre, 362 S. Salina St. landmarktheatre.org/event/ mannheim/. 607-206-6288. Canandaigua. Light Up Canandaigua. The Canandaigua Chamber of Commerce will sponsor a bus tour that will include homes and businesses entered in the “Light Up Canandaigua” contest. Come early for hot cocoa, coffee, and cookies. Riders are asked to bring a donation of a non-perishable food item or new, unwrapped toy. Free. Buses will depart from the Canandaigua chamber office at 5:30 and 7 p.m. Call the chamber to reserve seats. 113 S. Main Street. www. canandaiguachamber.com. 585-394-4400.

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Dec. 9 Old Forge. 40th Annual Snodeo Weekend. Now in its 40th year, Snodeo has become a permanent fixture in Old Forge, generating a consistent local following with the influx of snowmobilers and winter travelers alike. Free. 3 p.m. to 2 p.m. Hiltebrant Recreation Center Pavilion, 201 North Street. Lake Placid. Holiday Village Stroll. A Lake Placid tradition, the Stroll is a family and couples weekend chock full of events, entertainment, parties, dining specials and shopping in the fairy-tale winter wonderland of Lake Placid. The weekend includes lots of free kids activities. Santa will be making an appearance in several locations throughout the

weekend. There will also be dining specials and live entertainment into the late evening hours. www.holidayvillagestroll.com. Buffalo. John Cleese. With the legendary “Monty Python’s Flying Circus,” “Fawlty Towers” and “A Fish Called Wanda,” John Cleese created a unique comedic style that has inspired countless writers and comedians. $45 to $65. 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Center for the Arts, 103 Center for the Arts, University at Buffalo. www.buffalo.edu/ub-speakers. html. 716-645-2787. Syracuse. Festival of Lights at Burnet Park. Come see Burnet Park all decked out in twinkling lights. Free. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Coleridge Avenue. www.syracuse.ny.us/parks/ 2016 / 2017

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Syracuse. Djangoners. The Ithaca-based Djangoners will play acoustic swing. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sheraton Syracuse University, SITRUS Lounge, 801 University Ave. www.cnyjazz.org/jazzatsitrus. Syracuse. Amahl and the Night Visitors. See Dec. 2. Oswego. 5th Annual Gingerbread Contest. See Dec. 5 Canandaigua. Granger Homestead Festival of Trees. See Dec. 1. Oswego. Yes, Virginia, There is a Santa Claus. See Dec. 2. Cazenovia. Christmas by Candlelight at Lorenzo. See Dec. 8. Syracuse. Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. See Dec. 2. Oswego. Theatre Du Jour presents The Santaland Diaries, an evocation of what a slacker’s Christmas must feel like. Out of work, the slacker decides to become a Macy’s elf during the holiday crunch. $60. 6 p.m. cocktail hour; 7 p.m. Dinner; 8 p.m. show. G.S. Steamers (315-343-1600), 70 East 1st St. dujourcny@gmail.com. 518-253-6930. Seneca Falls. 70th Anniversary Celebration of “It’s a Wonderful Life” the classic 1946 Christmas movie. Seneca Falls is probably the inspiration for the fictitious Bedford Falls in the movie. The event features special guests Karolyn “Zuzu” Grimes, Carol “Janie” Coombs, and Jimmy “Tommy” Hawkins, the

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625-7691 Bailey children. Events will include a screening of the film, autograph signing, special presentations, “Merry Christmas George Bailey” an old time radio play based on the 1947 Lux Radio Theatre, the annual “Dance by the Light of the Moon,” food, and an “It’s A Wonderful Run” 5K, which last year attracted more than 3,000 participants. Visit the website for the complete schedule of events. www.therealbedfordfalls.com. Inlet. American Snowmobiler DynoTech Research Shootout. First chance to compare the 2016 stock sleds. Food, raffles and more. Event will run snow or no snow. Times and speeds will be recorded for all sleds using a timing light system. Trail riders can also race

$10. Gates open at 8:00 a.m.; racing begins at 10:00 a.m. Chip & Cindy Sauer’s Field behind The Ole Barn. www.newyorkshootout. com. 315-357-5501.

Dec. 10 Oswego.Food & History Tour. See Dec. 3. Sandy Creek. “Elf on the Shelf” Holiday Party. Ainsworth Memorial Library has an elf hidden in the shelves. Help find him and search for his candy canes. Make crafts, drink cocoa and watch the “Elf on the Shelf.” Free. 10 a.m. to noon. Ainsworth Memorial Library, 6064 S. Main St. www.ainsworthmemoriallibrary.org. 315-387-3732. Phoenix. Annual Phoenix Cookie Walk. A variety of Christmas cookies will be for sale by the pound. Cost TBD. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. First United Methodist Church, 49 Jefferson St. 315-695-4746. Oswego. Rice Creek Rambles. Enjoy a family-friendly guided walk. An adult must accompany children. Free. 11 a.m. Rice Creek Field Station, Thompson Rd. 315-312-6677. Weedsport. 20th Annual Weedsport Olde Tyme Christmas Celebration. More than 60 crafters located around the village, annual 5k, horse drawn wagon rides, breakfast with Santa, and carolers. Free. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Village of Weedsport. weedsportchamber. org/old-tyme-christmas. 315-834-2022. Baldwinsville. Natural Holiday Decorations


Salmon River Falls in northern Oswego County. February 2008. Courtesy of Oswego County Promotion and Tourism Department.

& Ornaments for Kids. See Dec. 3. Baldwinsville. Breakfast with Santa. See Dec. 3. Lake Placid. Holiday Village Stroll. See Dec. 9. Canandaigua. Granger Homestead Festival of Trees. See Dec. 1. Old Forge. 40th Annual Snodeo Weekend. See Dec. 9. Cape Vincent. Christmas in Cape Vincent Parade. The Christmas Parade will begin at 4:30 p.m. Floats will be decorated with holiday lights. After the parade, the children can visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus and hot chocolate and donuts will be served at Aubrey’s

Inn. Free. 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Broadway St. Contact Mary Rupp. 315-654-2533. Syracuse. Festival of Lights at Burnet Park. See Dec. 9. Syracuse. A Charlie Brown Christmas. This holiday season, Open Hand Theater will bring Charlie Brown, Snoopy and the whole Peanuts gang to life in A Charlie Brown Christmas. This special performance will highlight eleven hand-crafted puppets, as well as the puppeteering and acting skills of the Open Hand performers. Advance tickets: $15 adults; $10 youth; free under age 2. At the door: $17 adults; $12 youth; free under age 2. Saturdays 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.; Sundays 2 p.m. The Castle On North Salina, 518

Prospect Ave. www.openhandtheater.org. 315-476-0466. Syracuse. CNY Arts Presents Dasher’s Magical Gift. It’s a few days before Christmas and Santa is going to choose an extra reindeer to help pull the sleigh. Dasher has just returned to the North Pole, but he has lost his ability to fly. Can Peppermint, his biggest reindeer fan, save the day? $10. 11 a.m. Mulroy Civic Center Theaters. 421 Montgomery St. www. cnyarts.org. Syracuse. Amahl and the Night Visitors. See Dec. 2. Oswego. Yes, Virginia, There is a Santa Claus. See Dec. 2. Cazenovia. Christmas by Candlelight at Lorenzo. See Dec. 8. Canandaigua. Granger Homestead Festival of Trees. See Dec. 1. Syracuse. Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. See Dec. 2. Palmyra. Historic Palmyra Homestead Holiday Candlelight House Tour. Tour of historic homes in the village and two museums. Begin at the William Phelps General Store. Many additional homes dating throughout the 1800’s. Free. 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. 140 Market Street. www.historicpalmyrany.com. 315597-6981. Rochester. Love Jones the Musical. What happens after love at first sight? That’s exactly what the audience will find out as Chrisette Michele, Musiq Soulchild, Marsha Ambrosius and more join forces to tell the classic and iconic love story of Darius and Nina in Love Jones, the Musical. As much and as hard as they try to fight it, neither of them can resist what is pulling them together. It’s a passion, an obsession, a Jones that comes along once in a lifetime. $50 to 70. 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. shows. Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 855 East Main Street. www.rbtl.org. Seneca Falls. 70th Anniversary Celebration of “It’s a Wonderful Life” the classic 1946 Christmas movie. See Dec. 9. Victor. 2016 Santa Train. Ride the train with Santa and Mrs. Claus. Letters to Santa and photos with him are welcome. Passenger boarding begins approximately 20 minutes before the time the train is scheduled to depart at 10 a.m., 12 p.m. and 2 p.m. $18. Free for children 2 and younger sitting on an adult’s lap. person, with children age 2 and under who sit on adult laps, free. Letters to Santa are welcome. 60 East Main Street. friendsoftherailroad.org. friendsoftherailroad@gmail.com.

Dec. 11 Oswego. Christmas At Sea Open House. Traditional holiday decorations, themed trees, music and refreshments. Santa arrives by Coast Guard boat at 2 p.m. Free. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. H. Lee White Maritime Museum, 1 W. 2016 / 2017

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First St. www.hlwmm.org. 315-342-0480. West Monroe. Vanderbilt Snowmobile Club’s Annual Christmas Party & Sled Raffle. Buffet meal and new snowmobile raffle. Raffle tickets are $20 and available at Two Guys from Italy, NYS Rte. 49, Central Square. Admission TBD. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Vanderbilt Snowmobile Club, NYS Rte. 49. www.vanderbiltsnowmobileclub.com. 315-708-7332. Old Forge. 40th Annual Snodeo Weekend. See Dec. 9. Lake Placid. Holiday Village Stroll. See Dec. 9. Syracuse. Murder Mystery: Nick Saint, Private Elf. When night falls on Toyland Town, some elves play rough. But it’s nothing compared to what happens on The Island of Misfit Toys: the seamy underbelly of the North Pole. It’s Santa’s dirty little secret. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. $65; multi-show ticket, $60. WCNY’s Broadcast and Education Center, 415 W. Fayette St. www.wcny.org/murdermystery. Syracuse. Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker. The original Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker, direct from Russia. Larger than life “magical” props, a 60-foot growing Christmas tree and spectacular Russian-made costumes and sets. $28 to $68. 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. Mulroy Civic Center Theaters, 421 Montgomery St. www.nutcracker.com. Syracuse. A Charlie Brown Christmas. See Dec. 10. Syracuse. Amahl and the Night Visitors. See Dec. 2. Oswego. Yes, Virginia, There is a Santa Claus. See Dec. 2. 2 p.m. Syracuse.Theatre Du Jour presents The Santaland Diaries, an evocation of what a slacker’s Christmas must feel like. Out of work, the slacker decides to become a Macy’s elf during the holiday crunch. $60. 6 p.m. cocktail hour; 7 p.m. Dinner; 8 p.m. show. Barnes Hiscock Mansion (315-422-2445), 930 James St. dujourcny@gmail.com. 518-2536930. Seneca Falls. 70th Anniversary Celebration of “It’s a Wonderful Life” the classic 1946 Christmas movie. See Dec. 9.

