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its worst – especially on Main campus. Editor-in-Chief Larceny, which he number of crimes has been the highest on campus for 2011 crime on the Cleary was higher than any Report for 2008 – of the three previ- 2011, was reported ous years, according to 210 times; a 27 percent the Cleary Crime Report. increase from 2010. The report, which Simple assaults was released earlier this were only up two from month, reveals that 2010, which had had crime on campus is at 13 reported.

By Jyllian Roach

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Follow-up

Nine reports of aggravated assault were filed in 2011; there were none filed in 2010. Similarly, there were 10 drunk in public, two driving under the influence, six drug abuse violations, and six weapons possessions disciplinary see

CRIME on page 7

Alternative Transportation Series: Buses

PHOTO BY STEFANY OLIVAS | STAFF

Activists rally to raise awareness and support for the minimum wage increase ordinance on the Nov. 6 ballot.

Don’t

• Project calmness • Be an empathetic listener • Focus your attention on the other person • Maintain a relaxed yet attentive posture • Acknowledge the person’s feelings. Indicate that you can see he/she is upset. • Establish ground rules • Use delaying tactics that will give the person time to calm down. • Be reassuring and point out choices. • Accept criticism in a positive way. • Ask for his/her recommendations. Arrange yourself so that a visitor cannot block your access to an exit.

Feature Pg. 8

• Use styles of communication that generate hostility • Pose in challenging stances • Make sudden movements that can be seen as threatening. • Challenge, threaten or dare the individual. • Criticize or act impatiently • Attempt to bargain with threatening individual. • Make false statements or promises you cannot keep. • Try to impart a lot of technical or complicated information • Take sides or agree with distortions. • Invade the individual’s personal space.

Wage Proposal to be Included on Nov. 6 Ballot

Dean of Students:

University Students May Be Stealing Parking Permits because some students may want to avoid paying the higher parking fees at the Managing UNM lots. Editor The general parking There have been lots at Main campus on reports that UNM stu- University Boulevard and dents may be stealing Avenida Cesar Chavez are CNM parking permit located near a UNM shutdecals, said Dean of tle bus stop, which makes the CNM general lot Students Rudy Garcia. He said the permits enticing to some UNM are at risk of being stolen students, he said.

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“The reason parking permits are now required, especially at Main, is to ensure CNM students, faculty and staff have available parking,” said Garcia. Lieutenant Bernard Rogers of CNM security was unable to respond to questions in time for print. No reports of decal theft have been made since see

PERMITS on page 7

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Oliver said putting the ordinance on the Nov. 6 ballot may have saved Albuquerque Staff Reporter taxpayers around $400,000. “My position was that The proposed ordinance I preferred this to go on to raise the city’s minimum wage was officially included the ballot because it would on the Nov. 6 ballot by the have prevented the need for Supreme Court of New another, separate, election Mexico, said County Clerk around or on the same day as the General Election. This Maggie Toulouse Oliver. After being denied in could have been hugely comDistrict Court because of plicated for my office and concerns with the scope of very confusing for voters,” the proposal which would said Oliver. Although the State raise the state minimum wage Supreme Court voted to put to $8.50, OLE New Mexico, a community organization the issue on the ballot, the group, appealed the decision. ordinance’s legal troubles are The State Supreme Court far from over, said Fraire. If the ordinance is then upheld the validity of approved by voters, it is the petition and ordered the County Clerk to place the likely that the city will sue ordinance on the ballot, said again to get it thrown out student and OLE NM orga- because of a number of legal issues, said Fraire. nizer Lucia Fraire. In addition to a typo“It’s a huge victory for us obviously, but there’s a graphical error in the lanlot more work to be done,” guage of the ordinance, said Fraire. see WAGE on page 7

By Jonathan Baca

INFORMATION FROM CNM.EDU/DEPTS/SECURITY | WEB

By Stefany Olivas

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Do’s and Don’ts

PHOTO BY SCOTT M. ROBERTS | STAFF

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Follow these suggestions to de-escalate potentially violent situations.

PHOTO BY STEFANY OLIVAS | STAFF

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September 25 - October 1, 2012

Crime Spree

Opinion Pg. 3

Community News Pg. 6

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thecnmchronicle.wordpress.com

Volume 18 | Issue 5

Editorial: CNM is Falling Apart

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The CNM

/CNMChronicle

A Look Inside:

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2 | the CNM Chronicle

CAMPUS BULLETIN

Chronicle The CNM

525 Buena Vista SE, ST 12B Albuquerque, NM 87106 Views expressed in the Opinion page are those of the individual writer and do not necessarily represent the beliefs of all CNM Chronicle staff or Central New Mexico Community College.

