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contents november 2012 edition

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SERVICES MATTER 12 Services Matter 13 Do We Really Understand The EPA 14 What is a Services Export

17 Trade in Services Statistics 20 How and Why to Perfect Your Intellectual Property A Focus on Branding 24 Should've, Could've but Didn't: Failure to Protect IP 26 Trinidad & Tobago Coalition of Services Industries 5th Annual Services Week 30 Global Services Summit

15 Innovative Trade Policies for Service Exporters

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SERVICE COALITIONS 33 Services Coalitions An Overview of Experiences in the Caribbean & Africa 36 Coalition Updates

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Deutsche Gesellschaft fĂźr Internationale Zusammenarbeit

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The New Frontiers: A message from the CNSC Coordinator

38 BCSI Charting a New Strategic Direction 41 Global Services Coalition CommuniquĂŠ

10 From the desk of the Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda

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contents november 2012 edition

48 TTCSI Align Private Fashion Showcase in London Tackling New Markets

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50 Interviews With Designers 52 Market Entry Challenges (VISA) In Exporting to the EU

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SERVICES SUCCESS 43 Move Over Willy Wonka

SERVICES SUPPORT

44 Testing, Testing 1, 2, 3 67 Strategic Alliances 20 Reasons Why Establishing Credibility 10 Tips

45 What You Sow: Jakes Farm to Table Dinners

68 Capitalizing on Innovations

46 The Meiling Story 70 A Successful Service Exporter's Buisness Card

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SERVICE SECTOR HIGHLIGHTS

72 Successful Services Exporting First Steps 62 Down De Road to Opportunities Maximizing on Carnival 64 Experiential Tourism: Putting the 'Wow' in Your Business

52 Coalition Contact Details 53 EPA Contact Details 56 Editor’s Note

55 Culinary Tourism Let's Get Cooking 58 Face The Music 60 Contract Research Organisations Developing the Bioscience Sector in the Caribbean

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services scoop

Services Scoop is a publication by the Caribbean Network of Service Coalitions

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Duggan International Group helps companies and government create their visitor experiences, and develops and implement marketing strategies. The company also specializes in international trade sales and business development in tourism, professional services, manufacturing and ICT. Company president, Darlene Duggan, plans to attend Caribbean Marketplace in the Bahamas, January 2013 and would like to meet with government agencies and tourism operators to discuss experiential tourism and marketing promotion. Contact darlene@ dugganinternational.ca/ www.dugganinternational.ca

Managing Director of Brown Mint Productions (BMP) Inc. and budding attorney at law, Shalisha Samuel wears the crown of both a creator and a businesswoman. After composing music for 13 years, she launched BMP Inc., a publishing company and is currently building the catalogue and pitching to record labels. Her music is a melodic blend of her life in the Caribbean, NYC and Europe. At the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) she was responsible for developing strategic plans for Caribbean member states and coordinating projects for regional development through the use of intellectual property.

Lucilla has vast experience in providing technical assistance to clients in the private and public sector in the CARICOM region and wider Caribbean. She worked as an Assistant Secretary with the Government of Dominica, as Senior Economist with the Eastern Caribbean Central Bank and as Manager, International Business Unit with the Government of Dominica before she established her private consultancy firm, ICMS Ltd., in 2001. As an independent consultant she has worked with the CARICOM Secretariat in building capacity in the compilation of statistics in international trade in services. Contact her at lewisl2004@gmail.com.

Lucilla Lewis

Tamira La Cruz

Tamira La Cruz, MBA, founder and CEO of MarkStra Caribbean, is a researcher and a consultant to global firms on corporate strategy, competitiveness and innovation. A business economist, she has a continuing interest in small state innovations and their monetization. She can be contacted via www.markstra.com, her Caribbean Research and Strategy blog, or tlacruz@ markstra.com.

Shalisha Samuel

Andrea Livingston-Prince

Andrea Livingston-Prince is a business expert with over two decades experience in the development of MSMEs. A Masters in Business Administration combined with training, project management, rural development, accounting and competitiveness training has served her clients well and will continue to do so with the usual attention to excellence. Business Works Limited has been supporting rural development and MSME initiatives since 1990 and is domiciled in Jamaica, USA and Belize. businessdon.weebly.com thebusinessadvisors@ gmail.com.

Darlene Duggan

CONTRIBUTORS

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contributors

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Ms. Lisa Cummins is a former career diplomat and served at the Headquarters of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade and in the Barbados Embassy at Washington DC. A trade professional by training and a specialist in International Trade in Services, she served as the Trade Policy Adviser for the Government of Uganda as part of a Commonwealth Secretariat funded programme. She was lead adviser for Uganda on Trade in Services and for the East African Community in regional and EPA negotiations. She has consulted for the World Bank, UNCTAD, the EU and TradeCom. She is currently the Executive Director of the BCSI, the apex body responsible for promoting competitiveness and services exporting from Barbados.

Lisa Cummins

Liesl Harewood is a Freelance Writer and Founder of WasinĂŠ (https://www.facebook. com/WasineInfo), a social entrepreneurship network that facilitates business and trade development. Her articles have been published in the Barbados Business Catalyst, Zing and the Caribbean Entrepreneur Magazine. She can be contacted at liesl@wasine.org.

Liesl Harewood

Sharleen Chin is the CEO for Meiling Inc. Ltd, responsible for publicity and new business development. She is always on the lookout for innovative ways to get the brand to a global market and was instrumental in the ground breaking presence of the Meiling brand in virtual worlds. A journalist by training from the renowned Ryerson University in Toronto, she has over 25 years of experience in public relations, marketing, advertising, fundraising, event planning and sales. She is also a certified life coach and has given professional development workshops in Montreal, Toronto and Trinidad. Sharleen is also a director of the Meiling Model Boot Camp. Email: sharleen@meilinginc.com.

Sharleen Chin

David brings almost 15 years experience working at the intersection of trade and development. Alongside broader strategic thinking and management, his work involves research and stakeholder facilitation primarily in the areas of trade policy formulation and negotiations in subSaharan Africa. His recent work touches on regional integration, aid-for-trade and notably trade in services (including the facilitation of enhanced engagement of the private sector). He is currently the Executive Director of the independent, notfor-profit International Lawyers and Economists Against Poverty (ILEAP).

David Primack

Michelle Hustler

Michelle Hustler has dedicated the past nine years to trade in services and small business development in CARICOM. Presently she is contracted by the GIZ to raise awareness on the importance of services and services coalitions at the regional level,support the regional coalition network and provide developmental assistance to fledgling coalitions. She is also contracted by the Centre for Development of Enterprise (CDE), where she supports the Caribbean regional office through enterprise level competitiveness-enhancing projects across a range of sectors. Michelle can be reached at michellehustler@ gmail.com.

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contributors

Tanya Chase-Henry currently serves as the Executive Assistant of the Dominica Coalition of Service Industries. Tanya’s professional career spans some eleven years, commencing with employment in the accounting field, after completion of a B.Sc. Economics and Accounting with the University of the West Indies.

Tanya Chase-Henry

Her valuable input as a founding member of the team spearheading the implementation of the DCSI into Dominica’s business environment, can be attributed to her experience gained from her involvement with the implementation of reform and change management initiatives, as Project Accountant, under the World Bank Growth and Social Protection Technical Assistance Project in Dominica.

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Originally from the French Caribbean island of Martinique, Florence Louis-Edouard shares a deep passion for the Caribbean as a whole and more particularly for its regional integration process. An international trade expert by training and experience , Florence has been working in various institutions dedicated to developing micro, small and medium sized enterprises since 2004. She has significant experience in the design and execution of projects across a variety of sectors to assist SME’s increase their export sales. She is currently residing in Trinidad and Tobago.

Florence Louis-Edouard

James Lim is the Program Associate of CSI and has been involved in all of CSI's Global Services Summits. He holds a BA from Michigan State University and is currently pursuing a Masters of Public Policy with a specialization in International Security and Economic Policy from the University of MarylandCollege Park. He is originally from Detroit, MI and presently resides in Washington, DC. James can be reached at lim@uscsi.org.

James Lim

Ena Harvey is the Management Coordinator - Caribbean Region & Agribusiness Specialist in Agrotourism with IICA (InterAmerican Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture). She works with both the public and private sectors in Latin America and the Caribbean in identifying and developing new tourism sites and attractions in rural communities, and promoting trade of agricultural goods and services with the tourism sector. She can be contacted at ena.harvey@iica.int.

Ena Harvey

Chris Hillier

Professor Chris Hillier is a successful technology entrepreneur and respected academic scientist with global experience of company spinout/start-up, business development, SME governance, IP management, product development, and market analysis. He is currently employed by the University of the West Indies to drive the innovation and entrepreneurship agenda at their Cave Hill campus in Barbados.

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message

WillkomenDeutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)

Robert Glass Executive Project Manager, EPA Implementation Support Project Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), www.giz.de

I wanted to begin my thoughts with a Caribbean analogy of the progress of the coalitions and the Caribbean Network of Service Coalitions (CNSC) over the past two years, yet motorsport’s most famous words keep ringing in my ears “Gentlemen… start your engines!” This exciting last year’s introduction of GIZ’s support to the

regional coalitions has been followed by a year of building speed and racing down the track. From December 2010 to December 2012: the CNSC was established, coalitions were set-up last year in Jamaica, Dominica and Antigua & Barbuda and this year in Grenada and Belize, the already established coalitions in Saint Lucia, Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago have become more focused, stronger and better supported, and coalitions in Guyana and Dominican Republic are poised to launch in the immediate future. The GIZ, in an effort to fulfill its mandate in the Caribbean, “to assist regional and national organizations in the implementation of the Economic Partnership Agreement” by enhancing the “business environment for export-oriented companies”, has served the role, in this case, of the pit-stop, offering the support and resources necessary to ensure that the race continues speedily along. Over the course of the year the GIZ has continued its awareness building efforts with respect to trade in services and the important role that the coalitions play by maintaining the CNSC website, monthly newsletters, Facebook page and of course, the magazine you are now reading, Services Scoop. The GIZ also supported the

development of websites for four coalitions and will be extending the same support to two others in the upcoming months. The GIZ has provided technical support to coalitions, offering the fledgling coalitions the guidance required to ensure a quick and seamless start to their activities and will continue to do so in the future. The organization has also partnered with coalitions to support their various initiatives. For example, the GIZ was a key sponsor of TTCSI’s Services Week and supported the BCSI’s LEED Certification initiative and EPA workshops. While the GIZ’s programme was originally slated to end in December 2012, the value of the work accomplished has been recognized and an extension of the project has very recently been approved. I look forward, therefore, to another exciting lap in the race to develop alongside our regional CSIs an internationally competitive services sector.

WTO Director-General: Pascal Lamy The global economy is being transformed at an unprecedented speed and at the heart of that transformation is the services economy. (...) Services underpin every part of the production process, from research and development to design, engineering, financing, transportation, distribution and marketing. In short, without services, there would be little value-added and innovation. China International Fair on Trade in Services, May 2012 8

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message

The New Frontiers A Message from the Coordinator of the Caribbean Network of Service Coalitions Mr. Nirad Tewarie The primary goal of a service coalition is to assist in the expansion of the service sector.

Nirad Tewarie Coordinator, Caribbean Network of Service Coalitions and Executive Director, Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries, http://c-nsc.org / www.ttcsi.org

This means that our role is to help companies do more business. We are business support organizations. Our task is therefore both daunting and exciting. It is a daunting task because service providers, except for a few, are not very outward looking. Moreover, they are up against a plethora of very real limitations. These include the difficulty in accessing financing, challenges in establishing credibility in new markets, weak policy frameworks, little knowledge of market opportunities, language barriers and poor cultural-understanding. While many in the region talk of the 2013 EDITION

importance of services, real, sustained action at the macro level is limited. It is however easy to find a problem for every solution. Such an approach is also highly unproductive. It is therefore up to us, individually and collectively to plough through the problems, untie the knots and to make things happen! In that regard, we must look at ourselves first. From the limitations which I have identified, most can be overcome by service providers themselves. So, notwithstanding all the very real aforementioned constraints, service providers must get up and do. Just as a musician will invest in new instruments, an IT company in training and hardware and a yacht service company in a new marina, service providers must start including exploration of new markets and market research in their business planning. In huge swaths of the service sector, there is no substitute for personal relationships. In addition, we cannot be fearful of the apparent overwhelming size of external markets. We should not target a market as vague as “the EU” or even “Germany” or even “Berlin”, we have to be able to find the right partner(s) for the right market segment. Once we enter the market, we can grow. Too often it appears that businesses lack self-belief, are risk-averse and see the exploration stage as a hassle and a distraction from their attempts to deal current issues and constraints. As a result, many opportunities to explore new markets go to waste. Running a business is no easy task. However, diversification of markets and

revenue streams are critical to business sustainability. For this reason, the CNSC places much emphasis on tackling the challenge of business culture. The CNSC dedicates much energy to raising awareness, showcasing examples of success in order to inspire and motivate, highlighting opportunities and offering exportguidance – providing information and support. One specific thing that both the region and individual companies must work on however is the issue of branding. Many countries in the region are unknown in potential markets and our services are assumed to be low-quality. This in itself is a tremendous barrier to service exporting and needs to be addressed. Over the last year, we have seen the launch of several new Coalitions. In addition, the work of the existing Coalitions is beginning to bear fruit. Collaboration with both national and regional agencies involved in export promotion and service sector development is increasing. As we seek to build on these very positive gains the CNSC will continue to collaborate as a network and also with strategic partners to further develop the region’s services sector. In this regard, on behalf of the CNSC, I would like to say a special thank you to the GIZ for its continued support and valuable advice. Feel free to call on us at any time for assistance, advice or support. We look forward to working with you to take Caribbean businesses to the world! Warm regards, Nirad Tewarie

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message

From the Desk of the

Prime Minister

Hon. Dr. W. Baldwin Spencer Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda and Lead Head for Services in the CARICOM Quasi-Cabinet

Dear reader, as Lead Head of Government with responsibility for Services in the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Quasi Cabinet, it gives me great pleasure to be associated once again with this edition of the Services Scoop Magazine and thus to provide you with the broad scope of developments in the regional services sector for the year 2012. The year 2012 was quite a challenging one for the small, vulnerable economies of CARICOM. The global economic recession, which appears unwilling to go away, and the first and second stage effects of the international financial crisis continued their toll on all aspects of life in our small region, especially in Antigua and Barbuda. Internally, governments continued to 10

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be hard-pressed to meet the obligations of their electorate, while externally, measures taken by some governments to address falling revenues are now adversely affecting our small economies. I make specific reference to the Air Passenger Duty imposed by the UK and the non-settlement by the USA of the award to Antigua and Barbuda in the gaming dispute at the World Trade Organisation. These notwithstanding, efforts to maintain stability of the economies are paying off in the region. In this regard, the difficult but critical work of developing the regional regime for services continued in 2012 and I would like to highlight five areas. During 2012, CARICOM Member States were able to distil the elements of a Draft Regional Policy for the Provision of Professional Services in the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME) and extensive consultations with the relevant stakeholders were held in ten Member States. Among other things, this draft clearly defines a professional, makes provision for independent regulation and outlines the requirements and procedures for registration and licensing. The principal objective of the draft policy is to facilitate the free movement of professionals in the CSME as well as to harmonise the treatment of professionals from third countries. The data collection framework was also strengthened in 2012. A Common Core Trade in Services Questionnaire was developed and

independently pilot-tested by Antigua and Barbuda. It will be refined and further tested in six Member States in 2013. It is expected that this instrument will enable CARICOM Member States to report more detailed and timely data on trade in services. The regional framework for services statistics remains weak and needs the support of both the public and private sectors. Three regional conferences were convened: The Second CARIFORUM International Conference on the Financial Services Sector in the Caribbean Region (30-31 August, 2012, Antigua and Barbuda), Creative Industries (14 September, Barbados) and the Roundtable on Postal Sector Reform (13-14 November 2012, Guyana) respectively. These facilitated the exchange of experiences on various aspects of reform now taking place across the globe and the preparation of targeted strategies to respond to the rapidly evolving external environment. In the case of Financial Services, delegates examined in detail, the emerging framework of governance of international finance, the factors driving success in small financial centres, reviewed non-tax models that could be applied to the region and considered the elements of a new architecture for the sector. In the case of Creative Industries, one of the outputs was a framework to develop a preliminary data set on the industry which would facilitate proper planning to harness its full potential. 2013 EDITION


Negotiations with the European Union on the funding of the regional services work programme have been advanced and are now expected to be completed by year end. Work on the preparation of the Regional Strategic Plans for Financial Services, ICT, Professional Services, Education Services, Tourism Services, Health and Wellness Services and Cultural, Entertainment and Sporting Services are therefore expected to commence in January 2013 and completed by December 2014. Work is already in train in the areas of ICT, Creative Industries and Professional Services and we should reap an early harvest in these areas by December 2013. Our labours in the area of private sector strengthening continue to bear fruit. The Grenada Coalition of Service Industries was launched on 29 March 2012 and this brings the number of coalitions in the CSME to ten. These coalitions are set up to, inter alia; improve the

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region’s performance in trade in services. I am concerned though, at the level of private sector involvement during these difficult economic times. Three major trade in services agreements are enforced for CARICOM Member States: the CSME; the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) of the World Trade Organisation; and the CARIFORUM-EU Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA). I am not convinced that the private sector of the region is fully utilizing these agreements to create jobs and earn foreign exchange. I take this opportunity to call on the private sector to seize these opportunities. If restrictions still exist please bring these to our attention. I assure that we will find the appropriate solutions.

Prime Minister Hon. Dr. W. Baldwin Spencer Antigua and Barbuda

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SERVICES MATTER

SERVICES MATTER The services sector plays an integral role in the functioning of any modern economy: • From the important social role that health and education services play in affecting the quality of life and skills of the labour force, • to the essential basic infrastructure created by construction, telecommunications, financial and energy services, • to the invaluable role transportation services play in supporting the traditional manufacturing and agricultural sectors, • as well as the value professional services impart in enhancing the competitiveness of any business – the services sector is the cornerstone of all economic activity. Recent statistics show that the services sector accounted for almost 71% of global GDP in 2010 and is expanding faster than either the agriculture or manufacturing sectors. Employment in services surpassed that of agriculture in 2001; about 60% of men and

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70% of women were employed in service industries in 2010. Yet while the services sector of Caribbean countries continues to grow in line with these trends, trade in services comprises only a very small portion of total international trade and is concentrated largely in tourism. Through the expansion of global markets from increased openness across all sectors, coupled with the context of the modern digital economy, the importance of the services sector has become even more profound. Effectively all services have become potentially tradable through the internet and supply and demand has become global. The foundation for actively developing the services sector and supporting services exports has been laid. M. Hustler and D. Primack. 2012. Harnessing Services Trade for Development: A Background and Guide on Service Coalitions in Africa and the Caribbean. Toronto: ILEAP (Background Brief No. 22)

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SERVICES MATTER

Do We Really

Understand the EPA? By Lisa Cummins Barbados Coalition of Service Industries

Concluded in 2008, the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) between the CARIFORUM and European Union (EU) states remains largely unimplemented. The possible explanations for the non-implementation will inevitably lead to the question of whether we understand the Agreement. The question of ‘understanding’ is challenged first by the non-implementation of the provisions of the Agreement, particularly our obligations - but if we consider that the region is persistently challenged with implementation in most areas, this point becomes less indicative of our level of understanding. It is quite possible that the EPA is just one in a long series of issues that we have moved slowly on.

