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PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURAL WORKS /

conor wood WINTER - SUMMER 2011

314 E SUMMIT ST ANN ARBOR MICHIGAN 48104 / 970 393 3917 / cnrwood@gmail.com / ccwood@umich.edu


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ALUMINUM INSTALLATION


DIGITAL FABRICATIONS / ADV. COMPUTATIONAL GEOMETRIES / INSTRUCTION / M. KACZYNSKI, D. PIGRAM / COLLABORATION / R. JONES, B. WILLIAMS, A. AULERICH / FALL 2010 / 8 WEEKS / INSTITUTION / TCAUP, UM ARCH571 /

ARCH509 /

(n)arrborological morphologies

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Call Main()

Sub Main() Dim strStartLine : strStartLine = Rhino.GetObject(“Select the start line”, 4) Dim strStartSection : strStartSection = Rhino.GetObject(“Select the start section”, 4)

arrAllSimilarBranches(0) = strFirstLineReversed

arrAllSimilarBranches(1) = arrNewBranches(0)

arrAllSimilarBranches(2) = arrNewBranches(1)

arrAllSimilarBranches(3) = arrNewBranches(2)

For i = 0 To Ubound (arrAllSimilarBranches)

For i = 0 To ubound (arrSectionPts)

arrBranchesDrawn = Rhino.AddLine(arrCopiedLi ne1ScaledEndPt, arrSectionPts(i))

Dim arrStartLineStartPt : arrStartLineStartPt = Rhino. CurveStartPoint(strStartLine)

Dim i, arrBranchesDrawn

The said {cuina de la topografía} will be not so much as a BLDGDim arrBranchCrvStartPt : arrBranchCrvStartPt = Rhino.CurveStartPoint(arrAllSimilarBranches(i)) as a FIELD for Call Rhino.DeleteObject (arrLastCopiedLine) Dim arrThisBranchNormal : arrThisBranchNormal = Rhino. Dim arrStartLineEndPt : arrStartLineEndPt = Rhino.

Next

Call Rhino.DeleteObject (arrSectionScaled)

Call makeThick( strLine, arrLines, 5.0 )

CurveEndPoint(strStartLine)

VectorCreate(Rhino.CurveEndPoint(arrAllSimilarBranches(i)),arrBranchCrvS tartPt)

_INDIVIDUALS / CROWDS / CONSUMERS / PRODUCERS / Dim arrNormalPlane : arrNormalPlane = Rhino. End Sub PlaneFromNormal(Rhino.CurveEndPoint(arrAllSimilarBranches(i)), Dim strCopiedLine1 : strCopiedLine1 = Rhino. COMMUNITIES_ arrThisBranchNormal) CopyObject(strStartLine, arrStartLineStartPt, arrStartLineEndPt) Call Main() Dim intCounter : intCounter = 0 Sub Main() Dim arrCopiedLineStartPt :to arrCopiedLineStartPt = Rhino. For j = 0 To Ubound (arrAllSimilarBranches) CurveStartPoint(strCopiedLine1) _ARRIVE / STAY /DimLEAVE with strLine : strLine/= PARTY_ Rhino.GetObject(“Select 1 input ease lines”, 4) If Not(i = j) Then If isNull (strLine) Then Exit Sub Dim arrCopiedLineEndPt : arrCopiedLineEndPt = Rhino. CurveEndPoint(strCopiedLine1) where they may Dim / arrLines DRINK DANCE / RELAX / REFLECT_ / EATDim : arrLines / = Rhino.GetObjects(“Select 3 other input arrBranchCrvEndPt : arrBranchCrvEndPt = Rhino.CurveEndPoint Dim strCopiedLine1Scaled :_LEARN strCopiedLine1Scaled/= TEACH Rhino. lines”, 4) (arrAllSimilarBranches(j)) ScaleObject(strCopiedLine1, arrCopiedLineStartPt, array(.7, .7, .7)) If isNull (strLine) Then Exit Sub arrCrossSectionPts(intCounter) = Rhino.PlaneClosestPoint(arrNormalPlane, upon where after, they are left with an arousal of arrBranchCrvEndPt) Dim arrCopiedLine1ScaledEndPt : arrCopiedLine1ScaledEndPt _TASTE / WONDER / EXCITEMENT / INTELLIGENCEintCounter / LOVE_ = intCounter + 1 = Rhino.CurveEndPoint(strCopiedLine1Scaled)