Staff Editorial Jyllian Roach editor-in-chief jyllianchronicle@gmail.com, 224.4755 Stefany Olivas managing editor stefanychronicle@gmail.com, 224.4755 Steve “Mo” Fye copy chief sfye@cnm.edu, 224.4755 Newsroom Jon Baca Senior reporter jonathanbacachronicle@gmail.com 224.4758 Daniel Johnson staff reporter djohnson@cnm.edu, 224.4758 Adriana Avila staff reporter adrianachronicle@gmail.com, 224.4758 Christopher Pope staff reporter cpope2@cnm.edu, 224.4758 Position Available staff reporter jyllianchronicle@gmail.com, 224.4758 Production Jonathan Gamboa production manager jonathan.chronicle@gmail.com, 224.4752 Scott M. Roberts photojournalist srobertschronicle@gmail.com, 224.4752 Jodie Darrell-Salazar layout designer jodiechronicle@gmail.com, 224.4752 Jasmine Chavez layout designer jgarza21@cnm.edu, 224.4752 B usiness Bruce Warrington business manager bwarrington@cnm.edu 224.3255 Larraine Shelly-Becenti ad-sales manager lshellybecenti@cnm.edu, 224.3255 Brandy Valles distribution manager bvalles2@cnm.edu, 224.3255 Advisory Jack Ehn faculty adviser jehn@cnm.edu, 224.3636

A dvertising Advertising submissions are due by 12 p.m. the Thursday prior to publication. To submit an ad, or for more information, please contact Bruce Warrington at CNMChronicleAds@ cnm.edu.

C orrections The CNM Chronicle strives to publish only accurate and truthful information. If you believe you have found an error, please notify the CNM Chronicle by email at jyllianchronicle@gmail. com or call 505.224.4755.

C irculation The CNM Chronicle is a weekly, student-run newspaper. It is printed by Vanguard Publishing Co. and circulated free of charge to all CNM campuses and the surrounding community.

Free Resumé and Interview Workshops

Sepmtember 25 - October 1, 2012

professional advisement from South Valley Campus employment specialists. Staff in SV Room 40 provide The club meets on Main access Whether you need a job Campus, Student Services • SV Room 32 224-5056 now or want to prepare for Building, Room 207 on Westside Campus employment after graduation, Tuesdays, at two, of course. Staff at front desk provide you can attend Job Connection Visit cnm.edu/depts/jcc/ access Services’ Employability tuesdayattwo.php for more • MJG Building, Room 201-C Workshops. information. 224-5335 Offered on alternating weeks during the Fall Semester, Walk-in Lactation Stations Veterans Club Holds these workshops provide CNM Available at CNM First Meeting students and graduates with quality instruction in resumé Conveniently pump milk The CNM Veterans Club writing and interview strategies. in a private room with locked will hold its first meeting on Bring your questions, and let door: Wednesday, Sept 26 at 6 p.m. in our staff help you prepare for the the TW 207 conference room job search process. For workshop Main Campus on Montoya campus. locations and schedules, go to • Jeannette Stromberg Hall, Veterans who want to cnm.edu/jobworkshops. Room 312-G 224-3000 participate are welcome for • Student Health Center, SSC pizza and to share their ideas. Job Club Accepting Room 206 224-3080 For more information contact New Members Gwen Nutter at 224-3265. Montoya Campus Join CNM’s exclusive Staff at front desks provide Time Management job club, Tuesday at Two. access. Workshops Available Membership is open to CNM • I Building, Room 211, students and graduates. Hosted 224-5881 Learn to better balance by Job Connection Services, • G Building, Room 201, school and life a 30 minute Kick Tuesday at Two provides 224-5516 Start Workshop. The Sept. 19 weekly topics for discussion, • J Building Room 121, workshops will take place on opportunities to network 224-5993 South Valley campus Rm. 32 with other job seekers and from 11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.,

on Montoya campus H-Building Rm. 104 from 11:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. and on Main campus in the Student Services Center Rm. 205 from 2 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. For more information contact CNM Connect Achievement Coach Chioma Heim at 224-4080 or at cheim2@cnm.edu.

Student Allocation Board Accepting Membership Applications The Student Allocation Board is now accepting applications for student members. The Allocation board meetings monthly and distributes funds among student organizations for events, activities and equipment. Must have a minimum 2.5 GPA. For more information contact James Roach at jroach8@cnm.edu

To submit items for Campus Bulletin, please email notice with a maximum of 150 words to jyllianchronicle@gmail.com or call 224-4755.

Correction

• •

Correction: In Volume 18 Issue 4 the article entitled “High Fructose Corn Syrup vs. Table Sugar” it should have stated that high fructose corn syrup is a natural molecule. Clarification: In Volume 18 Issue 4 the article entitled “High Fructose Corn Syrup vs. Table Sugar” should have stated that overconsumption of high fructose corn syrup can lead to diarrhea.

