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Important changes coming this fall Both CNM and the federal government have made some big changes that will affect students beginning in the fall term, according to an email sent by the Financial Aid Department. time after July 1, 2012, who do not have a high school diploma, GED or state homeschool completion, are no longer eligible for the Pell Grant. Previously, students could still receive financial aid after passing an approved test or by successfully completing six college-level classes.

The previous aid limit of nine years has been shortened to 600 percent, or six years. For students attending school full time yearround, that means they must complete their undergraduate studies in six years. For students attending year-round part time, Repayment the limit would be 12 incentives eliminated years. It is important to The U.S. Federal note that while this is effective as of the fall term, Government can no longer it backdates for all current offer incentives for students students. Students can find repaying loans. their current percentage Direct loan by visiting nslds.ed.gov. interest rate raised Student loan The new fixed annual repayment grace interest rate for Direct period discontinued Subsidized loans is now 6.8 percent. This will Students will no longer remain in effect through receive a six month grace 2013. The precious interperiod for loan repayment est rate was 3.4 percent. after completing undergraduate studies for any loans Transcript borrowed after July 1, 2012. verification now Loan repayment will now required begin immediately after Students applying for leaving school. This does not the Pell Grant must turn affect loans received before in a transcript from all July 1, 2012. For students previous post-secondary receiving a post-graduate degree, loans must be pay education institutions to be eligible for financial aid. on while attending school. Appointment needed to Family income see academic adviser eligibility limit lowered

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“Mothers bring in their own pumps and lock the door so they don’t get Business interrupted. They can sit Manager comfortably, read some L a c t a t i o n magazines and then leave,” station services have been said Brittenham. Achievement Coach expanded to more CNM campuses for students, fac- Chioma Heim said she realulty, and staff who need ized how desperately CNM to pump breast milk, said needed to raise awareness Student Health Center about lactation stations when she returned from Director Marti Brittenham. Private rooms can be maternity leave and had reserved at no cost with difficulty finding a place to no requirements or paper- pump in private. “I didn’t know where work in order to pump to go. My office is all glass milk, said Brittenham.

The Academic Advisement Office, located in the Student Services Center room 203, will no longer accept walk-in appointments in an effort to cut down on student wait times. Appointments can be made with an adviser by calling 224-4321.

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Volume 17 | Issue 38

Lactation stations now available By Stefany Olivas

Managing Editor

Students enrolling in school for the first

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Private rooms provided for breastfeeding mothers

By Jyllian Roach

Ability to Benefit eligibility changes

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thecnmchronicle.wordpress.com

FYI

A student’s Expected Family Contribution is automatically zero only if the family earns less than $23,000 a year rather than the previous limit of $32,000.

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Financial Aid Changes

Pell Grant recipients will be allowed only six total years of aid

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Chronicle

07/10 - 07/16/12

www.cnm.edu

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and other offices still had for years on campus, but the little sliver of window this is first time intentional on them I would try to plans were made to expand cover,” said Heim. to multiple campuses, said It is important for the Multi Campus Director people to know that there Jennifer Cornish are places to go in order to She said she has been pump breast milk, she said. working with Student “Women need to be able Success Team Leaders the to pump and feed their kids. past six months to make It’s uncomfortable to be in a the stations more available. place feeling like you can’t A station in the Jeannette properly provide for your Stromberg building is the family. I knew I wasn’t the only one that is not open yet only person who needed to and stations at Rio Rancho pump,” said Heim. Lactation stations have been operating informally see LACTATION on page 7

Where to pump Montoya Campus:

South Valley Campus: 6) SV, room 40

3) Staff at front desks provide access

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7) SV, room 32

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4) I building, room 211 5) G building, Room 201

GRAPHIC BY JONATHAN GAMBOA | STAFF

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CNM South Valley Campus

CNM West Side Campus

Westside Campus 8) Staff at front desk provide service 9) MJG Building, Room 201-C

CAMPUS MAPS FROM CNM.EDU

CNM Main Campus

Main Campus: 1) Janet Stromberg Hall, Room TBA 2) Student Services Center, Room 206

A look inside:

“Savages” Review Entertainment Pg. 5

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2 | the CNM Chronicle the

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Chronicle 525 Buena Vista SE, ST 12B Albuquerque, NM 87106

Views expressed in the Opinion page are those of the individual writer and do not necessarily represent the beliefs of all CNM Chronicle staff or Central New Mexico Community College.