Dec. 12 Oswego. 5th Annual Gingerbread Contest. See Dec. 5 Cape Vincent. Christmas in Cape Vincent Parade. Floats will be decorated with holiday

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lights and represent youth groups and civic organizations from the entire 1000 Islands region. After the parade, the children can visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus and hot chocolate and donuts will be served at Aubrey’s Inn. Free. 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Broadway St. 315-654-2533. Palmyra. Historic Palmyra Homestead Holiday Candlelight House Tour. Tour of historic homes in the Village of Palmyra and two museums. Begin at the William Phelps General Store. Many additional homes dating throughout the 1800’s. Call for admission cost. 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. www.historicpalmyrany.com. 315-597-6981. Syracuse. Christmas Craft & Holiday Market. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. See Dec. 11.

Dec. 13 Schroon Lake. Open Mic. See Dec. 13. Witherbees Carriage House will be rocking with live music. All the proceeds from the DVD and t-shirt sales during the open mic benefit the Wounded Warrior Project and the Harry Chapin Project. No cover charge. 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Witherbees Carriage House Restaurant, 581 U.S. 9. Marcellus. Star Party: Geminid Meteor Shower. This is the night of the Geminid Meteor shower. Even though the moon will be nearly full, many Geminids are so bright they can still be seen. Bring a lawn chair to lie back and watch for meteors, and enjoy telescope views of some of the brightest winter star clusters and nebulae. Uranus and Neptune will be visible all evening. Venus will be a bold crescent just before dark. Back-up Date: December 14th. For all ages. Pre-register online at or pay cash at the event. $6 for members; $9 for nonmembers. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Baltimore Woods Nature Center, 4007 Bishop Hill Rd. www.baltimorewoods.org. info@baltimorewoods.org. 315-673-1350. Utica. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer: The Musical (www.rudolphthemusical.com). Back by popular demand following last year’s critically acclaimed and hugely successful inaugural tour, the world’s most famous reindeer and a holly jolly cast of iconic characters including Hermey the Elf, Yukon Cornelius and the Abominable Snow Monster will help Santa save Christmas during three North American tours visiting 50 cities this holiday season. $29 to $74. 7:30 p.m. The Stanley, 259 Genesee Street. 315-724-7196. Oswego. 5th Annual Gingerbread Contest. See Dec. 5

Rochester. Cirque Dreams Holidaze. A new cirque show, Broadway musical and family Christmas spectacular all in one. The holiday spectacle includes over 300 costumes, 20 acts and 30 artists from every corner of the globe. Many of these acts have been featured on America’s Got Talent and similar TV shows. Witness snowmen, penguins, angels, reindeer, toy soldiers, gingerbread men, ornaments and of course Santa; with soaring acrobatics, gravity defying feats, elaborate production numbers, imaginative costumes, illusions and more. $32.50 to $67.50. Various times. Check website. Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 855 East Main Street. www.rbtl.org. Syracuse. OCC’s Winter Concert OCC’s music students hold their annual Winter concert featuring singers and jazz players. Free. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Onondaga Community College, Storer Auditorium, 4585 W. Seneca Turnpike. 315-498-2256. Wallington. Community Holiday Fireworks. Free. Enjoy refreshments at 5 p.m. Fireworks start at 6 p.m. Wallington Fire Department, 7863 Old Ridge Road. www.wallingtonfd. com.

Dec. 14 Oswego. 5th Annual Gingerbread Contest. See Dec. 5. Syracuse. Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. See Dec. 2. Rochester. Cirque Dreams Holidaze. See Dec. 13.

Dec. 15 Auburn. A Little Christmas with the Calamari Sisters. See Dec. 15. It’s been a year since those crazy Italian sisters, Delphine and Carmela, were whisked away from public access cable and ushered into Food Network stardom, but this Christmas Eve they return to WFAT and you’re invited to their holiday mayhem. Find out what happened on The Food Network, get to the bottom of Delphine’s break up with the local butcher, and help Carmela finally get her madcap one-woman cabaret into the condominium circuit down in Boca Raton. The show is full of holiday favorites like “Rockin’ Around The Christmas Tree,” “Santa Baby,” “All I Want For Christmas Is You,” and of course, “Dominic The Italian Christmas Donkey”! $10 to $35. 7:30 p.m. Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St. www.auburnpublictheater.org. 315-2536669.


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Open All Year Round Oswego. 5th Annual Gingerbread Contest. See Dec. 5 Syracuse.Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. See Dec. 2. Rochester. Cirque Dreams Holidaze. See Dec. 13. Mexico. Theatre Du Jour presents The Santaland Diaries, an evocation of what a slacker’s Christmas must feel like. Out of work, the slacker decides to become a Macy’s elf during the holiday crunch. $60. 6 p.m. cocktail hour; 7 p.m. Dinner; 8 p.m. show. The Elis House (315-963-3830), 144 Academy St. dujourcny@gmail.com. 518-253-6930. Rochester. Irving Berlin’s White Christmas: The Musical. Enjoy the stage adaptation of the beloved classic film, including classic songs “Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep,” “Happy Holiday,” “Sisters,” “Blue Skies,” and the unforgettable title song, “White Christmas.” Music and lyrics by Irving Berlin with book by David Ives and Paul Blake and is based upon the Paramount Pictures film written for the screen by Norman Krasna, Norman Panama and Melvin Frank. Visit website for tickets and times. 855 East Main Street. www.rbtl.org. www.rbtl.org.

Dec. 16 Auburn. A Little Christmas with the Calamari Sisters. See Dec. 15. 8 p.m. Syracuse. Festival of Lights at Burnet Park. See Dec. 9. Oswego. 5th Annual Gingerbread Contest. See Dec. 5 Syracuse.Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. See Dec. 2. Rochester. Cirque Dreams Holidaze. See Dec. 13. Rochester. Gala Holiday Pops. Join Jeff Tyzik and a 200-voice high school chorale for a festive concert of treasured holiday carols. Jeff Tyzik, conductor; Festival High School Chorale; Amy Story and Harold McAulliffe, co-directors. $23 to $109. 8 p.m. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 108 East Avenue. www. rpo.org. 585-454-2100. Syracuse.Home for the Holidays. Experience a modern take on the symphony led by Symphoria’s principal pops conductor, Sean O’Loughlin. These performances feature music from contemporary artists and selections from movies, Broadway and jazz. $20 to $81. 7:30 p.m. Crouse-Hinds Theater, 421

Montgomery St. www.experiencesymphoria. org. 315-299-5598. Old Forge. Christmas at the Old Forge Library. The public is invited to come and enjoy a reading of “The Night Before Christmas” by Clement Moore read by Colin Criss followed by the play “A Christmas Tree for Kitty.” Cookies and hot cocoa will be served following the performance. Free. 6 p.m. For additional information, please call the Old Forge Library at 315-369-6008.

Dec. 17 Buffalo. Tony Bennett. An evening with the timeless entertainer, and winner of 19 Grammy awards: Tony Bennett. He is one of only a handful of artists to have new albums charting in the 50’s, 60’s, 70’s, 80’s and 90’s and 10’s. He introduced a multitude of songs into the great American Songbook that have since become pop music classics. $100. 8 p.m. Center for the Arts, 103 Center for the Arts, University at Buffalo. 716-645-2787. Alexandria Bay. River Santa Festival. Activities all day long, including wagon rides. info@alexbay.org. www.visitalexbay.org. 315482-9531. Auburn. A Little Christmas with the Cala2016 / 2017

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mari Sisters. See Dec. 15. 8 p.m. Syracuse.Festival of Lights at Burnet Park. See Dec. 9. Syracuse. A Charlie Brown Christmas. See Dec. 10. Syracuse. Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. See Dec. 2. Rochester. Cirque Dreams Holidaze. See Dec. 13. Syracuse.Home for the Holidays. See Dec. 16. 1:30 and 7:30.

buffaloplace.com/home. Syracuse. A Charlie Brown Christmas. See Dec. 10. Cortland. Dancin’ Thru the Decades: New Year’s Eve Dance. Ring in the new year. Each hour brings a new decade of hit dance tunes, from the 70s through today. $20 at the door; $10 advanced tickets. 8 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Cortland Repertory Theatre Downtown 24 Port Watson St. www.cortlandrep.org. 607756-2627

JANUARY

Dec. 18 Oswego. Christmas Organ Concert and Carol Sing. Nancy Saultz Radloff, DMA, presents an organ concert of Christmas music and a carol sing in the chapel of the Church of the Resurrection, 120 W. 5th St. Admission TBD. 3 p.m. 315-343-3501 www.resoswego.org Auburn. A Little Christmas with the Calamari Sisters. See Dec. 15. 2 p.m. Syracuse. A Charlie Brown Christmas. See Dec. 10. Rochester. Cirque Dreams Holidaze. See Dec. 13. Wallington. Community Holiday Fireworks. View fireworks while enjoying seasonal refreshments. Free. Refreshments at 5 p.m. Fireworks at 6 p.m. Wallington Fire Department, 7863 Old Ridge Road. www.wallingtonfd.com Syracuse. Symphoria Pops Series: Holiday Joy. Ring in the holidays with Symphoria, dancers, the Syracuse Pops Chorus, Syracuse Children’s Chorus, and special guests, as well as a visit from Santa. 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. $80. to $20. 18 & under free. The Oncenter Civic Center Theaters, 421 Montgomery St. 315299-5598.

Dec. 19 Savannah. Montezuma Christmas Bird Count: Birders of all experience levels are encouraged to count Montezuma’s wintering birds. Free. Registration required. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 Route 89. ny.audubon.org/montezuma. 315-365-3588. Dec. 21

Dec. 31 Buffalo. Annual Buffalo Ball Drop & Fireworks. See the Electric Tower transformed into countdown central, featuring the ball drop and a display of fireworks. Roosevelt Plaza, Main/Huron Streets. Free. 10 p.m.

