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Business Journal NORTHEAST

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By Dave Gardener

PENNSYLVANIA

THE REGION’S AWARD-WINNING SOURCE OF BUSINESS NEWS AND INFORMATION

June 2019 VOL. 34 NO. 6

Health care impact: The latest in local trends

W

ithin America’s vast $3.65 trillion health care system, teams of specialized caregivers are striving to tend to the needs of both mind and body, with an eye on challenges as well as opportunities. A wide variety of high-tech equipment from the world of science lines the halls at Northeast Radiation Oncology Centers (NROC), but survivorship issues and quality of patient life are also vital within treatment, Peters according to Christopher Peters, MD, medical director. Access to a dietitian, exercise therapists and care for the mind are all vital parts of this formula. According to Dr. Peters, each patient’s situation is different as his or her treatment plan unfolds. This amplifies the fact that caregivers apart from physicians can help a patient in ways that a doctor can’t. “We have followed this comprehensive approach with care this since day one of the center opening,” said Dr. Peters. He described how problems with body image often haunt cancer patients during and after treatment, making support groups and a shared commonality helpful as social relationships develop. Caregiver staff members can also participate in care associated with patient emotional needs. “Therefore, the push for survivorship and quality of life during post-diagnosis treatment is national in scope,” said Dr. Peters.

Specialized caregivers Nutrition counseling is a vital part of oncology treatment, according to Mary Klem, registered dietitian with a board certification in oncology. She described how the side effects of cancer treatment can be difficult for a patient in regard to eating, resulting in needs for specially textured foods and fiber contents that must be changed according to the onset of various symptoms. Oncology dieticians are also finding themselves in a nation-wide battle against misconceptions about the best way to deal with cancer. Patients often wind up limiting nutritional items that are important within their recovery, or abusing supplements. “A non-science approach that obtains ideas from the internet is not the best source for information,” said Klem. “Sometimes I think whoever writes these things is selling something.” She emphasized that oncology dieticians can’t “heavy hand” a patient with nutritional advice, particularly if the individual is suffering from additional sickness from treatment. Yet, portion size and texture for swallowing all are vital for compliance with a care plan, and losing weight is certainly favorable for most patients. On a positive note, Klem has noticed that most people she deals with seem to be increasingly interested in nutrition. They also grasp that simple fresh food within any dietary plan is always a plus. “Sometimes, simple techniques such as setting up a crock pot before you leave for work can make very big changes in what we are eating,” said Klem. Renewing the relationship between a cancer patient and his or her body is the work of former Olympic

A 9-year consecutive winner of the prestigious President’s Award.

Submitted photo

Abby Peck, exercise specialist; Mary Klem, registered dietitian with board certification in oncology; and Mindy Morgan Hill, certified wellness and yoga instructor. rower Abby Peck, MA, exercise and sport science specialist with NROC. She detailed how cancer treatments often bring physical and emotional pain that can be highly emotional to endure, thereby disrupting the mind-body partnership. “We work with these patients despite their limitations and help them to use their bodies in a positive manner,” said Peck. “We also laugh a lot, even though this is all happening while so many are dealing with pain.” A Peck-coached workout utilizes exercise routines, Please see Impact, Page 8

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Business Journal PeNNSYlVANiA

Vol. 34, No. 6 • JuNe 2019 149 PeNN AVe., ScrANtoN, PA 18503 www.biz570.com The Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal is a member of Times-Shamrock Publishing Division

Health care Papa John’s: evolving the brand away from the person, but keeping the name impact: the latest in local trends

CNG SALES MANAGER Alice manley — ext. 9285 CONTRIBUTING REPORTERS Dave Gardner Joe Sylvester Phil Yacuboski FiND uS oNliNe: www.Biz570.com facebook.com/570 • twitter.com/biz570

ADVERTISING/SUBSCRIPTIONS 570-207-9001 or 877-584-3561 PRESS RELEASES/STORY SUGGESTIONS 570-207-9001 or 877-584-3561 Fax: 570-207-3448 MAILING ADDRESS: NPbJ editorial Dept., 149 Penn Ave., Scranton, PA 18503 EDITORIAL E-MAIL ADDRESS: biz570@timesshamrock.com

NPbJ is protected under the federal copyright act. reproductions of any part by any means or facsimiles without the express written permission of the publisher are not permitted. reprints of NPbJ articles are available. Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited materials — manuscripts or photographs — with or without the inclusion of a stamped, self-addressed return envelope. information in this publication is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy and completeness of the information cannot be guaranteed. No information expressed herein constitutes a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any securities. Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal (iSSN 1078-5698) is published monthly except twice in the month of may by The Scranton Times from offices located at 149 Penn Ave., Scranton, PA. Periodicals postage paid at Scranton, PA. The Journal serves business owners, managers and professionals in a 10-county region. Subscriptions are available for $28 per year, $49 two years or $64 for three years. PoStmaSter: Send address changes to Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal, 149 Penn Avenue, Scranton, PA 18503.