...do we understand the ‘larger picture’?

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The more pertinent question to consider is, do we understand the larger picture? Do we appreciate the market dynamics driving global trade and our place in that context? Do we have the kind of private sector led, state sponsored, organized aggression that characterizes the trade and commercial policy of most successful trading nations, which in turn gives rise to innovation, market penetration and expansion of our goods and services? I would suggest we don’t. For the first time in our history, we have negotiated and concluded a reciprocal, preferential trade agreement. The EPA has been the first true test of our ability to handle our own without the covering of non-reciprocity. However, to date it is clear that we still don’t speak the same language of our successful competitors. The way in which we do business needs to change. Our current perception of business is a major hindrance and the EPA remains a casualty of our historical outlook on business and competitiveness. The Caribbean countries have to undergo, at all levels, a mindset shift that allows us to compete in a global market place with players who have been on the world stage for decades. The length of time it takes to make a decision in the region is far behind the world’s fast paced economies. A bureaucracy that doesn’t quite understand private sector activity complicates the ease of doing business. The reverse is the case for a private sector which is often woefully unaware of the policy environment within which they must function. All combined, we have a public and private sector that genuinely wants to do business and trade with our partners but needs significant structural and attitudinal change in order to operate at a level that is required to reach and maintain global competitiveness. Additionally, we have a foundational deficiency that we need to address. Our economies are made up largely of micro, small and medium sized enterprises (MSMES) which constitute the bulk of domestic production and employment. This is the group with the greatest potential to use the EPA and therefore must occupy our attention. But most MSMEs are not exporting to the EU. Most MSMEs are not versed in international trade and lack the capital to hire the human resources in this area. At the negotiation phase, although national consultations were held, there is no real indication that MSMEs had sufficient information or knowledge to articulate their interests, offensive and defensive, even through their business support organisations. In contrast, the larger firms were already exporting to the EU and were intimately involved in the negotiation of the agreement.

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SERVICES MATTER

A Refresh

er

What is a

Services Export? By Tanya Chase-Henry, Dominica Coalition of Service Industries

The Caribbean countries have to undergo, at all levels, a mindset shift that allows us to compete in a global market place with players who have been on the world stage for decades. 14

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The example of rum comes to mind immediately as a highly organized, focused and knowledgeable special interest group. There can be no question that they understand both the market and the Agreement and have successfully protected their defensive interests while securing offensive ones. Now that we are implementing the agreement, the same challenge remains. It is into this gap that development support must become a priority for business support organisations and government in an effort to bring MSMEs to where they can be fully integrated into the region’s export thrust. The Agreement contains a range of support measures designed to develop the capacity to trade. The region has also signed three financial agreements with the EC (European Commission) in support of regional integration to enable the CARIFORUM states to meet their commitments and make the most of the Agreement itself. These areas include fiscal reforms, Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) measures, trade in services, the removal of technical barriers to trade as well as capacity building. This developmental process should be our first step into utilizing the Agreement particularly for MSME’s. Some of this is already happening but we still need to go much further and faster. The mindset shift that is required can be a part of this development support as we expose both our policy makers, negotiators, private sector support organisations and business persons to best practices, the speed of doing business in more competitive economies and a business culture that spawns competitiveness. These are among the factors that will allow for the utilization of the EPA and any other subsequent trade agreement which the region signs either with traditional and particularly with non-traditional partners.

The export of services comprises all services rendered by residents of a country to non-residents of the respective country. The World Trade Organization (WTO) in its General Agreement on Trade and Services (GATS) defines and classifies services exports using a four-pronged approach. A service is exported when it is supplied in one or more of the following ways: Mode 1: Cross Border Supply - The export of services comprises all services rendered by residents of a country to non-residents of the respective country. Example - the provision of medical transcription services by a company based in Antigua, via the internet, for a medical facility located in the United Kingdom. Mode 2: Consumption Abroad - the domestic service supplier provides a service in the domestic market to a non-resident consumer. In this case, the service consumer has moved into another country to obtain a service. Example – a resident of Barbados visiting Dominica to receive therapeutic massage services from a local spa. Mode 3: Commercial Presence - a service provider establishes a business in an overseas territory to provide services the overseas location. In other words, the service provider establishes a territorial presence, by means of ownership or lease of premises in another territory, other than his base country. Example - a company legally registered in Saint Lucia, offering accounting services, establishes a branch in Germany to offer similar accounting services to Germans. Mode 4: Presence of Natural Persons - the physical movement of the service provider to provide a service in another country on a temporary basis. Example - a management consultant who leaves his resident country of Anguilla to work in Grenada as a management consultant for a human resource audit project. 2013 EDITION


SERVICES MATTER

Innovative Trade Policies for

Service Exporters By Andrea C Livingston-Prince, Management Consultant, Business Works Limited

The European Union, through the European Commission, has recently proposed a number of initiatives designed to enhance the manufacturing sector. These include initiatives to stimulate investments in new technologies, improve the business environment, secure market access, ensure that the industry’s skills requirements are met and provide access to financing, particularly for SMEs. The focus is understandable, goods account for over 65% of EU’s exports, as well as 80% of EU’s investment in research and development. In CARIFORUM, however, manufacturing continues to decline. This is not necessarily an indication of an overall economic worsening in the region. Many countries can stake a claim to rising above the challenges that the global economic meltdown has brought through the force of their services sector. Unfortunately, the efforts with respect to the development of the services sector to date have focused almost entirely on the tourism sector. To truly engender meaningful growth, CARIFORUM governments must pursue active consideration of the services sector as a whole, including the key subsectors and players in these subsectors, investment initiatives, the appropriate macroeconomic model, linkages between the sector and other regional priority issues such as environmental sustainability and so forth. There is a need to formalize this sector through the undertaking of foundational initiatives such as an appraisal of the current state of the sector, consultation with the private sector, including a needs assessment, establishing an inclusive micromanaged watch 2013 EDITION

and establishing a communication strategy to ensure continuous dialogue amongst all relevant parties. The governmental challenge that would be faced should such action be undertaken is identified by the McKinsey Center for Government in their October 2012 publication. “A new era in public management is under way. Governments everywhere confront major demographic, technological and social change, even as they must do more with less to ensure their citizens' prosperity, health, and security. To succeed, they must raise their institutional intelligence and capabilities to bridge the public, private, and nonprofit sectors in ways never attempted before.” The publication highlights two critical points: • The call for greater engagement and empowerment of citizens and; • The understanding that only systemic change, as opposed to incremental reform, will allow government to keep pace in a rapidly changing world. If we analyze the anatomy of these statements, we will find that they call for a new methodology in constructing our trade policy reforms in order to enact maximum impact on the services sector. This new methodology should include increased quality research, enhanced communication mechanisms, reduced

formalized structures between the sectors and the policy makers, improved use of documentation tools ranging from digital recorders to camcorders, enhanced accountability mechanisms, deeper linkages between policy and practice, increased dialogue between stakeholders in systematic and pragmatic way, increased linkages between educational institutions and the service sector, development of a wider network of research practitioners, deeper and expanded role for a research model within trade policy development units of governments and development of an ICT-based communication model for policy development within the region. Based on experience in managing a management consulting firm for over 2 decades and serving varied developing states, being a member of the Jamaica Trade Adjustment Team, serving the Small Business Association of Jamaica and working with the Ministry of Foreign Trade in Belize, I have devised four trade policy shapers that I believe can propel the services sector forward. Services Network Policy (SNP): The Services Network Policy would be based on four pillars of engagement: the services sector, the public sector, research initiatives and investment forces. Key to this policy would be a need for more deliberate and strategically managed industrialized and science and technology-based trade initiatives implemented in-country. Examples of this would include the revision of manufacturing processes, standards, trends or farming technologies. The related changes would create new skills, knowledge and aptitudes and therefore immediately result in service sector changes. Within the construction industry, for example, sewage treatment has seen recent innovative introductions, however the sector is services scoop

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SERVICES MATTER

dependent on imported experts and technicians. The industry changes have not impacted the supporting services sector. The proposed policy would govern the direction of trade agreements and would require that regulations and procedures undergo deeper qualitative analyses by the policy makers. A consistent and well-manged Trade Adjustment Team devoted to the sector would be required for this policy to reap optimal impact. Competency- Led: Sector Skill Councils are centers for subsector development. The SSC is a country’s method of strategically managing the development and strengthening of a sector through its people. This is especially important as sectors may be easily undermined through weakened offerings by its service providers. The Competency-Led Policy considers knowledge, attitude, aptitude and skills required for service-providers and may place sector skill councils at the helm of all policy development for the service sectors. Gender-Based Trade Policy (GTP) The proposed GTP has its roots in developing government sector policies and regulations based upon gender roles. For example, consider a matriarchal society where adult females are the bread-winners of the family, now consider the policies that would be more effective in such a context. 16

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The drawback to this proposal is its exceedingly heavy reliance upon periodic anthropological and economical statistical research and analyses. Its advantage is its relevance in nations and regions where there is a heavy change in the population by gender, e.g. decline of employable males over the age of 18. Though research in and of itself is valuable, the type, quality and analysis of the research is critical to the success/relevance of a policy. Metrics such as gender trends must always be incorporated into small states’ management research, policies and regulations. Body of Knowledge Focused The final proposal for a service sector focused trade policy would be the BOK. This is so named for its heavy focus on implementation based upon the uniqueness of each Body of Knowledge. Examples might include fields such as Geology, Anthropology and Sociology (culture), Technology - Management Information Systems (MIS), Technology – Engineering, Mechanical and Thought Systems, Aeronautical and Aerospatial and Industrialisation. These fields’ local and international body of knowledge would serve to drive, support and offer support to the service sectors. This would generally include training, consulting, value-added product design, marketing and development, process and strategy design support, project development, project

management, programme support, business start-up, product development, network management, etc. Stimulation would take place by implementing strategic management and oversight machineries that leverage measures which incorporate incentives to local and foreign investors through trade mechanisms. Sustainability It is important for us to bear in mind that being small makes us more vulnerable to climate change issues. Greater and improved management of climate change creates the opportunity for numerous new industries and professions for states. These may be driven by specialized experience within existing roles, new and advanced training, professional certification, research findings, applied creativity, compliance with international standards, local standards development processes and creativity, general innovation and strategic response to cultural forces. This multi-virate would have an accompanying benefit of increasing education and linkages between the state and the global and regional agenda, thereby increasing the quality and level of information about climate change on both urban and rural communities. These policies would attract investment, strengthen governance, broaden reach and improve and increase impact, what else could our small states want?

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SERVICES MATTER

You can’t manage what you can’t measure

Statistics Trade in Services

for Services Development

By Lucilla Lewis, ICMS Ltd.

We all know that the services sector is a major contributor to economic activity globally. In this global framework, Caribbean countries continue to identify the services sector as a key contributor to sustainable economic growth. This increasing significance of and dependence on services in the region is attributable to several factors including: 2013 EDITION

• An expanding global inclination of crossborder trade in services ushered in by information communication technology (ICT); • The development of a conceptual framework under the World Trade Organisation’s (WTO), General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) with rules and guidelines for regulating international trade in services; • As a result of technological developments and GATS, a trend has been established for the inclusion of services in free trade agreements (FTAs) negotiated within and among trading blocs – in the Caribbean, the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME), the European Commission (EC) CARIFORUM

Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA), the Caribbean Canada Agreement (CARIBCAN), the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) with the United States of America (USA), as well as several other FTAs entered into with trading blocs in Latin America; • Loss of preferential market access for traditional exports and the need for economic diversification; • Evidence of the Caribbean region’s comparative advantage as a supplier of tourism services and the perception of strong growth potential of other services. Tourism services have served as the primary contributing sector in the economies of several CARICOM Member States. In recent years, more Member

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States have transitioned from a dependence on banana, sugar, rice and other primary exports to tourism as well. Private and public sector stakeholders in the region, donors and friendly Governments have invested substantial levels of resources in product development and capacity building in this sector. These investments over the years however, have not paid enough attention to development of the statistical database to measure the impacts of the sector. The situation is that, while most countries compile arrival statistics and rough estimates of direct expenditure by tourists, the information on direct and indirect employment, revenue accruing to Central Government, ownership and financing profile of the sector, etc. is very sparse. The result is that policy and investment plans for the sector are being designed and implemented with inadequate and incomplete statistical information. For that matter, very few Member States compile the Tourism Satellite Accounts (TSA) to capture a more holistic assessment of the impacts of tourism on sustainable economic development. The situation gets worse when it comes

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to measuring impacts of the other services identified by the region to have strong growth potential, especially within the FTAs being entered into. In this regard, a cursory review of statistical publications by Member States reveals that in the external accounts, in most cases, data is not available for cultural and entertainment services, professional business services, construction services or charges for use of intellectual property. This scenario poses challenges, it also presents an opportunity. The post WTO GATS trading environment has ushered in increasing demand for statistics on trade in services which has resulted in the rolling out of an integrated framework with conceptual guidelines to guide countries globally in the compilation of statistics on international trade in services. In this regard, the first Manual on Statistics of International Trade in Services (MSITS) was published by the UN in 2002 with the revised Version MSITS 2010 published in 2011. The Caribbean region is therefore presented with an internationally endorsed framework within which to develop and

These statistics would also serve as a vital tool to agencies involved in regulating and facilitating foreign investment and to trade negotiators in the preparation of negotiations of FTAs.

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compile statistics on international trade in services to better profile, measure, quantify and forecast the services activities which are increasingly being targeted as key growth and development engines. MSITS, by listing compilation activities in order of priority and providing a metadata section, allows countries to implement recommendations within their resource constraints and to address any country customization necessary in the metadata. The pace at which this opportunity will be seized by countries will depend, as MSITS envisages, on resource availability, but also, in the view of the author of this article, on the level of appreciation by stakeholders, especially policy makers in the public sector and data providers across sectors, of the importance of statistical information in business, policy and development planning. It is those two factors which challenge the region’s ability to adopt the MSITS framework for better measuring the impact of services on sustainable economic development. Central Statistical Offices (CSOs) which are already pushed to their limits compiling basic economic statistics – national accounts, consumer price indices, trade statistics, the balance of payments in some cases in collaboration with the Central Banks, have increasingly been assigned responsibility for compilation of social statistics in the context of the 2015 target for achieving the Millennium Development Goals, are now required, with little or no additional resources in most cases, to compile statistics on international trade in services within the MSITS framework. The MSITS framework involves:

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• Compilation of the Extended Balance of Payments Services Classification (EBOPS). This is generally compiled in collaboration with the Central Banks. EBOPS is a more detailed presentation of the Services Account of the Balance of Payments (BOP); • Compilation of statistics on Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) inflows and outflows e.g loan capital, equity capital, interest, dividends and reinvested earnings. In some cases this is compiled in collaboration with the Central Banks as some of the flows of FDIs are already captured in the BOP; • Compilation of Foreign Affiliates Statistics (FATS). FATS are FDIs which are more that 50% foreign owned and it is the vehicle through which most of the capital movements within and between trading blocs is expected to occur. MSITS recommends the following priorities, among the other FATS variables to be compiled, based on Standard Industrial Trade Classifications (SITC): • Employment • Value added • Exports of goods and services • Imports of goods and services • Number of Enterprises • Compilation of statistics on the GATS 4 Modes of Supply.

Clearly, the above statistics if

compiled would provide much needed information for policy making and development planning in services dependent economies. These statistics would also serve as a vital tool to agencies involved in regulating and facilitating foreign investment and to trade negotiators in the preparation of negotiations of FTAs. The current baseline with respect to availability of statistics on international trade in services in the region, to be used to inform design of sector strategies, negotiations and assessments of FTAs, and growth and development planning, is grossly deficient despite past initiations led by the CARICOM Secretariat and supported by donor agencies including CIDA, USAID and the EU. These efforts need to be better complemented by efforts at a national level if results achieved are to be sustained. Discussions of national budgetary allocations to the Central Statistical Offices in Member States must therefore be held within the context of ensuring that these offices are adequately resourced to sustainably deliver on their increasing mandate to produce statistics on which efficient development planning and effective implementation of development strategies rely. Without statistics on international trade in services our assessment of the impacts of FTAs is greatly limited!

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How and Why to protect

Your Intellectual Property By Shalisha Samuel Brown Mint Productions Inc.

The business with the foresight and vision to use their intellectual property (IP) assets as a means to propel their service or product have even greater prospects for success and longevity.

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What is IP? IP is an idea that has been transformed into sight, touch, sound and even smell which when protected under law, grants exclusive rights to the creator/owner. The painting in your head is simply an idea; the painting on a canvas may be your personal property, but like any other personal property, it can be taken/used without your permission. The painting on canvas, once exclusive rights are granted, is your intellectual property. Intellectual property grants legal ownership of intangible assets. “Intellectual” because it is the creation of your intellect and “property” because it legally belongs to the creator/owner. In our knowledge-driven society, IP are

A Focus on Branding

intangible assets that are highly valued while tangible assets such as machinery rapidly devalues over time. The first generation iPod has a low selling rate, but ownership in the iPod trademark has a high value. The below beehive graph lists a number of IP categories. A product/service can attain protection in one or more of these areas. The length of protection varies according to the type of protection. Always bear in mind that these rights also vary according to jurisdiction, therefore, due diligence and research is paramount on your part as a business owner exploring new markets. A simple way of understanding the sub-categories is with association of well-known products or services.

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Geographical Indication: Champagne from the Champange region in France

Patents: Apple store's staircase/iPhone/ mp3 player/ breastfeeding shirts

Trade Secret: WD-40/Google's search algorithm/ KFC/Coca-Cola formula

Copyright: Books/Films/ Isaac Blackman's song “Jumping up to the Ceiling”

Industrial Design: Volkswagen Beetle/iPad/ Coca-Cola bottle

Trademarks: TIDE/ VISA/Clarks/ Tylenol

After viewing the beehive graph the below definitions should be easy to understand. Each protection grants an exclusive right to the creator to use/commercialise and to prohibit the unauthorized use by others.

Copyright: Protects literary and artistic works (books, films, songs etc.) and computer/software programmes. Term of protection is life of author +50 years after death (in U.S.A and Europe it is +70 years after death). Trademarks: Protects distinctive signs (words, letters, designs, logos) used to identify a product or service. Term of protection is 10 years in most countries but can be renewed indefinitely. Failure to use a trademark can result in it being an obsolete/dead mark. Patents: Protects new and innovative products or processes. Term of protection is 20 years. Industrial Designs: Protects the physical/aesthetic appearance of a product. Protection is offered initially for

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5 years, which can be renewed up to at least 10 years. Countries can therefore offer renewals up to 10 or 25 years for example – please check your local legislation/IP Office. Geographical Indications: Protects products originating from a particular region/country in which factors unique to the production in the region/country (climate, soil or special skills of the people) speaks to the quality of the product. Examples are Cognac from Cognac, France; Scotch whisky from Scotland and; Parmigiano-Reggiano (parmesan cheese) originating from a few select regions in Italy. This type of protection is offered on a collective and not an individual basis and therefore does not belong to a person or firm.