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Contact Information

CNM Chronicle 525 Buena Vista SE, STE. 12B Albuquerque, NM 87106

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505-224-3255

Classifieds may be submitted via email to: cnmchronicleads@cnm.edu

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OPINION

September 25 - October 1, 2012 Editorial

Women, Common Cause NM, the Native American Voters Alliance, Voto Latino, Nuestra Eleccíon, NM PIRG, the UNM and CNM Dreamteams, UNM MEChA and others. Voting is our most fundamental American right yet too many eligible voters are not registered and therefore do not vote on Election Day. Young people, unmarried women, and people of color – what is known as the Rising American Electorate – are all particularly underrepresented at polls across America. As the old saying goes, ‘If you don’t vote, you can’t complain.’ Voting brings us all together as Americans; it is the one time that we all have the same say and can all participate equally in our democracy. The act of voting determines the future of our country yet, sadly, not enough of us make our voices heard on Election Day. The National Voter Registration Day events in Albuquerque next Tuesday are a chance to learn more about how to participate in the voting process. Voting is simple and easy once you are registered and know where to vote. So come out to CNM or UNM on Tuesday, September 25, have some fun, have some food and make your voice heard!

Alex Curtis, Community Member

Want to share your opinion on a recent article? Send a Letter to the Editor: jyllianchronicle@gmail.com. *All letters subject to editing for length, spelling and grammar.

Present day...

30 years ago...

There are recently installed concrete steps leading from Ted Chavez Hall to Ken Chappy Hall that are already crumbling. These are all issues that should be handled with a higher priority than the purchase of a neat place to hold meetings. The CNM administration needs to address the condition of the campuses before taxpayers are stuck with the bill for completely renovating buildings and other infrastructure that could be saved at a fraction of the cost with simple proactive maintenance. This is just the local evidence of something that is happening nationwide. Infrastructure maintenance and repair are being delayed in order to stay under budget. Our country, our campus, is not disposable. We need to put effort and money into preserving what we have rather than allowing those in the future to deal with the broken remains.

L e t t e r To T h e E d i t o r Tuesday, September 25, is National Voter Registration Day and a diverse array of public education and voting rights groups are coming together to register as many eligible New Mexicans as possible for this important occasion. New Mexico has a voter registration crisis as over 250,000 eligible voters are not registered to vote. The events happening on September 25 in Albuquerque seek to lower this number by registering new voters, updating registrations, and informing New Mexicans about the importance of voting in local, state, and national elections. Two simultaneous events will take place Tuesday on the main campuses of CNM and UNM. The Albuquerque events are part of National Voter Registration Day activities being organized by individuals and organizations across the nation. There will be voting registrars on hand at both CNM and UNM who will be registering new voters and updating existing registrations. The events will also include food, music, and information from the participating organizations about Election Day, voting rights, and volunteer opportunities in New Mexico. The participating organizations in these events include NM Vote Matters, the League of Women Voters, the American Association of University

|3

Editorial Cartoon By Scott M. Roberts

It’s Broke, So Fix It CNM, especially Main campus, has a serious infrastructure problem. Some of the buildings have leaky roofs; others are in desperate need of replacement carpeting. Many of the security kiosks are out of commission, which could leave students or employees without a way to contact help during an emergency. While it is great to see CNM purchasing property near Main campus, as well as demolishing damaged buildings in the area to help beautify the neighborhood, there is a much more important issue at hand. Several departments and student organizations have been displaced because of fire code violations, many of which do not appear to have been resolved. The portable buildings near the Student Resource Center are sadly dilapidated and infested with ants and feral cats. Many of the restrooms campus wide are damaged, covered with graffiti and often plagued with plumbing issues.

the CNM Chronicle

“I made you a mixed tape.”

“I made you a playlist.”

Sun Cat Chit-Chat By Scott M. Roberts | Staff

“ I

Kevin Castelo, Paramedic Program

think it would be better before just because for someone like me I could use it sooner for school and equipment.”

Oscar Montes, Dental Hygiene

I guess we could get it sooner. As soon

as the deadline is up we should get it right away.”

Jennifer Bard, Nursing

I never really thought about it too much but I think it prevents people from taking classes just for the money.”

What do you think of CNM’s 3 week waiting period for disbursement?

Michaela Buhowski, Psychology

I think it would be better on

the first week of school because there are a lot of people who are wasting their time here, they get their checks and leave and I don’t appreciate that.”

Samantha Cabral, Nursing

A s long as we get our money

back it doesn’t really matter. It would be nice to get it back right when the deadline ends.”

Daniel Aquiar, Liberal arts

“It is a little frustrating but I

understand why CNM does it. It is to promote the learning environment as opposed to giving out free money.”


4 | the CNM Chronicle

STUDENT LIFE

September 25 - October 1, 2012

Cooking in Season: Tomatoes By Steve “Mo” Fye Copy Chief

Students lucky enough to have the time to garden are likely inundated with tomatoes right now. Even those who are too busy for a garden probably have friends who are growing tomatoes and have a plethora of the lovely, juicy beauties. Like zucchini and yellow summer squashes, tomatoes tend to give their fruits all at once, leaving gardeners with so much produce that they will push it on anyone who stands still long enough to accept a bagful.