FEATURES

NEPA Match Day ........................ 4 Marketing to millenials................ 5 Pa. revenue surge ...................... 6 Warehouse coming to Jessup....... 10 Managing drones ..................... 13 Women entrepreneurs ............... 14 Stroudsburg goes green ............. 17 Real estate summit................... 20

EXECUTIVE SUITE

Brand ..................................... 2 Defining a financial advisor......... 16 Investment strategies................ 16 Economic development .............. 18

BUSINESS BULLETINS

Briefs ................................... 19 Personnel File..................... 21-23 Deeds ............................... 24-25 Mortgages ......................... 25-27

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your anger ... criticism ... honesty. it is making us better.” Being the top executive of your company and Subsequent advertising tried a short-lived the front man for the brand at the same time is tactic of diluting the power of the name “John” by always a risky proposition. A cEo has to make suggesting that the company was made up of many unpopular decisions at times and his business people. priorities may not fit perfectly with the demands “You’ve heard one voice of Papa John’s for a of being the face of the brand. Every statement is long time,” an employee said in a tV spot, “it’s time highly scrutinized and mistakes, big and small, can you heard from all of us.” weigh heavily on public perception. At the end of the spot, a list of alternative names Papa John’s founder John Schnatter served for rolled by including Papa kiersten’s, Papa brant’s and years as a likable pitchman for the growing pizza Papa Daniel’s. brand that challenged Pizza Hut and Domino’s for of course, a litany of alternative names to resignificant share of the take-out and delivery pizza place the bad actor isn’t a long-term strategy, it just market. Though he shared the spotlight with the serves to begin redefining that when they say, “Papa likes of Peyton manning and others, Schnatter was John,” they don’t mean that “Papa John.” (one the center of the brand’s messaging for more than a subtle move by the company has been to register decade as it grew to national prominence. the trademark without the apostrophe in “John’s.”) Unfortunately, Schnatter proved to be a public in April, the brand made a big step toward relations nightmare for his company as well, wading demonstrating its commitment to inclusiveness by into political issues including health care and NFL naming Shaquille o’Neal, who is african-american, players kneeling for the national anthem. when his to their board of directors. The company also signed commentary took a turn toward racism with the him to a three-year contract as a brand ambassador use of the N-word, he was soon ousted from his and an investor in nine store locations. The popular executive roles. The company then began playing “Shaq” is a seasoned pitchman and has a Q Score defense against what once had been its greatest that is at the top of the charts. it’s a wise strategy for branding asset. Papa John’s to make such an overt choice for a new Now the brand faces the most delicate of face of the brand. balancing acts—keep the brand name, but get rid of So the process rolls on. Sales were down the guy it’s named after. anything this complicated before Schnatter’s racist statements became public, requires a strategic process, and the brand started and the brand continues to attempt to rebuild lost out correctly by first accepting blame for the situmarket share. it is slowly putting distance between ation. itself and its founder. The high-wire act of “keep-thein one ad in the fall of 2018, they acknowledged name-but-lose-the-namesake” continues. Shaq is the criticism of the company saying, “You expected likely part of the solution, but there’s a long way to better from Papa John’s. So did we. thank you for go to take the Papa John out of Papa John’s. by Dave Taylor

CNG MANAGING EDITOR elizabeth baumeister — ext. 3492

COPYRIGHT

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FEATURE

A giving record

Match Day, the Artists for Art (AFA) Gallery, 514 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. Northeastern Pennsylvania has never “They earned that for their high level of before given like this. engagement,” Pagnotti said. More than 30 nonprofit organizations “We didn’t raise the most,” said Lindserving Lackawanna County and the say Barrasse, AFA gallery coordinator, surrounding region collectively raised adding that the gallery raised just over $234,402 in 24 hours for the Scranton $1,400 but earned points for its varied Area Community Foundation’s fifth annual ways of fundraising, such as its use of NEPA Match Day. It was the largest day of social media and the number of events it giving in the region’s history, according to held. Those events included music and SACF spokeswoman Brittany Pagnotti. meditation nights, live drawing classes, “It all supports their missions,” Pagyoga classes and paint and sip nights. notti said. She said the gallery held two events a The donations came from more than week leading up to Match Day. 2,550 donors. “We held so many events in the comShe said SACF matches the donations munity,” Barrasse said. “I was really active dollar for dollar, up to $1,000 for each of on social media.” the 30 organizations. All exceeded $1,000 She said AFA earned 100 points for in donations. The foundation also present- every social media post and accumulated ed a $5,000 bonus to the top nonprofit for 20,000 points. by Joe Sylvester

AFA is a member-based organization started 31 years ago by artists for artists, including those in the performing arts. “It was started by artists who needed space to create and to share their work and to mingle,” Barrasse said. “The Scranton Area Community Foundation is honored to serve as a community partner through NEPA Match Day to help raise awareness of all the amazing work that our community nonprofit organizations are carrying out locally in Northeastern Pennsylvania,” said Laura Ducceschi, SACF president and chief executive officer. Pagnotti said the foundation’s mission is to enhance the quality of life for all people in the region through the development of organized philanthropy. With assets of more than $40 million and more than 180 charitable funds, the Scranton Area Community Foundation distributed

“Since its inception, NEPA Match Day has raised more than $650,000 for a variety of nonprofits within the community.”

