Page 1

thecnmchronicle.wordpress.com

/cnmchronicle

Volume 18 | Issue 13 C

e

n

t

r

a

/cnmchronicle

Chronicle

l

N

The CNM

e

w

M

e

x

i

c

o

c

o

m

m

u

n

i

t

y

c

November 20, 2012 o

l

l

e

g

e

Thanksgiving 2012

Welding program space limited Pg. 2

Holiday drive Pg. 2

Thanksgiving on a budget Pg. 6-7

Fans of Film CafĂŠ Pg. 8


2 | The CNM Chronicle

CNM NEWS

November 20, 2012

Happy helpers: Executive Council of Students hosts toy, coat drive By Shaya Rogers Staff Reporter

PHOTO BY SHAYA ROGERS

ECOS President Stephen Martos and member Carrie Ratkevich assemble donation boxes for toy and coat drive.

The Executive Council of Students is working with local organizations to sponsor a coat and toy drive running Nov. 19 - Dec. 13. Donation boxes have been placed in all CNM Connect locations. New, unwrapped toys as well as new or lightly used coats will be donated to families in time for the holidays, said ECOS Admi n ist rat ive Officer Emily Sarvis. “We just wanted to make it easier for students to help families in need, and we are really excited to be able to involve all campuses,” she said. There are many mothers and fathers attending CNM, and she

Governing Board approves raise, bonus for President Winograd By Stefany Olivas Managing Editor

President Kathie Winograd’s total annual income will now be more than $260, 000 from a base annual salary of $212,000, because of a measure approved by the CNM Governing Board at the November meeting. The measure also increased Winograd’s annual retention bonus from five to 10 percent of her annual income. This puts Winograd’s salary $93,000 more than the average community college president. Community College presidents earn an average of $167,000, according to the American Association of Community Colleges recent study “Compensation and Benefits of Community College CEO’s: 2012.” Winograd directed all questions about the pay increase to

Marketing and Com mu n ic at ions Direct Brad Moore, who said this newest raise allowed her the same 3 percent recurring raise other employees received over the summer, but no other employees receive a retention bonus. The 2 percent PHOTO PROVIDED BY CNM.EDU non-recurring raise President Kathie Winograd. will become permanent if the school does not receive any are high priority for the state budget cuts by college,” said Moore. Dec. 31, 2012. C o m p u t e r The funds for Programming Major the raise come from Christopher Bayer said CNM’s operational the president’s new combudget, which is the pensation plan seems same account for all like too much money. employees, said Moore. The extra money Winograd may could be used to fix receive additional things around the income for meeting school or would be goals set by the gov- best if it went to the erning board through- faculty, said Bayer. out the year. “I can’t imagine her “The goals are yet to doing anything that actube determined by the ally demands that much board, but they’ll be monies worth of work. related to meeting performance measures that see RAISE on page 9

encourages them to see if they have any old coats in their closet, she said. She is excited to work with KOATs For Kids because there are families that cannot afford to buy their children coats, she said. “I really wanted to do the KOATs For Kids because it always seems like they help out so many kids and I’ve known a lot of people who have gotten winter clothes through donations,” she said. Sarvis said they are trying to make donating easy so students arrive at school five minutes early, drop off the items and get on with the day. ECOS has not decided which organization to donate the toys

to, but Sarvis said she is confident they will find one in great need. The council is researching many organizations to find the one that would best be helped by the toys, she said. The holidays can be tough on many, but all kids should still be able to experience this part of childhood, she said. “They already have to witness their parents being stressed and going through a hard time and I’m sure the kids are feeling the struggle too,” she said. T h e d o l l a r store is a great resource for students who do not have

much money, but would like to help out in some way, she said. “If you only have five dollars to spend, go buy five toys and think about how nice it would be for that kid who didn’t think he or she was going to get any toys for Christmas,” she said. People never know when they are going to be in a similar situation see HELPERS on page 9

Registration Woes Class options limit welding students’ progress By Jonathan Baca Senior Reporter

Students in the Welding program are finding it difficult, if not impossible, to register for required courses, said Full-time Welding Instructor Ron Hackney. After completing the first or second terms of their

structured qualifica- waiting list before I tion programs, many was even allowed to students who tried to sign up,” said Wessell. register for the spring Hackney said that semester found no many trade programs open seats and full like Welding have waiting lists for nearly become so popular that all of the required the school simply does courses, said Welding not have room for every major Austin Wessell. interested student. “When I tried to “There is a high register for my next demand to get into term classes, just and continue in this about every class was filled up and had a see WOES on page 9

PHOTO BY JONATHAN GAMBOA

Welding student Reynaldo Dominguez prepares a metal frame for his welding project.


