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TRIANGLE THE

ISSUE 3 | VOLUME 96 | NOV. 4 2016

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PEOP

DISTRACTED DRIVING Thousands of crashes happen every

day because drivers aren’t paying attention. But eliminating the dangers of distracted driving goes further than shutting off your phone. It might mean more than you think. Students share why it’s important to drive behind the wheel, not the screen. COLUMBUS NORTH HIGH SCHOOL 1400 25th St., Columbus, Indiana 47201

LE D 7,000+ IE IN C THE U.S. AR CRAS EVER H Y YEA ES IN 1 OU R T OF 4C IN TH E US AR ACCI DE AR TEXT ING W E CAUSE NTS D BY HILE DRIV EVER ING Y DA Y, BECA USE 11 TEENA THE GE WHIL Y WERE T RS DIE E DR EX I V ING TING 25% OF T EENS RESP O LEAS ND TO A T ON T E WHIL E DR TEXT IVING

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CONTENTS

OUR POLICY

T Sophomore Collin Klofenstein rows his boat with his partner past the starting line at the annual boat race on Sept. 27. “The theme for our boat was minions,” Klofenstein said. “We decided on that theme because my partner and I are both entertained by minions.” BY HANNAH LONG

WHAT’S INSIDE? ELECTION 04-07 See National and Local Election

OUR STAFF

INDEPTH 12-17 Distracted Driving

FALL WRAP-UP 18-19

Photo Summary

EDITORS-IN-CHIEF Maddie Gaskill Tazwell Long Maddie Marks Shelby Tays

EXECUTIVE EDITORIAL BOARD Cole Bennett Rylie Day Karol Espinoza Emily Nelson Ruthie Yezerets

ADVISERS

Ryan Gunterman Rachel McCarver

02

HUMANITIES MOVIE 26 Topic of Movie

STAFF

Hannah Abts Jasmine Austin Madi Beck Kate Bennett Arlette Cambron Emma Cooper Caitlin Davey Maggie Davis Lydia Hammons Shreya Hurli Hannah Long Katie McAninch Tessa McKenny Brooklynn Moore Elijah Peters Akshaya Sabapathy Kat Steilberg Kate Thomas Yahilin Vera Emily Vo Suzanne Ward

he Triangle is the designated forum for student expression at Columbus North High School. The student staff chooses all content. Signed columns published in The Triangle express the writer’s personal opinion and not the views of The Triangle, student body, BCSC, administration, board of trustees or faculty of Columbus North. The Triangle practices ethical journalism by providing balanced and fair coverage as determined by community standards. The Triangle strives to achieve 100 percent accuracy by checking sources, spelling and quotes and attaining multiple sources. The Triangle encourages letters to the editor, but reserves the right to reject them for reasons including but not limited to lack of space, multiple letters of the same topic and personal attacks contained in the letter. The Triangle will not edit for content, but reserves the right to edit for grammar and length. Letters should be submitted to edit for grammar and length. Letters should be submitted to room 1507 or sent via e-mail to administrator@cnhsmedia.com. All letters must be signed by all persons involved in writing the letter, which the staff will check for validation. A letter sent via e-mail must be validated with a signature from the writer before the Triangle will publish it. If responding to a publication, letters must be turned in within one week of that publication’s distribution. In the event of death, The Triangle will run a standard obituary. Pertaining to work submitted via social media sites (Facebook, Twitter, etc.), The Triangle will only accept written submissions from the original poster and owner and will only publish entries with the permission of the original poster and owner. The Triangle will not edit submissions for content and reserves the right not to publish them for reasons including but not limited to lack of space, multiple submissions of the same topic, vulgar or incendiary content. The Triangle will not publish photographs from Facebook. Posts on The Triangle’s social media pages by readers are owned by the readers and do not necessarily express the views or opinions of the staff. The Triangle is not responsible for their content and reserves the right to delete and report any inappropriate and unnecessary posts. By posting on The Triangle’s social media pages, the poster grants The Triangle permission to publish the contents of that post. In cases when a source’s information may bring ridicule or incrimination upon himself or herself, the editorial board reserves the right to cite the source as anonymous. The Triangle will never use composite sources and pass them off as anonymous sources.


BECK ROCKER, PC Attorneys at Law

Your Partners in Business and Life Since 1969


NEWS

ELECTIONS 2016 See the 2016 primary elections through the candidate’s running statements, a school-wide presidential election and system behind one of the largest political fact-checking publications in the nation. With the election just around the corner, the issues presented are issues that may slowly change the country over the next four years. CNHS Media does not directly endorse any candidate running for any position and will not attempt to indirectly do so. All content shown is based off of sourced data, polls and interviews and is collected with full intent to be as transparent as possible.

04

BY TAZWELL LONG // DESIGN BY MADDIE GASKILL AND COLE BENNETT


NEWS PRESIDENTIAL ALIGNMENT See how the current primary candidates for the presidency align on certain topics.

ABORTION

CIVIL RIGHTS

DRUGS

Donald Trump Republican

GUN CONTROL

IMMIGRATION

www.ontheissues.org

Gary Johnson Libertarian

Wants to overturn Roe v. Wade Wants to cut their government funding and stop late abortions from happening with exceptions to rape, incest or health

Appoint Supreme Court judges who will uphold Roe v Wade Heavily opposes control on women’s rights Is generally pro-choice Government shouldn’t be involved with late-term decisions

Wants to keep things the way that they are Feels that Planned Parenthood is a good thing and there is nothing that needs to be changed

Promoted gender equality in male-dominated industries, also claimed that well educated blacks have an advantage over whites Says that same-sex marriage should not be handled on a federal level and instead left to the states

Strives to fight systemic racism and questions race bias Views flying Confederate Battle Flag as a symbol of racism Wants to enact gender identity and anti-discrimination laws

Believes it is racist to judge others by their birthrights Also thinks that individual liberty includes the right of freedom of marriage on a national level Believes that it is perfectly fine for the Confederate flag to be displayed

Believes that a careful approach with well-placed restrictions should be taken to legalizing pot

Wants to fund states to help with the opioid epidemic Wants to legalize marijuana usage and release previously imprisoned abusers with long sentences