Staff Editorial Paula Bauman editor-in-chief paulachronicle@gmail.com, 224.4755 Jyllian Roach managing editor jyllianchronicle@gmail.com, 224.4755 Steve “Mo” Fye Copy Chief sfye@cnm.edu, 224-4755

Newsroom Scott M. Roberts Photojournalist sroberts25@cnm.edu, 224.4758 Jodie Darrell staff reporter jodiechronicle@gmail.com, 224.4758

Production Bradley Pearson Production Manager bpearson4@cnm.edu, 224.4752 Jonathan Gamboa layout designer jgamboa8@cnm.edu, 224.4752

B usiness

CAMPUS BRIEFS CNM Expresses Condolences A member of the CNM community passed away on June 27 – Eric Johnson, who had been a multimedia specialist in Media Production Services at CNM since 2000. Prior to joining CNM, Eric was a videographer and photojournalist for KOB Channel 4. He was also an avid songwriter and played in many local bands. Eric was a 1979 graduate of Eldorado High School, where he was a varsity athlete in wrestling, football and track and field. He attended the University of New Mexico on a wrestling scholarship and graduated from UNM with a bachelor’s in Film/Communications. CNM expresses its deepest condolences to Eric’s family, friends and colleagues. He will be dearly missed.

Student Appointments Required for Academic Advisement Beginning Monday, July 9, students who would like to see an Academic Advisor must now make an appointment. The new system will help to reduce long lines of walk-in students. Students can make an appointment by calling 224-4321.

Governing Board Meeting July 10 Moved to South Valley Campus

Changes to Ability to Benefit Requirements

July 10 - 16, 2012

Preparations for Demolition of Buena Vista Properties Under Way

Beginning with the 2012-13 The regular monthly CNM academic year, only students The houses on the northeast Governing Board meeting with a high school diploma, corner of Buena Vista and Coal will take place on July 10 GED, or students who have been that are owned by CNM are at the South Valley Campus. home schooled will meet the being prepared for demolition. It was originally scheduled ATB requirement. Please obey all signs and fencing for Westside Campus. The Passing scores on an ATB in the area as construction September Governing Board test (e.g. , the Accuplacer) crews work at the property. meeting is scheduled to be held or successful completion of 6 Students in Science, at Westside Campus. college-level courses will no Technology, Engineering longer be acceptable. Students and Math Fields Invited Monthly Dunkin’ Donuts who have passed the ATB test to Check Out UNM Rust Scholarship Fundraiser or successfully completed 6 Set for July 12 college level hours by June CNM students interested 30, 2012, will continue to in pursuing bachelor’s degrees The Dunkin’ Donuts/Baskin be eligible under the ATB in the science, technology, Robbins on the corner of Central requirement. engineering and math (STEM) Ave. and Mesa St., just north of A homeschooled student is a fields are invited to join a Main Campus, will be donating a student whose parents (or parent) portion of its sale proceeds to the have registered their child with “STEM UP Walk-about” at the Rust Opportunity Scholarship every their state of residence. University of New Mexico on second Thursday of the month – the July 27. next opportunity is July 12. Students Excel at Students will visit the The Rust Scholarship National Competition UNM Biology Department, provides emergency financial Engineering Department, assistance to CNM students 25 CNM students competed Student Union Building and who are facing unexpected in the National SkillsUSA other student services locations. financial difficulties. If you Championships and continued The tour is part of a present a flyer from the CNM the College’s long tradition CNM-UNM grant-funded Foundation upon purchase, 20 of outstanding performances partnership called Science, percent of the proceeds from during the prestigious event. Technology, Engineering and your purchase will be donated Fourteen students placed in Mathematics Undergraduate to the scholarship fund. the top 10 of their categories Pathways (STEM UP). For This donation will only and two brought home medals more information, or to take place at the above Dunkin’ from the largest competition RSVP to attend the event, Donuts location and you must for career technical education emailstemup@unm.edu. present a flyer upon purchase. students in the country.