CAMPUS BULLETIN Bulletins

November 20, 2012

The CNM Chronicle

|3

To submit items for Campus Bulletin, please email news item with a maximum of 150 words to: jonathan.chronicle@gmail.com or call 224-4755. Private Rooms for Mothers Lactation stations available:

Student Literary Magazine CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Westside/Rio Rancho Writing Group Meets to Share Writing LEONARDO, CNM’s and Inspiration

Main Campus

annual student arts and literary magazine, is now •Jeanette Stromberg Hall, Rm. accepting submissions of 312-G, 224-3000 poems, short stories, flash •Student Health Center, SSC fiction, creative non-fiction, Rm. 206, 224-3080 art, and photography until Feb. 2, 2013. Montoya Campus Writers: Submit Front desk staff provides access. written work in a single •I Building, Rm. 211, MS Word e-mail. There 224-5881 is no limit to the number •G Building, Rm. 201, of stories and poems 224-5516 submitted. •J Building Rm. 121, 224-5993 Artists: All art (paintings, sketches, South Valley Campus sculptures, ceramics, photos, etc.) must be Staff in Rm. 40 provides access. submitted digitally as a •SV Rm. 32, 224-5056 Photoshop, Illustrator, or PDF file (minimum 150 dpi Westside Campus resolution). Front desk staff provides access. •MJG Building

Allocation Board Accepting Membership Applications The Student Allocation Board is accepting member applications. Allocation Board meets monthly and distributes funds among student organizations for events, activities and equipment. Members must have a minimum 2.5 GPA. For more information contact James Roach at jroach8@cnm.edu.

Send all submissions to: Patrick Houlihan at houlihan@cnm.edu. Type “Leonardo” in the email subject line. Include name, address, and phone in the email message, and send from your CNM email account. LEONARDO is created by and for CNM students, and is edited and designed by CNM student volunteers; the magazine is published and distributed every April (National Poetry Month) with the generous support of CNM Student Activities.

The Westside/Rio Rancho Writing Group meets twice a month to share a love of creative writing and to inspire each other. The group spends the onehour meeting time doing short writing exercises, talking about writing and sharing their work with each other. Everyone who loves writing is invited to attend. Writers of all genres are welcome. November meetings are Nov. 28, from 4 to 5 p.m. at the Westside Campus in MJG101.

Comics for Commandos Donation Drive On Friday, Nov. 23 Kaboom Test Labs comic book store will be hosting a donation drive at 10250 Cottonwood Park Rd. St. E, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Comics for Commandos is Political Science Major Krisztina Greene’s nonprofit organization created to collect comic books, strategy games, magic cards, hero clix and travel board games for all branches of the military. All donations must follow military morality guidelines. For more information visit facebook.com/cfcnewmexico.

Law Access New Mexico Free Meals for Offers Free Individual Thanksgiving Week Consultations Low income CNM students who have legal issues or questions have a free civil legal service available to them. CNM has contracted with Law Access New Mexico for the provision of legal services to CNM students who fall within 200 percent of the federal poverty guidelines. Students may call Law Access directly – 998-4529 and identify themselves as CNM students; or Students may contact a Connect Achievement Coach to sign up for on-campus individual consultations. Law Access Attorney Sandi Gilley comes to each campus twice a month to meet with students in need of legal assistance. For more information about this free program, contact Law Access, NM directly at 998-4529 or contact CNM Connect Achievement Coach Chioma Heim at 224-4080.

ECOS Accepting New Members The Executive Council of Students is accepting new members. ECOS meets every Friday at 3:30 p.m. in ST12-A. For more information email smartos@cnm.edu.

Tuesday, Nov. 20 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. – Albuquerque Rescue Mission, 525 2nd St SW

Wednesday, Nov. 21 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. – Joy Junction, 4500 Second St SW Noon – Grace Thrift Store and Restoration Center, 4351 Coors SW Thursday, Nov. 22 7:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. – St. Martin’s Hospitality Center, 1201 3rd Street NW 8:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. – Good Shepard, 218 Iron Ave. SW 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. – La Mesa Presbyterian Church, 7401 Copper Avenue NE 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Joy Junction, 4500 Second St SW 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. – Project Share, 1515 Yale Blvd. SE 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. – Albuquerque Rescue Mission, 525 2nd St SW

Student Film Club Looking for New Members DAT, a student film group, has just formed and is looking for new members. The group creates student-led films. Students interested in making films are welcome. Students do not have to be in the film program to participate. Email Madison Coss at 11mcoss@ gmail.com for more information.

Classifieds Contact Information CNM Chronicle 525 Buena Vista SE, STE. 12B Albuquerque, NM 87106

Employment UNM is recruiting women with asthma for research study. If interested, please contact Tereassa at 269-1074 or tarchibeque@salud.unm.edu. WE MAY NOT BE THE BIGGEST BUT WE’RE THE BEST! And we have an IMMEDIATE opening for a positive, flexible and teamoriented Office Assistant to join our team in our conveniently located office in NE Albuquerque! Primary responsibility is data entry, but also filing, occasional phone work and occasional errands. Strong computer/typing skills, strong organizational and time management and good written/verbal communication skills required. Flexible part-time hours. E-mail your resume to deanna@pompeo.com. Come visit us today at www.pompeo.com or visit The Pompeo Group on Facebook.

Deadline 12 p.m. Thursday prior to publication

Bruce Warrington Phone: 505.224.3255 Fax: 505.224.4757

Classifieds may be submitted via email to: AdsCNMChronicle@gmail.com

CNM CHRONICLE

For Sale

NEED EMPLOYEES? WANT TO SELL SOMETHING? ADVERTISE WITH US.

Discounts for: • • • •

1996 Chrysler LHS, 4 door, 6 cylinder, cruise control, leather, power windows & door locks, $1,995, or best offer. Email me at rocketr2@comcast.net. To see photographs, go to Craig’s List Albuquerque. New Logitech Mk320 Cordless Keyboard/Mouse combo $25. Sfarmer7@cnm.edu

Students Staff Faculty Pre-pays

TI-84 +Silver, w/CD and cord, $149 in bookstore, will let go $60. Call Janice 717-7854.