End If

So may the success of this venture be tested by its ability to provide, Next End Sub arrCrossSectionPts(3) = arrCrossSectionPts(0) unconditionally, physical and psychological comfort to the ciudad makeThick( ByVal arrOriginalBranch, ByVal from arrNewBranches, ByVal arrCrossSectionTriangles(i) de Barcelona and Function its población, visitors every culture and = Rhino.AddCurve(arrCrossSectionPts, 1) dblThickness ) Dim arrLastCopiedLineEndPt : arrLastCopiedLineEndPt = Dim arrBranchEndPt : arrBranchEndPt = Rhino.CurveEndPoint(arrAllSimila Rhino.CurveEndPoint(arrLastCopiedLine) place, and to the ecology where this {field} will be taking residency. rBranches(i)) Dim arrLastCopiedLine : arrLastCopiedLine = Rhino.CopyObje ct(strCopiedLine1Scaled, arrCopiedLineStartPt, arrCopiedLine1ScaledEndPt)

Dim strCopiedSection : strCopiedSection = Rhino. CopyObject(strStartSection, arrStartLineEndPt, arrLastCopiedLineEndPt)

Dim strFirstLineReversed : strFirstLineReversed = Rhino. AddLine(Rhino.CurveEndPoint(arrOriginalBranch),Rhino.CurveStartPoint(arrO riginalBranch))

Dim arrSectionScale : arrSectionScale = array(5.0, 5.0, 5.0)

Dim arrSectionScaled : arrSectionScaled = Rhino. ScaleObject(strCopiedSection, arrLastCopiedLineEndPt, arrSectionScale) + MakeThick & addBranches, function

Dim i, j

scripts.

Dim arrTriPts : arrTriPts = Rhino.CurvePoints(arrScaledSection(i))

Dim arrAllSimilarBranches(3), arrCrossSectionTriangles(3), arrCrossSectionPts(3)

Next

Dim arrScaledSection(3)

Dim arrSectionPts : arrSectionPts = Rhino. 4 CurvePoints(arrSectionScaled)

arrScaledSection(i) = Rhino.ScaleObject(arrCrossS ectionTriangles(i), arrBranchEndPt, arrScale)

Dim arrScale : arrScale = array(.2,.2,.2)

End Function


The (n)arrborological installation develops research the The said {cuina deMorphologies la topografía} will be not sofrom much as ainBLDG scripting and fabrication of developable surface units. Each unit is comprised of as a FIELD for four flat patterns of aluminum, that when rolled into shape, create a shape relative to the inversion of /aCROWDS tetrahedron. /This shape is then approximated by wireframe _INDIVIDUALS CONSUMERS / PRODUCERS / COMMUNITIES_ growth algorithms, written in Rhinoscript. The algorithms generate tree-like branching, based on the input of a length line and a triangular cross-section. The to script evaluates the vertices of the input cross-section, organizing a matrix of _ARRIVE / STAY / LEAVE / PARTY_ witha ease angular intervals to length values. This produces new generation of tree branches in the inverted tetrahedral pattern. If the original input cross-section is a 60-60-60 where may will remain uniform. If any other angles comprise the triangle, triangle,they the system _LEARN / TEACH /those EATdifferences / DRINK over / DANCE / RELAX / REFLECT_ the system exaggerates subsequent generations of growth. These systems eventually form pentagonal rings when growth values align on upon where after, they left with an arousal the same multiple. Thus the are branching will create irregularofdomes within other _TASTE / WONDER / EXCITEMENT / INTELLIGENCE LOVE_ irregular domes, if generated for long enough. The construction of/ the piece used .032” aluminum, cut on a CNC Routing Table. Each unit’s surface contours were So may the success thiswith venture be tested bymaking its ability tounits provide, pulled from surfaces in aof script an irregular triangle, no two the unconditionally, physical and tabs psychological comfort to the same. Each surface piece has drilled that bend to meet drill holes in ciudad adjacent de Barcelona and its población, visitors from every culture and and surfaces. Rivet connections along these intersections ensure a tight construction place, to the ecology whereand thisthe{field} precisionand of form, bridging the digital physical.will be taking residency.

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Unit Singular Flat Pattern with tabs, test, aluminum. 5


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RESEARCH

Model Iterations, Paper, Chipboard, Bristol, Aluminum.


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Tree Algorithm Describing Arch, script test.