How is IP relevant to my Business? Businesses typically incorporate IP into their strategy and vision as the business matures or as a response to IP losses: • a former employee is now bottling a pepper sauce that tastes just like yours because they know your secret ingredient (trade secret); • a former freelance graphic artist is now selling your client’s artwork because she believes it is her right (copyright/ trademark/industrial design) Could these examples happen to you? How can a Trademark bring Growth to my Business? Trademark: A Trademark is a sign or combination of signs (word, letters, design, logo) that distinguishes a product or service from others to avoid confusion and to increase recognition and competitiveness. It prevents others from selling or distributing a product or offering a service with a similar trademark that can mislead buyers. In filing your application, you must select the class of protection by firstly identifying whether your business provides goods or services and then selecting from the list in each category. Do you sell furniture (trademark) or do you simply set up furniture (servicemark)?

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3-Step Trademark Strategy in Starting or Strengthening Your Business

01 Business Name/Registration

02 Logo

03 Website

Your business name could ultimately be your trademark, therefore, thorough consideration of the name is critical in building your brand. Online research for checking whether your desired business name is not already in use is usually the first step. You can also visit the websites of countries that have online trademark databases such as the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) to carry out a simple search. The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) also has an online database of trademarks that were registered internationally under the Madrid System. Additionally, translate the name, if possible, in other languages and dialects to avoid a business name that is offensive or the cause of stares and laughs. Chevrolet, for example, had trouble marketing their Nova vehicle in Latin America, because “no va” in Spanish means “it doesn’t go”. Names incorporating the name of a town or neighbourhood may limit your reach to trade internationally. Once you have developed a brand in your home base, it is wise to continue using this brand, as you would otherwise have to rebuild brand recognition and regain customers. Once you feel confident that your business name is unique, you can register the business name and receive approval. Please note that your registered corporate name does not have to be your brand or the name known to consumers. You can start a company, “John Smith Investments Inc.” listing the sale of aromatherapy products as the nature of the business. JSI Inc. could own the trademarks to the various essential oil brands and products. If the brand fails, the company survives and creates another brand!

Avoid similar colour schemes, fonts, sizes and shapes as your competitor. Any design that may cause confusion would be difficult to register. Conduct research in prospective markets abroad. It would be obvious to some why a fast food restaurant should avoid entering the Barbados market with a purple and yellow colour scheme. As an entrepreneur, you should have a vision for your business. In two years or three months, you may want to export your product or service to Canada but if you, as an advertising agency, bear the same or very similar name/logo/ unique colour scheme to an advertising agency in Canada, there may be a challenge in registration and chances are, the exclusive right to use the trademark, would not be granted.

Your domain name should ideally be the same or at least a shortened version, of your brand/business name. Similar to determining the name for your business, you should visit websites of domain name providers to carry out a search on whether the name is taken. If your name is Junior and you make the best cheesecake in Dennery, St. Lucia, you won’t be able to register www. juniorscheesecake.com as your domain name because the site is owned by a company that was established since 1950. A website is an important tool in promoting your brand/your business name, and therefore clearance should be made on the availability of a domain name prior to registering the business name. The content on your website is also protected by copyright. Overall, be creative – a unique name optimizes search engine results and would exclude unrelated results.

Some rules do apply If you sell apples you cannot receive a trademark approval for “Apples Incorporated” because your company’s name cannot directly describe your product. Secondly, if you are an accountant, you cannot receive a trademark approval for “Accountants Inc.” because accounting is a general term that cannot be a trademark. “Samantha’s Yummy Apples” or “Joy’s Accountancy Firm” are both acceptable Trademarks however. Trademarks are territorial (governed by domestic laws); protection in Dominica does not equate to protection in Grenada. If you’re thinking ahead, you’ve guessed right

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– if you want to be protected in Grenada as well, you will have to visit the IP office there and apply for trademark protection. The Madrid System of WIPO provides a service to countries in which businesses can select up to 89 countries* where they seek to have their trademark protected. Antigua and Barbuda is currently the only regional member of the Madrid Union, which allows for international registration of marks. Registering your trademark locally usually involves registration, search, publication, agent and other fees. Call your local intellectual property office for a breakdown of the procedures and costs involved.

Move Beyond Protection to Commercialization Protection is the first phase of engaging your business with IP, but for it to stimulate growth, your IP should be commercialized. You can exploit the rights of a new device you developed by applying for and being granted a patent and then making the device available for sale, for example. Alternatively, you may license your new technology or smartphone application to a company with the budget to market and sell the product. If you’re a songwriter, you may license the use of the songs you wrote to a record label. A similar method is applied to well-developed brands

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that are franchises, for example Starbucks, Days Inn, Subway or KFC, where a franchise fee is paid for the use of the brand. In essence, a well-managed IP portfolio makes your business more attractive to investors, as revenue is expected to flow from the exploitation of the company’s intangible assets. Take Action! Have the conversation today with yourself, your mentor and your business partner(s) today to identify the IP assets of your company and determine how to protect them. Protection of assets is the first phase of a company incorporating IP in their

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business strategy, Maintenance involves the use of the brand and payment of renewal fees. Exploitation for commercialization is the optimal goal. Be mindful of the vision you have for the company and embrace the usefulness of acting now to establish a foundation for a competitive and sustainable business. * The Madrid Union has 89 member states as of November 15, 2012.

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Should've Could've but Didn't: Failure to Protect IP

Caribbean Examples of Demerara Sugar of Guyana and the Steel Pan of Trinidad & Tobago By Shalisha Samuel Brown Mint Productions Inc.

Demerara Sugar Two well-known cases touch upon the “Demerara” name, although neither case arose as a direct result of IP infringement. In Anderson v Britcher (U.K, 1913)1 sugar from Mauritius was sold as Demerara sugar originating from Demerara, Guyana. The buyer argued it was not genuine sugar from Demerara, however the court ruled that “Demerara” is a generic term used to describe brown, crystalised sugar made from sugar cane and bears no indication to the region in Guyana. In the second case of Bedessee Imports Ltd. v Guyana Sugar Corporation Inc. (Canada, 2010)2, Bedessee Imports Ltd., packaged and distributed sugar made in Mauritius under the brand “Demerara Gold”, a Bedessee’s registered trademark “since at least 1984”3, while another sugar

was packaged with the map of Guyana. When the Guyana Sugar Corporation Inc. (Guysuco) sought to register the trademark “Demerera Gold” in Canada, Bedessee filed an opposition and then submitted an application for registration of the same name, which was later opposed by the Government of Guyana. Guysuco withdrew from the application process. Following this, the Government of Guyana (Minister of Agriculture, et al) then made, what Bedessee considers to be, defamatory statements. The case therefore is one relating to defamation and diplomatic immunity in which the court, including the appellate court, dismissed Guyana’s claim to immunity thereby allowing Bedessee to file a suit against the Minister. If steps were made years ago from producers in Guyana and the Government for a geographical indication (GI), the more recent 2010 Canadian case may have resulted differently. There still exists hope

Demerara Sugar of Guyana and the Steel pan of Trinidad and Tobago are great Caribbean examples of the importance of prompt Intellectual Property (IP) protection.

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for Guysuco, as neither of the above cases dealt directly with “Demerara” as a protected word/brand. Therefore, attempts can be made for “Demerara” to be protected as a GI, collective mark, or even a trademark by altering the name; “Demerara of Guyana”, “Guyanese Demerara”, “Demerara Sugar” or “Guyana’s Demerara Sugar” are some examples. Furthermore, Camembert de Normandie was said to be a generic term according to a French court in 1926, but is now protected in France and the EU.4 Anderson v. Britcher 30 T. L. R. 78 (1913), 34 Cox’s Criminal Law Cases 60 2 Bedesse Imports Ltd v. Guyana Sugar Corporation Inc., 2010 ONSC 3388 3 Bedessee Imports Ltd. v. Guyana Sugar Corporation, Inc., 2010 ONSC 3388. para. 17. 4 Gangjee, Dev Saif, Demerara Sugar: A Bitter Pill to Swallow? (December 1, 2011). Intellectual Property Journal, Vol. 24, p. 1, 2011. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/ abstract=2029290 1

Steel Pan A patent application was filed by, and granted, in 2001 to Hydro Steel LLC for using the hydroform press to mass produce steelpans in the United States. The patent on the process of making the steelpan was later challenged by the Government of Trinidad and Tobago and revoked by the United States Patent Trademarks Office (USPTO), a success for Trinidad and Tobago. The process was previously developed by a research team at the University of the West Indies where, accordingly, the researchers claimed that an application for a patent was not submitted due to a lack of finances and concern that the patent process was too complex.5 Trinidadian steelpan producers can therefore continue with innovations of the steelpan and quite possibly, someday, be granted patents on these improvements.

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BLACK BELLY SHEEP While the commercial use of the Black Belly sheep's name has not been subject to legal proceedings, protecting and promoting the name in trade would be an ideal Government strategy for Barbadian businesses. Some groups have already laid claim to the Black Belly Sheep, therefore, challenges to any form of registration/ protection should not be surprising. Needless to say, IP protection of the Black Belly sheep would undoubtedly position entrepreneurs in the manufacturing and even service sectors to differentiate their offerings in the global market. 5

“Intellectual property issues strike at the heart of the steelpan”. July 31, 2011. Dr. Kris Rampersad, The Guardian (Trinidad and Tobago). Accessed October 11, 2012. <http://www.guardian. co.tt/entertainment/2011/07/31/ intellectual-property-issues-strike-heartsteelpan>

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Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Service Industries

5 th

Annual Services Week

By Michelle Hustler, GIZ

The Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Service Industries hosted its fifth annual services week from October 29 to November 2, 2012. Having now attended three of these five events, it’s quite clear that the activity is bigger, better attended and more impressive with each consecutive year. Professor Miguel Carillo, Executive Director of Arthur Lok Jack Graduate School of Business, joked during the opening ceremonies, at the Excellence in Service Awards, that he looks forward to the day when the event more closely resembles the Grammys. Knowing the TTCSI, as I do, it may not be that many more years before I’m

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ushered down the red carpet to my seat in a blaze of flashing photographs. For those of you who missed it, I’ll do my best to summarize this important, dynamic, week-long trade in services event, covering four sub-sectors, an industry awards show and an exciting closing event in the four pages allotted to this article in the Scoop, however, it really would be a much easier feat to simply have all the readers attend next year’s event, than it would to compose a thorough four page summary of Services Week.

Excellence in Service Awards As I greeted the TTCSI staff at the door to the ballroom, my first impression was that the event certainly had the vibe of an awards ceremony. In true Caribbean fashion, attendees and prospective awardees were dressed to the nines. Drinks were being served by attentive staff. The crowd buzzed. Promptly at 6:30pm, as scheduled, the event was underway. This year, like the last, there were seven awards categories, including a ‘Special Award’, awarded last year to Anya Ayoung-Chee, season 9 winner of Project Runway. This year the ‘Special Award’ went to Roger Al the creator of I'm Santana: the Movie, the highest grossing feature film produced in Trinidad and a YouTube viral hit. If you haven’t yet caught this Trini puppet drama… well, go on, I’ll wait

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for you here… Hilarious, ent?! Other awardees include Mamatoto Resource and Birth Centre and the Association of Female Executives of Trinidad and Tobago (see page 29 for the full list of winners). A common message of the awardees and attendees was how pleased they were to see kudos being offered in this critical, but commonly overlooked sector. Unleashing ICT for Development Day 2’s workshop, Unleashing ICT for Development was the best attended event of the week with over 250 participants. It’s a little wonder why. The keynote speaker was Mr. Annesh Chopra, the former American Federal Chief Technology Officer of the United States, who answered directly to President Barak Obama. Not only is Mr. Chopra highly knowledgeable, but charismatic, engaging and (can I say?) cool as well. Comedian John

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Stewart, of the Daily Show, described him quite accurately during a 2009 episode as ‘The Indian George Clooney’. The packed house was rapt. Chopra, through numerous examples, highlighted the power of ICT for development. He discussed three trends: Digital Infrastructure, Open Government and Innovation Platforms and how the amalgamation of these three elements can result in unlimited growth potential. His presentation is available on the CNSC site, but I’ll offer one example. In the immediate aftermath of the Haiti earthquake, the US State Department worked with a group of engineers from the tech community to launch a free SMS relief information service to help people in Haiti. The text message program allowed people in Haiti with cell phones to text their location and their needs to a free short code: "4636" (INFO). Using an open-source platform the texts were accessible globally linking the ‘listeners’ – those translating the texts from French Creole into

English – to the helpers – those who were able to respond to the needs. They fielded 50,000 messages, each one taking approximately 10 minutes from the time sent to dispatch. A great example of how the infrastructure, plus the innovative platform, in addition to harnessing widely dispersed talent can make a tremendous difference. Cosmetology Workshop: The Importance of Standards and Raising Your Game I sat at a front table before the workshop began, writing the bit on the Aneesh Chopra presentation, hardly lifting my eyes from the laptop. I paid no attention to the bustle of participants settling at tables around me, waiting for TTCSI’s Executive Director, Mr. Nirard Tewarie to take the mic and begin the day’s proceedings. It was only finally during these opening remarks that I took the occasion to survey the room. Oh. My.

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Two simultaneous thoughts struck me at once: 1. How was the TTCSI able to fill and entire ballroom (there must have been 200+ people in the room) with a sector generally concerned with the creative elements of the profession and the day-to-day demands of making women beautiful? As a former manager of a service coalition myself, I had not known the sector to come together in such large numbers to discuss the more technical aspects of cosmetology, such as setting standards, drafting legislation and building a vibrant association – topics being discussed that morning. I was equally impressed with the TTCSI’s ability to interest so many cosmetologists in the event, as I was with the commitment of these cosmetologists to this sector. 2. I should have worn lipstick. Yup. The room was not only full, but full of fashionably dressed, beautifully made up women. Hair, nails, makeup – looking around the room, it seemed clear to me, that this sector knew its ply well. The keynote speaker was Mr. Guy Hewitt, Regional Manager of City & Guilds Caribbean. City & Guilds is a world leading vocational education organization. The company develops internationally recognized standards, offers training and certification. Mr. Hewitt discussed the importance of standards both generally and specifically to this sector. By the response in the room, it seemed clear that all were in favor of coming together, establishing standards and working through the recently strengthened Trinidad and Tobago Cosmetology Association in building a vibrant sector.

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Trinidad has this way of making everything exciting – even a workshop on standards. A point was made at the ICT event on Tuesday about “emphasizing verbs over nouns”. Trinidad has certainly transformed the noun ‘Carnival’ into a verb. The workshop was punctuated by up-beat, exciting hair, makeup and nail ‘fashion shows’ – including, in fact Carnival models! TTCSI & AC12 FORUM: 'The Brain Gain' Another element of Services Week I very much appreciated was how the TTCSI was able to repeatedly highlight and celebrate the success of Trinidadians. Not only via the evident celebrations associated with the Excellence in Service Awards, but consistently throughout the week. Perhaps the best example of the celebration of excellence took place during the Brain Gain workshop. This workshop took the form of a panel discussion involving six young, dynamic Trinidadians involved in various aspects of film making and gaming at the highest international level. Digital artists, visual effects compositors, animators, character artists, software engineers, hailing from companies like Lucas Film, Disney, Pixar and Rockstar Games. They had worked on dozens of movies like Preist, Narnia, FrankenWeenie, Beowulf, Transformers and Dark Shadow. All told a similar story of dreaming big, following your passion, taking chances, being innovative and working hard. I hope TTCSI takes the opportunity to share the success stories that emerged during Services Week with the rest of the region. These success stories are necessary. Perhaps in consuming enough of them, Trinidad and the Caribbean might one day overcome the biggest barrier to trade… self-belief.

Entertainment as a Business The final formal workshop of the week featured Mr. Ray Paul, described in the programme as ‘Music Business Legend’. What Paul offered the audience, was very specific and very informed advice on penetrating the EU music industry. The presentation is available online. All musicians and music managers in the Caribbean should review and consider the advice being offered. SW12 Closing Party The event closed with a joint Animae CaribeTTCSI closing party. There are a lot of areas Trinidad clearly leads the region in and throwing a great celebration is definitely one of those areas. Music, food and drinks and a fete celebrating services and services excellence (again, clear in the quality of the offerings of the event) took participants late into the night. I’m going to close with two piece of advice, advice that is not news to me, but was reinforced during the week’s events: 1. Caribbean service providers, believe in yourself! With the multitude of examples demonstrating excellence at regional and international levels, there is no reason to continue to believe that your service cannot also be on par with international champions. Just focus and go for it! 2. Don’t miss another Services Week. Having attended every Services Week activity over the past two years, whether it was a session in fashion, cosmetology, ICT, filmmaking, animation or entertainment, I took home a valuable lesson that I can apply to my own services company - so will you. See you next year.

