Page 1

Chronicle

C

e

n

t

r

a

l

N

e

w

M

e

Editorial: Administration Offers Excuses, Not Solutions

By Stefany Olivas Managing Editor

CNM President Kathie Winograd said that she will explore possible solutions to the student concerns raised at a recent open forum.

o

m

m

u

n

i

o

l

l

e

g

e

/cnmchronicle

September 18 - 24, 2012

The forum was designed as an update to students on the progress of CNM, Several students attended the forum to ask questions and express concerns directly to Winograd. “I really appreciate that they held this forum. I thought I was really good

for students to be able to go and really put down their ideas,” said Criminal Justice major and ECOS President Stephen Martos. He said that student government was there to represent the general needs of the students. Business major Brian

Taylor said he was concerned about the appeal process. He said he applied to UNM and Highlands for the fall term, but he did not find out his appeal to continue at CNM was denied until the week that the two schools started

turn it into energy, he said. Because the body does not recognize fructose as regular sugar, it is sent to the liver instead. The liver breaks the fructose down. If too much has been ingested at once, the liver can’t process it fast enough to use as sugar energy, and it turns into fat, he said. Table sugar is actually half glucose and half fructose. High fructose corn syrup is almost the same thing, but it has a higher concentration of fructose than glucose, making it an unhealthy balance, said Kennedy. High fructose corn syrup is a combination of 55 percent fructose and 45 percent glucose. Both fructose and glucose are natural sugars but have different shapes. Our bodies therefore process them differently, he said. “Shape is extremely important in biological reactions,” said Kennedy. In the US, a person consumes an average of 12 teaspoons of high fructose corn syrup a day. Teens, students and others with little time for sleep consume close to 80 percent more on average, he said.

here are some big differences between high fructose corn syrup and regular sucrose ­— better known as table sugar — said Biology instructor Thomas Kennedy Fructose and glucose are natural sugars and are both plant products, but high fructose corn syrup is genetically modified. Fructose, especially the kind found in corn syrup, does not identify in a body the same as glucose, contrary to the television ads created by the Corn Refiners Association, he said. “To say fructose and glucose are treated the same in our bodies is completely wrong,” said Kennedy, “They are treated differently.” Fructose is preferred by junk food manufacturers because it is sweeter and cheaper than table sugar, said Kennedy. Both Pepsi Co. and Coca-Cola have released special ‘original flavor’ versions on their drinks which are made with table sugar instead of high fructose corn syrup, he said. The two versions have very different see KENNEDY on page 7 tastes, said Kennedy. “If they’re both the same, “10 Minutes With…” is a then why do they taste differ- feature in which a member ent?” Kennedy said. of the CNM faculty shares When glucose enters professional insight on a the bloodstream, insulin is local, national or interreleased to regulate it and national issue.

and ruined his chance of attending for fall. “By the time I got an appointment I couldn’t register over there,” said Taylor. Winograd said she did not have the answer to his concern, but she is going see

FORUM on page 7

PHOTO BY SCOTT M. ROBERTS | STAFF

CNM Employee’s Union President and full-time SAGE instructor Andrew Tibble discusses the contract ratified at the September Governing Board Meeting.

Staff Contract Impasse Ends

Wednesday Sept. 19

Thursday Sept. 20

sunny

mostly sunny

85°

86°

Friday Sept. 21 sunny

ratified at the September Governing Board meeting, had been in limbo Staff since 2008 due to disReporter agreements between the Security officers, union and administrapart-time and full-time tion, said Tibble. The timing of this faculty members and instructional support contract is important, staff are very happy to because it means that have a formal contract those groups will now after the long wait, said receive the one-time CNM Employee’s Union two percent and recurPresident and full- ring three percent raise time SAGE instructor that was approved for all employees over the Andrew Tibble. The employee contracts, which were see CONTRACTS on page 7

By Jodie Darrell

PHOTO BY JONATHAN GAMBOA | STAFF

Full-time MSE Biology instructor Thomas Kennedy describes the consequences of consuming food and beverages containing high fructose corn syrup.

PHOTO BY STEFANY OLIVAS | STAFF

81°

c

High Fructose Corn Syrup Vs. Table Sugar

T

sunny

y

THOMAS KENNEDY

Staff Reporter

Tuesday Sept. 18

t

10 M i n u t e s W i t h…

By Adriana Avila

Alternative Transportation Series: Trains

c

Students Voice Concerns to Administration

NM State Fair

Feature Pg. 8

o

FREE - TAKE ONE

Entertainment Pg. 5

PHOTO BY SCOTT M. ROBERTS | STAFF

c

thecnmchronicle.wordpress.com

Volume 18 | Issue 4

Opinion Pg. 3

i

The CNM

/CNMChronicle

A Look Inside:

x

86°

Saturday Sept. 22 sunny

84°

Sunday Sept. 23 partly cloudy

78°

Monday Sept. 24 mostly sunny

83°


2 | the CNM Chronicle

CAMPUS BULLETIN

Chronicle The CNM

525 Buena Vista SE, ST 12B Albuquerque, NM 87106 Views expressed in the Opinion page are those of the individual writer and do not necessarily represent the beliefs of all CNM Chronicle staff or Central New Mexico Community College.