To submit items for Campus Briefs, please send an email to cnmchronicleads@cnm.edu or call 224-4755.

DISCOVER

Stefany Olivas Business Manager stefanychronicle@gmail.com, 224.3255

JOURNALISM

Larraine Shelly-Becenti ad-sales Manager lshellybecenti@cnm.edu, 224.3255 Brandy Valles distribution manager bvalles2@cnm.edu, 224.3255

Advisory

A dvertising Advertising submissions are due by 12 p.m. the Thursday prior to publication.To submit an ad, or for more information, please contactAlejandro Gomez at CNMChronicleAds@cnm.edu.

Start your career with

Now accepting applications for Editor-in-Chief 2012-2013

C orrections The CNM Chronicle strives to publish only accurate and truthful information. If you believe you have found an error, please notify the CNM Chronicle by e-mail at pbauman2@cnm.edu or call 505.224.4755.

C irculation The CNM Chronicle is a student-run newspaper created, written, and designed by the students of CNM. It is published weekly during academic terms byVanguard Publishing Co. and circulated free of charge to all CNM campuses and the surrounding community.

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OPINION

Editorial cartoon by Scott M. Roberts

Suncat Chit-Chat

What do you think of the new lactation stations on campus? By Scott M. Roberts Photojournalist

“I think it is a good idea, because when mothers are full they need to let their milk out so they don’t go dry.” Alicia Benavidez Criminology

“I think it’s great because there are a lot of young mothers trying to go to school, and it makes it more convenient for them to have something here to use without leaving the school.” Brittany Byrne Early Childhood Education

“I think that is a great idea for moms who have to keep on going to school because I just had my daughter last week. Pumping is actually good. I was worried that I would have to in the bathroom. That’s awesome.” Samantha Atler English

“It’s a good thing. There are a lot of students here who have kids so they need a room to take care of their kids.” Shannon Pollard Liberal Arts

the CNM Chronicle

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Letter to the Editor: In regards to ‘Leonardo Scruitinized’

Someone recently made me aware of the May 22 Chronicle article on Leonardo, CNM’s literary magazine. Some pretty inflammatory statements and accusations were made in that article. I would like an opportunity to put in my two cents. I’m not likely to make any friends with the following testimony, but I am more interested in truth than gaining allies. I will state my case without naming names, at least for now. Did some editors saturate the 2012 edition of Leonardo with their work? I believe so. I was not in support of the large number of pieces per editor in Leonardo. I was fairly vocal about it among select friends, classmates, and CNM instructors—and my wife certainly got more than an earful. Should I have been more vocal within the editorial staff, and with Patrick Houlihan, the faculty advisor for Leonardo? With the glorious gift of hindsight, yes. Well, here comes a big nasty secret; I did not care much for my coeditors on a professional level. I often exercised silence as a means of maintaining a professional relationship and not losing my temper. When it comes to negotiations I generally have two settings: peacemaker, and Tasmanian Devil. I tend to err on the side of passiveness when no one’s health, well-being, or civil liberties are at stake. In retrospect, I should have been more vocal, but I was just trying to keep the peace and get the magazine out. The Chronicle article stated that James Roach of the Allocation Board feels that more than two published works by an editor is too many. Perhaps he is correct. Why do I have five published works in the 2012 edition? I submitted six fine art photos, another photo of a woodcarving I made, and three literary works. I didn’t submit all of those items because of any kind of ego trip, but because I always advocate for variety— the more options, the better. Although I have some artistic accomplishments under my belt, anyone who knows me will tell you that I don’t take myself