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Summit Global Services

By James Lim US Coalition of Service Industries

On September 19, 2012 at the Grand Hyatt, Washington, D.C., the Coalition of Service Industries of the US (USCSI) and its Global Services Coalition (GSC) partners convened the 4th annual Global Services Summit (GSS). The Summit brought together over 350 international trade policy leaders from business, government, academia and media from all over the world. The focus for the 2012 Summit was "Services: The New Agenda", highlighting the growing recognition of the importance of trade liberalization in services and investment, as the world services sector comprises 70% of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s GDP and roughly a similar percentage of employment. 2012 has been the year in which we have seen a growing number of substantive services commitments being negotiated such as in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a trade agreement involving the US, Brunei, Chile, New Zealand, Singapore, Australia, Peru, Vietnam, Canada, Malaysia and Mexico, as well as the positive momentum in Geneva among 30

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the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Really Good Friends of Servicesâ&#x20AC;? (RGF) group. Comprised of 20 WTO members, they have been meeting since January 2012 and laying the framework for the potential launch of negotiations on an International Services Agreement (ISA). As he has done at previous Summits, Ambassador Ron Kirk, the United States Trade Representative made the opening Keynote to the Summit. Afterwards, he joined a panel of Ministerial level colleagues from RGF and TPP member countries, that included Honorable Ed Fast, Minister for Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway of Canada; Honorable Anabel Gonzalez, Minister of Foreign Trade of Costa Rica; Honorable Taeho Bark, Minister for Trade of the Republic of Korea; and Honorable Tim Groser, Minister of Trade

of New Zealand for a robust discussion on the paths ahead for services negotiations. Ambassador Kirk commented in his opening address, "the ISA presents significant new opportunities to examine the achievements of services agreements so far; consolidate the most important and effective elements into a single framework; and extend that framework to a broader group of countries. The ISA also offers a means of building international consensus on new trade rules that someday could be introduced into the WTO." Other ministers agreed with the sentiments of Ambassador Kirk. Minister Anabel Gonzalez of Costa Rica hailed the importance of services trade liberalization, mentioning the strong service chapters in Costa Rica's over 50 Free Trade Agreements (FTA). Moreover, that Costa Rica's IT services exports have multiplied 9 fold in a decade, surpassing tourism and that opening their telecommunications and insurance sectors have dramatically increased Costa Rica's participation in the global value chains. More broadly, Minister Bark commented on the role of services in global economic recovery, noting that we have international debt problems, a global imbalance and a slow but noticeable increase in protectionism and the most effective way to combat this is to make progress in liberalization. Bark said, "keep the ball rolling with the ISA, TPP and other liberalizations." The Summit also convened a panel of several senior trade officials from the RGF group, where the panel discussed their aspirations for such an agreement. As noted by one of the panelists, the consensus that emerged among the panelists through the presentation was encouraging. Some example characteristics of the ISA that panelists agreed on are that it should be ambitious, have additional market access provisions, allow for other countries to join after it is completed, and be completed within a year. Further panels continued the discussion of past summits on the importance of the Asia Pacific economies and the 21st century issues that services trade faces, such as state-owned enterprises (SOEs), services' important role 2013 EDITION


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They spoke on the challenges of creating service coalitions and the opportunities they create to help economic growth in developing countries. in enabling the movement of goods in the global value chain, forced localization and restrictions on cross-border data flows. A special presentation was also made recognizing the achievements of retiring CSI President, Bob Vastine and welcoming the new President, Ambassador Peter Allgeier. For summaries of the panels of the summit

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and videos, visit: http://uscsi.org/about-csi/ global-services-summit-2012. Following the Summit, the GSC convened their annual business meeting and a special seminar on the role of service coalitions in developing countries. This seminar was hosted at Microsoft Corporation's Washington, D.C. office. Presentations were made by Sebastien Saez, Senior Trade Economist from the World Bank; Andrea Lupo, US Trade and Development Agency; David Primack, International Lawyers and Economists Against Poverty; Rajesh Sharma, Director General of the Services Export Promotion Council of India; Nirad Tewarie, CEO of the Carribean Network of Service Coalitions; and Angela Becaty, East African Business Council representative. Asha Bobb-Semple, Jamaican Coalition of Service Industries and Yvonee Agard, Saint Lucia Coalition of Service Industries

participated in the seminar. They spoke on the challenges of creating service coalitions and the opportunities they create to help economic growth in developing countries. The GSC is comprised of the Australian Services Roundtable, Canadian Services Coalition, Coalition of Services Industries Malaysia, Coalition of Service Industries of the US, the European Services Forum (ESF), Hong Kong Coalition of Services Industries (HKCSI), Japan Services Network, Mexican Services Coalition, The National Association of Software and Services Companies (India), Taiwan Coalition of Service Industries, and TheCityUK (United Kingdom).

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SERVICES Coalitions

Service Coalitions A service coalition is an organization of stakeholders related to the services sector who may have diverse interests, but nevertheless share a common objective: the development of the service industry. A service coalition ultimately aims to enhance the international competitiveness of the services sector. It does this by raising the profile of the services sector, supporting the development of an enabling environment, building private sector capacity and engaging in export promotion activities, amongst many other efforts.

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In the Caribbean, there are actively functioning coalitions in Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica, Saint Lucia and Trinidad and Tobago. Get involved in the activities of your coalition today! Contact details are on page 73. If there is no coalition, help support the creation of this valuable organization. Start by speaking to service exporting champions and the Ministry responsible for trade. In this section, we explore what is happening with the coalition movement in the Caribbean and around the world.

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SERVICES Coalitions

Service Coalitions:

An Overview of Experiences

in the Caribbean and Africa

By Michelle Hustler, GIZ & David Primack, ILEAP

Service coalitions that are currently evolving in developing countries â&#x20AC;&#x201C; such as sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and the Caribbean â&#x20AC;&#x201C; offer an innovative channel for micro and small services firms to unlock the potential of the services sector and foster inclusive growth, sustainable development and poverty reduction. 2013 EDITION

What is a service coalition and how do they differ in developing countries? A service coalition is an organization of stakeholders related to the services sector who may have diverse interests, but nevertheless share a common objective: the development of the service industry. The aims of the stakeholders are seen to be more efficiently accomplished through a coalition. The coalition movement was first launched through the UK Liberalisation of Trade in Services (LOTIS) Committee in late 1981, followed soon thereafter by the US Coalition of Service Industries (USCSI). Since then, new coalitions have been established in countries throughout the world, with the Global Services Coalition (GSC) now boasting more than 13 members worldwide. Like LOTIS and USCSI, most developed country service coalitions focus on lobbying and raising the profile of the services sector. Their efforts traditionally revolve around the promotion of services liberalization.

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SERVICES Coalitions

In this respect, service coalitions in developing countries have the potential to offer a range of more robust interventions. However, a slightly different model has emerged in developing countries (starting with Malaysia circa 2001) which focus on developing the services sector in order to be able to better take advantage of available market access opportunities. In this respect, service coalitions in developing countries have the potential to offer a range of more robust interventions. In doing so, they can serve to augment and complement public sector institutional roles, thereby helping to provide essential support services for catalysing dynamic entrepreneurial activity.

• Weak policy/regulatory environment – emanating in part from the lack of understanding, the policy and regulatory environments are often quite weak, especially when it comes to providing targeted incentives to help develop the sector domestically; • Low access to affordable finance – the limited capital base of these firms and their inability to access affordable finance is perhaps the single-most important constraint on firm/sector growth (resulting from the intangibility of services and exorbitant interest rates); • Low recognition – these firms also tend to suffer from low brand recognition and credibility; • Poor market information – these firms often suffer from an inability to readily access critical information on overseas markets. How can service coalitions help? Service coalitions can take a more proactive role in helping to address many of the challenges above. This can be done by engaging in the following activities: • Offering a unified voice on services issues and helping to raise awareness. By serving

as a focal point on services, coalitions can help to better articulate and disseminate private sector needs and commercial interests, as well as raise awareness amongst a cross-section of stakeholders (public and private, including the donor community); • Providing training to small and micro enterprises, including sector-specific associations; • Advocating for policy and regulatory reforms, trade negotiations, standards and incentives; • Assisting service providers to promote and increase trade and exports, including through the dissemination of information on export opportunities and market intelligence, supporting trade missions and fairs; • Collecting data and offering award/ recognition programs. Taking on such roles, coalitions can also serve as an important conduit for targeting development cooperation (or aid-for-trade) resources towards the services sector. Experiences in the Caribbean The initial implementation of service coalitions in the Caribbean proved more difficult than expected. While floated as a

What are the challenges facing domestic services firms in developing countries? Despite the vast potential of the services sector, the challenges faced by developingcountry firms to harness them are numerous and exacerbated by the endemic scarcity of available and/or quality services data. Some of the characteristics and challenges facing domestic these services firms include: • Fragmentation – firms are often fragmented and small with little or no representation across sectors; • Lack of understanding – the service sector is not well understood, including by policymakers, politicians and the publicat-large; • Little influence – many services firms, especially micro and small firms, often have little political influence; 34

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SERVICES Coalitions

concept for more than a decade prior, by early 2010 only four coalitions could have been considered operational. One key obstacle was the lack of awareness pertaining to private sector needs vis-à-vis services policy, negotiations and even trade promotion, and thus the associated challenge of articulating their own needs as well as generating public sector buy-in. Another challenge emerged due to assumptions about the relationships coalitions would have with their national Chambers of Commerce (which was not always feasible). Lastly, the lack of adequate and consistent funding for the coalitions resulted in delays and a number of false starts. Since late 2010/early 2011 however, significant progress has been achieved in the region. This includes the December 2010 inauguration of the Caribbean Network of Service Coalitions alongside the strengthening of existing coalitions in Barbados, Saint Lucia, and Jamaica via additional financial and human resources, as 2013 EDITION

well as the operationalization of coalitions in Antigua and Barbuda, Belize, Dominica, Grenada. Helping to underpin this momentum has been varying combinations of support from national governments, alongside the Caribbean Export Development Agency, GIZ (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit GmbH) and DFID’s CARTFund (Caribbean Aid for Trade and Regional Integration Trust Fund). Experiences in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) Experiences establishing service coalitions in SSA remain at a preliminary stage (despite also having been floated over a decade ago). East and Southern Africa is perhaps most advanced on this front, with Uganda serving as the most commonly known coalition in the region. With laudable achievements to-date, the Uganda-CSI continues to face challenges in shifting from ad-hoc activities and influence to a more systemic role as a fully functioning

coalition. As in the initial Caribbean phase, progress has been hampered by the availability of financial resources, alongside the political challenges of situating itself in the existing landscape. At a regional level, the East African Business Council (EABC) has taken the lead, collaboratively with the International Lawyers and Economists Against Poverty (ILEAP), to establish the East Africa CSI (EACSI). Building on efforts in 2009 and 2010, stakeholders outlined a road map for bringing the coalition to fruition. While the full scope of this effort has not yet garnered the financial support needed to move into implementation, results have been achieved in the context of securing support to develop a Professional Services Platform to be housed at EABC.1 As noted by stakeholders early in the process, the Platform constitutes an essential stepping stone to the formation of the EACSI. Similar efforts are underway throughout the continent – including (to name a few): Burundi, Congo-Brazzaville, Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, and South Africa. At a regional level, the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) Business Council is also advancing on its mandate to support the formation of coalitions throughout COMESA. Seen in this light, service coalitions in SSA are emerging with the potential to serve as an essential business support organisation, helping to mitigate institutional deficiencies across a range of interventions that might otherwise be provided by the public sector in developed countries. They also have the potential to serve as innovative channels for delivering aid-for-trade resources. Doing so requires that stakeholders in SSA take heed of the success factors in the Caribbean, as well as development partners’ recognising the different nature of coalitions and associated support needs to facilitate their success. This article is based on the ILEAP’s publication: Harnessing Services Trade for Development: A Background and Guide on Service Coalitions in Africa and the Caribbean; available at www. ileap-jeicip.org. An earlier version of this article was previously published in BRIDGES Africa, Vol 1 Issue 4. 1 Via TradeMark East Africa

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SERVICE SECTOR HIGHLIGHTS

Coalition Updates BCSP is currently undertaking a membership drive, while assessing the needs and the challenges of the various national services sectors.

Antigua and Barbuda The ABCSI was launched in February, 2011. With a single staff member elaborating the efforts of the organization, progress may be slow, but it’s steady. The most recent successes of the ABCSI include efforts in the establishment of an ICT association, capacity building sessions for those in the film and video sector, as well as support to the fashion sector via the co-hosting of Kreyol Fashion Days. The organization will continue to drive the country’s priority sectors forward. The ABCSI maintains an active Facebook Group for ongoing discussions on the national services sector. Join the conversation! Barbados Having worked assiduously on the organizational strategy in 2012 (read all about it on page 38), the BCSI is now leading the process of developing a national service sector development strategy and export promotion plan, which will include an asset mapping database for service providers. The 36

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first national steering committee meeting in this respect has taken place and efforts will continue throughout 2013. Some other 2012 BCSI activities included a grant proposal writing workshop, the creation of a professional development opportunity (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)) for those in the construction sector, export and funding workshops for those in the creative industry and EPA awareness building workshops. Belize The Belize Coalition of Service Providers is the eighth actively functioning coalition, having set up earlier this year. During a short, busy period the BCSP has hired an executive director and support staff, secured an office space, set up and are raring to go. First activities planned involve the development of a service sector database, undertaking a baseline survey, and the hosting of a Services Week early in 2013 which will include awareness raising sessions, capacity building workshops, as well as the second AGM.

Dominica During this first full year of operations the DCSI has secured a new office space, expanded its membership, conducted a baseline assessment of the country’s priority sectors, held sensitization workshops, guided the development of work plan for the construction sector, supported the health and wellness sector in the establishment of an association, facilitated an intellectual property workshop for the music and film sector, established an online services directory and provided guidance to several new and fledgling associations. The DCSI has also launched its website – www.dominicacoalition.org, as well as a Facebook page. Next year, the DCSI hopes to complete a comprehensive service sector strategy and action plan for Dominica. Dominican Republic The ‘Coalicion de Servicios de Republica Dominicana’ was very recently launched on December 5, 2012. The CSRD includes key associations in ICT, film and audiovisual, accountants, management consultants, fashion, movie producers and tourism. It will expand to include most services industries associations in the DR. The key initial sectors are expected to continue the coordination of activities at the regional level with the key regional entities as well as through the CSIs. The CSRD is being supported by the Santo Domingo Chamber of Commerce through the support of a Secretariat and the Ministry of Industry and Commerce through the Directorate of External Trade (DICOEX).

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SERVICE SECTOR HIGHLIGHTS

It is anticipated that the CSRD will be actively involved in the efforts of the network over 2013. Grenada The Grenada Coalition of Service Industries is one of the newest fully active coalitions, having launched earlier in the year. Since the launch Grenada has been meeting with the various service sector associations to assess their needs, raise awareness regarding the role of a coalition and garner support for the coalition’s efforts. They are working closely with professionals in the health and wellness, ICT, creative industries, architects and engineering sectors to establish professional associations for these key groups. The GCSI has been working on the development of a five year strategic plan which is expected to be implemented beginning next year. GCSI’s other upcoming efforts involve enhanced communication through the development of a website. Guyana The Guyana Coalition of Service Providers has recently hired a Research Officer/ Assistant Coordinator who has been instrumental in the rapid movement of the Coalition over the past three months. As a starting point, the GCSP is undertaking a detailed compilation of the all services providers and umbrella associations in Guyana as well as assessing the needs and challenges of the key services sectors. The GCSP will be strengthening their communication over the upcoming months through various strategies including the development of a website and annual services publication. By next year the GCSP anticipates servings as a fully active coalition.

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Jamaica In the JCSI’s first year of operation, the organization developed the Services Sector Strategy and Expansion Plan which will focus on the development of six priority sectors. The plan will be finalized by the end of the year and will be implemented beginning 2013. Promotion and awareness building was a heavy focus of the year. The JCSI launched its website -www.jamaciacsi.org and the JCSI quarterly newsletter, The Services Atlas which is available electronically. To facilitate the dissemination of important information a database of stakeholders, including national associations, was created. With the purpose of raising awareness on services issues, the JCSI also participated in numerous national level and association-driven events and participated in policy dialogue. The coalition also supported the formation of the Business Process Industry Association of Jamaica and are working with the relevant stakeholders to establish a spa association. Saint Lucia 2012 was a significant and strategic year for the SLCSI. A survey of service providers and services firms in key sectors was undertaken. The output was used to inform both a policy paper outlining recommendations on a National Services Policy for Saint Lucia which focuses on policy, regulatory and trade investment issues, as well as roadmap designed to enhance export competitiveness. Other efforts included support to the spa and wellness sector regarding the development and implementation of a code of practice for health and beauty facilities, technical support to three associations in the execution of their work plans, as well as resource mobilization for these sectors. The SLCSI has been working very closely with the Trade Export Promotion Agency (TEPA) to assist the Unit in targeting key services sectors for trade export promotion, the Ministry of Commerce, Business Development and Investment

in the development of Saint Lucia’s services sector and Invest St. Lucia for the promotion of investments into the services sector. The SLCSI also held its annual general meeting, where key association executives representing professional services associations were elected to the board of directors to serve for the period 2012-2014. Saint Lucia is also spearheading an initiative to establish an OECS Coalition Network in order to harness and maximize on the limited capacities within the OECS CSIs and continues to network with its colleague in the region to create a strong “Services” alliance. Trinidad and Tobago TTCSI has been busy as ever! Two key events are featured in this edition of Services Scoop. Check out the articles on Services Week on pages 26-27 and the Align Private Showcase which took place London on pages 48-49. Other noteworthy activities undertaken during 2012 include study tour to Europe for the creative industries, the initiation a national ICT strategic plan for off-shoring, the elaboration of a project which seeks to enhance competitiveness in key priority sectors, several awareness building workshops including an awareness building session on exporting to the EU and support to various associations including the Printing and Packaging Association. The Bahamas, Suriname and Haiti The Bahamas, Suriname and Haiti have each expressed an interest in establishing a coalition of service industries and the wheels are slowly in motion to achieve this end. The GIZ remains on stand-by to provide the support necessary, including one-on-one capacity building support, to ensure that the coalitions are established and well-functioning across CARIFORUM.

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SERVICES Coalitions

BCSI

Charting a New

Strategic Direction

By Lisa Cummins, Barbados Coalition of Service Industries

The Barbados Coalition of Service Industries (BCSI), the first services coalition to be established in the region, has been in existence for nearly ten years. 38

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FACILITATING THE GROWTH OF THE DOMESTIC SERVICES MARKET

Though a decade has now passed, the rationale of the CARICOM Heads of Government for establishing coalitions nearly ten years ago – supporting the region’s trade in services agenda - remains as relevant today as it was then. We now have coalitions spanning from Belize, across to Jamaica and down the island chain to Guyana, each with shared regional interests, but unique national imperatives. Around us the economic and global environment has dramatically evolved. Developments organizationally, regionally and internationally have presented a set of diverse challenges which the coalitions have had to assess, mitigate and translate into opportunities in order to deliver on the

mandate given by the Heads. The region’s collective agenda, while unchanged at its core, certainly has needed to evolve operationally and strategically to remain relevant. National economies and the services coalitions which serve them, accordingly have to make their own way forward through clearly articulated development strategies including export development interventions which lay the groundwork for export promotion. This, while keeping a keen eye fixed outward on evolving international developments and best practices. Internationally, the region has signed for the first time a reciprocal trade agreement, the Economic Partnership Agreement, which includes services. However, although 2013 EDITION


SERVICES Coalitions

Though a decade has now passed, the rationale of the CARICOM Heads of Government for establishing coalitions nearly ten years ago – supporting the region’s trade in services agenda remains as relevant today as it was then. signed, the agreement remains largely unimplemented. Negotiations have begun for a new reciprocal arrangement with Canada. This agreement will also include services, but with little experience in utilizing these agreements, the region will have a lot of work to do to ensure that their impact is meaningful. The CSME, originally envisaged as the first line market offensive for domestic exports, has not evolved as comprehensively as had been envisaged at the signing of the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas in 2001. Yet the region remains the most promising for exporting for all CARICOM economies. Despite the significant market opening created by the combined effect of regional integration and trade agreements, we have much farther to go to actually prepare our producers, and in the case of coalitions, our service providers, for domestic sectoral development and competitiveness. This preparation provides a platform for export promotion, market entry and retention and third country expansion, whether in the region or further afield. Services coalitions need to understand the mutually reinforcing trade, commercial and business development environments and develop programs which reflect the kind of strategic thinking and vision that prompted our establishment. This is the starting point at 2012 for the BCSI. The past year has been about charting a new strategic direction for the organisation that ensured that its post-2012 outlook 2013 EDITION

takes full cognizance of the factors facing the Barbados economy. The organization had to consider regional and international market opportunities, the role which services can and must play in supporting economic transformation and how we, as an organisation, can deliver meaningful benefits. The anticipated results of our support being: the further expansion of the services economy, services exporting, more competitive service intermediate inputs into the wider economy and ultimately economic growth. This process had to be dynamic, aggressive, progressive, practical and outward looking. We needed to be innovative – to consider doing new things in old markets and looking at entering new non-traditional ones. In 2012, it certainly could not be business as usual. We don’t have the time or economic space for that. The BCSI, on that basis, has redesigned its strategy starting by looking at the foundational challenges which needed to be disaggregated and isolated for analysis. Those challenges, when combined with the tremendous opportunities presented to us, resulted in the development of a model of operation which we call the Reverse Pyramid. Essentially, the first layer intervention in the pyramid will focus on building a strong and diverse domestic services industry - one that is ready to enter the regional and global marketplace on a solid footing, prepared for the challenges likely to be faced in that environment. Standards, benchmarking, competitiveness support, education, training and capacity building inter alia form key components in this domestic layer of the pyramid. The focus

at this level is the domestic sectoral growth cycle in the economic value chain. As firms in the respective sectors reach the apex of the pyramid and are ready for export markets, the pyramid reverses and provides a second layer of development support - this time in the export market. The second tier of the pyramid is built on the foundation created by the first and creates an entry level into exporting for businesses which prepares them in competitiveness enhancement, market share retention and expansion into third countries. The pyramid is therefore mutually reinforcing the two primary objectives of export development and export promotion both in the domestic and external space. Historically, a significant amount of effort and resources have been placed on export promotion, but the capacity of businesses to sustain that export orientation and effectively utilize the resources allocated to international marketing and distribution of services must be underpinned by a base of well developed, competitive services, that are well priced and of the highest standard. That will form the core of BCSI’s service offerings. As an association based organization, the BCSI also undertook to review the kind of support it provides to membership. Strong vibrant associations are the objective of BCSI’s interventions at this level and programmes have been developed to support that. Through the associations, the BCSI has been providing direct capacity building support, export awareness, continuous professional development training and awareness building in order to develop a cadre of export ready professionals who can take advantage of export promotion initiatives. But while this export oriented strategic approach has so far been effective, one must also consider the macro national policy framework, which is essential in order to increase efficiency and efficacy. This is the time for Barbados’ services sector to move beyond the baseline that has brought the country to its current development and growth level and plot a strategic policy driven trajectory that moves progressively

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SERVICES Coalitions

This is the time for Barbadosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; services sector to move beyond the baseline that has brought the country to its current development...