more than $1.3 million in grants and scholarships in 2018. NEPA Match Day was created by the foundation in 2015 as a way to help the vital nonprofit organizations serving the community raise much needed capital. The event encourages philanthropy in the community and demonstrates how even small gifts make a real difference to local nonprofit organizations, according to the foundation. Since its inception, NEPA Match Day has raised more than $650,000 for a variety of nonprofits within the community. The 30 participating nonprofit organizations who all registered on a first-come, first served basis to become part of the 2019 NEPA Match Day cohort include the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute, Griffin Pond Animal Shelter, Friends of the Poor, Scranton Fringe Festival, Greater Carbondale YMCA, Lacawac Sanctuary Environmental Education Center, Jewish Family Service of NEPA, Boys & Girls Clubs of Northeastern Pennsylvania, The Wright Center for Community Health, Valley Community Library, Greater Scranton YMCA, Victims Resource Center, Everhart Museum, Dress for Success Lackawanna, Countryside Conservancy, AFA Gallery, Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple, Outreach - Center for Community Resources, Indraloka Animal Sanctuary, NeighborWorks Northeastern Pennsylvania, The Arc of Northeastern Pennsylvania, Marley’s Mission, Meals on Wheels Community Services of NEPA, The Greenhouse Project, Family Service Association of Northeastern Pennsylvania, Women’s Resource Center, The Philharmonic Society of Northeastern Pennsylvania, Saint Joseph’s Center, Discovery MI Preschool and Northeast Pennsylvania Youth For Christ Inc. Additional information about the Submitted Photo Scranton Area Community Foundation can Thirty nonprofit agencies joined together on Friday, May 3 for the 5th annual NEPA Match Day, a one-day giving event created by the Scranton be found at safdn.org. Area Community Foundation.

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FEATURE

Marketing to millennials less confident then their generational predecessors and possess lower self-esteem. Within the ongoing sweepstakes to In addition, as part of America’s “trophy capture youthful recreation dollars, sellers generation” they may have unrealistic exacross the landscape of commerce must un- pectations about their ability to accomplish, derstand the appetites and lives of the nainitially expect an “A” on every scholastic tion’s millennials born from 1981 to 1996. exam, and wind up with a wake-up call Applicable data to guide merchant when they find collegiate success takes a marketing efforts is revealing. According focused effort. to MarketingCharts.com, one out of four The digital economy is also embedmillennial men attend a gym, regularly exded within their blood, and the millennials ercise, or participate in indoor sports, while therefore exhibit strong spending on a for females the total logs in at 17 percent. regular basis for high-tech products. When planning a cherished outing with “Almost every year there’s a new wave friends, 59 percent of millennials prefer to of tech products that they have to have, and meet at a restaurant, while 30 percent will they will spend with consistency for these,” choose a bar and 28 percent a shopping said Roy. center. Additionally, at least 75 percent of According to Roy, when it comes to millennials attend movies and 60 percent hard-core recreational spending, it must be patronize night clubs. understood that personal depression rates within the millennials are relatively high. He Huge demographics believes many of their buying habits have Abhijit Roy, DBA, to do with attempts to alleviate this depresprofessor of managesion, and they will use their digital presment, marketing and ence to project a positive face to peers. entrepreneurship at the “We can also expect that the millennials University of Scranton, will evolve as they mature and the world explained that big bucks changes around them,” said Roy. “They are at stake in the drive will eventually buy homes, but before this to sell to millennials. can happen there generally has to be a debt Roy According to data colpay-down.” lected by the renowned Pew Research Center, millennials have now Literal escape become the largest buying group in the A millennial-friendly recreational vendor United States, with about 73 million millen- delivering a relatively new form of enternials now present, and the number increas- tainment utilizes a marketing plan recognizing to 80 million by 2050. ing how millennials, for 60 minutes, will According to Roy, to understand the pay to be totally immersed within their own spending of the generation, you have to consciousness. realize that most of them with a post-high Ryan Hnat, co-owner school education are carrying heavy educa- of Electric City Escape tional debt. This is creating consequences Room with his wife, within their purchasing abilities and delayoperates a “physical ing the acquisition of big “stuff” such as a adventure game where home purchase or getting married. participants are locked “In addition, overall incomes have not in a themed room and been rising,” said Roy. “Something with must work together to Hnat this pattern has to give within a decade.” solve a series of puzzles, Roy cited how various studies have codes and clues to looked at the behaviors of the millennials, escape in 60 minutes.” and established that as a group they are The business has its roots in a trip to by Dave Gardener

Getty Freedom Images

According to MarketingCharts.com, when getting together with friends, 59 percent of millennials prefer to meet at a restaurant.

Europe where the Hnat’s saw established escape rooms. This led the elementary school art teacher and interior architect to open in the Electric City. Various themes are used for the different escapes, which may be purchased by individuals, groups or corporate trainers. These include the Molly McGuires where participants are caught in a race against air and must find their way out, and the Great Houdini, in which a team walks backstage and looks as though caught in a trick, using magic to escape. Despite the modern nature of the escape room format, Hnat emphasized that oldfashioned business tactics make it profitable. He continually stresses the need for customer service with his employees, and preaches that the best form of advertising for potential customers involves word-ofmouth commentary from satisfied patrons. “The push-and-pull that leads up to making a sale is always a beautiful thing,” said Hnat. During the winter and holiday season, Hnat’s team will serve about 1,000 patrons

a month. Spring is slower because the escape room is in competition against many additional activities for recreational time, such as graduation parties. Hnat has studied his target audience, and in regard to the millennials he has noticed how they can review entertainment possibilities instantly because of their digital connections. He said this is vital to understand, because with millennials so deeply in debt from student loans and dealing with a high cost of living, they will analyze recreational purchases carefully before buying. “Every day is a big hustle for these kids, with different influences creating their buying appetites,” said Hnat. “Often, they have an interest in a subject that goes back to something from their childhood, and a recreational buy will be about reliving these memories. They also love group events.” Above all, Hnat is selling a time-out from daily living to the millennials. “This appetite for escape is what kindles their spending patterns, particularly with entertainment,” said Hnat.