Pricing

Payment

FREE to CNM students, faculty, and staff up to 15 words and $0.40 per word after. Regular Rates $0.40 per word. $3.00 per week for bold header.

For Rent For Rent Gold and 8th 1br1ba, 2br1ba apartments from $595. All utilities are included. Gated on-site laundry, freshly painted, new carpet, quiet one way street, pets welcome. 505-203-5365 or 305-975-0908.

Cash, Check or Credit Card MC, Visa, Amex, and Discover


4 | The CNM Chronicle The CNM Chronicle 525 Buena Vista SE, ST 12B Albuquerque, NM 87106 Fax: 224.4757 Copyright © 2012 The CNM Chronicle | This newspaper, its design and its contents are copyrighted. editorial | 224.4755 Jyllian Roach editor-in-chief jyllianchronicle@gmail.com Stefany Olivas managing editor stefanychronicle@gmail.com Steve “Mo” Fye copy chief sfye@cnm.edu newsroom | 224.4758 Jon Baca senior reporter jonathanbacachronicle@gmail.com Adriana Avila staff reporter adrianachronicle@gmail.com Daniel Johnson staff reporter djohnsonchronicle@gmail.com Shaya Rogers staff reporter shayachronicle@gmail.com Position available staff reporter jyllianchronicle@gmail.com production | 224.4752 Jonathan Gamboa production manager jonathan.chronicle@gmail.com Scott M. Roberts photojournalist srobertschronicle@gmail.com Jasmine Chavez layout designer jasminechronicle@gmail.com business | 224.3255 Bruce Warrington business manager bwarrington@cnm.edu Jodie Darrell-Salazar ad-sales manager jodiechronicle@gmail.com Brandy Valles distribution manager bvalles2@cnm.edu Shanee Sanchez distribution assistant ssanchez283@cnm.edu advisory | 224.3636 Jack Ehn faculty adviser jehn@cnm.edu

EDITORIAL Make it count Editorial By the CNM Chronicle Editorial Board

P r e s i d e n t Winograd’s retention bonus is too much money. As mentioned in this week’s article, “President of CNM receives pay raise,” the measure was approved in November’s Governing Board meeting to increase her retention bonus from five to 10 percent. This additional money would be a small but encouraging bonus for CNM faculty, who with the large amount of work and small amount of pay, need much more encouragement to stick around. It is good that she received a two percent non-recurring and three percent recurring raise, along with the rest of CNM employees, but there was no need for a raise in her retention bonus. The retention bonus increase alone adds up to more than an additional $21,000 annually on top of her regular salary. It would seem that her bonuses for achieving goals would be enough incentive to continue at the institution. These bonuses have yet been determined, and will be in addition to her more than $260,000 annual salary. As Full-time SAGE instructor and

Employee’s Union President Andy Tibble stated, in this week’s article, giving an employee in the education industry a bonus just for sticking around is an unusual practice. Especially since Winograd already makes more than the average community college president. This quick decision was a bold move to make considering many governing board seats are up for re-election in January 2013. President Winograd is not the only person whom they need to keep happy. She is also not the only one working to improve the CNM community. All staff and faculty have a part in forwarding the progress of the school, and should be rewarded more often. Every instructor, especially part-time, puts in many more hours than they are allowed to claim— they are on the frontlines of educating the community. Yes, Winograd has been with CNM for a long time, but not nearly as long as some staff and faculty who have been here for a decade or two. They need no cash incentive to hang around longer, so why does she?

November 20, 2012

Ten percent bonus?

“Thank you.” EDITORIAL CARTOON BY SCOTT M. ROBERTS

Angry Thanksgiving

opinion Views expressed in the Opinion page are those of the individual writer and do not necessarily represent the beliefs of all CNM Chronicle staff or Central New Mexico Community College.

CARTOONS BY SCOTT M. ROBERTS

Ted the turkey has different plans for Thanksgiving.

advertising

Champagne $10,000 Caviar $5,000

Twinkies $50,000

Advertising submissions are due by 12 p.m. the Thursday prior to publication. To submit an ad, or for more information, please contact Jodie Darrell-Salazar at AdsCNMchronicle@gmail.com. corrections The CNM Chronicle strives to publish only accurate and truthful information. If you believe you have found an error, please notify the CNM Chronicle by email at jyllianchronicle@gmail. com or call 505.224.4755. circulation

He he heh.

The CNM Chronicle is a weekly, student-run newspaper. It is printed by Vanguard Publishing Co. and circulated free of charge to all CNM campuses and the surrounding community.

-Life of Luxury-


OPINION

November 20, 2012

On minimum wages and living wages in Albuquerque and CNM 12 November 2012 Last week voters in the city of Albuquerque, by an unambiguous 2-1 margin, approved a $1 per hour increase in the minimum wage, taking it to $8.50 per hour and leaving little doubt about their feelings about the state of economic inequality that has come to define our nation. We wonder what the city electorate would think about the compensation for part-time faculty at Central New Mexico Community College. A part-time faculty member with a Ph.D. in the school of Communication, Humanities and Social Sciences earns just under $2,800 per course section. It doesn’t make any difference whether the doctorate was earned 30 days earlier or whether it has been followed by 30 years of experience. CNM compensation does not recognize seniority, years of loyal service, or career accomplishments. No part-time instructor has one scintilla of job security. They work semester-long contracts, with no assurance there will be courses to teach the following semester. The administration likes to define part-time compensation as a function of only in-class hours with students, actual face time in a classroom,