That leaves the question of what to do with the bounty when it all hits at once. There are nearly endless uses for this beautiful gift of nature. A way to take this staple vegetable (yes, technically tomatoes are fruits, but all fruits are vegetables, while not all vegetables are fruits) to a higher level of elegance is to make an “Insalata Caprese.” In the simplest form, this “Salad in the style of Capri” is just sliced fresh tomatoes with slices of buffalo Mozzarella cheese and fresh basil, drizzled with olive oil. This easy recipe can be dramatically flavorful when made with garden-fresh tomatoes, basil just trimmed from the plant and a good Mozzarella and extra virgin olive oil.

There are many ways to tweak the recipe: Drizzle some fine balsamic vinegar on top; finish with a nice vinaigrette; or stack the cheese on thick slices of tomato and broil just until the cheese starts to brown and garnish with finely chopped basil. A great way to deal with more tomatoes than can be used before they spoil is to make a sauce and freeze it. Take washed tomatoes, chop them up and simmer them with spices. Basil, oregano and thyme or marjoram make for a great sauce which can be frozen for a few months and then used as a base for pasta sauces or, with fewer herbs, be used in Texas chili. Another efficient way to handle a surplus of tomatoes is

to dry them. Drying tomatoes concentrates the flavors. The dried tomatoes are rich and sweet, with a pronounced sweet and savory flavor. True sun drying is not recommended, as there is a risk of food-borne illness. Tomatoes have a high acidity and sodium level, which tend to discourage bacterial growth, but it is much safer to use a dehydrator or oven. To dry tomatoes, wash them well and cut small tomatoes in half. Larger tomatoes such as beefsteaks or oxheart should be quartered. With a clean finger, wipe out the seeds and gelatinous membranes. These can be saved for making stock, composting or just discarded. Flatten the sections of

tomato and place in a dehydrator or on a foil-lined baking sheet. Dry the tomatoes in the oven on the lowest temperature setting for several hours. Alternatively, dry them in a dehydrator on a medium to medium-high setting. The tomatoes should be leathery and shrunken when done. The drier the tomato, the longer it will last in storage, but it will take longer to reconstitute dehydrated tomatoes. Dried tomatoes should be stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator or freezer. They can be readied for use by soaking in water, wine or oil. Sauces made with pureed, dried tomatoes are rich and satisfying, giving a sense of meatiness without adding the cholesterol

and fat of animal products. Tomatoes are among the most versatile and useful vegetables at our disposal. Students without a garden can visit the local growers markets or farmers market soon to get locally grown tomatoes and experiment. The reward is lovely flavors and colors as well as a superior source of lycopene, an excellent and easily available anti-oxidant. “Cooking In Season” is a monthly column designed to help students learn to cook using locally available ingredients. Look for the next installment on squash in issue nine.

PHOTOS BY STEVE “MO” FYE | STAFF

(left) Garden fresh Beefsteak and Roma tomatoes. (center) Insalata Caprese made with fresh Mozzarella and basil. (right) “Sundried” tomatoes made in a dehydrator.

Outstanding Student Organizations

Early Childhood Education Organizationss

By Jonathan Baca Staff Reporter

After five years dormancy, the Early Childhood Education Organization has been rechartered by five student members, said Faculty Adviser Andrea Olguin. Olguin said the students want the club to keep growing and invite those who have hopes to work with children professionally to join the ECEO. “It’s fun to see that light bulb go on, when you know that they’ve mastered something or figured something out on their own,” said Early Childhood Multicultural major and club President Annie Sanchez. The club members are students, as well as teachers working in the industry, said Sanchez. The Early Childhood Education Organization is a small club with big goals, said Olguin. The members recently raised enough money for a trip to the National Association for

the Education of Young Children Conference in Atlanta, said Sanchez. “It’s the cutting edge on techniques and strategies,” she said. ECEO members will choose from hundreds of seminars hosted by some of the biggest names in early childhood education, said Sanchez. “It’s a great opportunity for anyone in the educational field,” she said, “to actually be able to talk with other professionals around the country and around the world is an amazing experience.” Olguin said members of the club are also members of the local chapter of the National Association for the Education of Young Children. ECEO represented CNM at a local conference and addressed a crowd of educators from all over the state last March. The upcoming Atlanta trip is being made possible in large part because of a grant given by the NMAEYC, she said. Many of the club members have never travelled

outside of Albuquerque, and are grateful for the chance they have been given, said Olguin. “Without help from CNM and our other sponsors, it would be impossible for these students to go,” she said. Sanchez said she hopes that with support from government and higher education institutions, the field of Early Childhood Education will be taken more seriously. “There is a really big push now for Early Childhood educators to get their degrees,” she said. “We’re more t han glorified babysitters. We need to prove it by getting training.” To find out more about the Early Childhood Education Organization contact Andrea at aolguin25@ cnm.edu. Are you a member or advisor of a student organization? Contact Jyllian to have your PHOTO COURTESY ANDREA OLGUIN | ECEO club featured in the Chronicle. (left) Nancy Martinez and (right) Ramona Armendariz at the ECEO yard sale jyllianchronicle@gmail.com. fundraiser held on the CNM parking lot in August.