Tree Algorithm Describing Cube, script test.

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Doubly-Curved Surface Attraction, script test. 7


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Generated Wireframe, Installation Elevation.

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Generated Wireframe, Installation Plan.

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Typical 2-dimensional Cut Sheet, CNC Router.


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Surface Unit Assembly, Installation Diagram. 9


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FABRICATION

Cut Sheet Productions, Aluminum.

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Construction Operations, Aluminum.


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Unit Aggregation, Aluminum.

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Unit Interior, Aluminum. 11


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REALIZATION


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HEALTH INSTITUTION


ARCH501 / SEC STUDIO / LOCATION / BLOOMFIELD HILLS, MI / INSTRUCTION / R. BURNHAM / SPRING 2010 / 10 WEEKS / INSTITUTION / SAID, UC

cranbrook academy wellness center

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Cranbrook Academy’s Wellness Center provides a relaxation outlet for students, teachers, and patrons among the beauty of the wooded landscape of Eliel Saarinen’s master-planned campus. Implicitly, new construction within the campus is a precise contextual operation. A strategy of visual perception was researched according to James Corner’s essay, Eidetic Operations and New Landscapes. The theory proposes that well-made landscapes are not simply objects in a field, but instead act as a changing sequence of events, dependent upon the view and perspective from different locations in the field. The chosen site is at the east end of Cranbrook’s Grand Allee, effectively terminating the currently open-ended Allee, and deemphasizing the road just to the north. This interception manifests itself in a singular masonry Wall, a provision of boundary and separation. This 10’-wide Wall internally becomes the datum of spatial organization. Cubic lanterns project from the Wall, responding to complex programmatic and micro-climatic parameters. To remain performative in all of these operations, the Wall is assembled in several overlapping layers of construction. A cavity for human circulation splits the Wall into two masonry-steel structures that support one another. Within each of these members is another cavity that feeds HVAC and communications systems throughout the building and into a larger plenum housing the center’s “mechanical brain”. This system keeps all spaces operating haptically separate from one another.

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Entry Door Handle Mock-Up, Zebrawood, Steel.


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Allee Termination & Circulatory Interceptions. 17


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VOLUME

Spiral & Woven Datum Model, Bristol and Basswood.

Layered Programmatic Model, Chipboard and Basswood.

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Below Grade, Plan.

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Lower Level, Plan.

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Upper Level, Plan.

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Interconnected Systems (Looking East), Section.


FLASHING ROOF DRAIN RIGID INSULATION

MTL. STUD FRAMING PANEL CLIP

WOOD PANEL POLYCARBONATE PANEL

5/8" GYPSUM WALL BD. 2 WYTHE REINFORCED ROMAN BRICK

AIR DIFFUSER W/ WEATHER CAP

2" CAVITY BRICK TIE WATERPROOF MEMBRANE 2" RIGID INSULATION

GLASS FIN

8x16" CMU BLOCK

4" CAVITY WOOD FLOOR

AIR DIFFUSER

PLYWOOD

DOUBLE -GLAZING

SPACERS

GLAZING CLIP

TONGUE & GROOVE DECKING

SLIDE FITTING

GLU-LAM JOIST

TONGUE & GROOVE CHANNEL

WEEP HOLE STEEL ANGLE FLASHING

WATERPROOF MEMBRANE CONCRETE FOUNDATION

STEEL REINFORCEMENT

CHEMICAL VALVES POOL PUMP PLYWOOD TOPPING RIGID INSULATION CONCRETE SLAB

EXPANSION JOINT KEY FOOTING

DRAIN

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External Climatic Analysis, Diagrams.

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Full Wall Section. 21


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Entry From Orpheus Fountain (Looking West).

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Lantern Climatic Control.


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Entry From Jonah Fountain (Looking South).

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Lantern Assembly. 23


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COMMUNITY KAYAKING CENTER


CHRISTIANSHAVN STUDIO/ COPENHAGEN, DK / SUMMER 2009 / 3 WEEKS / INSTITUTION / DIS, CPH

COURSE /

LOCATION /

christianshavn kajak haus

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100 m

N

Barrier is the primary concern regarding the site. If the objective of the Kajak Haus is to bring people to the water, then the barrier of water surrounding the site needs to be changed, to become a part of the design. Part of the canal’s 1.5m-high bulk-wall was cut and opened up to form a pool and courtyard in the center of the site. The building then results from iterations based on a lively, bright surface splashing against a dark, solemn barrier. The contrast of these two massing elements provides a relevant framework for the private and public functions of the building.