roughly 40 hours per course per semester. The calculation does not acknowledge time for course development, lesson planning, the preparation of student evaluations (tests, quizzes, essay assignments), grading those evaluations, course management duties, office hours, maintaining communication with students outside class, and for staying on top of the literature and other developments within one’s discipline(s). The actual time spent outside the classroom varies widely. Clearly less is spent on a course that is largely unchanged from the previous semester or for multiple sections of the same course. But for a variety of reasons, usually financial necessity, it is not uncommon for parttimers to teach multiple sections of, say, three separate courses, which shreds those economies. Those are the semesters when $8.50 per hour might constitute a pay increase if every workhour was compensated. The average number of courses for part-time faculty, any distribution of compensation, is guarded like a state secret at CNM, but if a part-time CHSS faculty member with a Ph.D. were to teach 10 sections per year—and few get that many—the

workload starts to look fulltime for a gross annual pay of $28,000. Many part-time faculty members work second jobs. The part-timers we know at CNM are dedicated, conscientious professionals who enjoy their work and do it well. And let’s be honest, you must be committed to education to work for compensation this lousy and no job security. CNM, like colleges and universities across the nation, survive on a contingent labor force in a market glutted with unemployed and underemployed professionals with advanced degrees. Administrators use those market realities to justify substandard compensation with a clear conscience. For students, it is powerful counterevidence to the endlessly parroted claim that a college education promises a good living. From our end, it is exploitation and we are willing to bet that any reasonable group of people, like the Albuquerque electorate, would agree. Seamus O’Sullivan, Ph.D. Co-signed by: Robert Anderson, Ph.D. Benay Blend, Ph.D. Felecia Caton Garcia, Ph.D. Marta Henrickson, Ph.D. (abd) Diane R. Layden, Ph.D. Geri Rhodes, Ph.D. (retired) Andy Russell, Ph.D.

Sun Cat Chit-Chat

The CNM Chronicle

|5

Published books written during NaNoWriMo S T T E Y T J O S C Y X D R S M P E B D B L L M P S T T T T T T W

R I O U E H A H H H H H A

H H Z J R O T C A F E N E B E H T I S P E V S R R A K E E E E E T

A V I D S D E

K I N E I E

B C G M N ER

B W A L O Y B V Y C U S O Z R N P V T G

E O Q D M Z G Q I O A I J Q U E J O N X

U E G R S S T E O O O I

PB O F OU TE O HE NE MP D VI GH FO

A I M G E T T O P O P B K U T T T M A H A W A S N F

N J O W M S N M I C A Y W S A Q V E H G

BE EN ITH CR CE MI REI FACT OUND PATE E T CI R EL

T I X L F E O E H G Y X U D E O N H P L

E V X L O C B F T H N C E D R V G T E H

LIVED E O L N O

V W V X E S G A M A R G O Z C X J A L H

T Y O H C W I I B I P C C S S B K K E W

J F T X N J F N C P L D L T U U P E R Z

R M I F E A T T G O U K O M O T V T O P

S Z U V T E H X D F T K A G R P K H F S

K I B X S G W N D T A L A N E Y B E R T

L I V V I E O W E N L I V E D H E R E Y

A D O N S F K U X T N O T H R H T E T G

I N E W R W L Y T S Q B T H U B O I A N

L H M O E W G L K W Y L E V M N N N W G

T M C G P S E C U K N M J M R P R S E A

N I A O G R N R S G S V L G E B Q M U Y

HERE

ATURES F MEMORY K AND HONEY S R

NT RCUS EPHANTS

Terrible puns! Atheism:

Unscramble the tiles to reveal a message.

Number Blocks - Hard

By Shaya Rogers

What are you least thankful for? Rosanna Ulibarri, Journalism “I’m least thankful for those celebrities that don’t need to be celebrities, like the Octomom. They get attention the wrong way. Octomom, she’s getting all this attention for having kids and not taking care of them. I think that’s bad publicity and she’s not using it for good.” Mahogani Lacy, Criminal Justice and Engineering “Weekend homework, because its due Monday and they know we’re not going do it until Monday morning.”

Try to fill in the missing numbers. Weston Marquez, Automotive Technology “I don’t care for the new music, I like old music. After 2002 music stopped being cool for me.”

The missing numbers are integers between 0 and 9. The numbers in each row add up to totals to the right. The numbers in each column add up to the totals along the bottom. The diagonal lines also add up the totals to the right.


HAPPY

6 | The CNM Chronicle

November 20, 2012

Thanksgiving dinner

Tired of the same old thing every Thanksgiving? Here are so low-budget cook. This meal, which served 12 people wit

By Jyllia

Cor nbr ead -Ch oriz oS tuffi ng

• Put 1 pound of chorizo (casings removed) in a 10- to 12-inch frying pan over medium heat until crumbly and brown. Transfer to paper towels to drain. • Cook carrots and celery until soft. • Pour a boxed cornbread stuffing mix, substituting half the water with chicken stock, into a casserole dish. • Add chorizo, vegetables, and ½ cup of butter and mix thoroughly. • Bake at 350 degrees for 35 minutes.

nch a R y Spic

Editor-I

• Cut 5 pounds of rus 2-inch chunks and of water until pot tender, about 20 mi • Drain potatoes and • Mix potatoes, 1 corn, 1 can cream 1 cup sour cream. • Add salt and pepper

ng i s s Dre

• In a food proc e s sor mix a bottle of ranch dressing, a ¼ cup fresh cilantro, a ¼ cup of fresh parsley, 1 teaspoon of Mexican oregano, 1 teaspoon of black pepper, 1 teaspoon of cumin and red chile to taste. • Blend.