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FEATURE

A surprise revenue surge by Phil Yacuboski

You can call it a revenue surge – a surge no one saw coming. Pennsylvania is raking in far more than it anticipated in revenue from Act 43 legislation, enacted by Governor Tom Wolf in fiscal year 2017-2018. It’s now brought in $171.3 million. Pennsylvania is now one of a handful of states across the country where online sellers must pay sales tax (or tell consumers they have to pay sales tax) on items sold to state consumers. The change in Pennsylvania law came after a U.S. Supreme Court decision overturning a lower court decision. That decision said that in order to collect sales tax, you had to have a physical presence in that state. “It requires online remote sellers making sales to Pennsylvania customers to either collect or remit Pennsylvania sales tax or to send notices to their customers that they might have an obligation to remit the tax,” said Jeff Johnson, communications director for the Pennsylvania Department of Revenue. “That legislation

has been very effective for us.” Johnson said the initial estimate in revenue was $50.5 million for the current fiscal year and from May 2018 through the end of March, the state was at $174.5 million. “That’s the impact that it is having,” he said. Johnson said it hasn’t been terribly difficult collecting the tax or helping out-of-state online sellers deal with the new rules. “We’ve been working with a lot of the online marketplaces to help them understand the law and what the requirements are,” he said. “We’ve had a lot of success with that.” Johnson said out-of-state sellers totaling more than $100,000 in annual gross sales to state customers, are now required to submit that tax to the state. “It’s a decision that’s really changed things,” he said. But if you’re selling items to Pennsylvania customers from Utah, Colorado, Florida or Vermont – how does the revenue department keep track of all of those sales from all of those states?

“We’re on the verge of announcing a new project with certified service providers,” said Johnson. “Essentially, a business can outsource their sales tax collection obligations.” He said in many states, the companies already exist. “We are hoping that it helps meet their obligations and makes things easier,” he said. Johnson said the Department of Revenue formulates its revenue projections based on ‘economic data that was available at the time.’ “Online marketplaces have really changed the land-

scape of how commerce occurs in this day and age,” he said. “That’s part of the reason why the number is so much larger than expected.” Two years ago, Pennsylvania imposed a sales tax to online sellers. Pennsylvania’s Independent Fiscal Office believes Pennsylvania is on track to college $300 million in revenue from the new tax rules. The U.S. Department of Commerce said in May that online marketplaces throughout the country did $137.7 billion, an increase of 3.6 percent from the previous quarter.

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HEALTHCARE FROM PAGE 1

cardio work, weights and sessions with other types of equipment. An additional patient benefit she observes is the uplift often felt from simply being at NROC with fellow patients, as well as interacting with living examples of people beating the disease. “Any cancer patient can come here and participate,” said Peck. “They don’t have to be in treatment with NROC.” Patient motivation within oncology varies widely, thereby making it important to encourage the behavior known as mindfulness. This involves attention to the way a person thinks and acts, with the promotion of inner peace. In the cross hairs of the battle to tend to these mental health needs strives NROC’s Mindy Mordan Hill, certified wellness and yoga therapist. Yoga is her lifelong passion as it is utilized to calm the mind, emphasize the miracle of breathing and create spiritual connections. Hill interacts with more than 100 patients each week within her yoga classes. The physical activities also teach patients to combat anxiety and encourage their ability to sleep which is vital for healing. “Medical practices, to some degree, have their hands tied in what they can offer,” said Hill. “But, oncology caregivers all know they need to provide people with the tools for wellness if they are to thrive, and that’s where we come in.” She added that patient compliance is never a problem with Yoga, and that some patients, after their recovery, continue with yoga due to the ongoing health benefits. This includes a reduction of aches and pains, lower blood pressure and mental serenity. “This is all part of society’s shift to acceptance of the vital need for wellness,” said Hill.

Home care productivity As the need for home health care increases, administrators within the medical specialty are dealing with challenges such as rising demands for caregiver productivity plus cost effectiveness. Additionally, as the number of elderly Americans explodes, needs for home care are sure to also Kelleher accelerate. Melissa Kelleher, assistant vice president of Home Health with Allied Services, manages a program that has been serving a wide variety of post-acute patients for more than 30 years. The staff, exceeding 65 employees includes skilled nursing personnel plus physical, occupational and speech therapists, as well as care aides you may help patients

with tasks as basic as bathing. As private insurers push for cost savings with care, the goal of Allied to return patients to self-care becomes increasingly attractive. The staff, within an average year, cares for more than 2,000 patients and any given time must deal with 260 to 280 patients on its active census. According to Kelleher, 60 percent of the care is paid for within Medicare advantage plans, plus a limited amount of Medicaid coverage. Constant regulatory changes must be coped with, and during 2020 payment systems are scheduled to shift away from pay-per-episode to a Patient-Driven Groupings Model (PDGM). The PDGM system, according to its proponents, will focus on patient needs. It also will rely more heavily on patient characteristics in order to pay for home health services. As Allied faces this financial conversion, a nagging problem sure to continue involves staffing shortages. Kelleher commented that Allied has been lucky due to its maintenance of a stable workforce with longevity, but it is increasingly difficult to recruit nurses, particularly weekenders and those working on-call. “Many of the kids who choose to study nursing continue in their schooling and go on to become a nurse practitioner,” said Kelleher. “One of the reasons for this as that they will be carrying heavy educational debt upon graduation, and therefore need the higher salary of a nurse practitioner.” She also explained that, as the elderly numbers in the country rise, more nurses than ever before will be needed. The nation’s schools can only turn out so many graduates, ensuring that workforce shortages will compound. “I have no idea how we’re going to deal with any of this, and its all part of the reality that home health agencies must evolve, be part of a system acquisition, or close,” said Kelleher. Allied’s home care nurses are each required to “see” six patients per day to satisfy productivity requirements. Within the home environment the requirement for extensive computer documentation of each patient’s situation can also be difficult, because time spent on an iPad is not the hands-on care nurses are expected to deliver. “Payment and quality control all depend on accurate documentation, so there’s no way to reduce the amount of computer time our nurses must spend during each home visit.” said Kelleher. Opiate battle Vital services such as primary care, behavioral health and the need for social assistance for mothers-