Staff Editorial Jyllian Roach editor-in-chief jyllianchronicle@gmail.com, 224.4755 Stefany Olivas managing editor stefanychronicle@gmail.com, 224.4755 Steve “Mo” Fye copy chief sfye@cnm.edu, 224.4755 Newsroom Jon Baca staff reporter jonathanbacachronicle@gmail.com 224.4758 Daniel Johnson staff reporter djohnson@cnm.edu, 224.4758 Adriana Avila staff reporter adrianachronicle@gmail.com, 224.4758 Christopher Pope staff reporter cpope2@cnm.edu, 224.4758 Position Available staff reporter jyllianchronicle@gmail.com, 224.4758 Production Jonathan Gamboa production manager jonathan.chronicle@gmail.com, 224.4752 Scott M. Roberts photojournalist srobertschronicle@gmail.com, 224.4752 Jodie Darrell-Salazar layout designer jodiechronicle@gmail.com, 224.4752 Jasmine Chavez layout designer jgarza21@cnm.edu, 224.4752 B usiness Bruce Warrington business manager bwarrington@cnm.edu, 224.3255 Larraine Shelly-Becenti ad-sales manager lshellybecenti@cnm.edu, 224.3255 Brandy Valles distribution manager bvalles2@cnm.edu, 224.3255 Advisory Jack Ehn faculty adviser jehn@cnm.edu, 224.3636

A dvertising Advertising submissions are due by 12 p.m. the Thursday prior to publication.To submit an ad, or for more information, please contact Stefany Olivas at CNMChronicleAds@cnm.edu.

C orrections The CNM Chronicle strives to publish only accurate and truthful information. If you believe you have found an error, please notify the CNM Chronicle by email at jyllianchronicle@gmail. com or call 505.224.4755.

C irculation The CNM Chronicle is a weekly, student-run newspaper. It is printed by Vanguard Publishing Co. and circulated free of charge to all CNM campuses and the surrounding community.

Free Résumé and Interview Workshops

Sepmtember 18 - 24, 2012

professional advisement from South Valley Campus employment specialists. Staff in SV Room 40 provide The club meets on Main access Whether you need a job Campus, Student Services • SV Room 32 224-5056 now or want to prepare for Building, Room 207 on Westside Campus employment after graduation, Tuesdays, at two, of course. Staff at front desk provide you can attend Job Connection Visit cnm.edu/depts/jcc/ access Services’ Employability tuesdayattwo.php for more • MJG Building, Room 201-C Workshops. information. 224-5335 Offered on alternating weeks during the Fall Semester, Walk-in Lactation Stations Student Allocation Board these workshops provide CNM Available at CNM Accepting Membership students and graduates with Applications quality instruction in résumé Conveniently pump milk writing and interview strategies. in a private room with locked The Student Allocation Bring your questions, and door: Board is now accepting let our staff help you prepare applications for student for the job search process. Main Campus members. For workshop locations and • Janet Stromberg Hall, Room The Allocation board schedules, go to cnm.edu/ 312-G 224-3000 meetings monthly and jobworkshops. • Student Health Center, SSC distributes funds among student Room 206 224-3080 organizations for events, Job Club Accepting activities and equipment. Must New Members Montoya Campus have a minimum 2.5 GPA. Staff at front desks provide For more information Join CNM’s exclusive access. contact James Roach at job club, Tuesday at Two. • I Building, Room 211, jroach8@cnm.edu Membership is open to CNM 224-5881 students and graduates. Hosted • G Building, Room 201, Time Management by Job Connection Services, 224-5516 Workshops Available Tuesday at Two provides • J Building Room 121, weekly topics for discussion, 224-5993 Learn to better balance opportunities to network school and life a 30 minute Kick with other job seekers and Start Workshop. The Sept. 19

workshops will take place on South Valley campus Rm. 32 from 11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., on Montoya campus H-Building Rm. 104 from 11:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. and on Main campus in the Student Services Center Rm. 205 from 2 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. For more information contact CNM Connect Achievement Coach Chioma Heim at 224-4080 or at cheim2@cnm.edu.

Financial Aid Release – Sept. 21 Financial aid disbursement checks will be released on Friday, Sept. 21. Checks can be picked up from the Cashier’s Office on Main and Montoya campuses and from the Financial Aid Office on Westside campus. Students will need either a New Mexico I.D. or a student I.D. to receive a disbursement check. Students with late-start classes may receive a partial disbursement on Sept. 21 and a secondary check three weeks after any late-start classes begin.

To submit items for Campus Bulletin, please email notice with a maximum of 150 words to jyllianchronicle@gmail.com or call 224-4755.