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ALL MONTH Statewide. NYS Winter Classic Fishing Tournament. Includes all legal angling methods such as ice, open water, shore fishing, rivers, and tributaries. $2,500 cash prize. To read complete rules and to register, visit www. nysiceproam.com/winterclassic/home.html. info@FKsportfishing.com. 585-330-0494.

WEDNESDAYS Baldwinsville. Weekday Snowshoe Jaunt. Enjoy an hour-long outing through Beaver Lake’s winter woods. Benefit from a naturalist’s insights, along with the light aerobic exercise. Free with nature center admission. Snowshoes may be rented for $5. 1:30 p.m. Beaver Lake Nature Center, 8477 East Mud Lake Road. 315-638-2519.

WEEKENDS Fabius. Horsedrawn Sleighrides. See Dec. EVERY WEEKEND.

Jan. 1 Oswego. First Day Hike: Join Site Manager Paul Lear on a history-themed walking tour of the Fort Ontario National Register District. Assemble at the old fort. Dress warmly; then add a layer. Free. 10 a.m. Fort Ontario State Historic Site, 1 E. 4th St. www.fortontario. com. 315-343-4711. Syracuse. Lights on the Lake. See December ALL MONTH. Buffalo. Poinsettias Show. See December ALL MONTH.

Jan. 2 Syracuse. Annual Gingerbread Gallery. See December ALL MONTH. Syracuse.Lights on the Lake. See December ALL MONTH.

WINTER GUIDE

Buffalo. Poinsettias Show. See December ALL MONTH.

Jan. 3 Syracuse.Annual Gingerbread Gallery. See December ALL MONTH. Syracuse. Lights on the Lake. See December ALL MONTH. Buffalo. Poinsettias Show. See December ALL MONTH.

Jan. 4 Syracuse. Annual Gingerbread Gallery. See December ALL MONTH. Syracuse. Lights on the Lake. See December ALL MONTH. Buffalo. Poinsettias Show. See December ALL MONTH.

Jan. 5 Syracuse. Annual Gingerbread Gallery. See December ALL MONTH. Syracuse.Mary Poppins. See December ALL MONTH. Syracuse. Lights on the Lake. See December ALL MONTH. Buffalo. Poinsettias Show. See December ALL MONTH.

Jan. 6 Baldwinsville. Guided Moonlight Snowshoe Hike. A winter moon lights the way as your group explores the Nature Center’s woodlands and meadows on snowshoes. This is a special opportunity to explore Beaver Lake’s night world. Registration is required beginning at 8 a.m. the day of the hike and space is limited. This program will be offered only when snow conditions are acceptable. Please call the Nature Center at 315-6382519 that day to register and check conditions. Also, trails will be open until 9 p.m. for cross country skiing and snowshoeing (not guided). Free with nature center admission. Snowshoes may be rented for $5. 7 p.m. Beaver Lake Nature Center, 8477 East Mud Lake Road. 315-638-2519. Syracuse. Annual Gingerbread Gallery. See December ALL MONTH. Syracuse. Mary Poppins. See December ALL MONTH. Syracuse. Lights on the Lake. See December ALL MONTH. Buffalo. Poinsettias Show. See December ALL MONTH.


Winter in the Adirondacks...

Syracuse. Murder Mystery: Fiddler on the Loose. The milkman, Skeevya and his family have been forced to leave their little village of Havavodka and immigrate to America. Skeevya now has a new job with the Russian mafia. At last he is a rich man but how long can it last? 6 p.m. $65; multi-show ticket, $60. WCNY’s Broadcast and Education Center, 415 W. Fayette St. www.wcny.org/ murdermystery. Rochester. Raiders of the Lost Ark: Film with Orchestra. Relive the adventures of Indiana Jones at Eastman Theatre while John Williams’ epic score performed live by the RPO. Vinay Parameswaran, guest conductor $23-$98. 8 p.m. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 108 East Avenue. www.rpo.org. 585-454-2100.

Jan. 7 Oswego. Food & History Tour. See Dec. 3. Syracuse. Murder Mystery: Fiddler on the Loose. See Jan. 6. Syracuse. Annual Gingerbread Gallery. See December ALL MONTH. Syracuse. Mary Poppins. See December ALL MONTH. Syracuse.Lights on the Lake. See December ALL MONTH. Buffalo. Poinsettias Show. See December ALL MONTH. Oswego. Rice Creek Rambles. Enjoy a family-friendly guided walk. An adult must accompany children. Free 11 a.m. Rice Creek Field Station, Thompson Rd., Oswego. 315312-6677.

Auburn. Comedian Krish Mohan. Krish is a socially-conscious Indian stand-up comedian and writer who regularly performs at small theaters, bars, comedy clubs, colleges and venues across the country. He focuses on idea based stand-up tackling race, religion, immigration, relationships, political and social issues. With his quirky attitude, charming personality, and intelligent humor, Krish captivates and engages audiences of all backgrounds. Mohan has opened for nationally touring headliners and has had a highly rated & hit show at the IndyFringe & Capital Fringe. He has been featured on NPR and in the Arch City Comedy Festival. Admission TBA. 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Auburn Public Theater, 108 E. Genesee St. www. auburnpublictheater.org. 315-253-669. Rochester. Amy Grant, vocalist. The sixtime Grammy Award winner with over 30 million albums sold worldwide performs on the Eastman Theatre stage for the first time. “The Queen of Christian Pop” and Gospel Music Hall of Fame inductee performs some of her #1 hits, including “Baby Baby” and “Every Heartbeat,” plus other inspirational favorites. VIP packages available - VIP tickets and meet-and-greet with Amy Grant. Call 585-454-2100 for more information. $23$104. 8 p.m. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 108 East Avenue. www.rpo.org. 585-4542100.

Jan. 8 Syracuse. Murder Mystery: Fiddler on the Loose. See Jan. 6 Syracuse. Annual Gingerbread Gallery. See

December ALL MONTH. Syracuse. Mary Poppins. See December ALL MONTH. Syracuse. Lights on the Lake. See December ALL MONTH. Buffalo. Poinsettias Show. See December ALL MONTH.

Jan. 11 Utica. Motown the Musical. It began as one man’s story, became everyone’s music and is now Broadway’s musical. Motown the Musical is the true American dream story of Motown founder Berry Gordy’s journey from featherweight boxer to the heavyweight music mogul who launched the careers of Diana Ross, Michael Jackson, Smokey Robinson and many more. Motown shattered barriers, shaped our lives and made us all move to the same beat. Featuring classic songs such as “My Girl” and “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough,” experience the story behind the music. $29 to $74. 7:30 p.m. The Stanley, 259 Genesee Street. 315-724-7196.

Jan. 12 Utica. Motown the Musical. See Jan. 11. Rochester. Ehnes Plays Beethoven. Grammy-winning violinist James Ehnes plays Beethoven’s Violin Concerto, Ravel’s Valses nobles et sentimentales and Strauss’ Suite from Der Rosenkavalier. Ward Stare, conductor. $23-$99. 7:30 p.m. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 108 East Avenue. www.rpo.org. 585-454-2100.

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Jan. 13 Oswego. Oswego Music Hall Open Mic Friday. See Dec. 2.

Jan. 14 Oswego. Rice Creek Rambles. Enjoy a family-friendly guided walk. An adult must accompany children. Free 11 a.m. Rice Creek Field Station, Thompson Rd., Oswego. 315312-6677. Redfield. Chicken BBQ and Poker Run. Chicken barbeque starts at noon. Poker run cards can be stamped beginning Jan. 7. $10 for dinner; $5 to draw poker hand. 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. Cheese Factory Restaurant, Co. Rte. 39. redfieldsnow.snowclubs.com. 315-5997762. Oswego. Food & History Tour. See Dec. 3. Lake Placid. 2017 FIS Freestyle Cup. See Jan. 10. Oswego. Oswego Music Hall Presents Seth Glier. A singer-songwriter, producer and multi-instrumentalist, Glier averages over 250 live performances annually. He’s shared the stage with artists as diverse as James Taylor, Ani DiFranco, Edwin McCain, Martin Sexton, Emmylou Harris and Ryan Adams. USA Today stated that his “exquisite tenor echoes Bruce Springsteen and Billy Joel.” $18. 7:30 p.m. Oswego Music Hall, Roy C. McCrobie Building, 41 Lake St. www.oswegomusichall. org. 315-342-1733. Long Lake. Long Lake Annual Winter Carnival. Cardboard sled racing, coronation of the king and queen, sledding, free ice skating, ladies frying pan toss, wacky hat competition, and men’s caber toss. Fireworks at 6:30 p.m. Free. 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. Mt. Sabattis, Geiger Arena, 6 Pavilion Way, Long Lake, NY (off Deerland Road, across the street from the Post Office). Buffalo. Buffalo on Tap. Sample over 150 releases from some of America’s best craft breweries. Live music, food available for purchase, and vendors. Souvenir glass included with entry price. VIP options available. $35. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Buffalo Niagara Convention Center, Convention Center Plaza, 153 Franklin Street. americaontap.com/buffalo-on-tap-festival-buffalo-ny. 716-855-5555. Rochester. Ehnes Plays Beethoven. See Jan. 12. 8 p.m.

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Jan. 16 Auburn. MLK Day Open Jam Night. Celebrate diversity and creativity. Sing, play, read, and express yourself. Free. 4 p.m. Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange Street. info@ auburnpublictheater.org. 315-253-6669.

Jan. 17 Lowville. Black River Valley Concert Series. Featuring Kelly Flint, post-modern folk artist. Advance tickets $18, available in Lowville at the Historical Society and Cafe Z, and in Watertown at Dr. Guitar. $110 season tickets individual (includes one guest pass); $20 at the door; $20 individual; $45 family (2 parents and up to 4 children). 7:30 p.m. Historical Society Blue Room, 7552 South State St. www. lewiscountyhistory.org/brcseries.html.

Jan. 19 Syracuse. Make Me A Song: The Music of William Finn. Music by William Finn. Conceived by Rob Rugglero. Directed by John Grimsley. $15. Various times; check website. Red House Arts Center, 201 S. West St. www. theredhouse.org. 315-362-2785.