September 25 - October 1, 2012

ENTERTAINMENT

the CNM Chronicle

|5

‘Dredd 3D’: Dreadfully Violent and Dreadfully Pointless By James Roach Guest Writer “Dredd 3D” will be able to join the ranks of other 2012 remakes and reboots like “Three Stooges,” “Dark Shadows” and “Total Recall” as an utter disappointment. Director Pete Travis (“Endgame,” “Vantage Point”) decided to not only remake 1995’s “Judge Dredd” which starred Sylvester Stallone and was based on a popular comic, but also to hop on the new technology bandwagon and make it in 3D with the help of Slumdog Millionaires cinematographer, Anthony Dod Mantle. However, no amount of special effects can make up for poor character development, bad acting and large plot-holes. Karl Urban (“Star Trek,” and “Red”) fumbles in the role

of Judge Dredd. Urban never takes his helmet off, a staple trait of the comic character, but on screen it makes him wooden and disconnected. Urban’s co-star is indie actress Olivia Thirlby — known for her supporting role in “Juno.” Thirlby plays a cadet named Anderson, a mutant with psychic abilities in a world where mutants are heavily discriminated against. Dredd is asked to give the barely failed cadet a final evaluation. The biggest problem in “Dredd 3D” is its title character. Judge Dredd is without backstory, flaws or emotion making him difficult to connect with. Instead, the movie becomes all about the manylayered and flawed Anderson. Thirlby did a spectacular job playing Anderson, and

brought many dimensions to the character. Urban — as good an actor as he is — didn’t seem to be utilized as well as he could have been. In the end, he became another stereotypical antihero with a gravelly voice and anger issues. Even the gang leader, Ma-Ma, (Lena Headey, “Game of Thrones,” “Terminator: The Sarah Conner Chronicles”) outplayed Dredd, whom the movie should have been all about. The dystopian buddy cop film takes place in Mega City One — the area stretching from Boston to Washington D.C. and centers on a new street called Slo-Mo which makes the user feel as though time has slowed dramatically. The special effects team

must have been ecstatic when they read the script. The film is laden with slowed down scenes in which blood sparkles and skin ripples with movement. The problem with doing scenes in slow motion is that they are slow motion scenes in a fast-paced action film. An action scene should take perhaps 15 seconds rather than the 30 second Slo-Mo version. However, in a Slo-Mo scene the full effect of watching a bullet fly out of a gun, into a guy’s cheek, and explode out of the other side of his head is really cool. Which begs the question – was it truly necessary? Quick answer, yes, but when it is done over and over again it becomes boring. The movie advances at a nice pace, but after about an

hour, it is easy to feel claustrophobic from the small hallways and grayed-out concrete walls. Trapped-in-a-building style movies have been done before, but usually include periodic shots of what is happening outside to break it up. “Dredd” lacked that sort of break entirely. However, “Dredd 3D” does have some good things going for it. Costuming was done very well, and it allowed the movie to feel more real, if not believable at times, as opposed to Stallone’s version, where everything was shiny and never got any blood on it. Who should go see this movie? Men, but not just any men — men who love explosions, but have enough restraint to wait to see the movie at the dollar theatre.

A whole bro’s night out could be made of it; steak, beer, then an hour and 20 minutes of slow motion shots of a couple of guys’ head blowing up to make the night complete. Now, the one great thing to say about Dredd is it does follow the original comic quite well. For the original comic fans out there, Dredd would be a must see. He never takes his helmet off, delivers quick dead-pan one-liners, and never changes emotion. The CNM Chronicle gives “Dredd 3D” two bangedup Judge Helmets out of five.

Want to guest write for the CNM Chronicle? Contact Jyllian: jyllianchronicle@gmail.com.

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COMMUNITY NEWS CNM to Purchase More Property

6 | the CNM Chronicle

September 25 - October 1, 2012

has a historical feel to it and adds to the character of the Staff Reporter neighborhood, she said. NM plans to pur“It would be a really nice chase property at addition,” Ulibarri said. 2120 Oxford Ave., She said the main reason but there are no they are interested in the propsure plans on what the space erty is because it has a beautiful will be used for, said Finance backyard that can be used for and Operations Vice President outdoor functions. Katherine Ulibarri. “It’s a really nice space that The purchase of the could be a place for outdoor funcproperty on the northeast tions, receptions, and those kinds corner of Oxford Avenue of things,” Ulibarri said. and Buena Vista Street was The buildings would approved by the Governing require some renovation, but Board earlier this month. since the property has not been The property includes a officially purchased yet, the 1,000 square foot house that renovations are not part of the

By Adriana Avila

C

official master plan, she said. Since the property on Oxford is right across the street from campus, it is an ideal location, Ulibarri said. “To have a property that serves as a barrier between where we have the heavy traffic areas of CNM and the residential neighborhoods is ideal and that’s what caught our eye about it. It would be just such a great location to hold meetings and events when you need more of a small intimate setting that could be outdoors,” Ulibarri said. Ulibarri said she is aware

that student organizations have requested a dedicated space, but felt that this property would be too isolated to serve as such as space. She said that Vice President of Student Services Philip Bustos is working with the Executive Council of Students to create a proposal for the master plan. If all goes smoothly, CNM could own the property in a few months, said Ulibarri. After that, the school will begin decide on how to best use the space, she said.