The organization, is fully poised to chart a new direction based on current imperatives up the value chain to produce services which are in high demand and emerging. Barbados must determine its priorities for the services sector, direct adequate resources to development and competitiveness support and integrate those priorities within a comprehensive policy framework. The focus of such a framework must centre around what Barbados has to offer the world and what needs to be done to use this recessionary period to make strategic changes which will effect positive growth. It must 40

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twin export development with second phase export promotion. Several questions must be answered: How can we use the growth trends that have brought us this far to take us further? What do we need to do to take our well established service providers higher up the value chain to produce and export higher quality, better priced and more competitive modern services? What is our potential and what is being underutilized? What must we do differently? The BCSI was envisioned to be the agency leading this transformation since 2002 and has to be the agency to play a leadership role in this process. The BCSI serves to bridge the gap between the complementary roles to be played by Government and the private sector in identifying a business focused, export oriented services trajectory for Barbados that expands our domestic services market and builds on the gains we have made up to this point.

The organization, is fully poised to chart a new direction based on current imperatives and play a new and energized role in leading Barbados service sector along the path to economic growth and development, create new jobs/entrepreneurial opportunities for current and potential service providers, generate employment and create a world class service sector that serves as a platform for exporting, increased productivity and global competitiveness. It however needs to be guaranteed the requisite institutional and financial support in order to continuously remain on the forward edge of the global services market and chart new and strategic paths for the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s services economy. This is certainly the time to make that investment in order to ensure that we all contribute to delivering on the legitimate development ambitions of our services industry and our economy more widely. 2013 EDITION


services success

Global Services Coalition Communiqué Washington, DC, 19 September 2012

Services – The New Agenda! Meeting at the 4th Global Services Summit in Washington DC on 19 September 2012, business organizations comprising the Global Services Coalition (GSC) applauded Governments for their concerted efforts in responding to business calls to reignite global interest in the growth and development of the services sector. Over recent months, a group of WTO members have been meeting regularly in Geneva as the “Really Good Friends of Services” to consider what could be done, and how, to allay business frustration over stalled Doha Round outcomes on services. Discussions have focused on developing a coherent, new agenda towards an international plurilateral services agreement that would be ambitious, flexible, and inclusive with the goal of attracting maximum support and providing a means for extending its outcomes to all WTO members. The Global Services Coalition calls on those WTO members which have not yet participated in these meetings to delay no longer and to join in as soon as possible. The Global Services Coalition urges all the participating 2013 EDITION

Governments to move rapidly to capture the existing hard-won momentum towards launching formal negotiations by the end of this year – to achieve early practical outcomes in support of global economic growth. The services sector accounts for the bulk of GDP and new job-creation in most of the world’s economies. Services industries are everywhere providing the key value-added which is enabling more and more economies to find an entry into global supply chains, enhancing growth, development, and job opportunities. But international business in services is severely hampered by longstanding trade, investment, and regulatory barriers of all kinds, and it is threatened by new protectionist restrictions. In the current global environment, marked by low growth in many economies, Governments need to take concerted action to reverse recessionary drift. Opening up to international business is the most efficient spur to economic growth. By operating both the demand and supply levers at the same time, reform of trade and investment regimes is the most effective means of bolstering commercial expansion, facilitating

business innovation, and creating jobs. New market access abroad means new export opportunities, while acting as a catalyst for inward flows to bring the benefits of cheaper inputs and more efficient businesses at home. The fourth Global Services Summit, entitled, “Services – The New Agenda!” was oriented to shed new light on key challenges facing services trade and investment in the current global economic climate, emphasizing the urgent need to tackle them through a coherent new negotiating agenda in the interests of growth and wealth-creation worldwide. Insightful discussions included cross-border trade and the digital economy; the problems for business of local preferences and other localization requirements; the impact of state-owned and state-assisted enterprises; the role of trade facilitation and enhanced logistics in global value chains and the role of services in generating momentum in the Asia Pacific economies. The Global Services Coalition brings together businesses that lie at the heart of the functioning of modern, competitive economies. The Coalition’s members are committed to working together with all Governments to help reap the productivity gains and development dividends that services sector reform can deliver. The Global Services Coalition includes: Australian Services Roundtable Canadian Services Coalition Coalition of Service Industries Malaysia Coalition of Services Industries (USA) European Services Forum Hong Kong Coalition of Service Industries Japan Services Network Mexican Services Network NASSCOM (India) Taiwan Coalition of Services Industries TheCityUK (United Kingdom)

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services success

Services Success A successful services exporter can be small and capital-modest. A successful services exporter can work from home or from the local coffee shop. A successful services exporter might even be a manufacturer or someone in the agricultural sector. A successful services exporter can be YOU!

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Opportunities in services abound. This section will introduce you to regional service providers who are boldly innovating and creating excellence – our region’s successful services exporters. Yet as challenges and opportunities go hand in hand, in this section, we’ll also discuss some of the challenges of services exporting.

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services success

Move Over

Willy Wonka!

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Reviews Great Tour!

Successful services exporting is not the exclusive domain of service companies. While the thought may seem puzzling, allow me to explain by example. Agapey Chocolate Factory manufactures gourmet chocolate in Barbados. Were this piece not about successful service exporters, the company’s efforts in the realm of manufacturing in the Caribbean would still be noteworthy: • Agapey doesn’t use extracts, concentrates, flavourings or preservatives. The ingredients are very simple: high-quality, single-sourced, flavoured cacao beans used in only 5%10% of all commercial chocolate and Barbadian Plantation Reserve sugar, some of the world’s highest quality sugar. The ingredients are sourced from the wider Caribbean region including Grenada and Ecuador; • Agapey’s packaging is of worldclass standard and meets export requirements; • Agapey has installed Photovoltaic technology and is in the process of converting the operation to be energy self sufficient. Here’s where the services element comes into play; to support Agapey’s marketing efforts

tripadvisor The tour is small, but very interactive and informative. You get to try samples of all of the different ingredients and the chocolates. We would highly recommend this tour! Thank you for a great morning in Barbados! – Suzie N

Great Experience!

with their tourist target market – who are typically more receptive to the bitter taste of dark chocolate, Agapey introduced a tour of the chocolate factory. Tourists, particularly cruise tourists who are looking for something new and interesting to do during their layover in Bridgetown are invited to visit the factory for a lesson on chocolate making. Agapey is now rated the number one Bridgetown attraction and the number three attraction in the whole of Barbados by TripAdvisor, the world’s largest and most visited travel website, supporting author Darlene Duggan’s assertion on page 64 that tourists are looking for unique, ‘wow’ experiences. Agapey has even been awarded a Certificate of Excellence by TripAdvisor – a noteworthy feat for a manufacturing company! Agapey clearly demonstrates that any company can embrace services exporting. Be sure to visit Agapey during your next visit to Barbados! www.agapey.com

My wife and I visited Agapey Chocolate Factory while on a cruise. Location was within walking distance of the pier. Derrick, the owner, gave a wonder presentation with tons of excellent information and plenty of taste testing at different stages of the process. This is a must do when visiting Barbados. I wish Derrick would find a distributor in the US since the chocolate we bought after the tour went fast. Thanks Agapey for an exceptional experience and some GREAT chocolate. – cruiseaholic_az

One of the best activities in Barbados! If you like chocolate even a little, you’ll love this tour! Though the factory is small, the tour is interactive and fun and you learn a lot about chocolate. It’s about an hour, with half the time spent learning about chocolate and tasting various types. You have to book in advance online, but don’t let this stop you! The tour is great and so is the chocolate! – londonathens123

Excellent tour and very eye opening! This is definitely not your usual tour in the Caribbean like the beaches, snorkelling or restaurants, although that’s why I love the islands. The chocolate factory tour really takes you back to where and what chocolate is all about and just the pure essence of chocolate. Very educational and tasty! I think it’s history in the making for this chocolatier. Best of luck to you, Derrick! – Natalie K

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Testing, Testing, 1, 2, 3

The global medical technology sector is worth approximately US $250 billion, of which clinical testing accounts for more than US $20 billion. 44

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Within this, clinical testing for the African diaspora is a highly specific but significant sub-sector worth US $156 million in Latin America, USA and the Caribbean alone. It is a common misconception held by much of the general public that different races respond similarly to medication. This is not the case. According to the Journal of the National Medical Association, “Pharmacogenetic research in the past few decades has uncovered significant differences among racial and ethnic groups in the metabolism, clinical effectiveness and side effect profiles of therapeutically important drugs.”1 Dr.Jeyaseelan of 4R (4 Research) in Barbados explains, “We are all broadly the same, but there are slight differences when working at the molecular level which can make big differences in treatment effectiveness.” As an example, beta blockers used to treat hypertension are less effective in

people from the African diaspora. It is however estimated that between US$1 to 2 billion will be earmarked to the discovery and development of drugs, diagnostics and vaccines for Africa and its diaspora. While this is positive news for advancements in this sub-sector, one of the current research challenges is the mistrust among African Americans of clinical trials and the US health system in general. This has led to their underrepresentation in clinical trials, and there is concern that this lack of representation in medical research may perpetuate health disparities.2 If we’re thinking like an entrepreneur (Read Capitalizing on Innovations on page 68), these factors can translate into an opportunity for the Caribbean - which is where the story of 4R becomes relevant. 4R is an ethically-driven, research solutions, start-up company created to provide services to clients carrying out healthcare research for the benefit of the African Diaspora – specifically companies outside of the Caribbean who wish to evaluate their products with the help of African-descent participants. Despite the newness of 4R, they have already developed a reputation for quality and are presently undertaking research for firms in the US and the UK. 4R would like to expand to develop better linkages within the Caribbean, eventually undertaking research that reflects the needs of the regional health service in order to bring cutting edge procedures and treatment to the Caribbean. (And still thinking like an entrepreneur… this will add to our advantages in the field of Health Tourism.) 4R is offering a niche service, in an area of demand and is competitive in cost and quality - the perfect mix for a successful services exporter! Journal of the National Medical Association Vol. 94, No. 10 (Suppl.), October 2002 2 NetWellness is a non-profit consumer health web site that has been in operation for over ten years. It provides high quality information created and evaluated by medical and health professional faculty at the Case Western Reserve University, The Ohio State University and the University of Cincinnati. 1

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What You Sow:

Jakes Farm to Table Dinners “Once a month, when the moon is full...” makes a good beginning for many a story, and so it does with this one too. Each month, on the Saturday closest to full moon, Jakes, an eco-friendly, boutique hotel in Treasure Beach Jamaica, hosts a celebration of farmers and the land at their rustic and chic Farm to Table Dinners. The dinners are a collaboration between Jakes and Liz Solms, accomplished chef and local sustainable agriculture expert.

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The objective of the Farm to Table Dinners program is to recognize and support the small independent farmers of Jamaica’s ‘bread basket’ in Pedro Plains (where nearly 80% of the food in Jamaica is grown) and serves to reconnect the diners to the land and the origins of their food. The series of monthly dinners features locally sourced, organic ingredients and is prepared and served tableside at local farms on elegantly set tables, under romantic lighting. Past rural gourmet meals have included penne with lime basil and goat cheese crostini alongside chicken with dill yogurt sauce or chevre on toast with homemade lime pepper jelly and lamb with coconut milk and spices. The dinners also play host to various specialists. For example, in February 2012, New York Times featured beekeeper, Cerise Mayo, prepared a honeyinspired menu. The Farm to Table Dinners attract local and foreign visitors alike and has been featured online in Washington Times, National Geographic and Travelling Greener. Jakes Farm to Tables Dinner embodies many of the best practices being discussed in this issue of Services Scoop and otherwise – experiential tourism, culinary/agro-tourism, sustainable tourism. Jakes - a great example of an innovative, socially responsible and successful services exporter.

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SERVICES Coalitions

The Meiling Story By

Sharleen Chin, Meiling Inc. Ltd.

Meiling Esau

Very few people in the Caribbean are automatically known by their first name, but an exception to this assertion is Meiling. 46

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Meiling has developed a Caribbean-wide reputation as a fashion house tour de force, built on over thirty years of hard work, tenacity, creativity and always keeping true to her mantra of zero compromise on quality, design or workmanship. For Meiling Esau, fashion design is in her blood: her mother was one of the top couturiers in Trinidad during the 40s and 50s. Meiling grew up amidst the whirring sounds of sewing machines and stacks of fabric bolts. Her first garments were designed and made for her dolls: the passion was ignited. However, with no opportunities in the 1960s for a formal fashion education in Trinidad, Meiling left home in her teens, bound for London, England and the Lucie Clayton School of Design, which has produced the ilk of Mary Quant, inventor of the mini skirt. Fast forward forty years, Meiling is an award winning designer in high demand to

show on fashion runways around the globe including the most prestigious in Latin America; Plataforma K and Dominicana Moda. Among her many awards are the Grand Master of Design from Caribbean Fashion Week and the Chaconia Medal from the Government of Trinidad and Tobago for meritorious service to the fashion industry. She has collaborated closely with Emmy award winner, costume designer, Peter Minshall and received accolades for her involvement for the opening and closing ceremonies of the 1996 Centennial Olympic Games in Atlanta. Perhaps one the most unusual recognition is the MEILING Martini, created by Absolut of Sweden in recognition of her great talent. It has chocolate in it! The list of awards continues to grow with each year and for the 50th anniversary of Independence of Trinidad and Tobago in 2012, she was named one of the top 50 most 2013 EDITION


services success Meiling Collectoons influential people in the nation. The MEILING line is presently available in Trinidad at the charming 6 Carlos Street boutique which is also the home to the MEILING design studio. In Jamaica, an exclusive line is sold at the very stylish Jamaica Soho Shop in Kingston where the brand is revered by fashionistas. A heads up for Meilingistas who can’t get to any of these exotic locations, look out soon for the Meiling online boutique of black and white luxury women’s apparel. It will be accessed through the website www. meilinginc.com. Never to rest on her past laurels, Meiling is the first to say that she is only as good as her last collection and as such, she is constantly pushing the envelope for innovation and excellence. “This year has been one of widening our boundaries,” says Meiling, “and aiming for a global customer who we think will not be unlike my present Meilingista. My customers travel the world, buy from designers everywhere and yet they keep coming back to me for my signature look, which will make them stand apart from the crowd.” A big part of this global stretch was the presentation of the Spring/Summer 2013 collection at a private showcase during London Fashion Week in September this year, following shortly after the 2012 Summer Olympics. Held at the Tony Mayfair Hotel, the Align Showcase also featured the lines of Season Nine Project Runway winner, Anya Ayoung Chee and renowned Trinidad jeweler, Rachel Ross. “It was an exciting opportunity to be proactive and just go for the gold like our athletes did” says Meiling. “Instead of waiting for things to just happen, I applaud the initiative of the Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Service Industries (TTCSI) for this innovative move to propel the Trinidad fashion industry into the global arena,” said Meiling of the organizers of the event. “We three were the first chosen to test the waters and my wish is that it will encourage the emerging designers from the Fashion Academy of the University of Trinidad and Tobago to shoot for the stars. We hope that 2013 EDITION

complexities of having a viable fashion business, the challenges of exporting, the responsibilities to employees and to plan for succession. “These are trying times worldwide and it’s important to surround yourself with capable and committed support,” says Meiling. “I am blessed to have a great team dedicated to the success of the MEILING brand and they are as much a part of the MEILING story as I am.” Final words from Meiling: “My advice to emerging designers who want to have a fashion house is what I tell my interns - to succeed in this business, you need one third talent, one third education and one third tenacity.

There is no such thing as overnight success.

TTCSI can make a commitment each year to a venture like this so it can grow and have sustainability”. Regarding the future in the fashion industry in Trinidad, Meiling believes that TTCSI can play an integral role for capacity building to help designers understand the

You can be the most brilliant designer, but if you don’t know how to build a sound business and meet deadlines, you might as well pack up all your sewing supplies and go home. You also have to pay your dues like every major designer has at one time or the other. There is no such thing as overnight success.”

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TTCSI Align Private Fashion Showcase in London:

Tackling New Markets By Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries

London Fashion Week is one of the highest profiled fashion events in the world and one of the ‘big four’ international catwalk influencers amongst Milan, New York City and Paris. It is in this context that, as part of its efforts to promote services sector exports, the Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries (TTCSI) designed The Align Private Showcase on the eve of London Fashion Week 2012. 48

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Align Private Showcase, which is one of the many initiatives undertaken by the TTSCI towards the further development of the local Fashion Industry, gathered a targeted, prequalified buyer and press audience in the UK to view the Spring/Summer 2013 lines presented by three of Trinidad and Tobago’s top fashion designers. Renowned clothing designer Meiling, Project Runway Season 9 winner, Anya AyoungChee and jewellery designer, Rachel Ross, all from Trinidad and Tobago, gave the intimate crowd a preview of their upcoming collections at the Mayfair Hotel’s Amarillo Suite in London. The showcase was hosted on the eve of London Fashion Week to take advantage of the presence of industry professionals who flock to London to get a jump on next season’s trends. The TTCSI worked with London-based luxury fashion consultant, David Jones (mentor to some of the world’s biggest designers and developing fashion houses such as Matthew Williamson, Karen Millen and John Galliano) as

well as Public Relations, Branding and Design consultant, Sharon Louise Laurent, to plan and promote the private showing. The event was conceptualized and designed based on a similar format used for many elite brand launches. Before the presentation, both Meiling and Anya helped prep models backstage, making last-minute adjustments to their outfits, before stepping out to welcome attendees and mingle with the crowd which included celebrity Chris Eubanks, former middleweight world champion. His Excellency, the High Commissioner for the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, Garvin Nicholas, shared with the crowd a few aspects of Trinidad and Tobago creative talents. The Ministry of Tourism of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago sponsored the reception. The show was accompanied by the Angostura Limited sponsored performance of rising music star, Collis Duranty. The choreography, music and makeup reflected a Trinidad and Tobago atmosphere.