Pushing for the idea that the War on Drugs was a mistake Wants to reduce the penalty and harm for heroin but he does not want it legalized Feels that marijuana has fewer side effects than alcohol but has made no specific statement as to its legalization

Wants to let schools compete for funding, which includes competing for charters Believes that Common Core should be cut from all schools and that the government should not profit from students loans

Wants to make college debtfree Testing system based on core curriculum has value Wants to take the initiative to provide every student with an education in computer science

Wants to remove Common Core from the education system

Believes that people on terrorist watch-lists should not be able to purchase or own guns Wants to set up a system that would red flag anyone who has bought large amounts of ammunition and body armor

Respect 2nd Amendment but close loopholes

Feels that banning assault weapons is only criminalizing the owners Focus on keeping weapons away from the mentally ill and terrorists

Wants to tighten border security, feels that an overflow of immigrants means U.S. citizens lose jobs Claims that he will not apologize if he bans all Muslims from entering America Wants a database of possible terrorist refugees

Wants to introduce a path to earning citizenship in her first 100 days. She supports the DREAM Act

Thinks that medical marijuana is a good thing but should be decided on a state level

EDUCATION

Hillary Clinton Democrat

Looking for a balance between self-defense and keeping guns away from criminals

Does not want to send raids to capture and deport illegal immigrants

Reform public education as a whole

Doesn’t trust no-fly list, encourages airport security instead Believes that the mission to deport 11 million illegal immigrants is built on false data 05


NEWS

YOUR VOTE COUNTS (HERE) 425 students were surveyed about who they would vote for in the Presidential and Local Primary Elections. The following data is an approximation of our total student body and is not entirely exact

POLITICAL VIEW

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP

43%

HILLARY CLINTON GARY JOHNSON

34% of students

get election information on social media

Republican

22%

Democrat

25%

Not Sure

14%

Neither

73%

37%

of students

20%

have watched at least one national debate

GOVERNOR OF INDIANA Rex Bell

10% 42% 48%

06

39%

John Gregg Eric Holcomb


NEWS

POLITICS DONE RIGHT In an interview with the founder of the website politifact.com see how the popular fact checking database was created and the process behind their data collection.

P

ulitzer Prize winning website politifact.com is a source for checking a political candidate’s validity while they are running. The website produces many up-to-date stories on the truthfulness of statements made by political figures, most prominently those who are running for president. This year in particular has been generous for Politifact, with more than 100 million page views, according to website founder Aaron Sharockman. “The project was an idea of Bill Adair, then the Washington bureau chief of the Tampa Bay Times. I think he was tired of seeing political journalists cover stories without letting readers know who was right. I think Bill thought journalists could really provide a service to readers if they called out a politician for telling a falsehood,” Sharockman said. “It helped that the Times was supportive of the idea and invested in it. We launched in 2007 with a staff of around three. Today we’re up over 10 full-time employees, with additional staff on hand for the 2016 election.” Not only did the Tampa Bay Times support the idea of Politifact, they have also been funding it since its creation. By partnering up with other publications and accepting financial support from groups like the Democracy Fund, Politifact has been able to remain an up-to-date source for political news. “The primary goal (for Politifact) was to help voters sort out fact from fiction. Other than that, we were so busy figuring out what to do and how to do it, that I don’t think we really had a lot of time to set goals. Today, I think we’ve come a long way. We’ve published nearly 13,000 fact-checks and have partnerships in 18 states where local journalists are fact checking their local politicians. We have a nation partnership with NBC. We want to continue to grow and thrive,” Sharockman said. “To us, fact-checking is not just an election year fad. We think it’s an important part of journalism and it serves a critical purpose every day.”

According to the Pew Research Center, the average Millennial can’t identify common important political figures as well as older generations. For example, only 45 percent can identify and recognize senior Senator Elizabeth Warren. “There’s no real algorithm (to writing our stories). The process for us is all about fact-checking that people hear and wonder if they’re true. Other than that, our goal is to be talking about the big issues just like the front page of the newspaper or the 6 o’clock news. For every fact-check, we contact the speaker of the claim first to see what their evidence is. From there, we reach out to independent and objective sources to verify their information. Everyone we talk to is on the record and we list all of our sources along with every article. We want to be as open and transparent as possible about our reporting process and how we reached our conclusion,” Sharockman said. “The Truth-O-Meter has six ratings (True to Pants on Fire!) and every fact-check, every one, is ultimately judged by a panel of three editors who sit as jurors. The point of that is to make sure no one person decides a ruling. The group does.” The website’s fact meter is scaled from True to False, with the ‘Pants on Fire!’ rating reserved for ridiculous and blatant lies. Between True and False are different scales that are usually determined by accuracy. For example, a Half True rating means that the statement is not a lie, but lacks important details. As a final statement, Sharockman added this comment about his website’s popularity this year. “Fact-checking has never been more popular. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have brought it up during the debates and we’ve seen record page views,” he said. “In the 48 hours after the first debate, we saw more than 3.6 million page views on our site. To put that in perspective, that’s more pageviews than we had for all of June 2015.”

POLITICAL

TRUTH-O-METER Politifact set up “Truth-O-Meters” to help voters establish what is fact and what is false about what is being said by the candidates. source: http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/lists/people/comparing-hillaryclinton-donald-trump-truth-o-met/

HILLARY CLINTON True

69

Mostly True

76

Half True

67

Mostly False

40

False

29

Pants on Fire

7

DONALD TRUMP True

13

Mostly True

35

Half True

46

Mostly False

61

False

107

Pants on Fire

56

BY TAZWELL LONG // DESIGN BY SHELBY TAYS AND COLE BENNETT

07


NEWS

PINNING UP SUPPORT Activism has been prevalent during last two years, with 1,555 demonstrations being organized by the movement Black Lives Matter. Students shared their opinions and views of this relevant issue.

2016 IN REVIEW JAN. 16-18

Groups all over the country took part in the #ReclaimMLK march, rally and bridge shutdown

MARCH 12, OH Over 300 people took part in a 2-mile march for immigrant rights organized by Black Lives Matter and other immigration activists.

MAY 2, IL

Students marched through the SIU campus and buildings protesting campus racism, among other issues.