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to-be who are within the grasp of addiction are all being addressed within the Healthy MOMS program. Maria Kolcharno, director of addiction services with The Wright Center for Community Health, administers the substance-related portion of the program. She declared that opiates remain the number one problem in NEPA, with some alcohol and cocaine treatment also needed. Working within the behavioral health services of the Wright Center, Healthy MOMS functions with a keen understanding that without resources and life skills, the situation Kolcharno facing a pregnant woman can be daunting. When addiction is present, the scenario can become overwhelming. The program’s caregivers therefore strive to take down barriers that inhibit addicted women from receiving vital services by utilizing a collaborated network financed with government grants. The driving force behind the effort, according to Kolcharno, is Linda Thomas-Hemak, MD, president and CEO of The Wright Center for Community Health. “Addiction treatment resources are limited even within a 12-step program, and there’s way too much simplicity out there even with drug treatment, such as the 1980s ‘Just Say No’ initiative,” said Kolcharno. “We’re very aware that future sustainability of a program like ours is always a problem, even though many doctors and clinics are not necessarily positioned to deal with these types of social problems.” Patients come to Healthy MOMS through various paths such as billboard and radio advertising, prison referrals, personal networking, Maternal and Family Health Services and the Wright Center as a patient. Kolcharno has noted that most pregnant moms are usually compliant because they fear hurting their child, and agree to use the drug Subutex to reduce cravings and opiate withdrawal symptoms. The program then teaches the women to focus on the problems at hand and learn life skills, financial planning and to integrate behavioral modifications into their lives. Instruction in money management skills are also offered, as well as day-care options and how to pay for it. According to Kolcharno, the program formally launched in October of 2018, and as of mid-May 40 expectant mothers had “enrolled” with 17 births. Healthy MOMS is also working with the maternity staff at Commonwealth Moses Taylor to break down the stigma of addiction and include more women in birthing classes. “Some addicted women, to counteract the stigma

they feel, will simply do an emergency department birth,” said Kolcharno. “Guilt and shame are also big factors with these mothers, and they have fears that the government will take their baby away.” The program also creates a safe care plan for the post-birth era. The participants are fully informed about the societal realities they will face, and drug screened. “Once the word ‘baby’ is mentioned, most people in this society are open to helping moms-tobe,” said Kolcharno. DNA connections The evolving science of DNA exploitation is alive and well within the Geisinger Health System with the expanding MyCode Community Health Initiative. This program identifies genomic variants within consenting patients that increase the risk of a specific diseases, such as heart disease, cancers and cystic fibrosis. David Ledbetter, Ph.D, executive vice president and chief scientific officer, explained that more than 235,000 patients have signed consent forms that allow the program to draw their blood and subject it to select genomic testing. More than 145,000 of these samples have now been DNA sequenced, creating the largest study of its kind in the world. According to Dr. Ledbetter, the initial findings of 100,000 adults in average health with sequenced genomes indicate two percent have genetic variants that create a real risk for the serious diseases being identified. In addition, one-half this group has no recorded family history that would lead to testing for the diseases. “This means that 50 percent of the group would have waited until symptoms appear, which is certainly not preferLedbetter able,” said Ledbetter. “This is encouraging to us and gives us the power to help them before disease appears.” He indicated that the future of MyCode will include expansion of the number of genetic variances being identified that cause disease. In addition, DNA sequencing costs continue to drop. According to Ledbetter, identification of a genetic variant that causes disease can have an emotional side-effect for a patient. However, the vast majority of program participants react well to the news of high risk, and then pursue a better outcome for their situation. “There also are some conditions that may have genetic variants which we are not testing for because of a lack of effective prevention,” said Ledbetter. “These include Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.”


Newly-elected Chief Resident to Take on Challenge of Advocate and Mentor In addition to caring for patients, she’s on several organizational committees, organizing a health fair, preparing presentations and engaged in many community service projects. And, she’s part of a growing group of Wright Center physicians now volunteering their services at Pittston’s Care and Concern Free Health Clinic, which serves local residents lacking medical insurance.

Dr. Kelly O'Leary

K

elly O’Leary, MD, has traveled thousands of miles in her journey to become a doctor, from her Southern California hometown to the Caribbean to the Big Apple and now, for the past two years, Northeastern Pennsylvania. O’Leary, on a path to becoming a primary care physician, is currently wrapping up her second year as an internal medicine resident at The Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education. In several months, she’ll begin her third and final year, and was recently peer-elected to serve as one of four chief residents. The role of chief is a big responsibility for the Huntington Beach, California, native; essentially, she’ll serve as an advocate and mentor for almost 100 fellow internal medicine residents. “I’m honored. It’s nice to know the residents respect me and think highly enough of me to believe I can take on this role,” said the 28-year-old Scranton resident. “I’m currently a resident leader, so I’ve already been a spokesperson for the class. Now, in this role, I’ll get to take the reins a bit more. It’ll be a challenge, but a good challenge.” The new role will only add to O’Leary’s incredibly full plate. Her 10 to 12-hour days are spent rotating between shifts at Scrantonarea hospitals and The Wright Center for Community Health’s various clinics in Luzerne and Lackawanna counties.