Correction

• In Volume 18, Issue 3 the article entitled “Have a Bite of Language for Lunch” should have stated the instructor as Chris Frechette.

Classifieds

Contact Information

CNM Chronicle 525 Buena Vista SE, STE. 12B Albuquerque, NM 87106

Bruce Warrington

505-224-3255

Classifieds may be submitted via email to: cnmchronicleads@cnm.edu

Services

Employment

For Sale

‘THE TREE MAN’

Avon Reps Needed... New opportunities! Only a $10 start up fee for your new business with great potential earnings! For more info. Call Natasha (505) 8045751 (rep). General Contractor Needs a P/T Person who has a minimum of 1 to 2 yrs experience with Server 2008/2001 and networking. Must be proficient with MS Office products; experience with Sage Masterbuilder a plus, but not required. 20 to 30 flexible hrs/wk. Starting Pay: $15/hr. If interested, submit resume to pdavis@ecinm.com

Canon PIXMA Photo Printer, Brand New sealed box, 1 yr WTY. 4800x1200 res. For PC/ MAC-USB, compact, w/photo paper, can deliv CNM, $45, 833-1146

33 years of tree expertise. No job too big or small. Estimate is always free. Just call Pat, 505615-7751 JR Mundo de Fiesta The Premier Party Equipment Rentals Fun Jumps-Canopies-Pinatas-Tables-Chairs! CNM Special: $15 Off Combo rentals with CNM I.D. Eliberto Calderon (505) 259-9615 ecalderon2@hotmail.com

Volunteer VA research study looking for:-OIF (Iraq)/OEF (Afghanistan) Female Veterans, who are at least 18 years old With no history of sexual trauma, alcohol or drug abuse, psychiatric disorders, or head injuries. You will come to the VA hospital to perform tests of thinking. Must be able to come two times within a four month period. You will be compensated for your time and inconvenience. Please call (505)256-5736.

Deadline 12 p.m. Thursday prior to publication

UNM is recruiting women with asthma for research study. If interested, please contact Tereassa at 269-1074 or tarchibeque@salud.unm. edu. VETERINARY ASSISTANT/ RECEPTIONIST/ Kennel help. Pre-veterinary student preferred. Ponderosa Animal Clinic: 8818990/ 881-8551.

Gretsch duojet, black in great condition $300 OBO. Marshal amp $65 OBO. footboard $70 OBO. also 1956  chevy bel air hardtop. Call 505-554-9936 NEW 14MP DIGITAL CAMERA,5X Opt& 7.5Dig. Zoom.Imag.Stabiliz.Blink,Smile,Face Detect. Many features,sealed box.$79. 836-4546 1996 Chrysler LHS, 4 door, 6 cylinder, cruise control, leather, power windows & door locks, $2,600, or best offer. Email me at rocketr2@comcast.net

Items Wanted WANT TO BUY

Word 2010 for CIS 1120 class Call/Text Clara (505)203-9146 WANTED

23 PEOPLE TO LOSE 5-100 POUNDS! I LOST 30 LBS. IN 6 WKS! 855-250-1522

Pricing

Payment

FREE to CNM students, faculty, and staff up to 120 chars; Local businesses: $2.00/wk for the first 30 characters; $0.40/wk each additional character; $3.00/wk bold header.

Cash or Check


September 18 - 24, 2012 Editorial

OPINION

the CNM Chronicle

|3

Editorial Cartoon By Scott M. Roberts

Students Talk, Administration Sticks Fingers in Ears The recent forums in which students were asked to provide feedback for the college seemed more like an opportunity for administration to explain away student concerns as unimportant than an actual dialogue about problems on campus. Among the concerns were lack of space for student organizations, the high cost of textbooks and difficulties with financial aid. For every student concern, Administrators seemed to be armed with an excuse rather than a genuine desire to openly discuss campus issues with students. What’s more, these are not new student concerns: student organizations have always contended with little or no meeting space. The processes for appeals, financial aid and the like have always been confusing and slow and textbook prices have been climbing for some time. If student concerns matter, why were there no explanations for these ongoing student issues?

The word student is not synonymous with child. It is insulting to adults to be told — even in veiled language — that their concerns seem unimportant and invalid. If the administrators do not want to hear about student concerns, they should not ask for them. Students who are genuinely concerned enough to come to such a discussion should not be met with defensive excuses and condescension. If administrators want to show how much they care about students, they could show tangible effort toward resolving these concerns, instead of just assuring students that it will be looked into. This forum seemed not like an open dialogue between the administration and students, but a performance by administrators in which they pretend to see students as people and not just stacks of money.

Something’s wrong with this tablet.

Sun Cat Chit-Chat By Scott M. Roberts | Photojournalist

What are you looking forward to at the state fair? Alberta Rosetta, Radiology

Jesse James Kaufman, Network System Administration

I am looking forward

Same

as usual. The good food.”

“ I

Jeremy Casias, Liberal Arts

really like going to the two different villages because I like the music and the dancing.”

to the food but not the rides because it is getting too expensive.”