JULY 20, IL

Protesters chained themselves to the CPD Homan Square facility and occupied a nearby area.

SEPT. 24 PRESENT, GA

Protesters are boycotting Lenox Mall, Peachtree Center and other big businesses as part of their #NotOneMoreDime protest.

FEB. 2, MD

Students at Mount Hebron H.S. marched out after a fellow student appeared in an online video disparaging the Black Lives Matter movement.

APRIL 6, CANADA

Rally in Montreal for Villanueva and a march to where Jean Pierre Bony was killed.

JUNE 10, VA

Over 100 people marched to a Donald Trump Rally and protested outside of his rally.

AUG. 1, NY An all-day rally was held in protest of racism in the NYPD.

OCT. 16, NY

Buffalo Bills fans knelt during the National Anthem in solidarity with Colin Kaepernick.

NOVEMBER

2016

DECEMBER 2016

B

lack Lives Matter is an organization that was created in 2012 after the death of Trayvon Martin. Martin was a 17-year-old boy who was put on trial for his own murder after he was shot to death in a Sanford, Florida neighborhood (blacklivesmatter.com). Throughout the last four years, the Black Lives Matter movement has been seen on social media and in the news as more and more people become activists for the movement. According to colorlines.com, more than 50 percent of adults 18 to 30, from different ethnic backgrounds support the movement. Sophomore Nadia Lomax shares her way of contributing to the activism even with her limitations. “I’m not as active as I would like to be in spreading awareness for Black Lives Matter. However, I feel like I’m doing as much as I can given the circumstances,” Lomax said. “Being the age I am is definitely a restraint. I can’t just get up and go protest things that are within driving distance. Although my sister, Mikala, has helped me with that part.” Lomax and her sister have created their own business making pins. Pins are badges that can be fastened to clothes using a safety pin. Here, sports teams sell them to the parents with players’ faces on them. But, Lomax and her sister decided to create pins to support Black Lives Matter. “The pins are mine and my sister’s way of activism,” Lomax said. “They’re a creative way to express things in general without having to follow a certain set of rules. The sisters were also recently certified as their own business and plan to begin to sell their pins at festivals to spread awareness for the movement. “My sister came up with the idea when she was working with a group at IUPUI,” Lomax said. “[We] make pins using a simple pin machine that’s actually fun to use. We do all types of things with them.” Since Michael Brown’s death in 2014, more than Black Lives Matter demonstrations have taken place throughout the United States/ Demonstrations held in larger cities have attracted an upwards of 3,000 people or even more, while most demonstrations attract only a hundred or less people. “We made the Black Lives Matter pins first because the idea was brought up when more and more police shootings and things popped up in the media,” Lomax said. “That’s when we realized shootings and unfair arrests happen more often than what the media portrays and we wanted to be the ones to bring that into the light. We also plan on doing things with LGBT+ equality, racial and gender bias and more.” According to Black Lives Matter, it is a network of people who advocate for dignity, justice and respect. Lomax shares how she defines the movement. “I would define this movement as a base of black people bringing to the attention of everyone (not just white people) that ‘hey, we matter too and what’s happening isn’t okay and we need to support each other.’”

SOPHOMORE NADIA LOMAX 08


NEWS One-hundred nineteen students were surveyed anonymously on what they would tweet with #BlackLivesMatter and their views regarding this issue. NO OPINION

12% NO

16%

DIVERSITY CLUB

YES 72%

Do you believe the Black Lives Matter movement pushes for RACIAL EQUALITY?

“All lives matter, everyone affects our world.” #BlackLivesMatter “Every person is the same, made the same, designed the same, except for the color of our skin.” #BlackLivesMatter

YES “Stop discrimination. Its 2016. Get a grip.” #BlackLivesMatter

67%

NO

NO 23% OPINION

10%

Do you SUPPORT the Black Lives Matter movement? YES 3%

NO 97%

“We must push for equality peacefully; start violence and the goal won’t be achieved.” #BlackLivesMatter “Black lives matter. It doesn’t matter who, when, what, or where you are. You’re still important.” #BlackLivesMatter

“It’s not the 1800s. Get it together.” #BlackLivesMatter “Let’s all get along and leave racial discrimination out of the picture. A human is a human.” #BlackLivesMatter

Celebrating the diversity at Columbus North High School since 2006. Contact Mrs. Pfaffenberger in 1214

BLACK LIVES MATTER OF COLUMBUS Seeking equality and affirming justice for all people. Contact Brittany King at brtking7@gmail. com

Have you been involved in a PROTEST relating to the Black Lives Matter Movement? BY MADI BECK // DESIGN BY RUTHIE YEZERETS 09


NEWS

TRICK OR TREAT SO KIDS CAN EAT Halloween is all about spookiness and treats, but for the Thespian society, it’s all about collecting food for those in need.

5,000 lbs goal

A

s Halloween rolled through, the Thespian society kept an open mind for those less fortunate in the spooky season. The Thespians take part in what is known as Trick-or-Treat so Kids Can Eat, a can fundraiser for starving children. Junior Joe Robinson, a part of the fundraising committee, commented on the meaning behind the fundraiser and the impact it has had on the community. “[Trick-or-Treat So Kids Can Eat] has happened in previous years,” Robinson said. “It has not been done the past couple of years because it conflicted with band, which is a large majority of Thespians. This year we can do it because it doesn’t conflict.” Trick-or-Treat So Kids Can Eat is a student driven fundraiser. “[the members] get into teams with the drivers and non-drivers,” Robinson said. “Then we dress up in our theme, and then we go around basically Trick-or-Treating, but instead of collecting candy, we collect cans.” After the cans are collected, the Thespians weigh the cans. “We see how much weight [they] have can wise, and then they donate it to the Love Chapel,” Robinson said. “Our goal is 10,000 pounds of food. We’re doing 300 houses for drivers and non-drivers, and [the homeowners] will hopefully donate at least a plastic bag of cans.” The committee tries to keep this event in the North District. “East’s Thespian society [collects from] East’s district.” Trick-or-Treat So Kids Can Eat, took place on Oct. 31, during community Halloween hours.

Members of the Thespians Troupe 57 headed out in costumes on Halloween night to collect cans for those in need.