Jan. 20 Syracuse. Make Me A Song: The Music of William Finn. See Jan. 19. Rochester. Bugs Bunny at the Symphony II. Celebrate the world’s most “Wascally Wabbit” and pals as Bugs Bunny hops into the concert hall. Classic Looney Tunes favorites like “The Rabbit of Seville” and “What’s Opera, Doc?” are projected on the big screen, paired with their original live scores inspired by the master composers—just as you remember them. Plus scores of new additions since this concert’s last RPO performances in 2011, including “Pepe Le Pew,” “Show Biz Bugs,” “Robin Hood Daffy,” and the East Coast concert premiere of “Long-Haired Hare,” and two brand new Warner Bros. 3D animated shorts: “Rabid Rider” and “Coyote Fall.” Created by George Daughterty and David Ka Lik Wong. $23-$104. 8 p.m. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 108 East Avenue. www. rpo.org. 585-454-2100.

Jan. 21 Oswego. Oswego Music Hall Presents Jamcrackers. Seasoned solo performers Dan Berggren, Peggy Lynn and Dan Duggan have combined talents to create a dynamic trio named in honor of the river drivers who broke up log jams. They worked hard to find

solutions, to get things rolling again, and it was a job that couldn’t be done alone. Dan, Peggy and Dan feel the same way about their music. The trio’s diverse talents blend folk and blues, ballads, gospel, and dance tunes. $18. 7:30 p.m. Oswego Music Hall, Roy C. McCrobie Building, 41 Lake St. www.oswegomusichall.org. 315-342-1733. Auburn. Mary Fahl. Former lead singer of October Project, Mary has released several recordings as a soloist, including the re-working of Pink Floyd’s “Dark Side of the Moon” for V2 Records. Her original studio album “The Other Side of Time” was with Sony Odyssey and her album “Love and Gravity.” She has also written and performed songs for several major motion pictures, including the lead song, “Going Home” for the Civil War epic “Gods and Generals.” $25 advanced; $28 at the door; $10 students. 8 p.m. Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange Street. info@ auburnpublictheater.org. 315-253-6669. Syracuse. Make Me A Song: The Music of William Finn. See Jan. 19. Rochester. Bugs Bunny at the Symphony II. See Jan. 20. Rochester. Ron White. Ron “Tater Salad” White, best known as the cigar smoking, scotch drinking funnyman from the “Blue Collar Comedy” phenomenon, makes his return to Rochester with his new stand-up show. The Ron White “200 Proof” VIP Experience. Includes a premium seat, typically in the first 5 rows, and opportunity to meet Ron White after the show, VIP access pass personally signed by Ron White, DVD: Ron White’s Comedy Salute to the Troops & autographed note, Margo Rey CD (Ron White’s wife and top Billboard charting singer/ songwriter). $42 to $62. 7 p.m. Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 855 East Main Street. www.rbtl.org. Central Square. 22nd Annual Don Rowe Antique Snowmobile Show: Sponsored by Square Valley Trail Blazers, this is the longest-running antique snowmobile show in NY. Six classes including a yearly featured snowmobile and a new youth class for ages 15 and younger. Plaques and trophies awarded. Register snowmobiles for $5. Admission is free. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Two Guys from Italy Restaurant, NYS Rte. 49. www.squarevalley. net. 315-668-9945. Oswego. Rice Creek Rambles. Enjoy a family-friendly guided walk. An adult must accompany children. Free. 11 a.m. Rice Creek Field Station, Thompson Rd. 315-312-6677.


Jan. 22 Rochester. Music of Mozart. Mozart’s Sinfonia concertante and Symphony No. 39 and Thomas Ades’ Three Studies from Couperin. Michael Butterman, conductor; Juliana Athayde, violin; Melissa Matson, viola. Admission TBA. 2 p.m. Performance Hall at Hochstein, 50 N. Plymouth Ave. www. hochstein.org, www.rpo.org. 585-454-2100.

Oswego harbor. Undated photo. Courtesy of Paul Murphy.

Jan. 25 Inlet. Frozen Fire & Lights. Bonfires, sledding, cross country skiing, snowshoeing, cardboard sled race, Noah’s Ark Animal Workshop, face painting, fireworks, wine and chocolate. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Fern Park & Arrowhead Park. www.frozenfireandlights.com. 315-357-5501.

Jan. 26 Buffalo. Disney on Ice. Nothing can stop a princess from a courageous adventure when Disney On Ice presents Dare to Dream. Join your hosts Mickey Mouse and Minnie Mouse as they share the heroic stories of four of your favorite Disney Princesses. $20 to $80. 7 p.m.; Friday show at 7 p.m.; Saturday shows at 11 a.m., 3 p.m. and 7 p.m.; Sunday shows at 12 p.m. and 4 p.m. KeyBank Center, 1 Seymour H Knox III Plaza. www.keybankcenter. com. 716-855-4100. Syracuse. Make Me A Song: The Music of William Finn. See Jan. 19. Inlet. Adirondack Ice Bowl. See Jan. 26. Pond hockey tournaments with food, music and fun for the whole family. Fees for competitors. Event schedule online. 4th Lake & The Woods Inn. www.adirondackicebowl.com. 315-357-5501.

Jan. 27 Clayton. 1000 Islands Pond Hockey Festival. Three on three pond hockey with a maximum of four players per team. Family friendly, kids skating/hockey, and on-site concessions. To register a team, mail check for $400 to River Hockey Classic, River Hockey Classic, LLC, PO Box 401, Clayton, NY 13624. For registration and additional details please visit website. Clayton Marina Sales & Service, 50 State Street. riverhockeyclassic@yahoo.com. www.riverhockeyclassic.com. Inlet. Adirondack Ice Bowl. See Jan. 26. Syracuse. Make Me A Song: The Music of William Finn. See Jan. 19. Oswego. Oswego Music Hall Open Mic Friday. See Dec. 2.

Jan. 28 Oswego. Food & History Tour. See Dec. 3. Clayton. 1000 Islands Pond Hockey Festival. See Jan. 27. 2016 / 2017

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Skaneateles. Ice Walk & Demonstration. Ice sculptures on display throughout the Village! Ice carving demonstration in Clift Park. Free. 10 a.m. 315-685-0552. Skaneateles. Taste of Skaneateles. Over 50 tastings throughout the Village of Skaneateles. Free. 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Location Clift Park, W. Genesee Street. 315-685-0552. Lowville. Black River Valley Concert Series. Gwen Tracy, Adirondack blues/rocker and songwriter. Advance tickets $18, available in Lowville at the Historical Society and Cafe Z, and in Watertown at Dr. Guitar. $110 season tickets individual (includes one guest pass); $20 at the door; $20 individual; $45 family (2 parents and up to 4 children). 7:30 p.m. Historical Society Blue Room, 7552 South State St. www.lewiscountyhistory.org/brcseries. html. Alexandria Bay. Vintage Snowmobile Show. Prizes awarded for the following categories: featured sled, antique, vintage, classic, muscle, race, mini, best of show, and people’s choice. Registration fee: $5/sled or $10 for 2 or more sleds. Registration: 7 a.m. to 9 a.m.; show: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; awards: 3 p.m. www.visitalexbay.org. Inlet. Adirondack Ice Bowl. See Jan. 26. Syracuse. Make Me A Song: The Music of William Finn. See Jan. 19. Rochester. Shen Yun. This performance brings the profound spirit of China’s mythical Middle Kingdom to life on stage with dance and music. 2 hours, 15 minutes, including intermission. Recommended for those 5 and older. Presented by Upstate New York Falun Dafa Association. www.ShenYun.com. $73-$128. 7:30 p.m. Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 855 East Main Street. www.rbtl.org. Pulaski. Salmon River Winter Festival. Family fun throughout the village includes an opening reception, snowshoe walk/run, skating, sled dogs, children’s activities, vendors, refreshments and more. Presented by HalfShire Historical Society and Masonic Lodge #415. Free. Small charge for some activities. www.facebook.com/OswegoCountywintercarnival. 315-532-5919. Parish. Square Valley Trail Blazers Groomer Day. SVTB bring their groomers for everyone to see. Meet fellow snowmobilers. Free hot dogs and beverages are provided. Donations are welcome. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Happy Valley at the Big Tree. www.squarevalley.net. 315668-9945. Mannsville. The Stone Wall 5/10K Snowshoe Race/Walk: Family, friends, fellow outdoor enthusiasts get out and enjoy winter.

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Walkers and runners are welcome. Loaner snowshoes are available. Registration is $20$30. 10:30 a.m. Winona Forest, Rte. 90, CCC Camp, Bargy Rd. www.winonaforest.com. 315-657-3480. Oswego. Rice Creek Story Hour: Share tales of nature, animals’ wild ways, and how we relate to our world around us. These programs are designed for elementary-aged children, though all are welcome. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Free. 11 a.m. Rice Creek Field Station, Thompson Rd. 315-312-6677.

Jan. 29 Clayton. 1000 Islands Pond Hockey Festival. See Jan. 27. Inlet. Adirondack Ice Bowl. See Jan. 26. Rochester. Shen Yun. See Jan. 28. 2 p.m. Pulaski. Salmon River Winter Festival. See Jan. 28. Syracuse. Music Of The Masters. Masterpieces of Haydn and Beethoven are featured on this program, along with principal trumpet John Raschella playing one of the most beloved trumpet concertos. Haydn: Symphony No. 44; Haydn: Trumpet Concerto; Beethoven: Symphony No. 8. $35 adults; $26 seniors; $5 students; free under 18. 2:30 p.m. St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral, 310 Montgomery St. Enter the cathedral from Fayette Street. Parking is available across Fayette Street in a large surface lot, as well as on the street and in other surrounding surface lots. experiencesymphoria.org. 315299-5598. Pulaski. Take a Friend Snowmobiling Day. New and past riders can enjoy a fun and safe snowmobile ride. Dress appropriately for outdoors. Free lunch inside an enclosed, heated pavilion. Groomer rides and demos, too. Free. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Selkirk Shores State Park, 7101 NYS Rt. 3. www.pulaski-boylstonsnow.com. 315-430-1754.

FEBRUARY EVERY WEEKEND Fabius. Horsedrawn Sleighrides. See Dec. EVERY WEEKEND. Syracuse. Open Ice Skating. See Dec. EVERY WEEKEND. Lake George. The Lake George Winter Carnival. Founded in 1961, the annual event includes children’s activities, cookoffs, games, outhouse races, music, food,

vendors and more. For complete schedule and map, visit the website. Events are subject to weather. Most activities are free. All day. Activities located around the Lake George area. www.lakegeorgewintercarnival.com. 518-683-5333.