PHOTOS BY SCOTT M. ROBERTS | STAFF

(top) Katherine Ulibarri discusses the new building acquisition and plans for the property on Oxford. (left) CNM has approval to purchase the property located at the corner of Buena Vista and Oxford.

Library Creates Quiet Study Space By Christopher Pope Staff Reporter

The library section of the Student Resource Center now includes a quiet zone for students to study away from the hum of computers and foot traffic, said SRC Librarian Olivia Baca. The second-floor quiet space on the south side of the building was created, at no cost, in response to a spring 2012 survey in which students requested study space in a noise-free space, said Baca. “We want to listen and be responsive. To see that space really

being utilized kind of helps emphasize how badly it was needed. Our mission is to support students and support student success,” said Baca. Interim Director of Libraries Poppy Johnson-Renvall said she saw this as an opportunity to listen to student’s needs and to meet them quickly. It is something the library staff prides themselves on, she said. Because the SRC is a new building, no one wanted to add walls or new additions to the building. Instead, the library used existing space to provide for students,

said Johnson-Renvall. This was done by moving a set of bookshelves 20 yards north, she said. “The really nice thing about a community college is that we can be very agile in the ways we make changes,” said Johnson-Renvall. Moving more than 30,000 books and creating the space was expected to take two weeks and was set to occur between the summer and fall break, she said. Instead, work-study students from the library and the ACE computer labs combined efforts to complete the project

in four days. The south area of the second floor now includes individual workstations and reminder signs that the area is a quiet zone. “We could not have done it without ACE. So we are really grateful for their collaboration and cooperation,” said Baca. ACE administrator Merigen Naranjo said that the space has already become very popular with students wishing to study. “So far, everyone has been really happy with it,” said Naranjo.

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Students take advantage of the new quiet zone in Student Resource Center.

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September 25 - October 1, 2012

CRIME

Continued from Page 1 referrals in 2011 and zero in 2010. Forcible sex offenses have also increased from one in 2010 to three in 2011. Director of Student Discipline and Responsibility Kristopher Gaussoin said that it is important to remember that the forcible sex offense definition is designed to be broad and includes unwanted touching of any sort. Crime on Main campus was triple that of any other campus with a total of 189 reportable incidents. Montoya, South Valley, Westside, Rio Rancho, Technology Annex and Workforce Training Center had a combined total of 58 reportable offences, most of which were larceny.

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Murder, manslaughter, non-forcible sex offense, robbery, arson and injury or death by fire has remained at zero on all campuses since 2008. The report also includes reminders that security can help with vehicle jump-starts, car lock-outs, CPR and first aid services, and escorts from a classroom to a car. For any of these services, or to report a crime on campus students can call 224-3002. The Cleary Crime Report is an annual crime statistics and procedure report required by the federal government for all higher education institutions. To read the CNM Cleary Crime Report visit cnm.edu/ depts/security. Then select security documents.

WAGE

Continued from Page 1

District Court Judge Nan Nash brought up a problem with the scope of the proposal. The proposal requires too many changes to go into effect at once, said Nash “Those are issues we’ll have to deal with, but right now the important thing is for everyone to get out and vote,” she said. The Albuquerque Chamber of Commerce and the Restaurant Association have spoken out against the proposal. Neither group responded to requests for comment. OLE New Mexico is preparing for a large canvassing campaign called Get Out the Vote, in an attempt to mobilize voters and educate them about the existence and importance of the minimum wage ordinance, said Fraire. “We want everyone at the polls to know about the wage increase and to support it,” she said. Other organizations are also getting involved and showing their support. On Thursday Sept. 20, activists and concerned citizens from

many different organizations held a rally at Yale Park on UNM campus, said former student Tom Dent. “It’s the right thing to do. We’ve just been labeled the poorest state in America, so we have to do whatever it takes to lift ourselves up economically,” said Dent. Groups represented at the rally were the Sierra Club, New Mexico Democrats, Occupy Wall Street, and OLE NM, said Occupy member Jake Cook. “Right now, we have 49 million people living in poverty, 97 million people are near poverty, and we’ve got to do something to change that,” said Cook. Dent said Thursday’s rally was the first of many planned demonstrations and activities to build awareness and support for the minimum wage ordinance. Although the battle will not likely be over even after Nov. 6, Fraire said that OLE NM is still working hard, and that she is not giving up. “Volunteer with our Get Out the Vote campaign. Tell your friends. Most importantly, go and vote on November 6,” she said.