Christina Cordova, Psychology

I probably will not go to the state fair.”

Ezar Edwards, Business Management

“ To

Sarah Thomsen, Physics

ride the rollercoasters and puking my brains out with my kid.”

That’s a book.

Just

to have fun and eat some good food.”

Brittany Orozzo, Liberal Arts

I am looking forward to just the food.”

Alex Phung, Office Technology

I am looking

forward to eating the turkey legs because I like them.”


ARTS

4 | the CNM Chronicle

September 18 - 24, 2012

Talent Competition Holds Auditions in Albuquerque By Jodie Darrell Staff Reporter

T PHOTO COURTESY | CHRISTOPHER BURNS

(left) University Celebrity Las Vegas, N.M. winner Benito Martinez plays with a volunteer audience member (right).

Creative Scholarships That Don’t Require Writing The National Make It Yourself with Wool Competition: $1000 – $2000

The John Lennon Scholarship up to $20,000

Students can win a scholarship by knitting clothing out of wool. For more information send a self-addressed stamped envelope to: National Make It Yourself with Wool Competition P.O. Box 175 Lavina, MT 59046

Submit an original and uplifting song with lyrics. For more information: BMI Foundation, Inc. 7 World Trade Center 250 Greenwich Street New York, NY 10007-0030 info@bmifoundation.org

Collegiate Inventors Competition: $10,000 – $25,000 Create a working, patentable invention. For more information, write to The Collegiate Inventors Competition, c/o The National Inventors Hall of Fame, 221 S. Broadway Street, Akron, Ohio 44308-1505

KLI Academic Award: The Kor Memorial Scholarship - $500 Students interested in a degree in a language program can win this scholarship from the Klingon Language Institute. For more information: kli.org/scholarship

he inaugural University Celebrity talent competition will hold auditions for student to compete for scholarships said chief executive officer of the competition and New Mexico Highlands University student body President Christopher Burns. The auditions will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 25 at the African American Performing Arts Center at 6:30 p.m. There will be four categories: comedy dance, song and poetry. The top three entertainers will be awarded scholarships ranging from $125 to $225, said Burns. “University Celebrity understands the importance of a college education, which is the main reason we provide scholarships to the top three contestants at each talent competition we host,” said Burns. The competition gives students the

opportunity to give their talent exposure and a chance to become famous, said Burns. “There is a lot of college talent who grew up with huge dreams of becoming a celebrity or famous,” said Burns. Burns said the scholarships won at the auditions can be used at any college. There are more opportunities than just the scholarships for the winners. He said winners will also have the chance to be a part of concerts hosted by University Celebrity in the spring, and that they will have the chance for exposure to entertainment agencies and venues throughout the state. The winners will also be promoted through Youtube, Twitter, and Facebook, said Burns. “University Celebrity specializes in keeping dreams alive. We take pride in providing opportunities for talented college students educationally and through creative arts,” said Burns.

The idea behind the competition came from his campaign for student body president at NMHU, where he hosted a rap competition, said Burns. “In order to win, I knew I had to do something unordinary for my campaign. I decided to host a rap battle featuring the best rappers on campus,” said Burns, “the turnout was great and the rappers had a blast. Only one rapper was given the title as the best rapper on campus at New Mexico Highlands University.” Burns said he then took steps to create University Celebrity as a company during the fall of 2011. “I knew in my heart that there were many students across the nation who would love to be given a celebrity status on their campus for the talents they have,” said Burns. Students interested in auditioning for University Celebrity can call 603-9225 or email universitycelebrity@gmail.com.

Advertisement

Set You r Sig htS

higher After completing your courses At centrAl new mexico community college

tranSfe r to e m b rY-r i ddle Bachelor of Science in Technical Management Students in the Technical Management degree program have the opportunity to focus on one of the following areas of specialization: Engineering Sciences Information Security Management of Information Systems Occupational Safety and Health Project Management

5 ways to learn 1. Traditional Classroom 2. Online 3. EagleVision Classroom 4. EagleVision Home 5. Blended Program

Contact Embry-Riddle Albuquerque Campus to find out how your Central New Mexico Community College credits transfer into the Bachelor of Science Technical Management program.

Albuquerque Campus 505.846.8946 • 505.255.9409 albuquerque@erau.edu worldwide.erau.edu/albuquerque

With over 150+ campus locations and Five Ways To Learn, you can count on the support of the Embry-Riddle Albuquerque team to help you reach your goals.


September 18 - 24, 2012

ENTERTAINMENT

the CNM Chronicle

|5

Going to the Fair By Jonathan Baca Staff Reporter

The State Fair can be fun, exciting, educational, and expensive. The Chronicle spent a few days roaming the grounds in search of the best ways to have a good time while keeping the costs reasonable.