3,004 lbs

HUNGRY ON HALLOWEEN

CNHS Thespians have a goal to collect 5,000 pounds of food for families in need this year. Students have collected a total of 3,004 pounds so far and plan to collect more for the holiday.

10

As students collected canned goods, they stored them all together and will create care packages to distribute next week.

BY COLE BENNETT/ /DESIGN AND PHOTOS BY CAITLIN DAVEY


NEWS

HURRICANE MATTHEW

ESTIMATED COSTS OF

RECONSTRUCTION

Hurricane Matthew struck Haiti Oct. 4. One week later, Fox News reported Matthew hit Florida at a peak surge of 9.88 feet above normal. Two days later, the dreaded storm plowed into North Carolina with $50 billion dollars and South Carolina with $75 billion dollars in destruction.

F

$200

$150

Costs (in billions)

all break is over and now it’s time to go back to school, except children in North Carolina and South Carolina. Hurricane Matthew has caused $1.5 billion in damage to 100,000 homes, businesses and governmental buildings. According to Fox News, 2,000 people who were displaced by the storm are now placed in shelters. Many students had to either cancel or postpone their trips along the coast. “I was originally going to go on a cruise, then I found out that I had to cancel due to Hurricane Matthew,” freshman Saylor Doran said. “We moved our trip to Spring Break.” Some students didn’t find out that their trip was going to be canceled until a few days before their vacation. “I was going to go to St. Augustine, Florida. I found out three days before that I wasn’t going anymore. I’m frustrated because I was looking forward to this trip and now I’m staying home,” sophomore Karsen Hodnett said. Some students have family that live in the affected area and are worried, sophomore Morgan Munsey said. “I have friends and family that live in Florida and I’ve been very worried about them and their safety,” Munsey said. English teacher Kelley Culp has sponsored a child in Haiti since 2013. Hopes have dimmed for Haitians. According to ABC News, the central government says the official toll stands at 546 dead and 128 missing, but many believe the figures could be higher and some rugged areas still have not been fully assessed. “We have not had direct communication with Matisse or his mother, Sandia. However, the organization we go through has assured us that all the sponsored children are safe,” Culp said. She felt the family was prepared. “When we visited Haiti three years ago, we were able to visit Matisse’s home,” Culp said. “He and his mother have a cement block home that is designed to withstand earthquakes and hurricanes, so they should have been very safe at home.” Culp hopes to speak to them soon. “Of course, we were very concerned for their safety and we hope that they did not lose what little they had.”

According to fortune.com, this chart represents the estimated costs for reconstruction in certain states affected by Hurricane Matthew.

$100

$50

Flo

rid

a

So

ut

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No

rth

Ca

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lin

a

Ca

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a

States Affected

BY LYDIA HAMMONS // DESIGN BY YAHILIN VERA 11


INDEPTH

DRIVING

DISTRACTED Thousands of crashes happen every day because drivers aren’t paying attention. But eliminating the dangers of distracted driving goes further than shutting off your phone. It might mean more than you think. Students share why it’s important to drive behind the wheel, not the screen.

12


INDEPTH

IO

S N

o

CT ES RA EY ST UR DI YO UR F G O YO EEL UR IN S AK D NG H YO PE : T OA KI E W G G TY AL E R : TA TH KIN IN A IV SU TH L F VI FF UA OF E: T DR O N S IV F E O A D TH E M N NIT FF R TH ON HA G O DE VE RTI CO IND UN A O M S 0 H OP NER 2 R O IV OF T P CTI AL DR E ES RA AT AG GH IST D F HI F D TE S O ELA HE R AS CR v

c.g

cd

13


INDEPTH

EYES OFF THE ROAD

The human brain can’t concentrate on two things at once. It doesn’t matter whether drivers are looking at their cell phones, eating a sandwich or shouting over noisy passengers. What matters is when their mind is off the road, they’re at greater risk of danger. KNOW THE DANGERS OF TEXTING AND DRIVING

1 OUT OF EVERY 4 CAR ACCIDENTS IN THE UNITED STATES IS CAUSED BY TEXTING AND DRIVING

MANUA

TAKING YOUR EYES OFF THE ROAD

TAKING YOUR OFF THE W

11.6%

OF 1,071 COLLUSIONS WERE CAUSED BY A CELL PHONE DISTRACTIONS

FOOD

TALKING

MUSIC

11 TEENS DIE EVERY

CELLPHONE

GROOMING

DAY AS A RESULT OF TEXTING WHILE DRIVING

OF TEENS DRIVERS INVOLVED IN FATAL ACCIDENTS

14

VISUAL

94%

DO IT ANWAY 35%

21%

3 TYPES OF DIS

DISTRACTIONS WHILE DRIVING

90%

50%

OF ALL CAR CRASHES ARE CAUSED BY DRIVER ERROR

OF SURROUNDINGS ARE MISSED WHEN ON THE PHONE

O


INDEPTH

STUDENT RESULTS

STRACTIONS

AL

COGNITIVE

R HANDS WHEEL

TAKING YOUR MIND OFF DRIVING

HAS ANYONE YOU KNOW WELL BEEN IN A WRECK?

MIT

PER

DO YOU HAVE YOUR LICENCE/ PERMIT?

105: YES 56: NO HOW DO YOU GET TO SCHOOL?

41: YES 129: NO

EVER USED A DEVICE WHILE DRIVING?

105: YES 56: NO

TALKING ON THE PHONE

BUS

21% OF

STUDENTS

BIKE/WALK

8% OF

STUDENTS

CAR

53% OF

STUDENTS

TEXTING CHANGING MUSIC LOOKING AT TEXT BLUETOOTH

26%

9%

OF CAR CRASHES INVOLVE CELL PHONE USE

OF DRIVERS ARE CURRENTLY TALKING ON THEIR CELL PHONES

29 STUDENTS

20 MINUTES

17

STUDENTS

10 MINUTES

15 MINUTES

32

27

STUDENTS

25 MINUTES

7 STUDENTS

STUDENTS

30+ MINUTES

14% 11% 11%

10 MINUTES -

17% 17%

HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE YOU TO GET TO SCHOOL?