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I believe more than ever that the UK and European markets have a lot to offer to TTCSI promoted fashion designers...

The show started when large doors opened to reveal a regal boudoir draped with three models in simple modern cuts by Meiling adorned with Rachel Ross jewellery. This was followed by sensual silk pieces from the ‘Carnival of Colours’ collection by Anya. Fashion Industry leader, David John stated: “I believe more than ever that the UK and European markets have a lot to offer to TTCSI promoted fashion designers, both those that presented in London and others yet to be identified. Tough, though the market is, I certainly believe Europe is ready to embrace these labels and hope that we can build upon the

positive promotion that your incredible Align concept achieved.” The TTCSI will continue its efforts towards the development of the local and regional fashion industry. Other projects for the fashion industry include standardization for garments, coordination of the Trinidad and Tobago delegation to the Kreyol’ Fashion Days in Guadeloupe, contribution to the development of the National Strategic Plan for the Fashion Industry, lobbying efforts for the strengthening of the fashion industry, and capacity building training for fashion designers.

From Left to Right: First row: Sharon Louise Laurent, Chris Eubanks, Rachel Ross, Meiling. Second row: Anya Ayoung Chee, Collis Duranty, Florence Louis-Edouard, His Excellency Garvin Nicholas

PA G

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DON’T MISS

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OUR INTERVIEWS WITH THE DESIGNERS › 49


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INTERVIEWS WITH THE DESIGNERS support is not a one-way street and we intend to share our knowledge and experience with other designers and emerging designers so that they can learn from our mistakes and successes.

‘midday white heat’ of the Caribbean

MEILING

“24 Hrs Collection”

What is the inspiration behind your SS13 collection? Can you talk us through it? The Collection is called 24 Hrs, which is a poetic journey from dawn to midnight. The inspiration for the SS13 Collection is the ‘midday white heat’ of the Caribbean and is actually an excerpt from a larger collection. It comprises of cool offerings in white linen, organdy and poplin, trimmed with lace or paired with sandy beige. The collection has a casual but sophisticated urban flair, which makes it easy to wear around the globe; from the beaches of Grenada, to a dinner in Monaco. 50

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What’s your favorite piece of this collection? The short kaftan top/mini dress, which was inspired by kites in Trinidad, is my favourite. It is forgiving to almost every woman’s shape and therefore, very popular. You can wear it as a top with sleek trousers or as mini dress to show off fab legs and killer stilettos.

What’s next for Meiling? The MEILING brand is aggressively working on a global push to penetrate the international stage. We are committed to continuing the mentorship and supporting the growth of the fashion industry in Trinidad. The MEILING studio has always had an open door and students and industry professionals know that they are welcomed (once they have made an appointment) to visit.

What do you find most challenging about your job? I need 30 hours in a day! What I find most challenging, yet most stimulating, is the fast changing face of fashion. What Heidi Klum says, ‘what’s in today, is out tomorrow’ is true. It’s important to stay relevant and in tune with what is going on globally. How important is the support from Business Support Organizations like the TTCSI to assist with the further export of your brand? TTCSI has been a great support in the most practical sense - in providing funding for designers in Trinidad to export their brands abroad. However, even more importantly, they provided workshops with global experts such as Mercedes Gonzales of Global Purchasing to help prepare us for this international stage. I also want to take this opportunity to say that the

RACHEL ROSS What is the inspiration behind your SS13 collection? Can you talk us through it? The collaboration of natural resources: bamboo, sterling silver, mother of pearl, oyster shells and brass - simply gorgeous combinations. In the traditional jewellers world, it would be seen 2013 EDITION


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as working the precious with the non-precious, semi-precious stones with base metals! But that’s why I like designing for fashion; it allows me a huge canvass on which to create!

How important is the support from Business Support Organizations like the TTCSI to assist with the further export of your brand? Extremely important for both funding and creating opportunities abroad. For a small business such as Rachel Ross Jewelry, the expertise afforded to me by the TTCSI with

regards to sourcing grants and facilitating trade, is of huge assistance. What’s next for Rachel Ross? Hopefully further collaborations with Meiling and Anya, locally and abroad. I think we work well together and I enjoy designing for both.

creative element of my products, while having a strong team running the development and logistics side. What’s your favourite piece of this collection? I have many favourites in this collection since I love making cuffs. They give me the space to create just about any look I wish, simply because of the sheer size of these bracelets (some are 3 inches wide). I especially like the oyster shell, inlaid with zircons, on a hammered brass base, as well as the textured sterling silver, with the black mother of pearl and zircons. But I think that my series of bamboo bracelets with either silver, brass or copper are what I’m most proud of now. I think these are a unique combination specific to me.

ANYA AYOUNG-CHEE What is the inspiration behind your SS13 collection? Can you talk us through it? This collection is called “Carnival of Colour” and was an exploration of the transition of colour from the muted tones to very vibrant, all representing the range and dynamic of colour in the Caribbean landscape.

What do you find most challenging about your job? The lack of materials available locally and therefore, the high duties on imports. As our economy appears to be at a standstill, it is difficult to spend money to purchase materials to create, but these restraints also have their benefits, as it forces you to design with a different purpose. All these experiences are beneficial. 2013 EDITION

What’s your favourite piece of this collection? My favourite pieces are the black low V bodysuit with patterned silk skirt with high slits, and the blue and red coral pattern shift dress with low scoop back. What do you find most challenging about your job? Overseeing staff, managing operations and manufacturing and overseeing sales are the more difficult parts of my work. Ideally, I would love to have the freedom to design and direct the

How important is the support from Business Support Organizations like the TTCSI to assist with the further export of your brand? The support of agencies like the TTCSI is invaluable to brands like mine. As a start up company, I rely heavily on external assistance to take my company to the next level with respect to exposure to new markets, funding, mentoring and networking. This type of support for micro and small enterprises in the Caribbean is truly essential.

“Carnival of Colour” What’s next for Anya Ayoung–Chee? ANYA the brand is on the heels of expansion into the retail arena in the Caribbean and major US cities. The brand is also poised for a larger scale distribution platform in the US. Anya Ayoung-Chee continues to grow as a brand via television appearances, lectures throughout the US and the Caribbean, including most recently at the Foromic conference hosted by the InterAmerican Development Bank (IADB) and the Multilateral Investment Fund (MIF), and other professional appearances.

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Market Entry Challenges (Visa)

The EU Commissioner for Home Affairs announced on November 7, that nationals of Dominica, Grenada, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and Trinidad and Tobago would no longer require Schengen visas. This provision already applies for nationals of Antigua & Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados and Saint Kitts and Nevis. The Schengen visa members include 22 European Union states and 3 non-EU members.

in Exporting to the EU

DENIED

By Liesl Harewood, Wasiné

The signing of the CARIFORUM-EC Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) symbolised a new era of development cooperation and trade relations between the European Union (EU) and sub-groupings of the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries. 52

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While the EPA was necessary in establishing a WTO-compatible trading arrangement and therefore in resolving a long-running trade dispute between the EU, ACP and other developing countries, it was further intimated that CARIFORUM countries wanted, maybe even needed, this trade and development agreement with the EU because it was a major economic bloc and traditionally a significant trade partner. Five years after the signing of the EPA, CARIFORUM is not maximizing on the slated opportunities. One issue that has particularly strained the credibility of the agreement as a catalyst for opportunities with the Caribbean “services provider on the street” is that of “temporary presence of natural persons for business purpose”. It is not uncommon that visas are being denied, despite the provisions including “Short Term Visitors for Business Purposes” and “Business Services Sellers”. Yet, how can services providers from the CARIFORUM countries have a reasonable expectation of hassle-free rights of entry into the EU, when it appears as though we cannot even get it right in our own back yard? At a regional level, the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas, commits Caribbean Community (CARICOM) governments to free the movement of “skilled nationals” and national legislation has been enacted in member states to give effect to this for five priority categories1. Subsequent Heads of Government decisions extended this to ten categories; however as with most critical issues 2013 EDITION


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in the Caribbean, the discussions surpass the implementation and application phases. At the end of 2008, only 6210 Certificates of Skills Recognition had been issued entitling holders to seek employment in other CARICOM member states; but the number actually being utilised was unknown2, with the common cry across the region being “statistics for services are hard to track”. Major problems have emerged in the administration of the scheme; including standardised procedures among member states for the issuing of Certificates, the need for Contingent Rights regimes (especially as they relate to dependents), and the need for a regional registration and monitoring mechanism. The absence of hassle-free travel throughout the region by Community nationals is also a major deterrent to the free movement of persons. Governments have decided that an automatic six-month stay should be granted upon entry; but this is unevenly administered by national immigration authorities. Given the challenges regionally, it is therefore not surprising that services providers from the CARIFORUM region must also overcome several hurdles before being able to enter the EU market. Ongoing initiatives such as trade shows and missions to markets in France, Germany and the United Kingdom are commendable efforts, and undoubtedly derive several measures of success based on the indicators outlined by the beneficiaries, but the path to the proverbial promise land is not without many potholes. When services providers and regional consultants are still encountering hassles, and in some cases, being denied visas to facilitate such activities in the EU, it begs the question – “What have we really achieved since the signing of the EPA?” How can having to obtain two different types of visas for a ten day EU mission be financially feasible, or even practical, for the CARIFORUM services provider looking to access the EU market? In many countries, the application process for these visas – whether it be Schenghen or 2013 EDITION

The absence of hasslefree travel throughout the region by Community nationals is also a major deterrent to the free movement of persons.

United Kingdom visas – sometimes involve sending passports to an embassy or consulate in another island and numerous other inconvenient processes. The dichotomy that exists and still needs to be addressed is an environment which proposes trade liberalisation but does not easily offer the tools necessary, such as – ease of access to visa applications for the services providers to enter the market. Although I have painted a somewhat lamentable scenario, hope must triumph over despair. At this stage in the game, retreating from any of these signed agreements is not an option. Instead, we must develop strategies to overcome these seemingly insurmountable hurdles. By lobbying and advocating to the government officials charged with implementation, we can bring to light these issues for the five (5) year EPA review

process scheduled for 2013. Become familiar with your national EPA Implementation and Coordination Units3 and National Coalitions of Services and utilise the channels that they offer to relay anecdotes on both our challenges and successes in utilising the EPA. Hopefully in another four years I will be writing about the great strides taken and notable achievements gained in marking the progress of the EPA. The five priority categories are: Graduates, media workers, musicians, artistes and sports persons. 2 CARICOM Secretariat. Convocation on The CaARICOM Single Market And Economy (CSME); Draft Summary Report of the Appraisal of the State of Implementation of the Single Market. CSME (CONV)/2009/1/6. 6 October 2009, pp.59-60. 3 A directory listing of regional EPA Coordination and Implementations Units was provided in Services Scoop, Issue 1, 2012. 1

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SERVICE SECTOR HIGHLIGHTS

Service Sector Highlights ‘Service sectors’ refer to categories of service providers in similar or related areas. When used in a technical sense, ‘service sectors’ generally refers to a comprehensive list of service areas covered under the General Agreement on Trade in Services and used in negotiation efforts. This list of service sectors is known as the Services Sectoral Classification List. Sectors include, for example, ‘Business Services and Professional Services’ and a subsector in this category would include ‘Accounting Services’. Otherwise the term ‘service sectors’ is used informally to describe any category or grouping of service providers, not necessarily only those performing similar roles, but those also providing services to a similar area of

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focus. For example service providers in the health and wellness sector might include reflexologists, doctors, spa managers and even travel agencies. Priority sectors in the region include the cultural industries, ICT, health and wellness, education services, marine services, professional services, amongst others. In this edition of Services Scoop, we sought to highlight sectors that have potential but are not generally given ample consideration; culinary tourism, bioscience, experiential tourism and the Carnival sector are a handful of endless growth areas (with some innovation and energy) of the Caribbean. In which sector of the Caribbean do you see the most potential?

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Culinary Tourism:

Let’s Get Cooking!

By Ena Harvey, Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture

Caribbean cuisine is the original fusion cuisine, reflecting the multi-ethnicity of our African, East Indian, Far Eastern, European and Amerindian ancestors and presented uniquely in each island in a fabulous panorama of flavours and aromas. It’s hardly a wonder that food in the Caribbean is such an important focus of practically every social activity, whether it be a casual lime, fete, religious festival, christening or even a funeral wake. And the enthusiasm is catching on as more and more 2013 EDITION

of the 40 million tourists who visit our region each year come to savour and enjoy our food and culture. Culinary tourism is “the pursuit of unique and memorable eating and drinking experiences” and is a subset of cultural

tourism. It includes tourism experiences where one learns about, appreciates and/or consumes food and drink that reflect the local, national or regional cuisine, culture, tradition or culinary techniques and tells the story of the heritage, people and landscape. Culinary tourism enhances all tourism assets. “All travelers eat and drink and therefore food and drink have a greater ability to make long-lasting memories than any other kind of tourism experience,” explains Eric Wolf, President of the International Culinary Tourism Association. Not only does culinary tourism enrich experiences but it can serve as a valuable tool to boost economic, social and community development. Culinary tourism provides rewarding opportunities for women, farmers services scoop

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All travelers eat and drink and therefore food and drink have a greater ability to make long-lasting memories than any other kind of tourism experience...

and rural communities to achieve sustainable livelihood by increasing rural revenue sources and improving income levels and enables a tangible and direct share in tourism revenues: • The Trinidad and Tobago Mango Festival (now in its 4th year) is managed by the Trinidad and Tobago Association for Rural Women. The goals of the Festival include stimulation of the development of rural cottage industry in Trinidad and Tobago, highlighting the contribution of rural communities to national economic development and promoting economic opportunities through the sustainable use of the mango; • In Saint Lucia, the Anse La Raye and Gros 56

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Islet Food festivals, with an average visitor spend of US$75, link the fishing industry to tourism, with significant benefits redounding to the community along the value chain ‘Boat to Throat’; • In Jamaica, the Agro-Tourism Participatory Business Model used by the women of the Mango Valley Visionaries Friendly Society (MVVFS) has proven to be a success for this poor community. With the significant decline in traditional banana farming in the area after Hurricane Hugo, the women diversified their activities into greenhouse production of organic vegetables and the processing of a line of Mango Valley Pride products which

include guava cheese, jams, otaheiti apple balls and jerk seasoning. There is a steady local demand for their products with uptakes from local supermarkets, market vendors, as well as a small number of restaurants and hotels on the North Coast. Currently, this supports a workforce of 26 women employed in agro-processing and 75 male and female farmers. Culinary Tourism has been described by the Travel Industry Association (TIA) in the USA as “one of the fastest growing segments” of the industry. Sixty percent (60%) of American leisure travellers indicate that they are interested in taking a trip to engage in culinary activities within the next 12 months. 2013 EDITION


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opportunities in offering a quality Scottish food experience. This will improve the profile of Scotland as a destination where visitors can experience high-quality, locally produced food. The project will offer technical support to businesses in the areas of food preparation, menu development and food services, and will address supply chain issues which will facilitate the use of locally sourced Scottish produce. The Caribbean as a Culinary Destination – Some Food for Thought The International Culinary Tourism Association has established what is called a ‘Destination Readiness Index’ - a barometer by which the readiness of culinary tourism destinations can be ranked. Destinations surveyed in this year’s report include Belgium, Louisiana (USA), New Zealand, Ontario (Canada), Peru, Scotland (UK), Singapore, South Africa and South Korea. Some of the more interesting discoveries from the report include: Scotland is the most prepared culinary destination in the world (ranking 79/100), followed by Louisiana Travel enthusiasts are willing to pay big bucks for insider tips, immersive cooking classes, wine and agricultural experiences, as well as authentic cultural exchanges. Some have already seized this opportunity: Royal Caribbean now offers a Culinary Cruise – an entire week devoted to cuisine and fine dining, the Los Angeles Airport is opening a farmer’s market, a spin-off of 77-year-old Los Angeles tourist attraction at Third and Fairfax and the Shanti Maurice Nira resort in Mauritius offers a ‘Cooking with Grandmother’ activity - an interactive dining experience where the grandmother of a resort staff member cooks authentic local dishes and shares her recipes with the guests. While others are planning to cash in on this opportunity, for example the Scotland Food and Drink Organisatoin aims to create a food industry worth £10 billion by 2017. Culinary tourism is a vital element of this ambitious target, where the objective is to maximize on the relationship between food and tourism by helping businesses recognise the commercial 2013 EDITION

(USA, ranking 70/100) and Ontario (Canada, ranking 67/100), of the destinations surveyed, Ontario, Canada, had the greatest focus on the agricultural component of cuisine, Peru is the only destination surveyed with a dedicated culinary travel page on Facebook: http:// ww.facebook.com/perumuchogusto. Given the offerings of the Caribbean to date: organized food tours such as the Walkerswood Tour in Jamaica and the cheese route ‘Ruta de Queso’ in Costa Rica, the numerous food festivals including Mango festivals in Antigua, Dominica Republic, and Trinidad & Tobago, the Seafood and Wine Festival in The Bahamas, the Taste of

Barbados in Barbados, the Toledo Cacao Festival in Belize, the Creole and Kalinago Festivals in Dominica and the Rockstone Fish Festival in Guyana, (Jamaica alone has a calendar of 15 food festivals per year), the farm dinners of Jakes in Jamaica see page 31 or the cooking school for tourists in Dominica, amongst many others, it is clear that the International Culinary Tourism Association needs to survey the Caribbean. I am certain we would come out at the top of the rankings for our culinary offerings! We now need to package the offer, link the promotion programme to the products and market the Caribbean as the world’s top foodie destination. The influence of the Food Network and celebrity chefs like Rachel Ray, Bobby Flay, and Jamaican Levi Roots has resulted in a greater level of education and knowledge about Caribbean foods. This coupled with the increasing availability of ethnic and specialty foods from the Caribbean has made it easy for foodies and lovers of Caribbean food to purchase ingredients and confidently prepare ‘authentic Caribbean’ meals. The time is now! The good news is that IICA and the CTO are currently working to develop a Caribbean Culinary Tourism Association. The focus of the association is to develop on the following areas: • Leadership ; • Market-ready or near-market-ready culinary products and resources; • Destinations with good access from key origin markets; • Culinary tourism resources distinctive to the region; • Destinations with multiple culinary tourism experiences; • Market intelligence; • Integrated strategy; • Community-based collaboration; • Financial support and performance measures • Effective destination marketing. The Caribbean has all of the ingredients for success. Let’s get cooking!