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Christianshavn Canal & Context Plan.


The primary goal of the Christianshavn Kajak Haus is to establish a mediation between the street and the Wilder Canal in Copenhagen. While many Danes and tourists already have access to the water, getting inside of a kayak is not an easy task. The Kajak Haus seeks to bring people to the water, for kayaking or otherwise, by cutting small terraces into the site. A representation of two forces at work carries throughout the building, primarily between the white, porous “arms� that form the inner court, and the rectangular wood enclosure at the north and the west site boundaries. These two different pieces serve specifically to break up and separate the public and private domains of the building, but have other beneficial functions. The large box buffers the site from the taller buildings surrounding, while the white structure stretches outward, toward the canal. With the white piece being made of uneven, white-washed brick, its envelope will be ever-changing in the light. The box will remain a static structure, a wooden wall that holds the site. This is relative to how the canal bulk-wall holds the water, the pastoral image of Copenhagen. The Kajak Haus was part of the 2009 summer studio at the Danish Institute for Study Abroad.

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Harbor Bath, Copenhagen. 27


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Massing Sketches.

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Responsive Manipulations to Context.

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Model Study, Private + Public Massing.

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Iterative Study Model, Surface Perforation.


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Site Evaluation.


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Programmatic Plan.

Range of Private (blue) and Public (orange) space .

Sequence of Kayak Training Pools.

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Section, looking north-west.

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Section, looking south-east. 31


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Kayak Training Pools.

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Interior Lobby.


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Show Model, Cardboard, Foam, Chipboard, Basswood.

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HOUSE OF GASTRONOMY


THRESHOLDS STUDIO / S. PSARRA / LOCATION / BARCELONA, ES / FALL 2010 / 8 WEEKS / INSTITUTION / TCAUP, UM

ARCH552 /

INSTRUCTION /

cuina de la topografia + cabinet of curiosity

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The said {cuina de la topograf铆a} will be not so much as a BLDG as a FIELD for _INDIVIDUALS / CROWDS / CONSUMERS / PRODUCERS / COMMUNITIES_ to _ARRIVE / STAY / LEAVE / PARTY_ with ease where they may _LEARN / TEACH / EAT / DRINK / DANCE / RELAX / REFLECT_ upon where after, they are left with an arousal of _TASTE / WONDER / EXCITEMENT / INTELLIGENCE / LOVE_ So may the success of this venture be tested by its ability to provide, unconditionally, physical and psychological comfort to the ciudad de Barcelona and its poblaci贸n, visitors from every culture and place, and to the ecology where this {field} will be taking residency.

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Topographical Landscape, Plywood.


CLARIFYING culture + cuisine

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With Barcelona serving as an international catalyst for cultural integration, the city provides diverse options in cuisine. The Cuina de la Topografía seeks to explore cultural specifics from the perspective of culinary preparation and cooking. Sited on the plaza of the famous Boquería Market, the Cuina is a culinary institution available to the public. Kitchen space is provided for scheduled courses and open for public use at all other times. Six large kitchens sink beneath the plaza’s ground plane, preserving an urban topography populated by mysterious objects. The objects operate as windows, skylights, chimneys, and video screens for the kitchens below, while also promoting physical activity and outdoor cooking above ground. Three transparent bridges designate the over-underground condition and accommodate the studied paths of travel through the site. The Cuina explores the notion of tectonic flexibilities; the objects are static sculptures yet contain no predetermined formal use. Such flexibility encourages a variety of visitors to seek their own method of using the site. A narrative of the place is open to an individual’s own interpretation, much the same as in the case of Gaudi’s fantastic Barcelona roofscapes. As a preliminary exploration, a cabinet of curiosity was designed and built as a means of capturing tectonic strategies for the development of the work. The cabinet work proceeds methods of sculpting, assemblage, and literature in the construction of architectural form. +

Boqueria Siteplan. 37


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CABINET OF CURIOSITY

Invisible Cities Map, Diagram.

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Invisible Cities Conceptual Model, Acrylic, Chipboard.