24%

ADJUSTING MAPS

12

STUDENTS

15


INDEPTH

BEHIND THE WHEEL

Distracted driving rates are high, especially among teens. But law enforcement on the road, coupled with widespread awareness of the dangers of driving, is helping to combat those rates.

16

I

n September, freshman Kameron Harman’s friend was in a car accident. It happened late at night; her car was hit by a distracted driver who ignored a stop sign at a four-way stop. “Her car flipped three times before landing,” Harman said. “She came out with only a few scratches and bruises. The nurses had said that if she had not had her seatbelt on, she would have died.” When Harman heard about the accident, she was worried for her friend. “I wondered if my friend was okay because the crash was such a severe one,” she said. Although Harman’s friend was not seriously injured, crashes caused by distracted driving can be fatal. According to the Indiana Department of Transportation, every day, an average of nine people are killed in crashes that involve a distracted driver. “Anything can happen in a fraction of a second,” Columbus Police Detective Chris Couch said. “Vehicles have limits, and drivers are responsible for knowing those limits.” Couch is in charge of the local Precision Driving Course for Teens, a program run by the Columbus Police Department. There are four classes a year, with around 20 students per class. The majority of the students are teens and senior adults. “The program is in its 14 year, and is geared towards new drivers,” Couch said. “It was started after we analyzed accidents that occurred locally in southern Indiana among new, young, inexperienced drivers. We looked at the causes and contributions to the accidents and tried to duplicate some of the same driving scenarios in our course.” The course is an outdoor track and includes several different scenarios.


INDEPTH

“One is when tires go off the road. Another is what “A lady ran a red light and hit me and my family,” we call the evasive maneuver. We go high speed she said. “It was about 7 or 8 p.m. She smacked the around obstacles without brakes to simulate highway front of the car. We spun three times and smashed accidents, like the interstate or even US 31,” Couch into the car on the other side of the intersection.” said. “We use cones and tight lanes so the drivers are Nobody was hurt in the accident, but Calabrese pressed to react.” remembers feeling terrified and panicked. Couch said the most-valuable lesson students learn “I was young, and all I could tell the paramedics is that they have a limit to their own driving abilities. was that I had my seatbelt on and I felt fine. But I “The driver decides the safety of the vehicle. Even if was more worried about my parents. I was in shock you have a fast, fancy car or a big truck with the whole night and scared to drive for a little while four-wheel drive, you need to recognize the limits of after,” she said. your driving ability and the limits of the car itself,” he Calabrese thinks it’s important for people to know said. “It’s the knowledge that you’re not invincible. the dangers of distracted driving. “Maybe you can’t necessarily maneuver safely around “You don’t only have to watch the road, but also obstacles at a high speed. You’ll what other people do. In a matter recognize that in this course, of seconds you could be in a and you’ll gain a respect for wreck and holding onto your driving. The course is designed life,” she said. to make drivers safer and more Many new drivers participating conscientious.” in Driver’s Ed are learning to According to data provided by follow the rules of the road. the police department, the most Freshman Nicolette Guenther SENIOR TAMIM NOORE said that once she gets her local crashes involving teens have to do with texting. Typically, permit, she will keep her eyes on testimonies inform the police of the road at all times and refrain whether or not cell phone use from texting and driving. was a factor. For more severe accidents, they use call “Looking at one simple text has cost the lives of records and timestamps. many,” Guenther said. “You need to think before you Senior Tamim Noor has never been in a car crash, act.” but since the end of July, he’s had his license and has Couch encourages all teen drivers to take part in been on the road. the Precision Driving Course for Teens. “[It’s important to] not pay attention to my phone “It’s important to know your escape options to while driving,” Noor said. “Being distracted for even a prevent dangerous scenarios. You need to plan second can be risky because you never know when ahead and leave enough room in case you need to the car in front will suddenly brake or another one get out,” he said. “In the program, you get a better veers in.” understanding of your driving ability.” Freshman Makenna Calabrese knows from For many drivers, driving is fun and enjoyable. experience how risky distracted driving can be. Seven However, all drivers must be aware of their years ago, she and her family got in a car accident surroundings,” Noor said. “Don’t take driving for when they were driving home from Greensburg. granted. A life is on the line.”

“Don’t take driving for granted. A life is on the line.”

SOURCES// DRIVINGLAWS.ORG DISTRACTION.COM IIHS.ORG NSC.ORG BY EMILY NELSON // DESIGN BY KAROL ESPINOZA AND KATE THOMAS 17


SPORTS

Columbus North students cheer on the Dog Pack during the annual North vs. East football game. PHOTO BY COLE BENNETT

FALL SPORTS WRAP-UP Senior Wade Rankin reflects on his involvement in supporting the Columbus North athletics.

Q: In one word, how can you describe your experience as a fan at

CROSS COUNTRY 10-0

FOOTBALL

games, cheering on the team?

Freshmen 8-1 JV 8-1 Varsity 8-1

North sporting events?

GIRL’S GOLF

A: Electric Q: What has been your favorite memory of attending Columbus A: Probably by far beating East in our senior year, that was pretty sweet.

Q: Being a senior, what will you miss the most about attending sporting events?

A: Just the good times with friends that we get to have and just hanging out with people that make it fun.

Q: What is your favorite dress-up theme that has been done? A: I’d have to say I do like the “bub” dress up theme just because I think it’s fun. Q: Do you have any advice for underclassmen as far as having school spirit? A: The louder you are and the more you interact the more fun it gets. Q: Do you have anything to say to students like incoming freshman who are nervous about participating?

A: A lot of kids are scared of the upperclassmen and think “Well they can do all the work”, but we really just want you guys to be loud and have fun with it. Go to as many as you can before your four years is up. 18

11-1

MEN’S SOCCER JV 2-9 Varsity 15-5-1

WOMEN’S SOCCER JV 7-4-2 Varsity 13-2-4

MEN’S TENNIS 16-7

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL Freshman 2-12 JV 8-13 Varsity 16-13


SPORTS

Sophomore Danbi Kim swings her club in a golf match against crosstown rivals Columbus East. PHOTO BY YAHILIN VERA

Sophomore Alex McGill defends the ball during Rivalry Week’s North versus East men’s soccer game.