too seriously. I don’t think anyone should take themselves too seriously, and I don’t keep the company of those who do. Of all my submissions, one literary work and three photos were published. More of my photos were approved but I voted against their inclusion because I felt it was wrong for an editor to have so many works published. What about the cover, you ask? I threw it together one evening so we would have something to fall back on if we didn’t receive any cover submissions. In fact, we didn’t. The article lists 243 total submissions. I don’t know where this number came from. I looked back through my Leonardo-related e-mails at the submissions and counted 113 literary works, and 54 art pieces—a grand total of 167. In all, 22 authors were published out of 32 applicants. Some works had to be rejected solely for excessive length. Patrick Houlihan advised us that previous editions were kept in the low 60’s for page count because of limitations for stapling or binding. This is where our page count came from. I’ll admit that 17 published works of art looks bad compared to 54 submitted, but four of those rejected were mine, and 14 others came in an anonymous .zip file without attribution. Others were of poor resolution quality. We simply didn’t have a lot to work with. By comparison, the 2011 edition had 80 published works of art. I petitioned Patrick Houlihan and the editorial staff to push back the deadline for submissions, and despite some opposition the request was approved. For the sake of conjuring up more material, I made announcements in my classes, sent e-mails to students who I knew had literary or artistic talent, asked instructors to make announcements in their other classes, and accosted people in the hallways if I saw them carrying a portfolio. Unfortunately, very little came of my frantic campaigning. I made further efforts to level the playing field. After initial editorial voting I noticed that one person

submitted five literary works without a single one being chosen, and suggested that we include at least one, which we did. Another author submitted two works which were also not selected, but I strongly advocated for the inclusion of one as I found it to be an exceptional work of fiction, and it eventually made the issue. Furthermore, many of the literary works I voted for were left out, and several I voted against were included. Such is the democratic process. Allocation Board member James Roach had some strong opinions on the 2012 edition of Leonardo. I will agree with him that guidelines should be put in place for Leonardo editors. I will also agree that certain aspects of the last issue are distasteful. However, I will strongly disagree with Mr. Roach that I took advantage of any student organization. I tried my damned best to include more people and works, to better represent the full spectrum of talent within CNM, and to provide a public outlet for aspiring writers and artists. Despite the allegations of Mr. Roach, I personally don’t need Leonardo to feel important. I am an accomplished photographer, artist, and writer. My selfish gains as he calls them consist of being able to add editor and cover design to a resume, a lot of lost sleep, some heartburn, and a few more gray hairs. I don’t appreciate him including all Leonardo editors in his negative blanket statements, as not everyone was deserving of this condemnation. I was compelled to respond to this article because I have a reputation for being an honest, helpful, and nice individual. I consistently assist both students and faculty in numerous ways, occasionally to my detriment. I simply could not stand by and have this reputation tarnished by someone making a blanket statement based on incomplete information. Thank you for your time. Sincerely, Joel Wigelsworth Leonardo 2012 Co-Editor

Filled with thoughts, but unable to share them? Itching to tell the world what you think?

Spending sleepless nights wishing you could express yourself to others?

You Could Be suffering From Repressed Opinion Syndrome

(ROS) This virulent disease has has claimed countless intelligent people just like yourself in its cold and terrible grasp. Ask your doctor about

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Strike out against Repressed Opinion Syndrome and let your voice be heard!

Opinions can be emailed to: pbauman2@cnm.edu.

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4 | the CNM Chronicle

ARTS

July 10 - July 16, 2012

PHOTO BY SCOTT M. ROBERTS | STAFF

The Albuquerque Little Theatre building, located at 224 San Pasquale SW, will be hosting “Spring Awakening” July 19 - 29.