Feb. 1 Baldwinsville. Weekday Snowshoe Jaunt. See Jan. WEDNESDAYS.

Feb. 2 Baldwinsville. Beaver Lake snowshoe and skiing trails open until 9. See Jan. 6. Rochester. Mozart’s Requiem. Mozart’s genius burns with brooding intensity in the now-legendary Requiem that was to become his own funeral music, a centerpiece in the film Amadeus. Its intricate textures are mirrored by Hovhaness’ Fugue and Stravinsky’s self-proclaimed “War Symphony,” a razor-edged reflection of the atrocities of the age. Eastman-Rochester Chorus, William Weinert, director. Ward Stare, conductor. $23-$99. 7:30 p.m. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 108 East Avenue. www.rpo.org. 585454-2100. Lake Placid. 2017 Empire State Winter Games. In this, its 37th year, the Games brings together athletes from across the State and beyond to compete in 19 winter sports. The 2016 Games included more than 1,500 participants of all ages, including master divisions. Each ESWG registered athlete is invited to participate in all the festivities especially the opportunity to march in the “Parade of Athletes” during the Opening Ceremony on February 2nd. The opening ceremony is open to the public. Visit the website for specific event information. Venues include: Lake Placid Olympic Center Herb Brooks Arena, Lake Placid Olympic Jumping and Sliding complexes, Whiteface Mountain, Paul Smith’s College, the VIC, Saranac Lake Civil Center Ice Rink, Dewey Mountain Recreation Area, Tupper Lake Memorial Civic Center, Olympic Cross Country and Biathlon Center, Titus Mountain and Mount Pisgah. www.empirestatewintergames.com.

Feb. 3 Baldwinsville. Guided Moonlight Snowshoe Hike. See Jan. 6. Lake Placid. 2017 Empire State Winter Games. See Feb. 2. Saranac Lake. The 2017 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. The 10-day annual festival features performances, sports, dances,


parades and two sets of fireworks above the Ice Palace. Kicking off with the coronation of the Winter Carnival Royalty, the event proceeds with the lighting of the Ice Palace, fireworks, parades and performances and culminates in the Carnival Slide Show and Gala Fireworks. The 2017 edition marks the 120th anniversary, making the Saranac Lake Winter Carnival the longest-running event of its kind in the eastern United States. Visit website for complete times and schedules. www.saranaclakewintercarnival.com.

Feb. 4 Lorraine. Annual Tug Hill Challenge. A twoday ISDRA-sanctioned sled dog race. Classes are offered in ski-jor, 8-dog sled, 6-dog sled, 4-dog sled, juniors and limbo/novice. Cost varies. 8 a.m. Winona Forest, NYS Rte. 90. www.pasleddogclub.com. 856-809-2469. Oswego. Rice Creek Rambles. Enjoy a family-friendly guided walk. An adult must accompany children. Free. 11 a.m. Rice Creek Field Station, Thompson Rd. 315-312-6677. Oswego. 12th Annual Warm Up Oswego Festival. Live music, performances, vendors, family activities and fireworks. Free. 11 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. www.warmuposwegofestival. com. Oswego. Food & History Tour. See Dec. 3. Baldwinsville. Guided Moonlight Snowshoe Hike. See Jan. 6. Saranac Lake. The 2017 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 3. Lake Placid. 2017 Empire State Winter Games. See Feb. 2. Syracuse. Wild Things. Explore the stories, sights, and sounds of animals and other wild things with this program that is specially created for children under age six. $15 adults; $10 seniors; $5 college students with ID; free for kids who are 18 and younger. 10:30 a.m. Inspiration Hall, 351 S. Clinton St. sales@ skyarmory.com. 315-299-5598. experiencesymphoria.org. 315-473-0826. Auburn. Cocoa Brown. Actress and comedian Cocoa Brown takes the stage, with passion and soul-searching veracity, drawing from painful reminiscences and hard-earned lessons. Brown’s credits include Tyler Perry’s critically acclaimed comedy series “For Better or Worse” on Oprah Winfrey’s OWN network and a national commercial spot for Progressive Insurance Company. $20 advanced; $25 at the door; $10 students. 8 p.m. Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange Street. info@ auburnpublictheater.org. 315-253-6669.

Buffalo. Lumagination. See Jan. 25. Rochester. Mozart’s Requiem. See Feb. 2. 8 p.m. Syracuse. Cirque De La Symphonie Returns. Aerial flyers, acrobats, contortionists, dancers, jugglers, and balancers perform with professional choreography to some of the most popular classical masterpieces and contemporary music. Sean O’Loughlin, conductor. $20 to $81. 7:30 p.m. Crouse-Hinds Theater, 234 Harrison Street. www.experiencesymphoria.org. 315-299-5598. Ithaca. 5th Annual Festival of Fire & Ice. Fire sculptures, ice sculptures, sledding, hot chocolate, snow fort and den building, the ice laboratory, food-coloring snow mound mural, and more. Dress warmly. Bring some cash for fiery/icy treats, and your own frozen ice creations to add to the collaborative fun. Event brought to you with support from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Suggested $10 family donation. 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Ithaca Children’s Garden, 615 Willow Avenue, Suite G. ithacachildrensgarden.org. info@ithacachildrensgarden.org. 607-319-4203.

Feb. 5 Lorraine. Annual Tug Hill Challenge. See Feb. 4. Saranac Lake. The 2017 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 3. Lake Placid. 2017 Empire State Winter Games. See Feb. 2. Alexandria Bay. 1000 Islands Pond Hockey Festival. See Feb. 3. Syracuse. Cirque De La Symphonie Returns. See Feb. 4. Pulaski. Selkirk Shores State Park’s 3rd Annual Snowshoe 5K Race/Walk: Snowshoe rentals will be available through the park office at 315-298-5737. Cost TBD. Time TBD. Selkirk Shores State Park, 7101 NYS Rte. 3.

Feb. 6 Saranac Lake. The 2017 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 3.

Feb. 7 Saranac Lake. The 2017 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 3.

Feb. 8 Baldwinsville. Weekday Snowshoe Jaunt. See Jan. WEDNESDAYS. Saranac Lake. The 2017 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 3.

Oswego. Ke-nekt’ Chamber Music Series Presents Countertenor Reginald Mobley. Reginald Mobley’s preferred habitat is within the Baroque works but he is equally comfortable in the repertoire of musical theatre, jazz standards, and more. $15 adults; $5 students. 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sheldon Hall Ballroom, SUNY Oswego. www.oswego.edu/ arts. 315-312-2130.

Feb. 9 Saranac Lake. The 2017 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 3.

Feb. 10 Buffalo. Red Hot Chili Peppers. Red Hot Chili Peppers are an American funk rock band formed in Los Angeles in 1983. The band is touring in support of its 11th studio album, the worldwide No. 1 “The Getaway.” The group’s musical style primarily consists of rock with an emphasis on funk, as well as elements from other genres such as punk rock and psychedelic rock. Appearing with special guest Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue. $52.50 to $102.50. 7 p.m. KeyBank Center, 1 Seymour H Knox III Plaza. www.keybankcenter.com. 716-855-4100. Oswego. Oswego Music Hall Open Mic Friday. See Dec. 2. Saranac Lake. The 2017 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 3. Rochester. Sutton Foster, Vocalist. See Feb. 10. The New York Times famously remarked, “Who needs a brass section when you’ve got Sutton Foster?” The two-time Tony Award winner starred on Broadway with roles in “Anything Goes,” “Thoroughly Modern Millie,” and “Little Women,” among others. Jeff Tyzik, conductor. $23 to $104. 8 p.m. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 108 East Avenue. www.rpo.org. 585-454-2100. Old Forge. McCauley Mountain Winter Carnival. On Friday, enjoy a parade down Main Street in Old Forge, followed by an ice skating party. On Saturday, the coronation of the King and Queen will be held at McCauley Mountain, followed by torchlight skiing, dare-devil jumpers & fireworks. After the fireworks, the community is invited to a dance in the chalet. Please website for a full schedule of events. www.oldforge.com.

Feb. 11 Fulton. Great Eastern Whiteout. Snowmobile show and swap meet. $10 spectators. All proceeds go to local charities. $10. 8 a.m. On the 12th, ride from the Fulton War Memo2016 / 2017

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rial to the Lysander Fire Barn from breakfast. Free. Leaving at 8 a.m. sharp. Fulton War Memorial, 609 West Broadway. www. thegreateasternwhiteout.net. 315-592-4892 or 315-652-9603. Old Forge. McCauley Mountain Winter Carnival. See Feb. 10. Constantia. Warming Shack Ride-in. Ride your snowmobile to club warming shack on Trail C4. Hot dogs and events for kids. Free. Time TBD. Vanderbilt Snowmobile Club. 315708-7332. Oswego. Rice Creek Rambles. Enjoy a family-friendly guided walk. An adult must accompany children. Free. 11 a.m. Rice Creek Field Station, Thompson Rd. 315-312-6677. Sandy Creek. 2nd Annual ‘Love Your Library’ Wine Tasting Event: Wine, cheese and chocolate tasting. Perfect for couples and friends. Photo ID Required. $10/person; $15/2 people. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Ainsworth Memorial Library, 6064 S. Main St. www. ainsworthmemoriallibrary. 315-387-3732. Pulaski. Selkirk Shores State Park’s Candlelight Snowshoe Hike. Take a hike along the park’s candlelit trail, which starts and ends at the enclosed shelter and enjoy some refreshment by the fire. Free. Time TBD. Selkirk Shores State Park, 7101 NYS Rte. 3. 315-298-5737. Oswego. Food & History Tour. See Dec. 3. Syracuse. Dvorák & Dessert. The Symphoria string section takes the lead with the Dvorák Serenade. Multiple ensembles will perform throughout the evening as the music is paired with a special selection of dessert offerings from the SKY Armory pastry chef. $25 adults; $20 seniors; $5 college students; free under 18. 7:30 p.m. 351 S. Clinton St. 315-473-0826. sales@skyarmory.com. Lowville. Black River Valley Concert Series. Matrix Duo, Premier flute and guitar duo. Advance tickets $18, available in Lowville at the Historical Society and Cafe Z, and in Watertown at Dr. Guitar. $110 season tickets individual (includes one guest pass); $20 at the door; $20 individual; $45 family (2 parents and up to 4 children). 7:30 p.m. Historical Society Blue Room, 7552 South State St. www. lewiscountyhistory.org/brcseries.html. Syracuse. Spark Series II: Dvorak and Dessert: at Sky Armory. The Symphoria string section takes the lead with the Dvorak Serenade. Multiple ensembles will perform throughout the evening as the music is