Getting There Parking is free at the State Fair this year, which is already a five dollar savings over last year. Gas is still expensive, so take the city bus. Routes that serve the Fair this year are the 766 Red Line, the 777 Green Line and the 66 Central bus. Cars can be parked at the Uptown Transit Center, and on the west side, the stations at 98th Street and Unser Boulevard and at Coors Bypass and Ellison Road.

PHOTO BY JONATHAN BACA | STAFF

Dancers at the Indian Village perform for the Grand Entrance ceremony.

Attractions For art lovers, all of the art exhibits, including Spanish, Native American, kid’s art and many more are all free. Arrive early in the day to avoid large crowds. Visit the agricultural exhibits and see all the ribbon-winning fruits and vegetables. The exhibits also include live bees, a room dedicated to beef and a large pile of corn kernels that visitors can climb in. The blacksmith booth is worth checking out. Learn something new about metal for free. Using centuries-old techniques, volunteers demonstrate to fair-goers the art of crafting metal into useful objects.

Best Deals for Food Rex’s Hamburgers: $2.50 corn dog, $2.50 french fries The Cornfield: $3.50 corn on the cob Bad Boy’s Grill: $3 deep fried bacon M and M (near Indian Village): $5 fajitas, $4 Polish sausage and footlong hot dog

For The Kids PHOTO BY SCOTT M. ROBERTS | STAFF

The Ferris wheel and Wave Swinger are some of the main attractions on the midway.

AgVentureland: Lead your child through a simulated farm, learning to pick vegetables, ride a tractor and even lasso a steer. Free popsicle for every child. Petting Zoo: Admission is free. Cups of food for the animals can be purchased for $2 each. Unicorn Theater: Mini-plays performed every two hours. Visit exponm.com for schedules.

New and Interesting

PHOTO BY JONATHAN BACA | STAFF

Volunteer Blacksmith Thomas Powers demonstrates proper use of blacksmithing tools.

The Combat Booth: Shoot a human target with a paintball gun – $1 a shot or 8 shots for $5. Fried Beer: Check out That’s Amore Pizzeria to experience fried beer. Deep fried balls of beer batter drenched in Nexus Stout syrup. Non-Alcoholic. Donut Burger: Exactly what the name says. At Basil’s Home Cooking, get a hamburger with two glazed donuts for a bun. Sweet Cheeks: Deep fried heaven. Fried Twinkies, fried Oreos, fried Snickers, fried Fruity Pebbles; you get the idea. Rock It Up Zip Line: Swing from a harness attached to a cable suspended above the Fairgrounds. Ride the ZipLine once for $7 or twice for $10.


6 | the CNM Chronicle

Coaches Corner By Lori Gallegos Guest Columnist

CNM Achievement Coaches are a collaborative bunch. This close-knit group has always worked together in a spirit of information sharing, creative problem-solving, and mutual support in a coordinated effort to improve student success. This summer, the collaboration continued with a coordinated effort to improve student success with Cosmetology students. This past July, 16 Achievement Coaches from CNM Schools and Connect travelled to the South Valley Campus to meet with Cosmetology students and work with them one-on-one to create success plans incorporating each student’s individual strengths. Second-term students in Mary Kolesar’s Hair Lab II class each took the Clifton StrengthsFinder Strengths Assessment. Based on answers on this assessment, StrengthsQuest identifies an individual’s top 5 talents or themes which can then be developed into strengths. These talents/strengths are innately characteristic of each individual and can be used as a foundation from which one builds success in school, work, and relationships. Once the Cosmetology students took the assessment, CNM Achievement Coaches then worked with them to develop a Success Plan targeting a particular area the student identified. Barbara Burrows, former Health, Wellness, and Public Safety Achievement Coach, was instrumental in training the Achievement Coaches on student success plans and said that the effectiveness of the success plan is in the conversation between the coach and the student. The conversation incorporates how the student might utilize their strengths to achieve goals or address challenges. Student Celeste Romero, whose strengths included “woo” meaning she derives satisfaction meeting new people and “includer” meaning she is accepting of others and makes an effort to include those who feel left out, said she felt that these strengths speak to her choice of cosmetology as a career to work as part of a team to make others feel beautiful and good about themselves. The use of the StrengthsFinder Strengths Assessment was made possible by funding from the U.S. Department of Education, Carl Perkins Career and Technical Education grant. The Achievement Coaches hope to conduct a follow-up with the Cosmetology students sometime this fall to discuss strategies for the term. Coaches Corner is a monthly column written by the CNM Connect Acheivement coaches. Look for the next installment of Coaches Corner in issue eight of the CNM Chronicle.

STUDENT LIFE

Sepmtember 18 - 24, 2012

Connecting to Help Community Resources Available to Students Through CNM Connect Connect is proacBy Daniel Johnson tive in updating the list of available sources for Staff students. The CNM Reporter Chronicle has collected Executive Director of CNM Connect Ann Lynn Hall said there are many resources for students struggling with everyday life concerns. There are resources for housing, childcare, legal aid, food assistance, transportation and more, said Hall. An achievement coach at Connect can help students find assistance that will help balance life and school. “Connect is a onestop office for assistance on connecting students to local resources,” said Hall.

proper documents to the CYFD office to apply for the benefits. If qualified through CYFD, many daycare facilities require only a registration fee for each child enrolled into the program. Students can visit cyfd.org or call 841-4861.