“The clinic is really wonderful, because it’s a side of medicine I really love. Somebody comes in and has nothing, and you just do all you can to help them,” O’Leary said. “My days are filled with work activities and volunteerism. I try to give back as much as I can.” Meanwhile, she spends her limited free time immersing herself in NEPA life as much as possible, whether trying new restaurants, hitting the area’s many hiking trails or recently taking up skiing. Quite often, O’Leary finds herself spending her limited off-hours with her fellow residents, the vast majority of whom are from outside the area. “We’re like a family. We go to work and we enjoy seeing each other. And then outside of work we’ll do things together, like go for ice cream or play sports,” she said. “Work-life balance is important, because it does get stressful. You have to utilize your support system.” O’Leary’s path to medicine began in high school, when an injury brought her to the office of orthopedic surgeon Dr. Robert Ahearn. “He was amazing,” she said. “Very old school. On my first encounter with him, he spent an hour and 20 minutes in the room with me.” About a year later, she ran into Ahearn at a race, and he offered her the chance to shadow him at his office. That summer, O’Leary discovered her passion for patient interactions, which, coupled with her facility for science, led to the

realization that medicine was the right career track for her. After completing her bachelor’s degree at Northern Arizona University, O’Leary headed to the Caribbean island of Grenada to attend medical school at St. George’s University. “Grenada was amazing. It definitely had its benefits and drawbacks,” she said. “It is a third-world country. Milk was delivered to the island once a week. But the people there are incredible, and that whole ‘no worries’ vibe really gave me a wider perspective on slowing down and allowing myself to enjoy life.” From Grenada, O’Leary moved to Brooklyn, New York, to do her clinical rotations at New York-Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital. Then, it was time to find a place to do her residency. After much research, she came upon the Scrantonbased Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education, which has trained more than 750 physicians since its founding in 1976. Among other things, O’Leary was particularly struck by the organization’s focus on community health. “When I came for my interview, the residents all seemed very happy and friendly,” she said. “And everyone made me feel so comfortable. I think what was meant to be just happened. Here, the faculty and staff genuinely want the residents to do well.” The physician faculty — some full time and some volunteer — have been great mentors, O’Leary said, while the “one stop shop” approach at The Wright Center for Community Health practices has allowed her to treat a range of maladies and grow much more comfortable with aspects of the job like arranging patient appointments and ensuring follow-up visits. Of course, the patient interactions give O’Leary the most satisfaction. She aims to make a genuine

human connection with patients and treat them as she would want to be treated in times of such vulnerability. “You have to make the most of your time with them, and be fully present,” she said. Through these insights, O’Leary realized her future wouldn’t be as a specialist, but as the type of primary care physician The Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education aims to produce more of, especially given the well-documented regional and national doctor shortage. “I was battling for a while about whether I was doing myself a disservice by not picking a specialty,” O’Leary said. “But, to me, being an amazing general practitioner and internist is just as great as being a specialist. I’m happy to say I want to practice general medicine, because there’s so much good you can do for so many people.” Now that she has that figured out, O’Leary has the next year to decide if her first post-residency job will be in a primary care practice or hospital setting, and whether she wants to continue practicing in NEPA or explore a new part of the country where she can set her professional roots. “There’s a lot of comfort being here, and I do like this area. Ultimately, I’ll have to find the place that will give me the best platform to do what I want to do,” she said. “Overall, doing a residency in NEPA has been a great experience. I genuinely enjoy going to work every day. The team at The Wright Center for Community Health, and everyone who supports the residents and fellows through The Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education, are making amazing strides to improve the health of the community and create the physicians America needs.”

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LOCAL HNB supports Leadership Lackawanna

JON O’CONNELL / STAFF PHOTO

Officials ceremonially broke ground for the Valley View Trade Center Thursday, May 23 in Jessup. The 1 million-square-foot warehouse is being built by Texas-based developer Trammell Crow. From left, Trammell Crow Vice President Michael Wilson, Trammell Crow Managing Director Andrew Mele, Trammell Crow Senior Associate John Pollock, state Rep. Kyle Mullins, Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce President Bob Durkin, Jessup Mayor Joe Buckshon and SLIBCO President Marianne Gilmartin.

Enormous warehouse on its way to Jessup

ing, when the 10-year term begins and 5% more each year until it ends. A prolific commercial developer from Dallas, Officials from Lackawanna County, the Valley Texas, is building 1 million square feet of industrial View School District and Jessup all agreed on warehouse in Jessup with nobody to fill it yet. granting the LERTA. But Trammell Crow Co. executives have a vision “Government can’t create jobs. We can’t create for the building they ceremonially broke ground jobs single-handedly,” said state Rep. Kyle Mullins, for on Thursday, May 23, which will be called the D-112, Blakely. “But this project, this development Valley View Trade Center. is the perfect example of how economic develop“It’s undeniable that this location is really strate- ment, how job creation happens, when those gic for this type of use — super-regional warepartnerships come to fruition.” house distribution,” said Trammell Crow Managing The company started making inroads to NorthDirector Andrew Mele. “But that’s not why we’re east Pennsylvania about 12 years ago and was here. The reason that we moved ahead with this among the first at the table in the region’s emergent type of project is really about the workforce.” industrial park industry. Despite a booming warehouse and distribution Trammell Crow bought 172 acres in Hanover sector in the Greater Scranton market, he said the Township from the Earth Conservancy for $11 milworkforce remains underutilized. lion, then sold it to another company, KTR Capital Trammell Crow bought 92 acres from the Partners, for $18.2 million in 2014. Scranton Lackawanna Industrial Building Co., It’s now the site of the massive Chewy.com, or SLIBCO, the development arm of the greater Adidas and Patagonia distribution centers raised by Scranton Chamber of Commerce, in November for its current owner, another national industrial real $8,281,800. estate developer, NorthPoint Development, based It received tax incentives for the project, includ- in Missouri. ing a Keystone Opportunity Zone incentive that Trammell Crow recently finished a expires in 2021. At that point, a Local Economic 440,000-square-foot building in the Humboldt Revitalization Tax Assistance, or LERTA designaIndustrial Park in Hazle Township, which is about tion, kicks in. half occupied. That means Trammell Crow only pays 5% of The Valley View Trade Center is to be completed taxes on site improvements, for example the build- by the end of the year.