Junior Arig Tong runs along with her fellow teammates and Bloomington South students in Brown County for cross country semi-state.

PHOTO BY COLE BENNETT

PHOTO BY COLE BENNETT

Columbus North football team takes on Terre Haute North in yearly homecoming game.

PHOTO BY COLE BENNETT

Sophomore Maddy Sebahar serves the ball on senior night against Martinsville. PHOTO BY COLE BENNETT

Senior Natalie Teo sprints for the ball during the North versus East women’s soccer game. PHOTO BY COLE BENNETT

Columbus North cheerleaders lead the crowd in getting pumped up for the annual North versus East football game.

Senior Eli Fischer, sophomore Drew Smith, senior Alec Embry and senior Elijah Brooks accept their third place Semi-state ribbons and celebrate moving onto State. PHOTO BY COLE BENNETT

Sophomore Kevin Lin prepares for a forehand during his match against Columbus East. PHOTO BY COLE BENNETT

BY RYLIE DAY // DESIGN BY KATIE MCANINCH

19


SPORTS

GOING

FORE GOLD

Senior Holly Anderson is the only golfer to win an individual state title for the Columbus North High School women’s golf team.

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n Oct. 1, 2016, history was made. In addition to the women’s golf team placing third in the state of Indiana, senior Holly Anderson, the team’s number one golfer, won state. This made her the first woman from Columbus North to win individual state. “The state tournament went very well for us,” coach Scott Seavers said. “The weather was not very good on the first day. There were two rain/lightning delays. However, we played well overall.” Seavers showed pride for the team after the third place finish. “The team performed very well,” Seavers said. “I am happy with our results. We had the fifth-best score in IHSAA history.” Going into the tournament, Anderson was especially motivated. “My parents told me the day before state , that if I won, they would get me a puppy,” Anderson said. “Little did they know that I would actually win.” Along with the support from her family and friends, Anderson said she had worked extremely hard to win. “All of the hard work from this year definitely contributed to my win at state, also all of the support from my family, friends and team helped,” she said. Anderson reflected on how the win impacted her life. “Winning State affected me in a very positive way,” she said. “Obviously I was the first girl golfer to ever win state from CNHS and it also gave me a lot of confidence knowing that I am one of the best golfers in the state. That’s a huge confidence booster for me going into golf season next fall at Ball State.”

BY YAHILIN VERA

“Her win definitely impacted the team. She has worked so hard and I couldn’t be any happier for her. Our team is already so close and with Holly’s first place finish, and our team’s third place finish we were very happy with our year.” SENIOR AUBREY SMITH 20

“The team was very happy for our team success (third place) and they were also extremely happy for Holly. She is the first female individual girls golfer from North to win. We all were so happy for her.” COACH SCOTT SEAVERS

BY AKSHAYA SABAPATHY // DESIGN BY MAGGIE DAVIS


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OPINION

IRAQ, AGAIN

H

ello again! Y’all have been so agreeable about listening to my

rants. So I’m going to go out on a limb here. Iraq has always been a contentious topic. Every mischievous little political prankster who brings it up is sure to have success, polarizing the room more than telling people Rose could have fit on the door with Jack. And it’s derailed every history class you’ve

ever been in. I don’t see the point in rehashing old arguments about whether or not we should have gone into Iraq; we went in, and that is the reality we have to deal with. The current issue is the development of ISIS in the area, and so that’s where my monologue begins. When Saddam Hussein was overthrown by US armed forces in 2003, no one knew that the power vacuum left would allow ISIS to take control of the country. After the invasion, America replaced the dictator with a president it backed. As the costs of remaining in Iraq increased – the Iraq war itself cost around $1.7 trillion and public opinion favored a withdrawal, the US began to disengage and remove troops. Unfortunately, with American troops no longer backing the democratic Iraqi government, it soon lost control of territory to the new strongman, ISIS. Now that ISIS is launching terrorist attacks around the world, from Paris to San Bernardino to Cairo, America is getting involved in Iraq again, most recently leading the effort to take Mosul. This election year (I’m getting REALLY tired of saying those words), a number of candidates are running on isolationist platforms, from leaving NAFTA to ending our role as the “global policeman”. Those against foreign involvement argue that the monetary and human costs are too high, and that being involved in the internal business of other countries is like being a nosy Marie Barone, constantly invading her son’s house across the street to sniff at Debra’s attempts to make edible food. With support for such views at its highest in years, it seems that continuing our involvement in Iraq is a no-no. No one wants to be that mother-in-law.

Actually, though, I think we’d be more of a Marie if we didn’t stay in Iraq. The US left in 2011, and ISIS took Mosul in 2014, just 3 years later. Whether or not you agree with the decision to have gone into the country in the first place, it’s now evident that pulling out so quickly and leaving the weak Iraqi government without support has destabilized the region. The thousands of soldiers employed by Hussein were left jobless, largely unskilled, and resultantly malcontented – perfect material for radicalization. As members of ISIS, they killed hundreds worldwide and created the largest refugee crisis since World War II. Hindsight is 20/20 (I used a cliché! Dear god! Imma go wash my mouth out with soap…), but spending more time in Iraq after the initial invasion to develop the infrastructure and retrain Saddam Hussein’s soldiers to reintegrate them into society may have prevented ISIS from becoming as strong and widespread as it is. Yes, it would have been expensive, but it could have led to better relations with the region, with the US being seen as a rebuilder and stabilizer rather than simply as a home invader like Marie. Lives could have been saved as ISIS, without the thousands of new recruits, would not have had the fame to inspire terrorist attacks around the world. But we left, like a mother cuckoo that’s laid an egg. Now we have another chance to be the fixer instead of the Marie. Being part of the push for Mosul against ISIS means we can clean up a mess we are partially responsible for. America can make the world safer by ridding the Middle East of ISIS, preventing terrorist attacks around the world. Then we have the chance to rebuild Iraq and end the cyclical regeneration of threats, both creating a more lasting peace in the Middle East and improving the perception of America in the world. America needs to stay in Mosul until we win against ISIS. It’ll be expensive. It’ll be long. And there is no way to get around the fact that despite advances in military technology, like the improvement of drones, an intense assault would be potentially costly in terms of lives. But at this point, ISIS is being pushed to defeat. One final, decisive effort could end this threat, give us the chance to clean up the mess we made, and allow us to put an end to the cycle of anger and desperation that leads to the birth of such organizations. And in the end, I think we should look seriously at the benefits of continued involvement in Iraq, because walking away from a situation we helped create is just so Marie. When you vote for a candidate of your choice on Nov. 8, keep this in mind. Go vote so we can get this over with!