Cranberry-Jalapeno Salsa • Empty a 12-ounce bag of fresh or frozen cranberries into a saucepan and transfer 1 cup to a small bowl. • Add 1 cup sugar, 1 strip of orange or lemon zest  and 2 tablespoons of water to the pan and cook over low heat, stirring occasionally, until the sugar dissolves and the cranberries are soft, about 10 minutes. • Increase the heat to medium and cook until the  cranberries  burst, about 12 minutes. • Reduce the heat to low and stir. • Add sugar, salt and pepper to taste. • Chop 1 cup raw cranberries  in a  food processor and add to cranberry sauce. • Stir in 1 thinly sliced jalapeno, 1 tablespoon lime juice and 1 teaspoon each honey and salt. • Let cool to room temperature. Just before serving, add 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro. • Goes great with tortilla chips or spread on dinner rolls.

Sp

• Add the pan drippings from the turkey to 2 cups of chicken stock. • Make a roux by cooking 2 tablespoons of butter and 2 tablespoons of flour in a saucepan on low heat until lightly brown. • Add the drippings an the roux and whisk. • Turn heat to med bring to a boil.


THANKSGIVING on a college budget

The CNM Chronicle

November 20, 2012

|7

ome great Southwestern style recipe ideas designed for the th leftovers, cost about $95 — less than $8 per person.

an Roach

In-Chief

sset potatoes into boil in 3 quarts tatoes are very inutes. then mash can sweet corn, and

Sou thw est mas hed pota toes

to taste.

REC

IPE

AND

CO O

KIN

GA

SSIS

TA N C

E BY

BRA

DS

PHO

TO S

CO U

RTESY

D E YO N A

G U N D L AC H A N D J A S O N A

e f

nd stock to . dium and

MA

N

• Add a liberal layer of turkey mix on top of the tortillas; continue to alternate until you have run out of turkey mix, making sure that the top layer is tortilla. • Add 2 pounds of cheddar on top • Bake at 350 degrees until the cheese on top is brown and bubbly.

Gre en B ean sw ith Pep itas

NDRE

• In a large pot, bring water to a boil – do not add salt. • Add 1 pound of cleaned, fresh green beans to the water and let boil until bright green, about 3-5 minutes. • Fry 1 ½ cups of pepitas in butter until they smell nutty. • Drain beans and immediately place in ice cold water for 3-5 seconds to stop cooking process. • Combine green beans, pepitas, a ½ of butter, and ½ tablespoon of cumin and fry for three minutes, tossing to coat.

WS

picy Turkey Gravy

y er s et

CHU

• Rub turkey in red chile powder and adobo with cumin. • Cook in oven at 325 degrees – time should be indicated on the package based on the bird’s weight. • Shred turkey meat and place in a large mixing bowl (Be sure to save the drippings if you are making the Spicy Turkey Gravy). • If you’re not interested in making a casserole, you can simply serve the turkey like this. • Add 2 cans of Cream of Chicken soup, 1 can Cream of Mushroom, 1 chopped yellow onion, 1 cup sour cream, 1 container thawed frozen green chile and 3 pounds of cheddar cheese. • Mix thoroughly. • Place a layer of yellow corn tortillas on the bottom of a large casserole dish.

Turk ey E nch ilad a Ca sse role

• • •

• Reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes. • Turn off heat and cover; gravy will thicken as it sits.

1 large can of pumpkin pulp (NOT pumpkin pie filling). Grease mediumsized casserole dish. Follow instructions on the can of pumpkin for pie, but do not place in a crust.

Wa rm

Pum pkin Pud din g


CAMPUS NEWS Coffee house opens near Main Campus

8 | The CNM Chronicle

By Jonathan Baca Senior Reporter

Small business owner Michael Palombo said he is on a mission to make the world a better place one cup of locally roasted coffee at a time. Fans of Film Café, located at 504 Yale SE, aims to bring together people who enjoy art, film, music, and good food with a new concept; the microcinema café, he said. Just a few minute’s walk from Main campus, Palombo said he hopes his coffee shop will bring good food to a neighborhood sorely in need of a community hang out. “I’ve been in this building for three years, and I had wanted to try

this idea of a micro-cinema café. I would like to bring better food closer to CNM, because there isn’t a lot of that around here,” said Palombo. Palombo said he is committed to keeping things local, serving locally roasted coffee, and organic burritos and pastries delivered daily from Santa Fe’s Chocolate Maven Café and Bakery. While the food and coffee will be top notch, Palombo said the main focus of the café is in the name. “The focus is definitely on film. We’ll have regular screenings here, and eventually we’ll be streaming old movies on the projector all day long,” he said. He said he plans to

November 20, 2012

have a monthly screening, focusing on small, independent and local films. Along with the screening will be an art show, premiering a new featured artist whose work will be on display all month. “You’re not just coming here to see a film. You’re going to get to see some art, hear some music, and have a great time. It pulls two crowds and two different art forms together,” he said. Fans of Film works closely with local artists’ co-op Cosmic Trading Post, said Palombo. Their first art show, organized by Priscilla Garcia, is a collection of paintings, drawings, and photographs donated by artists from the local

community and as far away as Massachusetts, said Garcia. The show was organized to benefit Chance Catz, cofounder of Cosmic Trading Post and owner of local music festival Three Sided Hole, who is battling cancer, she said. “The art has come from all over the community. Mike has been a part of Cosmic Trading Post, and now he is giving back,” said Garcia. Palombo’s roots in the local film scene go deep. Before its current incarnation as a café, Fans of Film provided resources and support to local productions and aspiring filmmakers, as well as offering a community for creative minds to meet, mingle