by Jon O’Connell

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Submitted photo

The Honesdale National Bank donated $2,000 via the Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) Program to Leadership Lackawanna. From left: Elizabeth Nagy, VP, chief marketing and digital officer of The Honesdale National Bank and Leadership Lackawanna board member (left) presents a check for $2,000 to Nicole Morristell, executive director of Leadership Lackawanna.

Friends of the Poor receives grant

Submitted Photo

Friends of the Poor received a grant from The Scranton Area Community Foundation in support of the Family to Family Food Basket program. From left: David Price, Scranton Area Community Foundation board member; Meghan E. Loftus, president and CEO, Friends of the Poor; Laura Ducceschi, president and CEO, Scranton Area Community Foundation; Rosemary Broderick, Scranton Area Community Foundation board chair, and Ellen Burkey, Scranton Area Community Foundation board member.


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FEATURE

NASA’s first-of-kind tests look to manage drones in cities By SCOTT SONNER Associated Press

NASA has launched the final stage of a fouryear effort to develop a national traffic management system for drones, testing them in cities for the first time beyond the operator’s line of sight as businesses look in the future to unleash the unmanned devices in droves above busy streets and buildings. Multiple drones took to the air at the same time above downtown Reno late last month in a series of simulations testing emerging technology that someday will be used to manage hundreds of thousands of small unmanned commercial aircraft delivering packages, pizzas and medical supplies. “This activity is the latest and most technical challenge we have done with unmanned aerial systems,” said David Korsmeyer, associate director of research and technology at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. An autonomous drone took off Tuesday, May 21 from the rooftop of a five-story casino parking garage and landed on the roof of another out of view across the street. It hovered as onboard sensors adjusted for gusty winds before returning close to the center of the launchpad. Equipped with GPS, others flew at each other no higher than city streetlights but were able to avoid colliding through onboard tracking systems connected to NASA’s computers on the ground. Similar tests have been conducted in remote and rural areas. The Federal Aviation Administration has authorized individual test flights in cities before but never for multiple drones or outside the sight of the operator. The new round of tests continuing this summer in Reno and Corpus Christi, Texas, marks the first time simulations have combined all those scenarios, said Chris Walach, executive director of the Nevada Institute of Autonomous Systems, which is running the Reno tests of unnamed aerial vehicles, or UAVs. “When we began this project four years ago, many of us wouldn’t have thought we’d be standing here today flying UAVs with advanced drone systems off high-rise buildings,” he said. The team adopted a “crawl, walk, run” philosophy when it initiated tests in 2015, culminating with this fourth round of simulations, said Ron Johnson, project manager for unmanned aircraft systems traffic management at NASA’s Ames Research

AP File Photo/Scott Sonner

Chris Walach, executive director of the Nevada Institute of Autonomous Systems, points to the launch pad on a casino parking garage in downtown Reno, Nev., where NASA conducted the first drone tests of their kind in an urban setting. A series of simulations are testing the emerging technology that someday will be used to manage travel of hundreds of thousands of commercial, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) delivering packages. Center. “We are definitely in the ‘run’ phase of this development here in Reno,” he said. The results will be shared with the FAA. The agency outlined proposed rules in January that would ease restrictions on flying drones over crowds but said it won’t take final action until it finishes another regulation on identifying drones as they’re flying — something industry analysts say could be years away. Critics assert that the FAA has stymied the commercial use of drones by applying the same rigid safety standard it uses for airlines. “There can be a lot of Silicon Valley mentality where people don’t want to wait. So, we’re trying to strike a balance between unleashing entrepreneurship and ensuring we’re doing it safely while trying to accelerate acceptance of drones in public,” Johnson said. Amazon and FedEx are among the companies that hope to send consumer products by drone by 2020. Drone delivery company Flirtey began testing delivery of defibrillators for cardiac arrest patients last year in Reno under FAA oversight. Johnson said cities present the biggest challenges because of limited, small landing areas among tall buildings that create navigation and communication problems. He said it became apparent early on that the travel management plans for drones would have to be completely automated because FAA air traffic

AP File Photo/Scott Sonner

Two drones fly above Lake Street in downtown Reno, Nev., on, as part of a NASA simulation to test emerging technology that someday will be used to manage travel of hundreds of thousands of commercial, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) delivering packages. It marked the first time such tests have been conducted in an urban setting.