PERMITS

Continued from Page 1

decals that stick to the outside of windows rather than the inside was because many the second week of the students have windows that fall term, but if a student are heavily tinted which suspects a decal has been can make it difficult for the stolen a report should decals to be seen. immediately be filed with Students can tape the security, he said. decals to the inside of the “The decals are good for rear window to prevent the academic year and next theft, he said. year we most likely will be To report a decal theft buying decals that will go or any other campus crime on the inside front window,” to the security department said Garcia. call 224-3002. The switch to parking

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FEATURE

8 | the CNM Chronicle Special Series

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if you’ve been used to just walking 92 August 2012 96 out and getting in Effective Managing Editor BALLOON your vehicle,” said Rizzieri. FIESTA 157 IS E 9 6 D h e m i c a l Future plans in the 162 A PARK PA R ALA 9 8 E n g i n e e r i n g evaluation stage include a INTEL ME DA P 155 Bus Rapid Transit, which major Ben Chesebrough said would provide more timely ALAMEDA MC PA S EO Northwest MA service, said WEST heCNM commutes on the bus transit Rizzieri. DEL HO N Transit 94 O RT 25251 E four days a week from Rio IdeasN proposed Center P have ELLISON! 140 31 Rancho to Main campus included getting buses 9 2 551 because it is more time effi- their own dedicated lanes 98 BALLOON FIESTA 1 57 1 cient and saves him money. and even allowing signals SE I 9 6 D 162 P A RA It takes 45Pto 50 minutes to sense when the bus is 98 ALAME 34 92 PARK DA P every day to get to campus, approaching to stay green 790 but he spends that time longer, he said. SAN ANTONIO ALAMEDA studying and saves $8 a day Public meetings about PASEO D P P L NO 94 will be251 1E62 RTE MONTANO A — and he said neither would these proposals held S UN 2 O SOUTHERN 140 be the case if he was driving. later in the year. To find 31 10 PASEO DEL NORTE P AD 251 “It’s 5a 51really great the meeting schedule, visit 551 AC 98 2 51 money saver. If you add up cabq.gov for updates. 93 157 MONTANO P 92 four days a week for the 34 92De Reyes said that it 1 40 1 55 9 6 entire semester at eight dol- used to be that bus rider31 790 Effective August 2012 GR I EGO 141 lars a day that’s quite a bit of ship would only increase S SAN ANTONIO 9183 3 MONTGOMERY change,” said Chesebrough. when gas prices rose. There P P INTEL has been a steady increase His 162 scheduleMONTANO varies 25 NA 7 AD EMY P OS U 155 throughout the week; AC leav- in ridership for at least the 1 57 Y M COMANCHE E 10 P AD ing at 6:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. past six years, despite the 251 36 93 AC 12 P MC 9 4 Northwest MA going home and anywhere many times the gas prices HO 9 3 Transit M N 157 25 A from 3:30 p.m.Center to asPlate as decreased, he said. ONTANO 6 94 140 2 SPAIN 1 ER ELLISON! 155 790 AD 8:30 p.m., he said. “It’s still continued to 31 L GR I 92 EGOmuch MENAULCNM 141 96 He said he owns a car, go up. No matter how S BALLOON MONTOYA 98 3 8 MONTGOMERY 9 2 FIESTA 1 57 1 57 but chooses to ride the bus MONTGOMERY 96 gas prices have spiked or | STAFF PARK 93IN Uptown 540 PHOTOS BY STEFANY OLIVAS because the time it would went 9down, still at 8 ALAMwe’re 25 P Commuters stow their bikes on the front of the 766 RED LINE Bus west on Central Avenue before boarding. E DA P Transit P 157 96 take to drive adds up to the that seven percent increase. OLD TOWN COMANCHE COMANCHE Center ! P 5 1 3 same as riding thePbus. Maybe people here36 are disCO LOMA 9 4 1 6/18 ALAMEDA P S “It would take me that PAScovering more benefits,” EO D CANDELARIA E 155 O RT long to94 drive Ethen try RA 2 51to said DeL NReyes. 7 E 2 D 766 SOUTHE 790 A L DOWNTOWN 40 A find parking.L So the bus is Rizzieri said another Dr MLK 140 TR 11 JR LOMAS CE N31 MENAUL MENAUL UNM PASEO DEL NORTE a really good option for me,” reason that gas prices have 551 8 98 8 Alvarado 31 92 Central & Unser 766 766 said Chesebrough. contributed to an increased 40 TransportationUptown Transit Center P 777 66 ! 