THERE’S NO GOING BACK… RIGHT? Brexit may be scheduled in the next two years, but British Prime Minister Theresa May is intent on keeping relations with the EU the same as they’ve always been.

22

BY SHREYA HURLI // DESIGN BY MADDIE GASKILL


OPINION

MANNERS

With students ignoring each other for their phones and disregarding order in the hallways, it’s easy to lose the concept of acceptable behavior. The way our school runs now poses the question; do manners really matter?

MATTER D oes saying “excuse me” or holding the door open for someone make that much of a difference? In the grand scheme of things, no. In five years, it won’t matter if you dropped the door on someone or bumped into a student in the hallway. But in everyone’s small day to day life, manners do count. An action as simple as waiting your turn to walk out of a classroom can impact how well another student’s day goes. For me, manners are a category of unspoken rules. Unspoken rules are small tips that if followed, increase the quality of one’s daily life, and improve other’s opinions of you. For example, walking on the right side of the hallway.

It seems obvious, but students don’t always do it. This is the problem with unspoken rules- they go unspoken. They are often forgotten about, despite their simplicity. If students would walk on the right side of the hallway, less people would collide, reducing spills and the amount of books and homework dropped on the floor. If more people knew about unspoken rules and followed them, daily life would go more smoothly and overall people would be happier when they get home from school. The most commonly available opportunity for students to follow unspoken rules and demonstrate manners, is passing period. Every 45 minutes,

2,039 students flood the hallways for six short minutes. The hallway is like a road, and should be treated like one. Wait your turn, don’t walk out in front of others and walk on the right side of the hallway. If every student followed this hallway etiquette, then everyone’s passing period would go a lot smoother. With a faster trip from class to class, students could have time to finish up that last little bit of homework, or catch up with a friend. Who doesn’t want that? This goes to show that following unspoken rules and having good manners does matter, on a day to day basis. Saying “excuse me” in the hall or holding the door open for someone else may put a smile on someone else’s face.

UNSPOKEN RULES DO’S AND DONT’S

Do walk on the right side of the hallway.

“I think manners are important because good manners reflect character. If you don’t do something that’s easy to do, just because it’s easier for you not to do it, that reflects bad character.” JUNIOR GABE KIRSCH

Don’t play your music out loud.

Don’t stand too close to others.

Pick up after yourself.

Put away your phone when you’re talking to people.

Don’t talk about an event in front of people who aren’t invited.

“I think they [manners] are important because without them, everything would be a bit more crazy. Be accepting of other people no matter what their circumstances are.” FRESHMAN KATIE RICHARDS BY TESSA MCKENNEY

23


STAFF EDITORIAL

IT TAKES ONE GLANCE CNHS media takes a stance on distracted driving and what it truly means to be distracted.

T

he perfect lighting with just the right angle. The backThese statistics might just seem like numbers, but these are real ground, artsy with a good balance of original photo people and real consequences. and edited. After 50 tries and filter after filter, it’s finally We all know it’s easy to get distracted while driving, especially Instagram quality. With all the effort, the expectation of with social media always an app away or when that song that was likes is anticipated. Notifications keep popping up, and the urge totally last year comes on, but when is enough, enough? Distractto look to see who commented and who liked it becomes surreal. ed driving isn’t just using a phone, it’s bigger than that. The true But little do people know that just one glance down, can change definition of distracted driving is the practice of driving a motor everything. vehicle while engaged in another activity. This includes, but is A trending internet video, “Wait for it… this could save your life” not limited to, listening to loud music, eating and driving, changsits people down and asks a simple question, “What are your reaing music, talking to passengers instead of focusing, dropping sons for using a phone while driving?” The answers varied from something in the floorboard and picking it up, putting on makeup, texting to social media. Later, they were introduced to Jacy Good, reading and the list could go on. an advocate for safe driving. So what can we do to make a difference? On May 18, 2008, Jacy Good was driving with her family after Instead of having our phones up front with her Muhlenberg College graduation when they were struck head us, we need to turn them off and put them in on by a fully loaded tractor-trailer whose driver was distracted by our bags. Instead of eating, reading, getting another car turning left on a red light. According to CNN, Good’s ready or anything else involving that, let’s parents were pronounced dead at the scene, and she had a trauleave earlier. When our friends are yelling matic brain injury that left her chances of survival at 10 percent. and being loud or refuse to wear a seatbelt, CNN also reported that Good is one of the estimated half a take control. We need million injuries each year caused by phone use behind the wheel. to start realizing that Her parents were two of the 5,870 American distracted driving distractions are evfatalities in 2008. erywhere because no After those in the video heard Good’s story, all changed their one’s life is worth just perspective on using their phone while driving. But why does it that one distraction. have to take someone losing their life for people to listen or pay attention? Good isn’t the only person that has suffered from distracted driving. Interacting with According to “Distracted Driving Kills,” passengers in Indiana alone, there were over 1000 crashes in 2011 that were a direct result of distracted drivers. 814 of those There are many forms of discrashes caused property damage, 319 tracted driving. They account caused bodily injuries and 5 people for 58% of all teen related lost their lives because a driver got accidents. Take a look below distracted. to see how some of them play Some of us remember the long drivCell phone ers education video that seemed like it a role in the epidemic. use was 20 years old talking about distracted driving or the AT&T commercials “It teen Can Wait.” To be honest that video we wreaks are caused by watched or the commercials we have some form of distraction seen, we have blown off or treated them as background noise because we all think “It won’t happen to me,” but it Reaching for an can. object According to the Washington Post, on Feb. 24, 2014, “Distracted driving: 9 die, 1,060 hurt each day, CDC says” every Grooming day nine people die and 1,060 people Looking at someare hurt in crashes where distraction is thing in vehicle reported as a cause. That’s a death evSinging ery 2.6 hours and 44 injuries an hour. Looking at something out of vehicle HTTP://NEWSROOM.AAA.COM/2015/03/DISTRACTION-TEEN-CRASHES-EVEN-WORSE-THOUGHT/ 24 BY MADDIE MARKS// DESIGN BY MADDIE GASKILL

STOP

STATS BEHIND THE DISTRACTION

15%

6 OUT OF 10

12%

6%

6%

8%

10%

9%


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STUDENT LIFE

Humanities Teacher Mr. Perry

Junior Molly Donnell

Students work on their class’s movie so it is ready to present to fellow classmates. Sophomore Andrew Roese

LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION

Students share thier knowledge about their upcoming Humanities movies.