Community theatre gets edgy Summer musical a first for Albuquerque

By Paula Bauman Editor-in-Chief

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lbuquerque Little Theater is preparing for the premiere of “Spring Awakening,” a controversial musical that will appeal to a different demographic, said Executive Director Henry Avery. The Little Theater, best known for its “Family Theatre Series,” will feature “Spring Awakening” from July 19 – 29 because the theater seeks to serve the entire community while being respectful of audiences’ diverse tastes and feelings, said Avery. “Not every show is for everybody,” said Avery. Director and Stage Manager Ryan Jason Cook said he hopes the musical will elevate community theatre as a whole by pushing the community theater mentality into the professional realm. He expects the show to evoke mixed emotions from audiences, said Cook. “Some will feel passionately in love and strive for those in-your-face emotions and sexuality while others will not even make it through Act 1,” said Cook. Avery said it has been important to be honest with theater patrons about the mature content of the Rrated coming of age musical and that variety is important. While the show does contain strong language and sexual situations, Cook is taking things in a more

artistic direction to convey certain scenes, he said. Although “Spring Awakening” was originally written in the 19th century, the issues it addresses are still very relevant, said Cook. The musical is an adaptation of the play by the same name, written by German playwright Fred Wedekind. It follows Wendla Bergmann as she enters adolescence. Wendla has many questions in an era where children are not encouraged to ask questions. Throughout the musical, Wendla and her friends confront sexuality, puberty, rape, and what it means to come of age. “Human sexuality has not changed. It’s just more in-your-face now. At that time, people had very repressed feelings. This show is about dealing with those feelings,” said Cook. Dual-enrollment student, ensemble member and Wendla Bergmann understudy Michaela Bateman likes that the Little Theater’s version of the musical not only brings an absorbing story of life, death, identity and adolescence to audiences, but that also addresses these issues in a way that the audience can relate and connect to the characters, she said. “I find it easy to identify emotionally with the characters in “Spring Awakening,” but it’s sad to think of friends who faced some of the same issues, which just makes me realize how important this show is,” said Bateman.

The show will focus more on content than shock value because that is not necessary to make it powerful, said Avery. “There are multiple dimensions. It is a spectacle, but there are also a lot of straight scenes that drive things and flesh out the story line,” said Cook. Bateman said being a part of the rehearsal process has taught her so much about acting, singing and professionalism in general. “I know that I will leave the show with lessons learned, lasting friendships and great memories of being involved in an extraordinary show,” said Bateman. “Spring Awakening” will also be the first performance to christen Albuquerque Little Theater’s new stage, said Avery The theater received a $25,000 grant from PNM for the renovations and the remainder of the cost was donated by patrons, said Avery. The theater board members are deeply thankful for these generous contributions and wishes to express their gratitude, said Avery. The construction has allowed the cast of “Spring Awakening” to have more time to rehearse and better prepare for the show, said Avery. The theater will hold an open dedication on July 29 that will include tours, information, refreshments and entertainment from the cast of “Spring Awakening” and past productions.

Doing something

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Albuquerque Little Theatre Presents:

“Spring Awakening” Rated R

Show Times July 19-29 Thursday-Saturday: 8:00 p.m. Sundays: 6:00 p.m. Tickets Adults: $24 Seniors 62 and up: $21 Students 13 and up: $18 Tickets can be purchased at the Albuquerque Little Theater Box Office Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. or online at albuquerquelittletheater.org

Albuquerque Little Theatre 2012/2013 Season

“Main Stage Series” “9 To 5: The Musical”– October 19-November 11, 2012 “It’s a Wonderful Life” – November 20-December 24, 2012 “LA Aux Folles” – March 1-24, 2013 “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” – April 12-18, 20123 “The Producers” – May 24-June 16, 2013

“Family Theatre Series” “The Hobbit” – September 14-20, 2012 “Little Women” – January 18-February 3, 2013

We want to hear about it.

Tell us about your creative projects so we can feature YOU in our Arts and Entertainment Section. Send emails to pbauman2@cnm.edu


ENTERTAINMENT ‘Twelfth Night’ shines at Vortex

the CNM Chronicle

July 10 - July 16, 2012

By Jodie Darrell and Jyllian Roach Staff Reporter and Managing Editor

PHOTO BY SCOTT M. ROBERTS | STAFF

The cast of “Twelfth Night” rehearses for the play at The Vortex Theatre.