Main, South Valley Campus buildings to get updates staff had to deal with while the JS building was under construcStaff Reporter tion,” said Ulibarri. The L-Building on Main The windows, heating Campus and the main building system and cooling system will on South Valley Campus will also be updated for the South receive $10.5 million for renoValley building, she said. vations thanks to the passage The main building of Bond C, said Vice President which used to be an elemenof Finance and Operations tary school will be also be Katherine Ulibarri. remolded, she said. The L-Building, which “It is going to receive a facehouses the science lab classes, lift so it feels more like a colwill receive a larger percentage lege campus than an elementary of the funding to update the school,” she said. heating, cooling and ventilation The funds from Bond C will systems, she said. be used for these two projects “The students deserve a only, but it will not be enough comfortable working space that money, she said. is updated with state of the art The construction at equipment,” she said. South Valley Campus will be fully covered by Bond C, but the L-Building at Main Campus will also use local city bonds to be completed, she said. The renovations will be designed to meet Leadership in Energy and Environmental D e s i g n (LEED) Silver C e r t i f ic a t i o n , she said. “Thank you so very much to the students, faculty and staff PHOTO BY SCOTT M. ROBERTS for voting and Vice President Katherine Ulibarri discusses the Bond C funds that will make passing Bond C,” improvements to Main and South Valley campuses. said Ulibarri. By Daniel Johnson

The planning committee for this project will be formed by March, 2013 and will include Executive Director of Physical Plant Luis Campos and a member of Biology or Chemistry departments, she said. The project will take between two and three years to complete, she said The project may cause some disruptions to students, but that will be addressed by the committee and working situations will be set so students can still have access to the labs and class rooms while construction is ongoing, she said. “The situation will be similar to that of what the students and

and make connections, said Palombo. He said he has worked with many graduates from CNM’s film program. “CNM has a great film program, and I’ve seen a lot of students come through there and go on to do great things in the industry,” he said. Fans of Film is currently the subject of a documentary being shot by former student Chandra Brown. Brown said she had worked with Palombo on another film, and she felt her favorite coffee shop would be the perfect subject for her first documentary. “I was thinking about the most interesting people I knew, and I thought about

Michael, because he is a Renaissance man. I think it is important to celebrate your community, and I think this sort of thing is what makes a community strong,” said Brown. Music is also on the menu at Fans of Film, said Palombo. CNM students Jemie Alderman and Gwen Maitreya, members of the belly dancing troupe Cecile Amore, performed at the art show, and are planning a show in December to benefit Toys for Tots. “We love it here. It’s very cozy and intimate, and it’s just a great place to hang out. We’re really happy there is a place like this now so close to CNM,” said Alderman.

Disbursement Discrepancies, Part II Enrollment Services VP sets record straight By Daniel Johnson Staff Reporter

The Financial Aid office is working to speed up the process of disbursement to get financial aid out to students faster, said Associate Vice President of Enrollment Services Eugene Padilla. In response to Volume 18, Issue 8 “Disbursement Discrepancies” article, Padilla said he wanted to clarify the information provided by Director of Financial Aid Lee Carrillo and Director of Enrollment Services Glenn Damiani about how and why financial aid disbursement occurs. One way being considered to speed up disbursement is by switching to electronic processing, which could shorten the wait by two or three days, he said. The idea of giving students access to funds for buying supplies that cannot be purchased at the book store earlier than disbursement is something that is also being looked into, said Padilla. “If it makes a student more successful, then it is something worth discussing,” he said. A student dropping a class for lack of equipment is not something the school wants to happen, he said. He encouraged students facing that problem to speak with someone in CNM Connect or the Dean of Students Office. “There may be things that I cannot control, but if a student

needs help, they can always come see me,” he said. Carrillo and Damiani said in “Disbursement Discrepancies,” that the disbursement dates are set by state policy, which dictates financial aid checks being issued the fourth week of a term. Padilla said that state policies provide guidelines for disbursement dates, but the dates are not set by those policies. “It’s not their job to set the date, it’s ours,” said Padilla. The state census that Carrillo and Damiani referred to in “Disbursement Discrepancies,” is a record of student enrollment status, but is no longer the process that is used, said Padilla. Now, it is recorded by the enrollments status of students on the eleventh day of instruction, so there is no longer a need to wait for the state census, he said. All information on when and how much money is being released is processed through Banner — administrative software developed for higher education institutions to maintain financial and personnel data, he said. This helps to protect the integrity of the financial aid office, the college and the future aid of students, he said. “Our process is a way to prevent us from having to take back money from students and protect them from any negative outcomes like probation or financial aid suspension,” said Padilla.