Center is an organization which can help anyone who lives in the central southeast heights or downtown areas by a short list of resources giving out food boxes. available to students. The non-profit can assist by paying up to C hild Care $200 for utilities and According to the $300 for mortgage costs. CYFD website, the The center also has Child Care Assistance F ood/C lothing a clothing and commodProgram subsidizes the ities assistance program. Project Share is an Qualifications cost of child care for lowvary income families who are organization that offers based on the number of working or are in school hot meals at 5:00 p.m. people in the household. daily. The non-profit For more information, and need child care. The subsidy amount also has a free cloth- call 818-1345. People Helping varies depending on the ing and blanket bank for People is a Rio Ranchoage of the child, the type anyone in need. Project Share is based organization which of care needed and the open every day except requires no paper work location of the program Wednesday from 3 p.m. to or financial requirements the child will attend. 6:30 p.m. and can be con- to receive assistance. If candidates meet tacted at 242-5677. The group feeds these requirements, The John Marshall the community hot they can then take the

Call for World News!

meals twice a month. The have a food box program is based on the size of the household and is hosted on the third Friday and last Saturday of the month. There is also a clothing box which can provide clothing for an entire household. For hours of operation and locations of events contact 615-1951. For a complete list of resources available, contact any of the campus CNM Connect offices by calling 2243186 or visit the CNM Chronicle web page at thecnmchronicle.wordpress.com.

Advertisement

great price for students!

all high-speed internet. no phone line required.

29

$

.95

a month for 9 months*

speeds up to 12 Mbps

Are you from somewhere other than Albuquerque? The CNM Chronicle wants to know what is going on in your home town, state or country. Contact Stefany: stefanychronicle@gmail.com

(where available)

call 505.898.1708 click centurylink.com/nm come in centurylink.com/stores

*Offer ends 10/31/2012. Pure Broadband™ available to qualifying residential customers only. The monthly rate of $29.95 requires a 9-month term agreement (after which the rate reverts to the then-current standard rate), and applies to up to 12 Mbps service. An additional monthly fee (including professional installation, if applicable) and separate shipping and handling fee will apply to customer’s modem or router. General – Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them by service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions – All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at www.centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges – Applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges include a Carrier Universal Service charge, National Access fee or Carrier Cost Recovery surcharge, a one-time High-Speed Internet activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rates. Call for a listing of applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges. Pure Broadband Satisfaction Guarantee – Applies only to standard residential Pure Broadband service. To be eligible, customer must complete online form at www.centurylink.com/30days at least five (5) days before requesting cancellation of Pure Broadband. Customer must cancel Pure Broadband no later than thirty (30) days after service installation at customer’s residence. CenturyLink will credit the following applicable Pure Broadband charges to customer’s CenturyLink invoice within sixty (60) business days following customer’s Pure Broadband disconnection date: monthly recurring charges, monthly recurring modem or router charges, shipping and handling fees for modem or router, professional installation fees, activation fee, and all applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges related to Pure Broadband and modem/router. Not available on up to 15 Mbps, 20 Mbps, or 25 Mbps High-Speed Internet services, and may not be available with other offers or promotions. Pure Broadband – Unless customer properly exercises satisfaction guarantee described above, an early termination fee will apply as either a flat $99 fee or the applicable monthly recurring service fee multiplied by the number of months remaining in the minimum service period, up to $200. Customers must accept High-Speed Internet Subscriber Agreement prior to using service. Download and upload speeds will range from 85% to 100% of the listed download speed due to conditions outside of network control including customer location, websites accessed, Internet congestion and customer equipment. In some areas, a telephone landline may be required as a part of the service but only for the purpose of data traffic transmission/connection and cannot be used for voice traffic transmission, except 911 services. Private, Direct Connection and Consistent Speed Claims – Direct connection and consistent speed claims are based on CenturyLink providing High-Speed Internet subscribers with a dedicated, virtual-circuit connection between their homes and the CenturyLink central office. ©2012 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are the property of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owners.