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paired with a special selection of dessert offerings from the Sky Armory pastry chef as well as a cash bar. $20 to $25; $5 college students; free 18 and under. 7:30. 351 S. Clinton St. www.experiencesymphoria.org. 315-299-5598. Rochester. Sutton Foster, Vocalist. See Feb. 10. Saranac Lake. The 2017 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 3. Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. Annual, 10day festival includes games and sports, family activities, food, music and entertainment and treasure hunt. More than 100,000 attend each year. Most activities free. Visit website for times and locations throughout Syracuse. 11-22 www.syracusewinterfest.com. Oswego. Oswego Music Hall Presents Beaucoup Blue. The Philadelphia-based fatherand-son duo, David and Adrian Mowry play a range of music, from blues to bluegrass. During their years together as musicians, they have received numerous awards including “Grand Prize Winner of the Billboard Magazine World Song-Writing Contest,” and the “Grand Prize Winner of the Telluride Blues & Brews Acoustic Competition” as well as top 40 on AMA’s Americana, Roots, & Folk radio charts. $18. 7:30 p.m. Oswego Music Hall, Roy C. McCrobie Building, 41 Lake St. www.oswegomusichall.org. 315-342-1733.

Feb. 12 Fulton. Great Eastern Whiteout. See Feb. 11. Old Forge. McCauley Mountain Winter Carnival. See Feb. 10. Saranac Lake. The 2017 Saranac Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 3. Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11.

Feb. 13 Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11.

Feb. 14 Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11.

Feb. 15 Baldwinsville. Weekday Snowshoe Jaunt. See Jan. WEDNESDAYS. Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11.

Feb. 16 Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11. Rochester. Romantic Classics with Stare &

Dent. Pianist Jeremy Denk is “someone you want to hear no matter what he performs” (The New York Times). Music Director Ward Stare leads selections from Berloiz’s Roméo et Juliette and Brahms’ Piano Concerto No. 2. $23-$99. 7:30 p.m. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 108 East Avenue. www.rpo.org. 585454-2100. Buffalo. Ring of Fire. From the opening chords of vintage country music and onward to rockabilly, rock n’ roll, searing ballads and gentle songs of love and deep faith, Ring of Fire packs a score that provides a rich fabric in which to lay down the story of Johnny Cash. Performance times vary. Tickets start at $43.50. 7:30 p.m. Shea’s 710 Theatre, 710 Main Street.

Feb. 17 Old Forge. 13th Annual Pink Ribbon Riders Snow Run. The snow run is a two-day event open to both men and women. Includes a welcome party, snowmobile rides, awards banquet and more. Visit the website for more information. www.pinkribbonriders. com/wp/13th-new-york-snow-run. Buffalo. Ring of Fire. See Feb. 16. 8 p.m. Fulton. CNY Arts Center Presents “Godspell:” A series of parables interspersed with a variety of modern music set primarily to lyrics from traditional hymns. $12 to $15. 7 p.m. CNY Arts Center, 11 River Glen Dr. www. CNYArtsCenter.com. 315-298-2787. Syracuse. Murder Mystery: Death Takes a Cruise. Grab your party hat, and step aboard The Mississippi Mistress riverboat. Prepare to set sail down the “Big Muddy” for New Orleans and Mardi Gras. The mighty Captain “Crawdaddy” Cretin will help you navigate the shoals, sand bars, (and wet bars), while Scooter, the Porter, and your Cruise Director, Lucy Belle Juniper, see to your comfort and entertainment. Watch out for the other suspicious passengers. Someone might not make it to the “Big Easy” alive. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. $65; multi-show ticket, $60. WCNY’s Broadcast and Education Center, 415 W. Fayette St. www.wcny.org/murdermystery. Rochester. Decades Rewind. Take a trip down melody lane. Event features more than 60 songs blended into unique medleys from the most prominent decades in music history. This fully live concert experience features an 8-piece rock band and 6 vocalists surrounded by rock and roll stage lighting, poignant videos of American culture, and over 100 costume changes ranging from Abba to Zeppelin. $42-$48. 7:30 p.m. Rochester


Auditorium Theatre, 855 East Main Street. www.rbtl.org. Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11.

Feb. 18 Old Forge. 13th Annual Pink Ribbon Riders Snow Run. See Feb. 17. Fulton. CNY Arts Center Presents “Godspell”. See Feb. 17. Oswego. Food & History Tour. See Dec. 3. Mannsville. SnoFatShu Winter Duathlon. The only winter duathlon of its kind: snowshoe-fat bike-snowshoe; solo or 2-person teams. Loaner bikes available if reserved in advance. $30 to $50. 10:30 a.m. CCC Camp, Winona Forest, Bargy Rd. snowshoerace@ gmail.com. www.winonaforest.com 315-6573480. Oswego. Rice Creek Rambles. Enjoy a family-friendly guided walk. An adult must accompany children. Free. 11 a.m. Rice Creek Field Station, Thompson Rd. 315-312-6677. Syracuse.Red Violin. Elina Vähälä makes her first appearance with Symphoria in this performance of Corigliano’s Red Violin Concerto. This concert also features the Redline Tango and two works of Barber and Gershwin that premiered nine years apart. Lawrence Loh, music director; Elina Vähälä, violin. $20 to $81. 7:30 p.m. Crouse Hinds Theater. 421 Montgomery St. experiencesymphoria.org. Oswego. Hearts on the Bridge fundraiser to benefit local charities. Lake Ontario Event and Conference Center, 26 E. First Street. www.experienceoswego.com or call Ellen at Experience Oswego 315-704-8900. Raquette Lake. Raquette Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 18. A day of fun winter events. Youth activities start at 11 a.m. and include snowshoe relay, snow dodge ball, tug-o-war, balloon chase and so much more. The ladies frying pan toss is at noon. Warm up at the bonfire all day. Other activities include Ice Gold on Raquette Lake. X-Cut competition is held on Sunday Free. 11 a.m. Raquette Lake. Buffalo. Ring of Fire. See Feb. 16. 8 p.m. Auburn. Martin Sexton. Syracuse native Sexton got his start singing in the streets and subways of Boston in the early ‘90s. Still fiercely independent and headlining venues from The Fillmore to Carnegie Hall, he has influenced a generation of contemporary artists. His songs have appeared in television series such as Scrubs, Parenthood, Masters of Sex, and in numerous films. $40 advanced; $45 at the door. 8 p.m. Auburn Public The-

ater, 8 Exchange Street. info@auburnpublictheater.org. 315-253-6669. Rochester. Romantic Classics with Stare & Dent. See Feb. 16. 8 p.m. Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11.

Feb. 19 Fulton. CNY Arts Center Presents “Godspell.” See Feb. 17. 3 p.m. Raquette Lake. Raquette Lake Winter Carnival. See Feb. 18. Buffalo. Ring of Fire. See Feb. 16. 2 p.m. Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11.

Feb. 20 Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11.

Feb. 21 Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11.

Feb. 22 Syracuse. Syracuse Winterfest. See Feb. 11.

Feb. 23 Buffalo. Ring of Fire. See Feb. 16. 7:30 p.m. Syracuse. New York Farm Show. More than 420 exhibitors will display a host of new equipment, plant products and technologies targeted for Northeast farmers and livestock producers at this annual indoor farm expo that spreads across several buildings at the fairgrounds. Landowners may also find many products and services useful for maintaining their property. Food vendors available throughout each day. Free tickets available from many Northeast Equipment dealers. Or get them by writing to New York Farm Show, P.O. Box 3470, Syracuse, NY 13220. Free parking and shuttles between all six buildings. $5 adults. Free under 18. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. www. newyorkfarmshow.com.

Feb. 24 Fulton. CNY Arts Center Presents “Godspell”. See Feb. 17. Buffalo. Ring of Fire. See Feb. 16. 8 p.m. Oswego. Oswego Music Hall Open Mic Friday. See Dec. 2. Saranac Lake. 2017 World Snowshoe Championships. Register 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Opening ceremony at 5 p.m. Races start the following day at 11 a.m. Vendors, entertainment and food. View website for complete schedule. www.saranaclake.com/

world-snowshoe-championships. Syracuse. New York Farm Show. See Feb. 23.

Feb. 25 Fulton. CNY Arts Center Presents “Godspell”. See Feb. 17. Buffalo. Ring of Fire. See Feb. 16. 8 p.m. Williamstown. Base Camp Oswego County. Winter outdoor expo with workshops on winter survival skills, winter camping, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing and more. Overnight tent camping: bring your own gear. Oswego County Nature Park at Camp Zerbe, Rte. 104. Sponsored by Oswego County Division of Parks and Recreation, Destination Expeditions, Pinnacle Builders USA Inc., Oswego County Tourism Office. Free. Times TBD. www.facebook.com/BaseCampOswego. 315-349-8322. Oswego. Oswego Music Hall Presents Annie and the Hedonists. The group frequently performs at festivals, concerts, and swing dances with Annie Rosen on lead vocals, Jonny Rosen on guitar and vocals, Peter Davis on clarinet, tenor guitar, piano, and vocals and Don Young on upright bass and vocals. The band interprets the songs of the great female blues artists of the ‘20s, 30s & 40s and its other styles include western swing, bluesy country, and roots Americana. $18. 7:30 p.m. Oswego Music Hall, Roy C. McCrobie Building, 41 Lake St. www.oswegomusichall. org. 315-342-1733. Lowville. Black River Valley Concert Series. My Sweet Patootie, Canadian Folk Music Award winner. Advance tickets $18, available in Lowville at the Historical Society and Cafe Z, and in Watertown at Dr. Guitar. $110 season tickets individual (includes one guest pass); $20 at the door; $20 individual; $45 family (2 parents and up to 4 children). 7:30 p.m. Historical Society Blue Room, 7552 South State St. www.lewiscountyhistory.org/ brcseries.html. Saranac Lake. 2017 World Snowshoe Championships. See Feb. 24. Syracuse. New York Farm Show. See Feb. 23. Oswego. Rice Creek Story Hour. Share tales of nature, animals’ wild ways, and how we relate to our world around us. These programs are designed for elementary-aged children, though all are welcome. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Free. 11 a.m. Rice Creek Field Station, Thompson Rd. 2016 / 2017

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315-312-6677.