November 20, 2012

Raise

Continued from Page 2

Especially while there are a lot of part-time teachers making hardly anything,” said Bayer. Admin ist rative positions do usually have a higher pay, but the salary is rarely justified by the amount and type of work done, said Bayer. CNM Governing members Blair Kaufman, Michael DeWitte, Robert Matteucci, Penny Holbrook, Deborah Moore, Mark Armijo and Janet Saiers collectively responded to questions in an email. They said that Winograd has proven herself as a president with high quality, integrity and leadership skills and that her

Woes

Continued from Page 2

program, so there are limited slots available. There is an issue with the classes getting filled up before students even have an opportunity to register,” said Hackney. Unlike other programs, trades are limited in the number of students that can attend because of limited space and equipment, he said. Hackney said he encourages students who are put on waiting

Helpers

Continued from Page 2

so helping others who are less fortunate is important, she said. “Maybe that kid who didn’t think they were going to get anything for Christmas can open up a toy car and I bet you they are going to love that toy car that you bought for one dollar,” she said. ECOS member Carrie Ratkevich said she knows that the holidays can be a difficult time for families and wants to ensure that people who do not have resources receive help. “There are people

CONTINUED actions during an historic period of high budget cuts and record enrollments was integral to this decision, they said. “Her contract reflects the Board’s continuing high expectations for performance and accountability as she executes her many challenging duties as CNM President,” they said. No members of the board have heard of anyone upset about the raise, but feel that the decision they made serves the community well, they said. “We would have the same answer for anybody inquiring about the President’s contract – The CNM Governing Board is in unanimous agreement

that President Winograd’s revised contract is in the best interests of CNM, its students, its faculty and staff, and our community,” they said. Full-time SAGE instructor and Employee’s Union President Andy Tibble said that he is most

concerned about the retention bonus that Winograd will receive. “Providing large sums in the form of bonuses tied only to the President remaining on the job is a peculiar practice. If the president merits a 10 percent increase in salary, then Governing

lists to wait and see if additional sections are added, and to communicate with their instructors about other possible options. “Nine times out of ten, our administration is all for adding new sections. The issue then is where to put them, because we do have limited lab space,” he said. Associate Dean of Applied Technologies Michael Cranney said that determining the number of sections to provide for each course is a complex

who are less fortunate and it doesn’t matter how little you have, you can always give something back – even if it’s just your time or your energy,” she said. Ratkevich found herself in need of help in November of 2009 as a single mother without a job. The experience gave her a personal connection to the project, she said. “You don’t worry about what you have for yourself, you worry that you don’t have anything for your kids. What are you gonna do for them for Christmas? You don’t

Board members should authorize the raise along with the rationale,” he said. Another concern Tibble had is the bonuses for Winograd to complete certain goals, and who will be involved in setting those goals— faculty, staff, and students or just executive

The CNM Chronicle

|9

level employees. “That introduces a possible conflict of interest into a pay for performance plan, I think,” said Tibble. He does congratulate Winograd on her good fortune and knows that she is appreciative of it, said Tibble. “The college

president is always going to make a nice salary, and right now she’s got that position and I think she’s thankful for that,” he said. Tibble said he agrees that she has done well with managing the college in the face of several budget cuts. “Kathie’s been good with college’s resources in terms of the funding for our institution; we went through years of cuts and there were no layoffs. People need to remember that,” said Tibble. Tibble agrees with the Governing Board that Winograd has done well in her time as president, and it is important for college to not have a high turnover rate with presidents, he said. “You want some

stability and you want to have the ability to have a plan and follow it through,” said Tibble. It is important for the board and president to remember that the school is not just an institution for higher learning, but also an employer to provide a decent living wage, said Tibble. “We have many employees who struggle to make ends meet and live pay check to pay check. The majority of faculty at the college are categorized as part time employees and they have little or no job security,” said Tibble.

balancing act involving several factors. The number of interested students, expected dropout rates, available instructors, and the limited amount of lab space and equipment all must be taken into account, he said. Cranney said that because of the amount of high paying jobs currently available in the industry, retention rates for the Welding program are unusually high, further limiting space. “If waiting lists are big enough, we will

open up new sections. The hours may not be perfect for students, but if that is really what they want to pursue, we’re going to see what we can do to help them,” said Cranney. Hackney said that demand is high enough that the school could drastically increase the size of the program and still fill every class. However, he said this may not be in the students’ best long-term interests. “The program could probably be double the size it is

now. The problem is will the industry support that many welders? We don’t want to be a program that graduates students who then can’t find jobs,” said Hackney. Cranney said the Welding program is planning to hire one full-time and several part-time instructors to help meet student demand. There are no plans to add to existing lab space. “Now we’re kind of maxed out on physical space available to us,” said Cranney.

Hackney said he is proud of the program, and feels that too many students is a good problem to have. “And if we can’t get you into the labs, there are other classes, like Arts and Sciences, you can take to meet your certificate or degree requirements. So it doesn’t have to be a totally wasted term,” said Hackney.

have anything for them and that is really hard,” she said. The group wants to donate to people that have little to nothing and are essentially starting all over, she said. “I know it’s something that would help a lot of people,” she said. Having ECOS help turn her idea into a reality has been rewarding and she hopes to collect enough for many different families, she said. “I want to do this for other people. That’s where the idea came from. I proposed it and everybody was really supportive,” she said.

She wants CNM students to get involved and realize that many families are having a really difficult time, not just for the holidays, but throughout the year, she said. “ U n for tu nately many people, including myself, forget that other people are around. If you can’t look past yourself to help the greater good than you are not helping anybody including yourself, you are actually hurting yourself,” she said. Donations of coats and toys can be

dropped off at any CNM Connect location.

“You want some stability and you want to have the ability to have a plan and follow it through,” said Tibble.