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Face the Music By Florence Louis-Edouard

For several decades, from the 1940’s until sometime during the last 10 years, the recording industry managed to successfully and profitably sell a defined product to fans and consumers. Records, tapes and then CDs made it possible for musicians to connect with listeners anywhere through a powerful experience packaged in vinyl or plastic and which could be bought or sold like any other commercial product. Then came the internet and in less than a decade, that system collapsed. With uncontrollable and infinite duplication and distribution of recordings, selling records suddenly became much less relevant in the music industry. Latest data shows that global recorded music sales in 2011 totaled $16.3 billion. A International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) study also states that physical format sales slumped by 8.7% globally, falling from a trade value of $11.1 billion in 2010 to $10.2 billion in 2011. Music is getting harder to define; it's becoming more of an experience and less of an object. The music business is shifting away from the sale of ‘things’ to the exploitation of ‘rights’ and lifestyle merchandising. Through the technology of the internet, the audience for recorded music is fast expanding across the world. Artists who might not otherwise find a way to make their music available can take advantage of the new ways to distribute music the internet offers. Driven by the development of broadband and the growing penetration of digital devices, music has become a multi-format industry. New music consumption patterns are rapidly 58

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emerging. Music downloads are often free. Therefore, since selling a service is all about bringing in revenue, the ever-growing music industry is embracing the emerging technology trends for both consumers and artists to benefit. Today the primary channels for success in the music business are live performance (ticket sales, merchandises), music licensing (license fees, royalties), brand marketing (tour sponsorship fees, brand ambassador fees, TV appearance fees, royalties). According to IFPI, global digital revenues saw growth of 8.0%, rising from $4.84 billion in 2010 to $5.23 billion last year, crossing the $5 billion mark for the first time. Digital now accounts for 31% of overall recorded music revenues, up from 29% in 2010.

Global performance rights revenues also grew, climbing 4.9% globally, to $905 million (up from $862 million in 2010). The sector now accounts for 6% of overall revenues, while synchronization earnings grew by 5.7% in 2011 (totaling $342 million, up from $324 million the previous year) and accounted for 2% of global recorded music revenue. Much of this is cause for optimism and opportunity for the Caribbean Music Industry which has contributed to the global music industry since the 1920s with the recording and export of genres like calypso, merengue, son, reggae, zouk, salsa, soca, and dancehall. The music industry is an aspect of the new global economy to which the region has

Annette Shaff / Shutterstock.com

The music industry is in a period of dramatic change.

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participated in with relatively low levels of investment. However, the development of this field has recently taken a dramatic shift as much government initiatives in the creative industries are emerging. State interventions for the arts and cultural sectors no longer occur for purely philanthropic reasons. Rather, the current governments recognize the economic potential of the arts, culture and creativity. Over the years, the indigenous genres, in particular reggae/dancehall, calypso, soca, zouk, and salsa, have evolved into a steady business activity across the region and have propelled the popularity of these genres outside the region. There is a window of opportunity for the region given the growth in the global cultural industries, the increasing commercialization of the arts in the burgeoning digital and knowledge economy and the widening acceptance of alternative genres and world cultures. For starters, the CARIFORUMEC Economic Partnership Agreement EPA addresses the cultural sector and entertainment services through two legal instruments that allow Caribbean firms to invest in entertainment activities in Europe. For the first time, the European Community and its Member States have granted legally binding and significant market access for the supply of entertainment services via the temporary entry of natural persons in the EU, for up to six months in any twelve month period. Many realize the need to be proactive in building solid music business infrastructures and create opportunities to drive the Caribbean’s rich untapped industry. Having hit songs doesn't make an artist anymore: it's

also about YouTube views, Twitter followers, and Facebook friends. Consequently a number of smart operators have decided to ‘go with the flow’ of change and set up sites that facilitate the downloading of their music. As long as people listen legally and record labels continue to service a demanding market, it’s a winwin-win for the executives, the artists and the consumers alike. Rootz Underground, one of Jamaica’s most recent contributions to the International Reggae & World Music scene, has not gone platinum as yet but they have managed to build a strong international fan base that spans across and beyond the 22 European countries they have visited. They are known for their music videos, which they make with the same passion and perseverance they do their songs - but they are mostly known in Europe for the Rootz Global Releaf project. The concept is simply to plant trees everywhere that the band performs. Through the project, the band is promoting what they call “oxygen farming” - the bigger the leaves the better the more oxygen replenishment. The band, which attracts thousands of followers through the social media networks, give fans concert tickets, CDs and T-shirts in exchange for planting trees. The trees are tracked by a GPS system which is displayed in a digital forest on their website. The worldwide touring and eventual legendary Kingston, Jamaica reggae band was therefore not only able to adapt the reggae genre to the modern music era but they used innovative ways to attract fans and followers. The Internet makes it possible for bands to take control of their own career. YouTube

replaced MTV, Google replaced expensive advertisement and Facebook and Twitter allow a whole new level of fan base communication and interaction. Kevin Macdonald Director of the Documentary “Marley” described Bob Marley as a “spiritual character who had the ambition to adapt his music to ensure worldwide popularity”. In the documentary, the reggae legend is portrayed as a very competitive person who was willing to do whatever it took (e.g., replace his backing band, adapt the music to incorporate more rock/pop-accessible aspects, etc.) to reach a wider audience. Adapting the musical genre does not mean losing the essence of the Caribbean culture but ensuring that the audience can relate to the message being given through the musical experience. Kees Dieffenthaller and his band, Kes The Band have utilized the new digital marketing trends to expose their music, a blend of Soca, R&B, hip-hop and dancehall reggae to a wide international audience. Within the past few months the band has performed its latest hybrid sound from the Caribbean to international audiences as far as Japan, Greece and Dubai. The shifting of the music industry, in creation, consumption, and criticism provides a myriad of opportunities for the Caribbean Music Industry. The realization of opportunities for the region’s music industry needs to be achieved through the creation of an enabling framework including a favorable economic incentive structure, institutional strengthening and capability building particularly in the area of business management, networking and the building of new creative partnerships. In this ever shifting cultural movement, as we continue to question what makes the popular popular we must remember that art is still art. Music can be classified, it can support a cause or a product and it can provide a message but it still must reach a public, solicit an emotion and be found of value. The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect any official position.

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Contract Research Organizations Developing the BioScience Sector in the Caribbean

By Professor Chris Hillier, University of the West Indies

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A few months ago I wrote an article for the biotechnology Journal, Nature, as part of the BioEntrepreneur Trade Secrets thread in their publication. The article was titled "Minimum Requirement for a Successful Bioscience Ecosystem" and broke down the various components that needed to be in place to create a functioning biosciences industry. The idea for the article came from my reading of a book The New Players in Life Science Innovation, by Tomasz Mroczkowski, which explores how even emerging economies can become players in the global biosciences industry. My interest was then, as it is now, the Caribbean and how such a diverse and geographically segmented region might create a ‘cluster’ effect given the challenges that its own characteristics create. For me, this isn’t simply an academic or theoretical question but the real life challenge that I have set myself, and have been supported in, by the University of the West Indies. Although, there are many components to explore, including establishing regulatory bodies, improving intellectual property controls and building infrastructure and human expertise, one clear requirement for any successful industry is the existence of a relevant, reliable and costeffective services sector to provide outsourcing options and deliver the core functions that can make the difference between efficient product delivery and successful market engagement or company failure. The Caribbean is no stranger to excellent service companies but these have existed in the traditional markets for which the region has global credentials, particularly tourism. The bioscience industry in general is embryonic and highly fragmented here, although there are pockets of excellence to be found, for example, the highly regarded 2013 EDITION


SERVICE SECTOR HIGHLIGHTS

Fertility Clinic in Barbados. There is one glaring scarcity in the services armoury available in the region and that is the ‘contract research organization’, or CRO. The CRO is the lifeblood of the biosciences industry providing a range of value-added services to pharmaceutical, biotechnology, clinical and medical device clients. The services normally involve providing skills and expertise in carrying out a range of research functions such as clinical studies, trials for drugs or medical devices and data analyses. For any other market this would be analogous to market research testing or surveys. For the biosciences it is vital as the results do not just help companies make decisions on product price, placement and promotion but can literally provide the legal basis of offering the product at all, since the outcome usually has some bearing on human or animal health. A poorly carried out research service can destroy value in a product, or worse, a company and the annals of the bioscience industry is littered with examples of companies floundering on the negative results of a trial, clinical or otherwise. It is encouraging to see that recently in Barbados the gauntlet has been grasped by a new generation of start-ups with the skills and knowledge of the market to successfully offer these services to global clients from a Caribbean base. 4R is one such company, newly out of the blocks, providing world-class research analytical services as well as research management and resource services. Founded by two bioscientists with extensive CRO experience in Africa and the Caribbean, they have a mission to provide health related research services for the benefit of the African diaspora worldwide. They have already delivered proof of concept by attracting European and US clients wishing to provide specific interventions to this market and who have responded to 4R’s quality by being repeat customers. Their unique blend of virtual analytical services using a cloudbased framework and hands-on clinical trial management is clearly filling an unmet need in a true niche market. 2013 EDITION

Similarly, FITTHR (Fit Human Resources), founded by experienced public health clinicians, is a UWI spin out company offering wellness programs to local companies. What makes FITTHR distinct is their determination to only provide ‘evidencebased’ services derived from the latest medical trials worldwide, supported by opinion leaders including the World Health Organization, the British Heart Foundation and other. This dedication to real scientifically validated methodologies allows FITTHR to compete globally without any of the self-consciousness that a less experienced company may feel. As well as providing risk assessment reports and a range of tailored workshops, FITTHR have a clever stratification of services to allow individual clients to choose what is most suitable for their own situation. And it is not just in the classic areas that biosciences can be found developing in Barbados. Biosciences in the next century will impinge on all of our lives providing new products in food, health, energy, manufacturing and even tourism. One example of this can be found with Caribbean LED Lighting (CLL), a young, high-growth company providing a range of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting options for public areas, private homes and industrial and commercial properties. Again, like 4R and FITTHR, what sets

CLL apart is their unrelenting focus on providing quality, not only with regards to their products, where each component is tested rigorously but to their customer care approach which is soon to be augmented by a dedicated customer service unit, a bold step for a small company but a clear signal of their intentions going forward. According to Forbes Magazine, research and development budgets of CRO clients continue to increase, as do the number of drug makers and other potential CRO customers who outsource these services. The global R&D outsourcing market accounted for approximately a quarter of total pharmaceutical R&D expenditures in 2010 and is expected to reach 37.1% by 2018. “At a time when many people are asking ‘where are the jobs?,’ we have a clear answer,” says the Association of Contract Research Organization’s executive director, Doug Peddicord. The companies noted above, as well as other examples of new, energetic and innovative companies in our region can only increase the potential of Caribbean CROs to make their mark in the global biosciences market. CROs are a high-growth, high-value area, worthy of export focus.

CROs are a high-growth, high-value area, worthy of export focus.

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arindambanerjee / Shutterstock.com

Down De Road to Opportunities

Maximizing on Carnival By Michelle Hustler, GIZ

My final year of university was a blur of studying, coffee, beer and Caribbean fetes. I served as the Public Relations Officer to the McGill’s Caribbean Student Society (CSS) – my most fun-inducing title to date – and this role consumed almost all my spare time (and a lot of time I didn’t have to spare). It is stated that the objective of the CSS is “to provide an atmosphere where Caribbean students can feel at home and to educate 62

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the wider McGill population about the Caribbean”, in practice this translated into holding Caribbean fetes. I’m still amused and pleased, thirteen years post graduation, mind you, that the year I served as PRO, thanks to some creative marketing, our parties grew from a tiny, dark room in the basement of the Shatner Building, to outgrow the large university cafeteria, to finally overflow even the big ballroom - the largest room on campus. The final event of my last year at McGill not only saw the ballroom

packed, but included a long line of wouldbe-revellers extending down three flights of stairs, jostling to get in! These hundreds of Caribbean partiers, for the most part, were not McGill students, but were comprised of the Caribbean diaspora living in Montreal. Every year, the CSS would also organize a trip for dozens of members to London, Ontario. What was there in the comparatively boring city of London that would entice us enough to ride eight hours in a cramped bus, spend two nights along with all of our pocketmoney, only to face an eight hour ride back? A Caribbean fete (what else?!) Once a year Western University would host a large culture show, followed by a huge party, attended by thousands of Caribbean students in a large radius around London. These are but two small examples of the Caribbean’s dedication and enthusiasm to the consumption of Caribbean culture. According to a paper published by Dr. Keith Nurse1, there are over 70 Caribbean 2013 EDITION


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HAVANA

LONDON Little_Desire / Shutterstock.com

Kamira / Shutterstock.com

D id You Kno

w?

There are...

CANADA

FRANCE ilolab / Shutterstock.com

carnivals outside of the Caribbean every year. These Carnivals take place in cities across the US (Atlanta, Orlando, San Francisco, Tampa, Philadelphia, Baltimore), Canada (Toronto, Calgary, Montreal, Vancouver, Ottawa), the UK (Leeds, Leicester, Notting Hill, Preston, Bristol) and even in cities like Berlin (Germany), Rotterdam (the Netherlands) and Paris (France). The top three international Caribbean carnivals in Toronto, London and New York attract 6.5 million people annually. For my fellow Barbadians, overly-fixated on the local market, these three carnivals alone, translate into a potential market 23 times the size of Barbados. In addition to the carnivals there are countless other international Caribbeanrelated events that take place across the world, attracting hundreds of thousands more people: Caribbean Student Association events, fairs, dancehall queen contests, Caribbean music festivals, art exhibitions, etc. So here’s my point: while the Caribbean’s 2013 EDITION

arindambanerjee / Shutterstock.com

commitment to consuming Caribbean culture is exceptionally strong and while the number and magnitude of Caribbean events around the world is remarkable – we, in the Caribbean, are not at all seizing (or seeing) the opportunity in this. International Caribbean events are ideal opportunities for numerous Caribbean manufacturers and service providers: musicians, fashion designers, djs, makeup/ hair artists, costume designers, wire-benders, chefs, cooks, models, crafts persons, artists, event planners, food and drink manufacturers, clothing manufacturers. These events concentrate a large target market of customers into a manageable location and timeframe. • Do you have family in the US, Canada, UK? Of course you do. What city are they in? Plan your next visit around the nearest carnival(s). • Get in touch with the carnival organizers. How can you get involved? What are the procedures for securing a booth? What

• 17 music festivals in Belgium; • 10 music festivals in France; • 8 music festivals in Germany; • 11 music festivals in the Netherlands; • 11 music festivals in the United Kingdom and • 10 music festivals in Spain that take place annually and welcome foreign performers.

supporting events will be taking place? • Talk to your Can you see the opportunity? diasporic friends and family that participate in the event. What opportunities do they see? What goods or services do they believe are missing from the event? • Are there Caribbean offices in the city – investment or tourism agencies? Speak to them about the event. • Find out from your local manufacturing association the procedures to export goods to these markets? Get involved! The opportunities outside of the Caribbean are greater than the opportunities within! 1

Dr. Nurse, Keith. The Economics of Bacchanal: the Economic Impact of Trinidad and Tobago Carnival. The World Today, 2007.

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Experiential Tourism

Tourists and local visitors alike want ‘wow’ experiences when they travel or spend a day in a new town.

Putting the ‘Wow’ in Your Business

The b e

st tim

e ever! !!

By Darlene Duggan, Duggan International Group

People from North America and Europe are more than willing to fly great distances to hot climates to bask in the sun and swim in warm ocean waters. For the repeat tourist who annually flies to the Caribbean to escape cold winters, it can become the same product offering but a different island... and ho hum. With nothing to set vacation travel apart but the price, tourists will have no loyalty and will travel to wherever they can get the best deal. For some, this is all they want. For others, they 64

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are tired of just the beach, sun and alcohol with nothing different being offered by the hotel and area… Additionally, for businesses competing with all-inclusive resorts or even with resorts themselves, creating memorable experiences is becoming especially important in the Caribbean tourism marketplace. Vacation travel is not just about where you are going anymore. It is about what activities or excursions are offered, how it is going to make the customers feel, the people

they will meet and the memories they will bring home that will last a lifetime. Tourists and visitors want to make a connection, participate in a process and learn something about the local culture. Many hotels and resorts believe they offer experiences through partnering with excursion operators. However, even excursion companies need to review their experiences. The same type of excursion, but in a different island can also bore the traveller. 2013 EDITION


SERVICE SECTOR HIGHLIGHTS

Excursions are often talked about on social media sites and travellers will take these recommendations under consideration when booking where to go and what to do with their time. Excursions need to incorporate the local culture, create quality experiences and engage the traveller. Consider, more than just hotels and excursion operators should be offering interesting experiences to their customers. Craft shops, retail stores, restaurants, historic sites, educational facilities, tour operators, entertainment and sporting events alike involved in the tourism industry need to create treasured experiences for their visitors if they are going compete and grow their business. For example, companies who are not traditionally involved in tourism can develop experiences in their region by inviting visitors in for tours of their operation. Manufacturers and processors can support regional economic development and increase their earnings by incorporating a ‘tourism experience’. The benefits are multi-ford, as the attraction helps educate the consumers about the company’s products and thereby encourages new sales, it also creates additional employment, partnerships with others in the community (like taxi drivers and tour operators) and serves to diversify the tourism offerings, which encourages new visitors to the island. As a case study, consider Vermont, USA. Tourism is an important industry in Vermont. In 2010, 4.1 million visitors were attracted to the state. For outdoor enthusiasts, trout fishing, lake fishing, ice fishing and hiking activities are major tourism draws. In the winter, Nordic and backcountry skiers visit to

travel the length of the state. Vermont’s state parks, historic sites, museums, golf courses and new boutique hotels with spas are also designed to attract tourists. Yet, some of the most popular tourist attractions in Vermont are tours of renowned Vermont factories and manufacturing plants. Ben & Jerry’s Ice cream and the Vermont Teddy Bear Factory are two of the most popular tours in the state. A tour of a Vermont plant is both educational and fun. Some companies may not give tours, but offer a viewing or demonstration and product tasting. Others businesses are quite small, and by appointment the owner will make time to provide a personal tour of the facilities and describe the manufacturing process. Visitors are welcome virtually everywhere Vermont products are made. In Barbados, Banks breweries, the four rum distilleries – Mount Gay, West Indies, Foursquare and St. Nicholas Abbey, as well as Agapey Chocolate factory, Hutson Sugar Museum/Factory and the Caribbean Cigar Company all offer tours of their facilities. Other companies in the Caribbean could equally learn how to bring visitors to their business and enhance the visitor’s experience, encouraging repeat visits from locals as well as tourists. With experiential tourism practices, businesses need to remember when developing their sales strategy, a tourism product is what you buy and a tourism experience is what you remember. If you can create an exceptional memory for your customer, it can translate into repeat business and new business. Organizations can craft experiential tourism opportunities by providing visitors with unique, entertaining, and/or educational activities that

make it possible for them to have a personal connection to their island and its people. The first step is to understand who your visitors are and what type of experiences they enjoy participating in while on vacation. A visitor’s marketing profile should include demographics - income, gender, family status or education level and psychographics - personal beliefs, social values and views of the world. The next step is to create the experiences and target them to your visitor. Experiences can: • Include themes and connect to one or more of the island’s tourism core experiences such as marine life, outdoor sports, food and dance; • Engage the visitor through hands-on activities which allow them to become an active participant in the activity, not just an observer; • Provide the visitor with exclusive or behind-the-scenes access to a special presentation not usually offered; • Involve qualified guides when necessary; • Enlist resources that are unique to your community or business; • Engage local people and create a story; and • Create an experience that appeals to as many of the five senses as possible touch, taste, smell, sight, and hearing. In conclusion, by incorporating experiential tourism, your island will create international tourism ambassadors. Visitors will relate their experiences to friends and family and post pictures and videos on social media. These positive stories will create new sales and repeat visitors, improving the economy, and putting in the ‘Wow’ for all in the Caribbean to benefit.