Feb. 26 Williamstown. Base Camp Oswego County. See Feb. 25. Fulton. CNY Arts Center Presents “Godspell”. See Feb. 17. 3 p.m. Buffalo. Ring of Fire. See Feb. 16. 2 p.m.

MARCH March 1 Rochester. The Sound of Music. See Feb. 28.

March 2 Buffalo. Ring of Fire. See Feb. 16. 7:30 p.m. Rochester. The Sound of Music. See Feb. 28.

March 4 Oswego. Food & History Tour. See Dec. 3. Mannsville. 3rd Annual IditaFAT Bike Race. FAT bike racing on the best groomed trails in the region. Registration is $50. 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. CCC Camp, Winona Forest, Bargy Rd. www.winonaforest.com. 315-430-3889. Oswego. Rice Creek Rambles. Enjoy a family-friendly guided walk. An adult must accompany children. Free. 11 a.m.. Rice Creek Field Station, Thompson Rd. 315-312-6677. Syracuse. Cherish The Ladies. Instrumentalists performing Emerald Isle favorites. Dancers from the Johnston School of Irish Dance will also join for this special performance. Sean O’Loughlin, conductor. $36 to $81. 7:30 p.m. Crouse-Hinds Theater, 234 Harrison Street. www.experiencesymphoria. org. 315-299-5598.

March 5 Buffalo. Ring of Fire. See Feb. 16. 2 p.m. Rochester. The Sound of Music. See Feb. 28.

March 8 Oswego. Ke-nekt’ Chamber Music Series Presents Fulmer and LeDoux in Concert. David Fulmer on violin, and David LeDoux on cello, collaborate to perform piano trios by Schubert and Arensky. Pre-concert talk at 7 p.m. $15/adults; $5/students. 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sheldon Hall Ballroom, SUNY Oswego. www.oswego.edu/arts. 315-312-2130.

March 9 Rochester. Rachmaninoff & Tchaikovsky. Tchaikovsky’s popular First Piano Concerto features one of classical music’s all-time great openings, and its bravura demands are met by the “astonishing power and speed” (Chi-

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cago Classical Review) of Natasha Paremski. Rachmaninoff’s sensuous Symphony No. 3 caps off an evening of Russian greats. James Feddeck, guest conductor. Natasha Paremski, piano. $23-$99. 7:30 p.m. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 108 East Avenue. www.rpo. org. 585-454-2100. Ithaca. 7th Annual Winter Village Bluegrass Festival. Featuring The Jeremy Kittel Trio along with host band Paris Texas and downstate favorites Too Blue and more. Weekend ticket packages with lodging available. Hosted by La Tourelle, 1150 Danby Road. Contact for room rates at 607-273-2734. wintervillagebluegrass.org. 607-273-ARTS (2787).

March 10 Syracuse. Six Degrees of Separation. See Mar. 9. Rochester. Riverdance 20th Anniversary World Tour. The international Irish dance phenomenon is back by popular demand. Drawing on Irish traditions, the combined talents of the performers propel Irish dancing and music into the present day, blending dance, music and song. Composed by Bill Whelan, produced by Moya Doherty and directed by John McColgan. Admission TBA. Various times. Check website. Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 855 East Main Street. www.rbtl.org. Oswego. Oswego Music Hall Open Mic Friday. See Dec. 2. Old Forge. Snofest. The four major dealers, Ski Doo, Yamaha, Polaris, and Arctic Cat, will premier their 2018 models. Demos rides available, conditions permitting. Please contact Old Forge’s local dealerships for exact days & times of demos; Big Moose Arctic Cat & Yamaha, 315- 357-2998; Don’s Polaris, 315369-3255; and Smith Marine, 315-369-9911. Thousands of snowmobile enthusiasts take advantage of this opportunity to be the first to preview next year’s line of sleds and gear.

March 11 Old Forge. Snofest. See March 10. Rochester. Riverdance 20th Anniversary World Tour. See Mar. 10. Rochester. Rachmaninoff & Tchaikovsky. See Mar. 9. 8 p.m. Inlet. Vintage Snowmobile Races. Come by foot, skis, snowmobile or car. Lots of parking, food, and family fun. 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. 4th Lake, Inlet, near The Woods Inn. www. vintageicesnowmobileracing.com. 315-3575501. Oswego. Oswego Music Hall Presents Rev. Robert Jones and Matt Watroba. Every since their first meeting, over twenty years ago, Robert Jones and Matt Watroba have been musical partners. Their relationship started when they hosted, back to back, radio shows on WDET-FM, Detroit. Later on, they started

performing together and in doing so, they discovered a friendship based in mutual respect and a love for traditional American music, including Folk, Blues, Spirituals, Work Songs, and Chants: the music that reflects history, social change, migration, hopes and dreams. $18. 7:30 p.m. Oswego Music Hall, Roy C. McCrobie Building, 41 Lake St. www. oswegomusichall.org. 315-342-1733. Sandy Creek. Lego Leprechaun Trap. Challenge your friends to build a Lego Leprechaun Trap. Hear a story about “Casey the Unlucky Clover.” Hunt for golden leprechaun treasure and enjoy St. Patrick’s Day refreshments. Free. 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Ainsworth Memorial Library, 6064 S. Main St., Sandy Creek. www. ainsworthmemoriallibrary.org. 315-387-3732. Oswego. Rice Creek Rambles. Enjoy a family-friendly guided walk. An adult must accompany children. Free. 11 a.m. Rice Creek Field Station, Thompson Rd. 315-312-6677.

March 12 Oswego. 2nd Annual Oswego St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Celebrate Oswego’s Irish culture. Free. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Downtown Oswego. www.friendsofoswego.com. 315-806-0251. Rochester. Riverdance 20th Anniversary World Tour. See Mar. 10. Syracuse. Greater Syracuse Antiques Expo. Entering its 26th year, the event features 200 extra large exhibitor booths in the NY State Fairgrounds Horticulture Building. The show boasts wide variety and an enthusiastic buying crowd. $7 adults, VIP weekend pass $8, children 12 and younger, free. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Horticulture Building, New York State Fairground. www.allmanpromotions.com. 315-686-5789 Syracuse. Symphoria presents Selections From Amadeus: The Music of Mozart. Selections include grief stricken piano concerto No. 20, turbulent Symphony No. 25 and the famous Queen of the Night Aria. Program. Tickets $5 to $35. 2 p.m. St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral, 310 Montgomery St. Enter the cathedral from Fayette Street. Parking is available across Fayette Street in a large surface lot, as well as on the street and in other surrounding surface lots. experiencesymphoria.org. 315-299-5598.

March 13 Syracuse. . Greater Syracuse Antiques Expo. 10 a.m to 4 p.m. See March 12. 16.

March 17 Old Forge. St Patrick’s Day Parade This is the only Irish Parade in the Adirondacks. Creativity is always the main theme of this parade. Parade favorites return year after year.

Continued on p. 48


Cookie Bonanza By Deborah Jeanne Sergeant

W

hether you want to whip up a few batches of cookies for a cookie exchange, potluck, gifts or to satisfy your household’s sweet tooth, you don’t have to slave all day. Try this one base recipe with a few alterations to save time in the kitchen.

Base Recipe: 2 2/3 cups canola oil 2 cups white sugar 2 cups brown sugar 4 large eggs 6 tsp. vanilla extract 6 cups flour 2 tsp. baking soda 2 tsp. salt Beat oil, sugars, eggs and vanilla on high until fluffy. On low, beat dry ingredients into the wet ingredients. Divide the batter into four equal portions in four separate bowls. Select the four variations you like best. You can always double the above recipe to bake all eight varieties. After you follow any recipe’s special instructions, bake in a 375-degree, preheated oven for eight minutes (unless otherwise noted). Cookies will appear slightly pale, but no longer glossy. Allow them to cool on the baking sheet to finish setting up. Store in an airtight container.

Peanut Butter Cookies 1/4 of the base recipe dough 1/4 cup creamy peanut butter Additional white sugar Beat in peanut butter. Roll 1 1/2inch balls of batter in white sugar. On an ungreased baking sheet, place each ball two inches apart. Press down each ball with a fork in a crisscross pattern.

Chocolate Chip Cookies 1/4 of the base recipe dough 6 oz. semi sweet chocolate chips Stir together. Form 1 1/2-inch balls and place two inches apart on an ungreased baking sheet.

White Chocolate Chip Cookies

directions. Dip half of each cookie into melted wafers. Place on waxed paper to cool. For an extra decadent touch, sprinkle chocolate side with crushed macadamia nuts.

Peanut Butter Cup Delights

1/4 of the base recipe dough 1/3 cup cocoa powder 6 oz. white chocolate chips

1/4 of the base recipe dough Miniature peanut butter cups, unwrapped

Beat cocoa powder into Base Recipe. Stir in white chocolate chips. Form 1 1/2-inch balls and place two inches apart on an ungreased baking sheet.

Press Base Recipe into miniature muffin tins, filling them half full. Bake for seven minutes. Meanwhile, unwrap one peanut butter cup for each cookie. Press one unwrapped peanut butter cup into each cookie. Bake for another minute. Cool completely before removing from tin.

Cranberry Almond Cookies 1/4 of the base recipe dough 1 cup dried cranberries 1/2 cup sliced almonds Stir together. Form 1 1/2-inch balls and place two inches apart on an ungreased baking sheet.

Mint Avalanche Cookies

Confetti Cookies 1/4 of the base recipe dough 1 cup multi-colored sprinkles Stir together. Form 1 1/2-inch balls and place two inches apart on an ungreased baking sheet.

1/4 of the base recipe dough 3/4 cup crushed candy canes 4 oz. semisweet chocolate chips Stir together. Form 1 1/2-inch balls and place two inches apart on an ungreased baking sheet.

Deluxe Half Moon Cookies 1/4 of thebase recipe dough 1 cup chocolate candy melting wafers crushed macadamia nuts (optional) Form 1 1/2-inch balls and place two inches apart on an ungreased baking sheet. After cookies have been baked and cooled, melt the wafers according to package 2016 / 2017

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Seasonal Publications To advertise, send an email to wdotto@twcny.rr.com.