For Connect locations call 224-3186.


ADVERTISEMENT

10 | The CNM Chronicle

November 20, 2012

HOW WOULD IT FEEL TO GET

UP TO100% COLLEGE TUITION? As a member of the Air National Guard, you’ll receive up to 100% college tuition assistance. Plus, you’ll develop the real-world skills you need to compete in today’s economy. And because you serve part-time, you can work or go to school full-time. All while receiving a regular paycheck and affordable insurance coverage.

Talk to a recruiter today to learn more. GoANG.com/NM

1-800-TO-GO-ANG

12214 ANG NM CNM Chronicle Ad 5.25x7.74 bw.indd 1

Induction Dec. 1

nturner4@cnm.edu

10/18/12 11:26 AM


November 20, 2012

ADVERTISEMENT

The CNM Chronicle

| 11

How Can You Earn More When You Graduate? Learn more while in college. The challenging, in-depth education you receive at SUVA is far from easy - just worthwhile. SUVA’s internship opportunities and working, professional instructors are just part of the educational experience you need to stand out when you graduate. BA/ Graphic Design . Animation Illustration . Interior Design

Advertising & Marketing

BFA/ Photography . Fine Arts

Call today and learn more. 254 -7575 or suva.edu SUVA has the same accreditation as traditional universities and welcomes transfer credits.

Call for World News!

DISCOVER JOURNALISM

Start your career with

Chronicle The CNM

Are you from somewhere Now accepting applications for other than Albuquerque? Staff Reporter The CNM Chronicle wants to know what is going on in your home town, state or country. Contact stefanychronicle@gmail.com

Gain professional experience in Journalism.

Applicants must:

• Be work-study qualilfied • Have passed ENG 1101 with a B or higher • Have at least three terms remaining at CNM

Email your resume to jyllianchronicle@gmail.com


12 | The CNM Chronicle

FEATURE

November 20, 2012

Black Friday deals without getting trampled Frockstar Vintage Clothing Store By Adriana Avila Staff Reporter

Black Friday, that special time of the year when arguments ring out like carols throughout mega store parking lots, when festive brawls for the year’s hottest items are in season, and loss of sleep for the year’s top deals is an acceptable trade-off. People travel far from their homes for these kinds of deals when there are the same types of deals are around the corner. Nob Hill is a prime example of shopping locally where deals are easily found and the satisfaction of the prize is the same. Shopping locally can pay off big. Here are a few stores that prove commercial businesses are not the only stores who participate with the Black Friday holiday.

Birdsong Used Books 1708 Central Ave SE, 87106 Birdsong is holding a week long Black Friday sale that began on Nov. 19. All items in the store are 20 percent off. The store will be open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For more information visit birdsongusedbooks.com.

115 Harvard Dr. SE Frockstar’s sale will begin on Black Friday and run through the holiday season. All clothing will be 30 percent off the marked prices. Items in the store range from $5-$35 regularly. Frockstar will be open from noon to 6 p.m. For more information visit frockstarvintage.com.

The Zone 2222 Central Ave SE, 2505 San Mateo Blvd NE Self Serve Sexuality Resource Center

Free Radicals 300 Yale Blvd SE Free Radicals Black Friday sales will be a secret until Friday. The sales will also include a Crafter’s Fair. Local artists and crafters will be setting up shop to sell their wares. Free Radicals will be open from noon to 5 p.m. on Black Friday. This year is the first year since the ir opening that the store will be open on Black Friday. For more information visit freeradicalshq.com

3904B Central Ave. SE Self Serve is holding a Black Friday weekend sale of all the items in the store. The biggest sale will be buy one get one half off on all the sex toys. The store carries body treats, chocolate, books, sex toys, safer sex supplies, videos, and there are going to be things that will be priced for one dollar. They will have regular business hours from noon to 8 p.m. and Sunday noon to 6 p.m. They will also participate with Nob Hill Shop and Stroll. For more information visit selfservetoys.com.

337 Eubank Blvd NE Black Friday at The Zone will include piercing sales and general items throughout the store like clothing and tobacco items, but not tobacco itself. There will also be discount prices for tattoos –$200 for three hours of tattooing. The biggest Black Friday sale is a gift pack with a hand scale, some paper, a lighter, and hand pipes. The price varies from each of the gift packs from $20 and up. The Zone will be open from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. For more information visit thezonegiftshop.com

Lovelight Boutique

Astro-Zombies Comic Shop 3100 Central Ave. SE Astro-Zombies will offer buy three get one free for graphic novels, buy two get one free for T-shirts, toys and collectibles will be on sale too. The day after Black Friday is Small Business Saturday and Astro-Zombies will also participate with sales on that day. They will be participating with the Nob Hill Shop and Stroll. Astro-Zombies will be open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information visit astrozombies.com.

147 Harvard Dr. SE On Black Friday there will be a buy one get one free on everything in the store. There will be extended hours from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. There is also an on-going pre-Black Friday sale of buy two get one free. The store is half thrift store, half original designs from owner Bill Fort. They have a variety of casual, business and evening wear. Prices range from $5-$45. Lovelight Boutique will be open 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. For more information visit Lovelight Boutique on Facebook.

Profile for The CNM Chronicle

Issue 13, Volume 18  

Issue 13 of Volume 18 of The CNM Chronicle

Issue 13, Volume 18  

Issue 13 of Volume 18 of The CNM Chronicle

Advertisement