The Vortex Theatre’s production of Williams Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night” is entertaining, witty and saturated with a dazzling cast. Director Brian Hansen’s decision to set the play in post-World War I Italy breathed fresh relevancy into the 400-year-old work. Filled with hilarious antics, “Twelfth Night” can seem chaotic at times, but in the end carries a well-received message about gender roles and life in a man’s world. The play was a smashing success and the laughter was contagious. Caitlin Aase, who plays gender-bending Viola, delivers the role with incredible grace and understanding. As Viola masquerades as manly Cesario, Aase makes it as easy to forget that a woman is playing the part. When returning to the very feminine Viola, Aase is equally effective.

Charles Fisher is absolutely delightful as the taciturn Malvolio, who has become enamored of the Countess Olivia, played by Jessica Record. The scene in which Malvolio dons canary yellow stockings, in a mistaken attempted to prove his love for the countess, is perfectly – and hilariously – delivered by Fisher. Even the actors with minor roles, like CNM TRiO Adviser Rob Carriaga as the Holy Father and Linda Williams as gentlewoman Maria, offer shining performances in just a few short lines. Hansen bolsters the stage time for the minor characters with the addition of an incredible scene. In between a few of the main scenes, the then-common practice of passing a love letter through a fence gives the opportunity for the lineless ladies-in-waiting to spend time each as the only character on the stage. This ingenious bit offers insight into Hansen’s creativity and consideration for every cast member.

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“Twelfth Night” is the story of Viola and Sebastian (played by Billy Trabaudo), who are twins separated in a shipwreck and who each believe the other dead. In order to survive, Viola dresses herself up as a page named Cesario in the Dukes court. Soon after, Sebastian arrives in town and mistaken identity ensues. Add in three separate love triangles and what occurs is comedy gold. Overall, the entire production has the kind of comic drama that can only be found in a Shakespeare play. The cast played the roles with precision and execution worthy of the Bard of Avon. It is a must see. “Twelfth Night” runs Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday through July 15 at the Vortex Theater, located at 2004 ½ Central Ave. Student tickets are $10 at the door. For more information, call 247-8600 or visit vortexabq.org.

Sex, drugs and violence galore: ‘Savages’ is a hit By Jonathan Gamboa Layout Designer “Savages” is a typical drug-influenced, violent Oliver Stone film that lives up to the adrenaline rush action-thriller genre to which it belongs. The movie portrays two marijuana growers — peace loving humanitarian Ben (Aaron Johnson, “Kick Ass,” “Shanghai Knights”) and ex-Navy Seal Chon (Taylor Kitsch, “Friday Night Lights,” “X-Men Origins: Wolverine”) — duking it out with a Mexican cartel. O (Blake Lively, “Green

Lantern,” “The Town”) narrates the story of Ben and Chon, two best friends who create an ingenious marijuana business, and share O as their girlfriend. When O is kidnapped by the Baja Cartel, led by Elena La Reina (Salma Hayek, “Puss in Boots,” “Frida”), the two marijuana growers go on a rampaging spree of revenge. The love triangle among Ben, Chon and O drives the plot of the movie, but is awkward at best as it bogs down the action with too much love story filler. O serves as the glue that holds the two best friends together, as well as a pawn in Elena’s struggle for survival in the drug trade. Her narration adds a basic

background element to the element to the film. The movie, so that the audience can actors deliver a true emounderstand how the marijuana tional dialogue throughout business and Elena’s cartel the movie while still mainbegan and ultimately ended. taining a professional compoThough this was ben- sure with each other. eficial to the plot of the story, The only awkward acting the movie could do with- was from Hayek, because she out the narration, as it dis- did not fit the role of a drug tracted from the emotions felt kingpin. She made up for it by between the characters. having her henchman do all the The violence in the movie dirty and violent work. can get overly gruesome in Over all “Savages,” satisfies some scenes, but it definitely and fills the role of being one of clarifies Elena’s desperation, the best down-to-earth violent as her cartel is on the brink of action films of the summer, withfalling apart at the hands of her out being too over-zealous in the right hand man, Lado (Benicio drug aspect. Del Toro). The CNM Chronicle gives DEA Agent Dennis, “Savages” four out of five bulletplayed by John Travolta, and riddled marijuana leaves. drug bandit Lado, added a much-needed comedic IMAGE COURTESY UNIVERSAL PICTURES | UNIVERSALPICTURES.COM