The next step is to create the experiences and target them to your visitor.

CRAFT STORE 2013 EDITION

ADVENTURE TOUR

HISTORIC SITES services scoop

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SERVICES Support

Service SUPPORT As trade in services data remains inadequate, the necessary support is not being offered to the development of this sector and expertise in this area accordingly remains limited. This holds true across the globe. Happily, this trend is slowly changing. With coalitions being established and developing knowledge and know how across the region, the Caribbean is shaping a position

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of leadership and strength when it comes to expertise in services sector support. This section offers guidance for those looking to export. Please visit the CSI in your country, pick up the booklets on Establishing Credibility and Strategic Alliances noted in this section and ask the coalition for any additional help you might need.

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SERVICES Support

Strategic Alliances

20Why

Reasons

STRATEGIES FOR SERIES SERVICE EXPORTERS

STRATEGIC ALLIANCES r

Excerpt from Strategies for Service Exporters: Strategic Alliances

Michelle Hustle

Strategic alliances improve the competitiveness of services firms. Here are some of the many benefits a successful strategic alliance can offer your service firm: 1. Ability to Focus on Core Competencies 2. Ability to Keep Company Small 3. Ability to Move Quickly 4. Access to Capital 5. Access to Distribution Channels 6. Access to Expertise 7. Access to Innovation 8. Access to Networks 9. Access to Technology 10. Diversifying Offerings 11. Enhanced Bidding Capacity 12. Enhanced Marketing 13. Improved Credibility 14. Improved Relationships with Customers and Suppliers 15. Increased Export Capabilities 16. Learning Opportunity 17. Reduced Overheads 18. Reduced Risks 19. Sharing Research and Development Costs 20. Strengthening Market Position

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10 Credibility TIPS Establishing SERVICE EXPSTRATEGIES FOR ORTERS SER IES

ESTABLISHING CREDIBILITY A PUBLICA OF SERVICETION OF THE CAR IBBEAN COALITI NETWOR ONS (CN K SC)

Excerpt from Strategies for Service Exporters: Establishing Credibility

Services are intangible. They cannot be examined before purchase in the same way goods can. Therefore, in order for a sale to be made, the buyer must trust in the capabilities of the service provider to deliver what is being promised. Here are 10 ways to establish credibility.

1. Have a world-class website and a professional email address. 2. Engage in social media. 3. Undertake public speaking appearances whenever you can. 4. Become professionally licensed or certified. 5. Compete in industry award programmes. 6. Submit articles to respectable industry publications. 7. Get media coverage and keep articles where the company is mentioned. 8. Collect referrals and testimonials. 9. Join industry associations. 10. Be honest, knowledgeable and passionate.

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SERVICES Support

Capitalizing on Innovations ‘How can I innovate,’ he exclaims. “I work in a small country, in a deficient hospital. There’s no money for anything, limited human resources and large workloads. I can’t finance research myself. But, my colleagues in Holland…’ ‘But, I bet that because you live in a small country and work in a poor hospital, you have found creative ways to keep your patients alive with limited resources,’ she suggests. ‘Of course! I have to!’ he counters. ‘So, you have innovated,’ she responds. ‘If you have found a way to produce the same results with fewer resources, i.e. more efficiently, that’s an innovation’.1

By Tamira La Cruz, MarkStra Caribbean

Innovation is the creation of better of more effective products, processes, services, technologies or ideas that are readily available to markets, governments and society.1

Like the doctor in the dialogue above, it is generally thought that our circumstances limit innovation by Caribbean businesses, but consider it is because of these circumstances that innovation is not only likely, but also probable. So, how do Caribbean businesses make use of our circumstances, including our many limitations to innovate and create international possibilities? Here are some suggestions. Income: There are 200 countries in the world. Holland, USA, UK and Canada

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are amongst the richest. Most countries, businesses and consumers cannot afford the innovations conceived in these rich markets. Therefore, how can we package the inherently cost-efficient solutions by Caribbean entities to market them to markets for which they are appropriate and affordable? Are we even recognizing our innovations as such? Size: Globally, there are 56 sovereign states, 33 dependent territories and 125 islands with populations smaller than 1.5 million. Even if countries could financially afford the innovations conceived in the most developed

countries, consider that for many countries these innovations are unsuitable because they are too complex for their small markets or because there is not enough adequate local talent to implement and maintain them. This provides an opportunity to develop or share innovations with small markets, or smallisland states. Tourists: Some 20 million cruise and 24 million stay-over tourists2 visit the Caribbean

every year. This influx of tourists provides an opportunity for service providers to deliver services to them, perhaps at lower prices than these visitors pay in their home countries. Dental, cosmetic, wellness and therapeutic procedures are some examples of services that can be offered during the time cruise ships are docked, and can be promoted like any other shore excursion would. Is there a service you can adapt somewhat to offer to this market? Tropics: 40% of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population (3 billion people) lives in the tropics. Innovations are typically not developed with this market

in mind. How can the Caribbean offer innovations to this market? One idea might be in the development of weight loss programmes based on tropical fruits and vegetables readily to Caribbean/tropical households. Ethnicity: Black women spend many times more on hair care products than women of other ethnicities do. Most of our products come from the US, where the climate is not as hot. Can you develop a hair care product line

Are we currently exploring the right markets? 2013 EDITION

(or make-up!) specific to hot climates? The population of Sub-Saharan Africa alone is 800 million people3 and projected to increase to 1.5 billion by 2050.4 (Read Testing, Testing, 1, 2, 3 on page 44 for a great example of innovation as it relates to ethnicity).

What to keep in mind when trying to capitalize on an innovation? 1. Strive for DODM when designing the service: Design Once, Deploy Many5. E.g. if you are a trainer, design your training so that it can be used, compared or licensed across markets, with minimal adjustments. 2. What is the market for your innovation and how do you get into this market? Consider why your innovation in unique and who would be interested in purchasing. 3. Market access is already in place. Investigate trade agreements that your home country is party to, or if this is not the case, consider a partner in a country that does have access to the desired markets 4. Strategic alliances are key! See article on page 67.

1 Wikipedia 2 Florida Caribbean Cruise Association, 2011 3 World Bank 4 United Nations 5 Adobe Systems Co.

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SERVICES support

A Successful Service Exporter’s

Business Card Cover the Basics Make sure your business card features your name, title, company name, email, phone number, website URL and a logo. As a service exporter especially, do not forget to note your area code and country. A potential customer will rarely be motivated to Google either! And Keep it Basic While you want to make it as easy as you can for potential customers to reach you, that does not mean that you need to provide them with a dozen options. Your phone/mobile/fax/tollfree numbers, email/P.O./mailing addresses, Skype/Twitter/Facebook/LinkedIn/Google+ names and QR code are not all necessary in contacting you quickly and easily. One email address, one phone number, your physical address (if relevant) and a single website address will offer all the primary information any potential customer will need.

Use a Credible Email Address Do not use yourname@gmail/yahoo/hotmail. com. For those service providers who use addresses like hugglebunny@hotmail.com or mrman@gmail.com, doubt not that you are negatively affecting the image of your company. A service provider unwilling to invest in a professional email address - their primary contact point - does not instill trust in a consumer that they will consider any other aspect of their business with more seriousness. Avoid Typos While seemingly obvious, this point is not one always adhered to. It is best to get one or two other people to proofread for you. Watch for punctuation and consistency (colon versus dash, for example). Verify especially that your contact numbers are right as this detail is unlikely to be caught by proofreaders. A business card with typos actually reads very clearly: it says, “This person does not pay attention to detail”.

Maximize Use the back of the card! The back of a business card offers you an opportunity to stand out. What Do You Do? Include a line on the card about what you do or make sure it is evident otherwise. For example - ‘A&B Associates’ - is this a consulting firm, a legal firm or a funeral parlor? If the owner of your business card does not know what it is you do, it is likely that your card will end up thrown out. Go World Class Hire a professional designer. Ensure that the design is uncluttered, but beautiful and creative. Make sure the fonts are large enough to easily read. Use colour. Print the cards professionally on high quality stock paper. Rounded corners are a nice touch (and prevent corner snags and scratches). Avoid using glossy card stock so your business cards can be easily written on.

Avoid carrying cards in your wallet or back pocket.

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SERVICES Support

Include a line on the card about what you do

Avoid Typos

ARROW TREE

BUSINESS CONSULTANCY

Use a Credible Email Address

Janice James Senior Business Consultant Expert en Dévelopment d'Entreprise

6th Avenue, Belleville, St.Michael, Barbados BB000 (246) 455-7899 (246) 335-9063 janicejames@arrowtree.com arrowtree.com

consider using icons

DIRECTION IN GROWING YOUR BUSINESS

Rounded corners are a nice touch

Stand Out (but not too much) Your business card should differentiate you from the others, but some basic rules should still apply. Maintain standard shapes and sizes so your business card can fit into business card holders and organizers. Play with the card material, but ensure that your card can be read by a card-scanner. En Français? If you often do business, or want to do business, in a country or region where English is not the first language, consider a bi-lingual business card. It is a nice touch.

2013 EDITION

Use the back of the card!

Iconic If you export around the world (or plan to) consider using icons (symbols) instead of the words for ‘Fax’, ‘Mobile’, ‘Telephone’, to ensure that confusion is avoided. Always Have Your Card On-hand The most important bit about business cards is actually having them. Carry your business card holder wherever you go and make sure it is full. Avoid carrying cards in your wallet or back pocket. Handing someone a wrinkled, dirty card is off-putting.

consider a bi-lingual business card

Charm Accept and present business cards with grace and charm. Do not toss your cards across a table or hand them out like you are dealing Blackjack. Look the recipient in the eye and thoughtfully hand them your card and likewise, treat the cards you receive with thoughtfulness. Read a business card in front of the giver, try making a comment or asking a question about the card and then place it in your business card holder.

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SERVICES Support

First Steps Successful Services Exporting

By: Tanya Chase-Henry, Dominica Coalition of Service Industries

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SERVICES Support

There are numerous strategies which can be employed to increase the likelihood of a service professional being successful in their export endeavours.

However, what is certain, in order to achieve export success, it is critical that the service being offered in the export market is considered a niche offering or is competitive in price or quality. Further, it is important that the service provider has first achieved success in the domestic market and advisable that they commence their efforts in their regional market. In other words, a Grenada based architect who is desirous of offering specialized CAD drawings for the European Market should first attempt to export his services within the Caribbean region, for example to Trinidad, to create a profile of expertise in the niche offering, prior to preparing to enter the European market. Research literature indicates that the most useful strategy for success in the export of services is the development of a comprehensive marketing strategy. As a first step to the development of a comprehensive marketing plan for the export of the services,

2013 EDITION

one has to ascertain what service or services would be considered a niche or especially competitive in the export market. This is action is performed through market research. Market research can be conducted by visits to the export country, conversing with other professionals in the industry both in the domestic and export market as well as with potential clients. Market visits can also serve to encourage buy-in from prospective clients of the respective service, support the establishment of strategic alliances with companies in the export market and will serve to inform on prospective competition. When it has been determined what service will be offered in the export market, it is necessary to review the trade regimes and trade policies which may support or hinder service exporting. In other words, a St. Vincent based engineer who is desirous of providing his services in the United Kingdom, even though legally being able to provide such

services under the CARIFORUM-EC Economic Partnership agreement, would need to inquire about the particular stipulations for practicing engineering in the UK. In this case, the engineer would need to become registered in the United Kingdom with its engineering body. A review of the industry standards in the export market of the United Kingdom would also be necessary to ensure the service offering would be competitive in the export market. Once the framework for exporting has been established, it is critical to build credibility. Consider referrals, testimonials, references to professional and quality standards, world-class marketing material, membership in professional associations (see page 67 for more tips). These credibility boosters will contribute to your export success.

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Coalition of Services Industries

GCSI Grenada Coalition of Service Industries

Antigua and Barbuda

Belize

Guyana

St. Vincent and the

Name: Antigua and Barbuda

Name: Belize Coalition of

Name: Guyana Coalition of

Grenadines

Coalition of Service Industries

Service Providers

Service Providers

Name: St. Vincent and the

Website: www.abcsi.org

Primary Contact and Position:

Sharon Roopchand

Grenadines Coalition of Service

Julianne Jarvis, Project

Sue Courtenay, Executive

Email Address: shars_roop@

Industries

Implementation Officer, ABCSI

Director, BCSP

hotmail.com

Website: www.svgcsi.org

Email Address: info@abcsi.org

Email Address: suecourtenay@

Telephone Number:

yahoo.com

Fitzroy O. Glasgow, President Jamaica

Email Address:

Name: Jamaica Coalition of

fitzroy.o.glasgow@

Dominica

Service Industries

marinershotel.com

The Bahamas

Name: Dominica Coalition of

Marjorie Straw, Manager â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Telephone Number: gcsi@spiceisle.com

Name:

Service Industries

Special Projects, JAMRPO

784.527.4000

Website:

Website: www.

Website: www.jamaicacsi.org

Primary Contact and Position:

dominicacoalition.org

Email Address: mstraw@

Trinidad and Tobago*

Winston Rolle, Chief Executive

Lester Riviere, Executive

jamprocorp.com

Name: Trinidad and Tobago

Officer, Bahamas Chamber of

Director, DCSI

Telephone Number:

Coalition of Services Industries

Commerce

Email Address: info@

876.978.7755 x 2145

Website: www.ttcsi.org

Email Address: admin@

dominicacoalition.org

thebahamaschamber.com

Telephone Number:

St. Lucia

Officer - TTCSI

Telephone Number:

767.266.4092

Name: Saint Lucia Coalition of

Email Address: info@ttcsi.org

Services Industries

Telephone Number:

Grenada

Website: www.slcsi.org.lc

868.622.9229

Barbados

Name: Grenada Coalition of

Yvonne Agard, Executive

Name: Barbados Coalition of

Service Industries

Director, SLCSI

Service Industries

Carol Forbes, Executive

Email Address: yvonne.agard@

Website: www.bcsi.org.bb

Secretary

slcsi.org

Lisa Elrock, Executive Director,

Email Address: gcsi@spiceisle.com

Telephone Number:

BCSI

Telephone Number:

758.713.5545

Email Address: info@bcsi.org.bb

473.439.9275

268.562.7216/7215

242.322.2145

St. Kitts and Nevis

org.bb

Cuthbert Woods

Telephone Number:

Email Address: cuthbert@

246.429.5357

woodsrite.com

services scoop

Frequente Industrial Park St George, Grenada West Indies

Nirard Tewarie, Chief Executive

Email Address: lcummins@bcsi.

74

Tel: 1 473 439 9275

2013 EDITION


CAFEIN

The CARIFORUM EPA Implementation Network A ‘Wake-Up Call’ for EPA Implementation

What is CAFEIN?

The CARIFORUM EPA Implementation Network (CAFEIN) is a GIZ-supported, virtual platform that creates an online space for all information related to the CARIFORUM-EC Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) as well as its implementation.

The platform is two-tiered incorporating both a public site and an exclusive internal site for EPA implementers. The public site serves to raise awareness of the trade agreement. It contains the full EPA text, alongside a more easy-to-digest overview, as well as other EPA-related information such as EPA news, events, capacity building and funding opportunities and job notices for key posts in CARIFORUM member countries. The public area also includes a CAFEIN member list, links to the websites of the various EPA implementation units, alongside contact information. The social media facets of the website (Facebook and Twitter) allow all units, as well as the general public to access upto-the-minute updates on relevant happenings in the individual units. The internal site offers the relevant information to assist the often understaffed implementing authorities in systematically breaking down this extensive agreement into clear and comprehensive sections. CAFEIN intranet encourages a maximization of financial and human resources through information and experience sharing. It endeavours to ease coordination and cooperation amongst stakeholders thereby making implementation more straight forward. As more internal stakeholders actively engage with the website, this information will continue to expand, thereby ensuring that CAFEIN is the central online resource point and engineering room for EPA implementation.

CAFEIN: • • • • •

assists the EPA Implementing Authorities to streamline the implementation process while fostering regional integration; supports harmonization efforts in the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) implementation process; connects people in order to expedite problem solving and jointly overcome implementation challenges; increases communication and collaboration amongst EPA implementing stakeholders to enhance public-private dialogue; enables communication with one voice, essential in demystifying the complex agreement amongst key stakeholders.

Check out our website! http://cafein-online.net/ Like us on Facebook: CARIFORUM EPA Implementation Network/ https:// www.facebook.com/Cafeinonline Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/cafein_online

EPA Implementation Support Project Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH

In short, CAFEIN aims to bring all the relevant information about the EPA together on a national, regional and international level.

c/o Caribbean Export 1st floor, Baobab Tower, Warrens, St. Michael,

BB2206, Barbados, W.I.


Join the Conversation

Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ CaribbeanNetworkofServiceCoalitions

Sign up for our monthly newsletter: http://c-nsc.org


Get the Scoop, the Services Scoop! Finishing up the second edition of the Services Scoop made me feel even more excited than completing the inaugural edition. No more fits and starts and steps backwards of the past, the Caribbean region continues steadily over the past two years, to make noteworthy progress in the development of the services sector. I’m glad we can share our efforts and success across the region and the world (last year the magazine was circulated to every continent but Antarctica!) Services Scoop, a publication of the Caribbean Network of Service Coalitions (CNSC), is the Caribbean trade in services magazine, created to highlight issues affecting the services sector – raising awareness in order to generate support. The magazine features four main sections: Services Matter - discussing why services and trade in services are important to Caribbean economies, Services Success – a compilation of success stories used to inspire and motivate service providers into action, Services Support – a section offering guidance to services exporters and would-be-exporters and Services Coalitions – a section discussing advancements in the coalition movement both regionally and internationally. For those of you who missed the first edition, it’s available on the CNSC website (http://c-nsc.org). I would like to encourage all readers to “Like” the CNSC on Facebook and subscribe to the monthly CNSC newsletter. Further, I would like to encourage you to get involved in the activities of your national coalition. If there is none, lobby for establishment of one; the CNSC can help you in this effort. Lastly, enjoy the read! We welcome your feedback! Michelle Hustler EPA Implementation Support Project Consultant for Service Development Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit michellehustler@gmail.com

DESIGNED BY BLUEPRINT CREATIVE INC.

Services Scoop 2013  

Services Scoop is the pioneering trade magazine of the Caribbean. This magazine highlights the critical, yet underrated role the services s...

Services Scoop 2013  

Services Scoop is the pioneering trade magazine of the Caribbean. This magazine highlights the critical, yet underrated role the services s...

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