98 INDIAN SCHOO L P 92 is that in the past, P P 66 Center CE NTR A 34 92 During his time riding the ridershipOLD Transit 6 9 L6 9 6 TOWN 51 bus he was never late for class people have been able to Center ! 790 P CNM 5 97 ZUNI and has never missed a class adjust for fluctuations at CONSTITUTION LOMA 1SAN 6/18ANTONIO IN S 1 2 13 because of the bus, he said. low prices. Now that prices 50 BR ID GE 1 40 P 2 50 3 1 55 P 54 “There’s pretty much no are high across the board, TOAW ER 766 L N DOWNTOWN 155 NO 40 71S41 34 157 Dr MLK AD EMY P OS U downside to it. They haveCENTitRA simply falls out of their 11 JR 16/18 LOMA LOMAS 11 AC 51 Y UNM M GIBSON 53 E 10 range. ways to getting around the budget Alvarado MC AD 31 21793 Central & Unser 2 51 6 766 766 MA AC CNM 9 WEST 12 COPPER HO Transportation “I think we’ve reached a Transittraffic. Center PI would 40 777 66 definitely 1 6/18 SOUTHERN ! 9 8 VA 9 3 2  54 M AL EN 66 Center 1 57 AR C O E NTR1 recommend it to anyone,” point now where gas 5prices NT 51 AL 1 6 IN SPA 155 said Chesebrough. ANO are51just to high for a lot of 251 140 ZUNI 2 217 93 CNM CE NTR A 97 31 T L 777 R GR I PO ALBUQUERQUE ABQ Ride people too budget, and there’s CNM EGOPublic 1 41 9 6 SU N 15 98 MONTOYA 50 3 98 140 SE SUNPORT BR Imuch Information Officer S Rick not they can1give D GE more 250 3 16266 MONTGOMERY A DI KIRTLAND 54 MONTGOMERY 9 6 PA R TO W ER 3 4 Effective August 2012 93 De Reyes said with the up in order to pay for gas for a AFB 141 15 57 25 BLAKE 16/18 P 2 22 155 GIBSON many modes of alternative vehicle,” said Rizzireri. P 53 COMANCHE 25 157 98 COMANCHE 96 217 transportation, the price is He said that riding 1 3 INTEL 36 16/18 right 54 for students — a freeARENthe bus VA  P AL 1 RIO BRAVO 55also provides many LEAD RIO CANDELARIA COAL bus pass, and discounted economic benefits, even DENNIS on CHAVEZ 222 BR A V 217O 31 7 T train. a national ridership Mlevel; R C O 790 passes for the Northwest P ALBUQUERQUE M CNM WEST SU N HO tear on 66 Transit N 198 “As more CNM students reduces wear Aand MENAUL SUNPORT 25MENAUL KIRTLAND 51 Center P8 P ride and see how convenient the roads and decreases the 8 AFB ELLISON! 10 222 40 BLAKE amount of oil needed it is, they’ll not only come 92 overall. 92 GUN CLUB Uptown 2 22 155 INDIAN SCHOO L P P 25 BALLOON 9 8 to appreciate it, they’ll “You can have 40 people SOUTHERN Transit 9 6 96 157 OLD TOWN FIESTA 6 IS E 551 96 become 162 advocates forPAit,” Center ! PARK P 53 RA D on the bus or 40 people in5 A 9 8 RIO BRAVO L A CONSTI L TUTION O 1 6/18 INDIAN SCHOOL ME MA S said De Reyes. cars,” said Rizzieri.RIO B 251 P 12 700 DA DENNIS CHAVEZ P 222 individual R AV O 162 MONTANO Director of Transit “Full buses carrying so CE Bruce Rizzieri DOWNTOWN said transi- many people so many miles 766 L ALAMEDA 96 LOM AS Dr MLK NT TR A PA S EO 11 JR P LOMAS 11 CE N 51 D tioning to public transpor- is more 15 economical than if 51 R EL N UNM P AL 9 4 O RT 2 51 Alvarado E 31 tation can seem difficult you put the same number 2 66 766 GUN CLUB 140 40 Transportation COPPER CNM 31 P for some people because it of people driving in their 777 INTEL 98 PASEO DEL NORTE 2 155 66 Center CE NTR A SOUTH 5 51 TRA MWAY is a change of routine, but 53 own vehicles. You need less L 915 8 51 1 55 1 ZUNI once people are used to imports ofCNM CE NTR A oil.” 97 700 L 777 P MC Northwest 366 4 the routes and scheduling, 9250 MA Variation: 15 CNM WEST Service See Sche HO Transit Busing N R ID GE public transportation 1 40 250 3 790 54 INFORMATION FROM CABQ.GOV | WEB Center Albuquerque P 4 ELLISON! gets much easier. 15is3the 141 157ABQ Ride Bus that stops at CNMSANRioANTONIO Transit 251 only Rancho Campus. 16/18 *Bus P 9 2 GIBSON P “It’s a change P Center 53 from what P ! P 96 62 MONTANO 217 CNM A they’re used to, 1 especially P 19457 E S S UN I AD EMY P

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