+ Studying methods of literary application to the design process, Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino inspired tectonic exploration through a cabinet of curiosity. The cabinet materialized the ongoing lessons of geography between Marco Polo and Emperor Kublai Khan expressed in the novel. Polo is the traveler and collector of curiosities, revealing far more about cities than Khan has been able to empathize with. Khan sees his empire as the assemblage material wealth, whereas Polo describes the empire’s cities as harbors of conscious emotion and character. Khan describes the cities as “diamonds”; Polo describes them as collections of small objects. The cabinet is both a modeled terrain and display case of objects for this empire. Materiality contrasts the duality of Khan and Polo’s empirical perspectives, with one lens of the cabinet constructed in dense layers of plywood, and the other in perforated screens of acrylic. Tiny, “forgotten” urban objects are displayed from hooks across the plywood terrain. Hinges in the center open and close the device, as an explicit tool for interactive comparison.


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Geography Lessons, 1’x1’x7’.

Plywood, Acrylic, Found Objects. Built using CNC Router and Laser.

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DEVELOPMENT

Model Iterations, Chipboard.


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Plan Iterations, Vellum, Trace. 41


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DEVELOPMENT

Section in Sequence, Vellum.


TOPOGRAPHY / UPPER walkway

EXCAVATION / ENTRIES

PLAZA / SUB-LEVEL 1

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Programmatic Layers, Diagram.

CASA gastronomía

BARCELONA / CATALUNYA

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REPRESENTATION

Panorama From Boqueria, Day and Night.


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REPRESENTATION

bearing wall

column

beam

bridge joist

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Roof/ Terrain, Plan.

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Primary Structure, Plan.


track

portal

inventory

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Infrastructure, Plan.

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Egress, Plan. 47


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REPRESENTATION

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Beneath the Bridges.


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Preparing food on the Topography. 49


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REPRESENTATION

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Kitchen Interiors.


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Cuina Site Model, 2’x3.5’.

Plywood, Basswood, Acrylic, Steel.

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PROFESSIONAL APPLICATION


SUMMER 2007 / DENVER, CO / ACQUILANO LESLIE / SUMMER 2008 / ATLANTA, GA / RULE TRAMMELL JOY + RUBIO / WINTER 2009 / CHICAGO, IL / DANIEL P. COFFEY ASSOCIATES / WINTER 2010 / SAN FRANCISCO, CA / FEE MUNSON EBERT

work experience & qualifications

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Working in four distinct offices has provided a diverse range of experiences off of which to build a solid professional foundation. Though many different projects have provided interesting subject matter, there is some work that best exemplifies quality experience. The first is a three-tower, 2.5 million ft 2 development in Midtown Atlanta. Duties included the drafting, distribution, and assemblage of construction documents for the project, which was under construction at the time. Site visits were made to explore the process from drawing through construction. Another project in Chicago constituted the development of a master plan for a site west of The Loop. The scale continually shifted between site plan and individual buildings within the site. These schematic typologies developed digital models for townhouses, highrise apartments, parking structures, retail centers, theaters, and transportation infrastructures. The exposure to this array of building types proved to be a vital supplement to education. The third project was an undertaking to develop an accurate BIM model of the Transamerica Pyramid in San Francisco. Working off of the original construction documents drawn by Pereira & Associates, a Revit model was built to measurable precision. Even the precast window system details were completed as a part of this evaluation. The model will be used in the future to document post-occupancy information and BOMA measurements for Pyramid Center managers and leaseholders.

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12th and Midtown Scaffolding, RJT+R.


All of this experience has left a desire to pursue architecture at a higher professional level. IDP hours have been documented up to this point, preparing for entry into eventual licensure. Future opportunities to build upon this experience can be dynamic, strenuous, technical, schematic, and unpredictable. Every situation charges excitement into the field one way or another, and the path is wide open for architecture to continually improve and evolve.

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Structural Detail Sketches, DPCA. 55


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12th and Midtown Development, RJT+R.


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Clemson Research Center Competition, RJT+R.

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4th and Hawthorne, RJT+R. 57


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West Chicago Masterplan, DPCA.

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Parking Deck & Retail Space, DPCA.


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Retail Center Treatments, DPCA. 59


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Train Canopy and Retail Center, DPCA.


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Theater & Canopy, DPCA.

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62 314 E SUMMIT ST ANN ARBOR MICHIGAN 48104 / 970 393 3917 / cnrwood@gmail.com / ccwood@umich.edu


Conor Wood: Portfolio of Architectural Works (Winter-Summer 2011)