Local pickups with snowplows will entertain while in formation, under the name Synchronized Snowplows. The Old Forge Redheads group will be there, as will the Old Forge Irish Setters Club (which still has many dogs, but no Irish Setters). The Precision Shopping Carts will again be weaving their formations up Main Street. Free. 5 p.m. Main Street.

March 18 Oswego. Rice Creek Rambles. Enjoy a family-friendly guided walk. An adult must accompany children. Free. 11 a.m. Rice Creek Field Station, Thompson Rd. 315-312-6677. Oswego. Food & History Tour. See Dec. 3. Mumford. Maple Sugar Festival. Learn about 19th century and modern maple syrup production, including tree tapping, tubing system, and sap evaporation. Find out how to identify a sugar maple tree, how tall they grow and how big and old they need to be in order to tap them. Try your hand at using some of the metal tools, buckets and spiles used when tapping trees. See what it’s like to manage sap buckets on a shoulder yoke. Maple treats like maple cotton candy and maple popcorn for sale. In addition to the maple sugar camp, visit the Historic Village its many replica and restored homes and businesses. Visit website for more information, fees and times. Free for museum members. Various locations. New York State Maple Weekends. Almost 160 maple producers across New York State open their facilities to show people how maple syrup and related maple products are made from the tree

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to their table. This family-oriented event takes visitors back to their agricultural roots as they learn how a clear, water-like sap becomes a golden brown nectar. Most sites offer samples and tours of their sugar bush and evaporator room. Some offer animal petting areas, pancake breakfasts, wagon rides into the woods and more. Most are free but sell the breakfast. Visit website to find locations and details. www.nysmaple.com/

CNY WINTER GUIDE is published every year by Local News, Inc. Editor & Publisher: Wagner Dotto Associate Editor: Lou Sorendo Contributing Writers: Melissa Stefanec, Deborah Jeanne Sergeant Matthew Liptak Calendar of Events Editor: Deborah Jeanne Sergeant Advertising: Peggy Kain, Stacie Garafolo, Roxanne Seeber  Cover Design: Jillian Meisenzahl Office Assistant: Kimberley Tyler © 2016 by Local News, Inc.. All rights reserved.

315-342–8020 P.O. Box 276 Oswego, NY 13126

nys-maple-weekend.

March 19 Various locations. New York State Maple Weekends. See Mar. 18. Mumford. Maple Sugar Festival. See Mar. 18.

March 20 Baldwinsville. YMCA Acoustic Music Jam. See Jan 17.

March 24 Oswego. Oswego Music Hall Open Mic Friday. See Dec. 2. Fulton. CNY Arts Center Presents “Twelve Angry Men.” Courtroom drama set in a 1954 jury deliberation room. Times and Admission are TBD. CNY Arts Center, 11 River Glen Dr. www.CNYArtsCenter.com. 315-598-2787.

March 25 Fulton. CNY Arts Center Presents “Twelve Angry Men.” See Mar. 24. Oswego. Food & History Tour. See Dec. 3. Various locations. New York State Maple Weekends. See Mar. 18. Mumford. Maple Sugar Festival. See Mar. 18.


The Winter Fisherman Fly Tying: The Ideal Winter Meditation By Brandon Smith Ecclesiastes 3:1 To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven.

D

uring the spring, I am a single-minded pursuer of trout. During summer, I invest in my children and spend most of my fishing time as an educator and enthusiastic fatherly cheerleader. When fall arrives, I enjoy a couple days of salmon fishing, until I’ve had my fill, and then pursue steelhead the rest of the season. Winter is very different from the other seasons, but it’s not because I stop fishing. I’ll go ice fishing several times, I’ll still go fly fishing when the temperature is favorable, and I’ll occasionally float fish or bottom-bounce with my father on a random outing. But the majority of the winter, I find myself reflecting on the last three seasons and creating flies in my laboratory. If spring is the awakening, then winter is the long dream that precedes it. With a hook secured in my vise, I see a blank canvas to create upon. A great deal of the enjoyment I derive from fly fishing is from tying my own flies and creating more and more effective patterns through trial and error. I still remember the first trout I caught on a fly I tied myself. It was a deep reward that no other style of fishing had ever given me. Flies come in two categories, wet flies, which are designed for use underwater, and dry flies, which ride atop the water or are slightly suspended in the film. Another important classification, is imitators versus stimulators.

Imitators Imitators are meant to be imitations of something natural to the environment. The stone fly, the San Juan worm, the elk hair caddis and the glo

bug, as well as hundreds of other major patterns and their many variations, are all meant to recreate something that a trout would actually encounter and eat as a part of their diet. These reproductions of various insects, eggs and bait fish are not necessarily dead-on imitations to the human eye, but are ideally close enough when submerged (or floating or skating) to fool the fish. Some fly tiers take this several steps further and dabble in entomology, or the scientific study of insects. These are the ones who cannot only tie the adult fly, but accurately reproduce every larval stage from birth. When you’ve matched the hatch perfectly and presented the trout with a perfect recreation of the same insect it’s eaten a hundred of that day, and it still refuses your fly, what can you do? The unethical answer is to foul hook the fish and reel it in sideways if you have to. The sporting way is to present something different and entice the trout to open wide. This is where the stimulator fly comes in.

Stimulators A stimulator does not necessarily reproduce anything natural or familiar to the trout; therefore, it’s not clear if the trout is actually trying to eat the stimulator or is just attacking and striking out of anger. I sometimes wonder of some if these patterns actually do represent something familiar to the trout, and I just have no idea what it is. Whatever the answer is to this mystery, there is no exact science to creating them. It is purely an expression of art, which borrows features from other successful patterns.

The Gear I have amassed drawers and drawers of furs, feathers and other natural

A great deal of the enjoyment I derive from fly fishing is from tying my own flies and creating more and more effective patterns through trial and error. materials. I have synthetics, which are meant to match some these natural materials while employing different colors, weights and buoyancies. I find items at garage sales and craft stores and find ways to weave them into a new pattern or to spruce up a tried-and-tested one. I’ve sampled from leaf stems, pine needles, gift wrap and guitar strings. My wife knows that cat whiskers, when found, are a triumphant discovery.

The Hobby Whether you are someone who might gravitate to the extreme precision of insect reproduction, or the art-inspired radical who wants to experiment with something new, fly tying is a great escape, and winter is the season of fly tying. There a many great books, magazines and online tutorials that any novice can use to begin tying their own flies. If you want to learn how to tie a lifelike reproduction of a crawfish, there’s a resource for that. If you want to learn how to marry wings and create flies so elaborately beautiful that they can only be held in a picture frame, you can learn that too. When I turn up the heat, pour myself a finger of neat bourbon and sit down at my desk, I imagine myself outside on the first day of April. The sun is shining, the air is crisp and I have a plastic box full of my creations just opened with dozens to choose from. I can’t wait to see which refinements will prove themselves and which will not. Then I begin to create the new pattern that will somehow work, when all else fails. 2016 / 2017

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Snow 101 All you want to know about the white stuff

By Melissa Stefanec

S

now is what Upstate New York winters are made of. It’s responsible for car accidents, school closings, festivities and occasional cursing. Snow is an inevitable part of our daily winter lives, but how much do we know about the white stuff? Many of us probably know each snowflake is unique and that it is made of ice wrapped around a dust particle, but few of us know much else. The Winter Guide is here to share some snow knowledge from the National Snow and Ice Data Center.

Keep digging, it’s bound to get warmer

What about hail?

Snowflakes, graupel and sleet

Since snow is composed of frozen water, it is technically a mineral. A mineral is a homogenous (uniform) solid that is formed organically and has a definite chemical composition. Snow fits that bill.

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When snow falls and collects in fluffy, deep blankets it dampens noise. A heavy snowfall can really muffle your voice and other sounds. Conversely, when snow melts and freezes into an icy covering, it amplifies noise by reflecting sound waves. Hence the colder the snow, the louder the crunch beneath your feet. Snow is a great insulator. In fact, many animals hibernate in snow caves that they dig. Fresh, un-compacted snow traps 90 to 95 percent of the air.

Snow is precipitation in the form of ice crystals. When the temperature in the clouds drops below freezing, water vapor condenses directly into ice, completely skipping the liquid stage. Once an ice crystal forms, more water collects on it. Eventually these crystals cluster together and form a snowflake or ice pellet. That object leaves the cloud for our roads, sidewalks and countrysides.

50

I can’t hear you over all this snow

Snow can keep you warm

How the clouds make snow

Who knew there were three different kinds of snow? Snowflakes are clusters of ice crystals. Graupel or snow pellets are liquid cloud droplets with a temperature below freezing. The droplets eventually freeze and form a lumpy, soft and crumbly mass. Sleet is rain that freezes as it falls. Sleet can also be defined as a mixture of graupel and freezing rain.

blue snow in your own backyard. Poke a small hole in some deep snow and look down. The further down you look, the bluer the snow gets. This is because of light penetration and reflection. There are also algae that live in snow. Such algae turn snow pink or red. Iron can also leach into snow, giving it a red hue.

Hail is not snow. Hail forms when updrafts move graupel up through the atmosphere. The graupel grows until the updraft can no longer support its weight, and then it falls to earth, typically during thunderstorms. Hail is dense, heavy and icy.

Animal, mineral or vegetable?

I’ll take the all-natural snow cone Most of us are used to the good, old-fashioned white snow, but snow comes in blue and pink. You can see

Snow is created in the air. The ground is typically warmer than the air because it retains heat from the warm summer months. This means that snow on the surface of a snow bank is far colder than the snow at the bottom, which was warmed by the ground.

A foot of snow may sound like a lot But it is not. Most of the volume of snow is made of air. Most of the snow in the U.S. has a 4 – 10 percent ratio of water to snow. That means 10 inches of snow could contain as little as four tenths of an inch of water.

Lastly, I didn’t have to tell you this, but we live in the official snow belt We Upstate New Yorkers deserve our badge of winter honor. The down winds coming off the Great Lakes nail us with heavy snowfall. We live in one of the snowiest places in the country.


TRAVEL OFF THE BEATEN PATH.

Hundreds of inches of Lake Effect snow and more than 120 miles backcountry & groomed trails can only mean one thing,

Winter Paradise!

Explore Oswego County this Winter! Call (315) 349-8322 for Free Travel Brochures

Winona Forest

1-800-248-4FUN(4386) www.visitoswegocounty.com


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Winter Guide 2016-2017