September 18 - 24, 2012

FORUM

Continued from Page 1

to look at how they can do things better and she understands there are a lot of things that have to happen. ECOS member Carrie Ratkevitch said she is concerned with the lack of space available for student clubs and organizations. The portables that currently house some organizations near the Student Resource Center on Main campus have been deemed a fire hazard by the fire marshal, she said. ECOS member Cesar Silva mentioned the buildings that were recently demolished on Buena Vista and Coal could have been used. Winograd said they demolished the buildings because they were a hazard and just because they were vacant, does not make them a suitable building to be used. “A lot of us don’t have any space to really hold meetings or just have a space of our own. The portables are falling apart and they are a fire hazard,” said Ratkevitch. Ratkevitch said she does not want to see student organizations in a situation like the Art and Criminal Justice departments where the programs were suddenly without space. “I know space is limited on this campus, and I know it may be a while before we get something, but it’d be nice to be included in the plans,” said Ratkevitch. Ratkevich also said that some students were having trouble with financial aid limits. Some students have lost their federal financial aid when they have around 12–14 credit hours to complete. She asked Winograd what is being done to help those students. “They get close to finishing their program and they’re told they don’t have enough credit space to do so. So they have one term left, and they’re being told they can’t finish,” said Ratkevitch. Winograd said that CNM is aware of these issues and that the federal laws have been making restrictions over the past years. She said the administration is really trying to focus on how CNM can efficiently utilize scholarship money, and that students having issues with that should

visit the financial aid office. “What we have learned is that that money on the front end isn’t as important as the money on the back end,” said Winograd. Business major Therese Sossman said she is concerned by CNM having a privately owned bookstore for students, and worried that financial aid dependent students are being taken advantage of by the company. “Since they are privately owned, they charge these exorbitant prices for books that you can get elsewhere if you’re not dependent upon financial aid,” she said, “but when you are you have no choice you to go to the bookstore and pay double the price.” Winograd said she understands the price of books is one of the most critical problems facing students, but most other institutions also outsource for their bookstores. She said the high prices are partly because new technology has caused the entire book industry to struggle. She said she encourages students to buy cheaper books online if they can and, although she does not have a solution for the high prices at the bookstore; it is something they would like to fix. “We do have a contract with Follet. We know that the books there are priced by Follet. We also know that they have a little bit of a percentage up to some places like online,” said Winograd. Chemical Engineering major Timothy Torres said if Blackboard was more efficient it would make outside classwork and collaboration much easier. If Blackboard was able to bring people together through video conferencing or some type of forum where everybody in the class can be involved directly. Blackboard does provide students with the option to chat, but he said when chat does not allow students to compare their work right away “Then you can come back to the class the next week and say, ‘hey teacher, we tried this it didn’t work,’ and then she’ll throw some schooling on you,” he said. If students have other issues they can contact Stephen Martos, president of the Executive Council of Students at smartos@cnm.edu.

KENNEDY

Continued from Page 1

“As Americans, we have too much sugar in our diets to begin with,” Kennedy said. There is one thing that fructose manufacturers have been falsely accused of, he said. The urban legend that mercury can be found in high fructose corn syrup is based in fact, but is mostly myth, said Kennedy. Mercury has also been found

ADVERTISEMENTS

in several samples of commercial products containing high fructose corn syrup, but it was probably a contaminant from the machinery in the production factory rather than an intended additive, he said. “The mercury isn’t purposely put in the high fructose corn syrup. If it was, companies like Pepsi and Mountain Dew wouldn’t have many customers,” said Kennedy.

GET NOTICED

Sponsor a game with us! Local Discounts! Custom Ad Design! Contact our business office for more information. bwarrington@cnm.edu

Chronicle The CNM

Advertisement

Join Your Student Government

|7

Word Search

Countries Protesting “Innocence of Muslims” Film

(in a good way)

Advertise with us!

the CNM Chronicle

E F A H Z A V G Q K W M Q D P

D A D Q M I E J F R H Z A Y V

N H V A P S N B A S I U T H W

Y A K Q P E I A O M S J A H X

C I T T A N T H D T H P R Q A

Y B Y S K O S R R U O B Q G W

E A B P I D E A V X S T A F A

M N C R S N L I B Y A I R Y S

E G Y P T I A N S I N A I C Z

AFGHANISTAN AUSTRALIA BAHRAIN BANGLADESH EGYPT EGYPTIAN SINAI INDIA INDONESIA IRAQ KUWAIT LEBANON

N L X L A R P H S I I W C R I

Z A I D N I U Y G S Q U M U T

K D W R B U A E I F L K K B E

N E D Y K L R N O N A B E L C

P S N G A I U K B W Y V E O N

Y H S M A T C L M F Q B M K R

LIBYA MALAYSIA NIGERIA PAKISTAN PALESTINE QATAR SUDAN SYRIA TUNISIA YEMEN

Number Blocks | Easy Try to fill in the missing numbers. The missing numbers are integers between 0 and 9. The numbers in each row add up to totals to the right. The numbers in each column add up to the totals along the bottom. The diagonal lines also add up the totals to the right.

Contact Stephen Martos at smartos@cnm.edu for more information.