6 | the CNM Chronicle

STUDENT LIFE

July 10 - July 16, 2012

Fire Safety

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY SCOTT M. ROBERTS | STAFF

Bible study group sets sights on expanding to CNM By Jonathan Gamboa Layout Designer

Inter Varsity provides a community of students from the CNM and UNM area who love Jesus and want to grow and serve him in a way that also benefits the community through extensive bible study, community service and fun faith building activities, said group leader Nathan Layman. For the 35 regular student members, participation in the bible study groups throughout the week involves the students studying books of the bible, fellowship building games and singing songs

of worship, he said. “When you’re coming from high school into college, you are beginning to move into a new community while also going through a time where you are growing into a young adult, and by joining Inter Varsity you will be able to develop a really close bond around the fellowship of friends that will help you move through the changes and difficulties of college,” said Layman. He said that fully engaging in the group has helped him realize that college is so much more than just trying to survive the two or four years it takes

to get a degree. It is about the way the community is affected by the actions of people with skills and longterm relationships. There is a fair amount of interest throughout the university and college areas, he said. Many of the activities are what bring the community together. “As of now we are trying to expand into the Santa Fe colleges and start a fellowship up there that is sustainable after a semester of our group’s involvement,” said Layman. Layman said he has been a member for three years and has been leading a weekly bible study

group for two years. There is no application process and those interested in joining can come to a meeting to fill out contact information and receive the list of events that are held throughout the year, he said. “I would really love to get more CNM students to get involved, and if real interest is shown we can definitely create a charter and CNM fellowship,” said Layman. For more information about Albuquerque’s Inter Varsity fellowship, go to ivcf.unm.edu or visit their Facebook page at facebook. com/groups/ivunm.

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Email your resume to pbauman2@cnm.edu

IMAGE COURTESY SXC.HU | WEB

Student organization

and preparedness By Jodie Darrell Staff Reporter

New Mexico has far too many trees and not enough water to support them, said New Mexico State Forestry Fire Prevention and Outreach Program Manager Dan Ware. As fire danger increases, the need for fire safety increases right along with it. Understanding fire safety and taking steps to improve preparedness and preventing fires will help both the people and the land, said Ware. In light of the very hot and dry season, Ware offered these safety tips for students:

Tips for Fire Safety 1. Private property should have a fire-proof perimeter. Manage the land and create a healthier environment. Trim trees and keep trash contained. It will help protect from a raging wildfire. 2. Obey all fire restrictions. The state of New Mexico has many fire restrictions depending on the heat and dryness of the terrain. The fire restrictions can be found on nmfireinfo.com/information/ fire-restrictions-on-state-and-private-lands 3. Be aware of surroundings and do not add to fire danger. There have been so many weird or unique fire causes in New Mexico that had nothing to do with open flame: blown tires, engine exhaust, brake particles from cars. Paying attention to details can help lower the risk of a fire. 4. Use common sense regarding fires. Make sure there are water sources and a shovel when choosing to have a campfire so that it can be put out completely. 5. Understand that a fire can happen to anyone. People who believe that a fire cannot happen to them create a greater fire hazard. Some of the most destructive and biggest fires in New Mexico history have occured this year. The fire danger is so high it does not take much to get a big fire going. When burning weeds call 768-BURN first. Let neighbors and the local fire department know.

More information can be found at nmforestry.com


CLASSIFIEDS

July 10 - July 16, 2012

Lactation

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and ATC are planned for the future, she said. “We are committed to providing as many services as possible at each and every campus — not just at Main. We want the services wherever there are students, and in this case it is for faculty and staff too,” said Cornish. She said she wants students to know that CNM realizes that they are more than just students attending classes. “They are parents, they have jobs, and they take care of their family members. If you are a breast feeding mother, it is essential to have access to a private, clean space to pump. We also want to support mothers who are able to breast feed — it is good for the baby,” said Cornish. Achievement Coach Michael Heim participated in raising awareness about the stations and said that female students, faculty and staff coming onto campus should have an area to pump comfortably.