J

unior Molly Donnell anxiously sits while the camera is There are three total movies being made for this project, getting ready to roll for her part, students this year in Mr. “Shane”, “The Visit” and “The Hunchback of a Notre Dame”.The Perry’s Humanities class were given the task of recreating a three movies have different plots and ways each student can movie that has already been made and adding their own connect with the stories, but the one thing that they are most spice to it. junior Molly Donnell is recreating the movie “The Visit”. excited about is adding a twist to the plots “Our movie is called ‘The Visit’ and it’s about two siblings who “ I’m super excited about the movie because it has given me the go to their grandparents house and then the grandparents opportunity to learn more about the movie production cycle and start acting weird except there is a huge plot twist and it’s really given me the experience to make up scenes when we couldn’t suspenseful.” Each class is given the recreate the original scenes,” Donnell opportunity to choose which movie said. Mr. Perry is also very supportive “Our movie is called ‘The Visit’ and they want to do and how they want about the students adding their own it’s about two siblings who go to to recreate it. Mr. Perry gives them parts to the movies the opportunity to choose what “My students come up with the ideas their grandparents house and then topics and movie they want to recfor the movie they want to recreate the grandparents start acting weird and I review them. If they are school reate as long as it is school appropriate. Sophomore Andrew Roese except there is a huge plot twist and appropriate and realistic in terms is doing the movie ‘The Hunchback of our abilities to re-create them we it’s really suspenseful.” of Notre Dame’, and it is about the develop the storyboard and shoot the struggles of a deformed character JUNIOR MOLLY DONNELL film.” named Quinnie who tries to make To make all three movies students friends and get around in the city. have to devote some of their time to Mr. Perry uses this project to get his students familiar with film the weekends and after school. This seems like a lot of work but making and how important it is. the finishing result is what Mr. Perry looks forward to. “I want the students to learn about the process by which films “I enjoy seeing the smiling faces of my students as they see are transformed from idea to celluloid as well as the specific themselves on the big screen during movie premiere night.” role each member of a film crew plays in the movie production process.” 26

BY HANNAH ABTS // DESIGN BY HANNAH LONG


STUDENT LIFE

BEHIND THE PINK RIBBON During the month of October women who have experienced, beaten or have known someone living with breast cancer raise awareness to spread the importance of this disease.

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ctober is Breast Cancer Awareness month. It’s a campaign to raise awareness on risks of breast cancer, why early detection and screening are important and the treatment options for those individuals living with breast cancer. According to National Breast Cancer Foundation, the chance of women being diagnosed with breast cancer in their life is one and eight. In the United States, it is estimated that over 246,660 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer and more than 40,000 will inevitably die due to the disease. One awareness event for breast cancer that has taken place in Columbus is Courage to Climb. “Courage to Climb is a cancer benefit concert and the goal is to raise funds to support the work of the Hoosier Cancer Research Network,” senior Caleb Bray said, “Last year my mom was diagnosed and the fact that they did the concert was a real comfort to her. I decided that the concert was something I wanted to get involved in and approached the choir director Janie Gordon about getting involved. She knew I was interested and we discussed the possibility of getting involved with the senior project portion of the project. We got early acceptance and everything. It was really cool.” Hoosier Cancer Research Network (HCRN) is a facility that brought together academic and community physicians together to develop cancer trials tailored to community need. Since its founding, HCRN has initiated more than 160 clinical trials in a variety of cancer types. The process for Bray and many others went through was very extensive. “For the project, I worked together with Sarah Pankratz. Together we listened to auditions, selected songs, raised money and posted flyers. It was a long and rigorous process, but when the night of the concert came and we saw the faces of those who came be uplifted, we felt blessed. We also ended up reaching our goal of [raising] $7000 for the Hoosier Cancer Research Network. My mom has been cancer free for nearing a year now, and knowing what that was like for her to go through, I hope the concert we put on, not only helped uplift the spirits of those in attendance, but also helped the HCRN find new treatment options,” Bray said. The pink ribbon, a feminine color to symbolize health was chosen to symbolize breast cancer awareness. The ribbon has helped increase early detection of breast cancer, also making women more aware of regular selfexamination and increase funds to find a cure (maurerfoundation.org).

“My step-grandmother had breast cancer, I had met her and been over on her lake only a handful of times; she was such a kind hearted women. When I found out, I saw how it affected everyone else and I wanted to do everything I could to help. She passed away two years ago and is still very close to my heart.” SOPHOMORE OLIVIA DAVIS

59% of students have not been affected in some way by breast cancer

41% of students have been affected in some way by breast cancer “A member at my church has breast cancer. I have known her my whole life so it kind of just affected my whole family because we have been going to that church for a long time. She stopped going to the church so it was really weird not seeing her there.” JUNIOR CHEROKEE LYONS BY BROOKLYNN MOORE // DESIGN BY SUZANNE WARD 27


SPOOKY STATS

DESIGNED BY: EMMA COOPER AND KAT STEILBERG

69% of students said, “Yay!” to Haunted Houses.

81% of students choose “Party” over Trick Or Treating.

AVERAGE PLANNED HALLOWEEN SPENDING Greeting cards Candy Decorations Costumes

$11 $26 $34 $46

2 out of 3 Americans celebrated Halloween in 2015.

The Triangle: Issue 3 2016-2017  

The Triangle Columbus North High School Columbus, Indiana

The Triangle: Issue 3 2016-2017  

The Triangle Columbus North High School Columbus, Indiana

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