CONTRACTS

Continued from Page 1

Tibble said negotiating is a big part of the process to get these contracts summer, said Tibble. settled and choosing the “We managed to do it. It most important clauses like wasn’t easy and there were a gaining more protection for lot of disagreements with the employees in disciplinary school but we did get them to cases played into the process. move on some things and we “To some degree it’s frankly moved on some things,” like a high stakes game of said Tibble. poker,” said Tibble. CNM President Katharine Winograd is thrilled with Winograd said she was thrilled the fact that the contracts being that the contracts were settled settled did not conflict with any in time for any of the eligible of the eligible employees raises. employees to receive the raise. Collective bargaining She also said that the hard work rights are important for employfrom all of the staff throughout ees and the job of the union is to the recent years is appreciated. protect rights in the workplace “I’m grateful for all the for employee, said Tibble. work that was done by the “There have been definegotiating teams on all sides, nite improvement in the and I’m grateful that the col- contracts and just the fact lective bargaining process that we were able to reach an produced good outcomes for agreement with the school is everybody,” said Winograd. really positive,” said Tibble.

Letter Tiles


8 | the CNM Chronicle Special Series

FEATURE

September 18 - 24, 2012

Alternative Transportation New Mexico

Trains

Rail Runner

“Alternative Transportation” is a special fall term series that looks at various means of transportation. Look for “Bus” in issue five.

By Stefany Olivas Managing Editor

Liberal Arts major Marie Duran said she has been riding the train to CNM for more than three years because of how much she saves in gas by doing so. Duran rides the train every day to school from Bernalilllo. The student discount she receives allows her to ride the train and save at least $300 a month on gas. “I’m happy to be a student. I’m happy to be able to ride the facility and have a place that I can trust to get home,” said Duran. She said she has seen the train make it possible for many people to attend high school and college, when before, because of transpor`tation barriers, they may not have been in school at all. Not only do students ride from the south and the north into Albuquerque for school, but many students will also ride from Albuquerque to northern and southern areas for school, she said. “We have a lot of students now that ride and they come from all the neighboring areas. I don’t think they’d even get to college or school if they didn’t have the transportation of the train,” said Duran.

Rail Runner Marketing Manager Jay Faught encourages students to ride the train. Those with a valid student ID or proof or school registration get a discount. With the printed train ticket, students can also ride ABQ Ride, Rio Metro, or Santa Fe Trails buses for free, he said. “ T he R a il Ru n ner c a n save you hu nd reds of dolla rs each mont h,” sa id Faught. New Mexico’s population has been on the rise for some time, and alternative transportation is a great way to help keep the roadways from becoming clogged, said Faught. “ We need publ ic suppor t. T he R a il Ru n ner is a v it a l pa r t of t he t ra nspor t at ion solut ion i n ou r commu n it y,” sa id Faught, “even i f you don’t r ide t he t ra i n often today, t h i n k about how import a nt t h is is goi ng to be for t he next generat ion.” To make commuting easier, the Rio Metro Regional Transit District is developing a five-year transit plan to increase accessibility and bus connections from the train, he said. Faught said the biggest hurdle the Rail Runner faced was when two shortterm federal grants expired. Since then, the train has been funded from fares,

gross receipts taxes from the different counties the train runs through and more long-term federal funding, said Faught. “When those grants expired last year, there was some concern about the funding of the train. However, since that time we have received new longterm federal grants and other federal funding that has replaced that source,” said Faught. During Duran’s time riding the train she has met people from all over the country traveling the state and many international tourists visiting from places as far away as England. She said there was even a woman who was moving all of her belongings from Illinois to meet her husband in Santa Fe. She and other passengers helped the woman move her possessions from the deck onto the train. “You can meet nice people this way too. A lot of people just like to come into the city and ride the train for the experience,” said Duran. Duran said she rides t he train to school every day and t hat it is easier for her because she lives only five minutes from t he train station in downtown Bernalillo. She arrives 30 to 50

minutes early every day because she enjoys the quiet mornings at the station. “I like to look at the mountains. It’s peaceful and it’s quiet, and sometimes I see the morning star. So it gives me that peace in the morning,” said Duran. For more information on the Rail Runner visit nmrailrunner.com.

Cost Comparison Between Riding the Train and Driving a Car Per Term Destination (Average mileage) 34 miles from Belen to Alb. 24 miles from Los Lunas to Alb. 15 miles from Isleta/Sandia Pueblos to Alb. 17 miles from Bernalillo to Alb. 63 miles from Santa Fe to Alb.

Cost per month driving 2 days a week $75.95

Cost per month using monthly Rail Runner pass $18

$53.61

$18

$33.51

$9

$37.98

$18

$140.73

$42-$45

INFORMATION COURTESY FUELECONOMY.GOV & NMRAILRUNNER.COM |WEB

*Figures are calculated assuming an average of gas at $3.63/ gal and average vehicle mileage of 26 mpg.

PHOTOS BY STEFANY OLIVAS | STAFF

(left) Commuters board the train at the downtown Albuquerque station. (right) Liberal Arts major Marie Duran commutes from downtown Bernalillo to Albuquerque for school.

Profile for The CNM Chronicle

Issue 4, Volume 18  

Issue 4 of Volume 18 of The CNM Chronicle

Issue 4, Volume 18  

Issue 4 of Volume 18 of The CNM Chronicle

Advertisement