“I never thought about it, especially as a man. They used to have to really look for places because the stations were not advertised at all. Bathrooms are an inadequate area for pumping. There are a lot of parts and things to do. Set things down and handling other things and containers with your hands; it’s not conducive,” said Heim. CNM Connect will continue to develop and improve areas for mothers and increase resources for parents and their children, said Heim. “I think it will provide some sort of comfort to nursing mothers. Students aren’t usually here very long, but it is especially beneficial to faculty and staff. Both of those populations will be able to feel comfortable knowing they have a spot they can go to with some real privacy,” he said.

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8 | the CNM Chronicle

FEATURE

July 10 - July 16, 2012

Things are going boom at Quelab Hackspace open to the creative, the inventive and the curious By Stefany Olivas Business Manager

Q

PHOTO BY SCOTT M. ROBERTS | STAFF

Quelab co-founder and Treasurer Geoffrey Nicholson lights it up.

uelab was founded based on the popular idea of a hackerspace — a place where people are able to explore ideas with few limitations, said Treasurer, co-founder, and former student Geoffrey Nicholson. The non-profit hacker and maker space is a place where people can turn their inventive ideas into reality, said Nicholson. “We’re a community workshop and a collaborative workspace. It’s a place to work feeling at home, away from home,” said Nicholson He said he encourages people who have ideas to visit the lab to use the supplies for developing their creation and he said it is a great opportunity for inventive minds to work together. The laboratory, located at 1112 Second Street, is open for Hacknights every Sunday and Tuesday to non-members and 24/7 to all members, said Nicholson. “Our big focus is to come down and learn something. Hopefully if you learned something once, you’ll find it interesting and come back to keep working at it,” said

Nicholson. Biology and Engineering major Alfred Cockrin said he became a member at Quelab in 2011 after discovering hacker and maker spaces in Kansas and attending a makers fair. Cockrin has worked on many personal projects, but his most prized creation is a 3D printer. “That was my biggest project. I have little side projects that stem off of it,” he said. He said his favorite thing about Quelab is the community of people who have gathered around it. “The people that are there are willing to help out. If you have something you want to do and don’t necessarily know the next step, they’ll try to figure it out with you. If they don’t know, they probably know someone else who has the answer,” said Cockrin. There are some hackerspaces that are more focused on hardware or software, some mobile and some focused entirely on electronics or entirely on biology, said Nicholson. “It’s not a very defined thing. The big idea here is community and a technical focus,” said Nicholson. Quelab has gathered many computer savvy members so major focuses

are hardware and software, but Quelab lab would like to have more access to things like chemistry and biology, he said. “We’re generalized in theory, but in practice we’re more or less computer nerds,” said Nicholson. Quelab hosts Hacknights on Tuesdays and Sundays from 7 p.m. -10 p.m. and Co-working on Wednesdays from 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. for a fee of five dollars for non-members, first visit is free. July 13-15 is Albuquerque’s first Hackathon, at Quelab and there is still opportunity for people to turn their programming, design or development ideas into a project. Albuquerque will host a mini-makers fair on Civic Plaza on September 3. If people have projects they’d like to show off there is an ongoing open call for makers. “It’s like the State Fair mixed with a science fair; the best things to show off are things that don’t work yet,” said Nicholson. Nicholson said he suggests visiting hackerspace. org to learn more about hacker spaces and how to get involved. Makezine. com provides ideas and how-to’s for beginners.

What’s in it for you? Access to the lab includes: PHOTO BY SCOTT M. ROBERTS | STAFF

Quelab member Alfred Cockrin shows off a workshop and printing machine.

• Free access to public events and member-only forums • A @Quelab.net email address • 24/7 access to workshop space • One free guest pass per month • Space rental for sponsored events, locker rental, and workbench reservations • The lab provides Wifi, desks, comfortable chairs, a conference room, a library, spare parts, workbenches and tools INFORMATION FROM QUELAB.NET


Issue 38, Volume 17