AP File Photo/Scott Sonner

A researcher positions a drone for take off on the roof of a casino parking garage in downtown Reno, Nev., where NASA conducted the first drone tests of their kind in an urban setting. A series of simulations are testing the emerging technology that someday will be used to manage travel of hundreds of thousands of commercial, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) delivering packages.

controllers can’t handle the enormous workload. The system is being tested with the help of 36 private partners, including drone manufacturers, operators, software developers and other thirdparty service providers, Johnson said. The system uses software on the ground that communicates flight plans and positions to other software systems. The drones are equipped with programs for landing, avoiding crashes, surveillance, detection and identification, optical cameras

AP Photo/Scott Sonner

Ron Johnson, NASA's project manager for Unmanned Aircraft Systems Traffic Management, points to an image detailing airspace elevations in downtown Reno. Nev., where NASA conducted the first drone tests of their kind in an urban setting. A series of simulations are testing the emerging technology that someday will be used to manage travel of hundreds of thousands of commercial, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) delivering packages.

and systems similar to radar that work with lasers. Huy Tran, director of aeronautics at NASA’s Ames Research Center, said her supervisors at NASA headquarters were surprised to hear they had be testing drones in Reno. “They said, ‘Are you crazy?’” she said. “We hope (the test in) Reno shows drones can be flown and land safely.”

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CELEBRATING WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS

A blueprint to success to be exact – she and her husband, Garth settled down in NEPA 18 years ago. Originally residing With summer right around the corner, the time in the Hideout, a private community in Lake Ariel, is now to get in shape and get rid of the winter Estadt ran the fitness center there. After moving to blues. At it’s new location in South Abington Town- Justus, she began personal training at a different ship, Body Blueprint, 790 Northern Blvd., is the gym in the area. Her personal training slots quickly perfect place to do so. Beginning at Uno Fitness filled up and she was faced with two options. 15 years ago, moving to Core Fitness in 2016, and Either raise her prices, or hire more trainers, as finally opening up her own studio in November of she looked to leverage her time as opposed to 2018, owner and head trainer Christie Estadt has working more hours, primarily because of her two grown her business tremendously. kids. Fast-forward two years and she has opened Originally from Oklahoma, Estadt attended up her own studio. Southern Methodist University where she was Estadt always knew she was going to be an a member of the women’s basketball team. The entrepreneur, but didn’t know she was going to strength training she was involved in there sparked be doing this. Holding a grand opening with the her interest and made for an easy transition into the SBDC on Black Friday of 2018, Body Blueprint is fitness field. Graduating with a BA in psychology accommodating to all types of people, and not as and a minor in health and nutrition, she began her intimidating as a typical gym setting may be. For journey into the fitness world. those new to exercise, it is a great place to start, as Having a husband in the military, going back to any level can succeed there. Currently, Body Blueschool wasn’t an option for Estadt. After moving print offers personal training, semi-private training, all over the country – seven times in eight years, and small group training. Personal training focuses by Carolyn Giordano and Sydney Garofolo

solely on the individual, with a program developed specifically for client goals. Semi-private training is similar to personal training only with 3-4 people, all who have similar goals. All workouts focus on a combination of strength training, endurance, cardio and core training. Estadt describes her system as the “best system to produce best results for clients-weight loss and toning.” Throughout her time in the fitness industry, some of the struggles Estadt has faced is with her staff. In a client-focused industry, she has found it hard to find staff with the same work ethic and values that Body Blueprint promotes. Estadt continues to focus on keeping her staff busy through marketing her business in order to keep clients coming through the door. After occupying her new location for under a

year, Estadt is currently focused on streamlining the business. In the not so near future, she hopes to eventually expand into a second location. Drawing on her experiences, she reminds fellow women entrepreneurs to not be afraid to ask for help, “especially as women we think we can handle everything.” Lastly, she reminds all to believe in their own system and always “dream.” Body Blueprint Personal Training Company can be found on Facebook at Body Blueprint Personal Training Company and on Instagram at Bodyblueprintptc. Carolyn Giordano and Sydney Garofolo have been writing this column since they began internships with the Women Entrepreneurship Center several years ago. As they now graduate, the center wishes them the very best in their new adventures. Thanks for your hard work, ladies.

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1-800-377-5222 www.luzerne.edu Christie Estadt of Body Blueprint in South Abington Township.

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Submitted photo


We’re more than bankers. We’re partners. RYAN RUARK (LEFT) AND BILL RUARK (RIGHT), MESHOPPEN STONE MATT DOUGHERTY (MIDDLE), COMMERCIAL BANKING OFFICER

“Matt knows the industry, There’s a reason Meshoppen Stone is the largest stone wholesaler in its market: Its president, Bill Ruark, has a reputation for making quick, efficient business decisions. He expects the same from his bank. Matt Dougherty took the time to understand Bill’s and Meshoppen Stone’s needs, providing solutions at the speed Bill’s business requires. That’s how we treat our customers at Community Bank. We get

he knows our businesses and he thinks ahead about what we might need. He’s always been there for us.”

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BANKING & FINANCE

What a financial advisor is/is not Courtesy of Morton Brown Family Wealth

It should be clear, but it isn’t. When I attend networking events, it seems that everyone has “Financial Advisor” written somewhere on their business card. Why? Because, as Willie Sutton supposedly said about why he robbed banks, “That’s where the money is.” There is a false equivalence, though. A belief that because we all call ourselves something that we are all that thing. Not true. There are differences between the actions of an advisor and those of a salesperson. An advisor does/is: ■ Act as a fiduciary, at all times obligated to provide advice in your best interests. This is

not true of the vast majority of people calling themselves “advisors,” unfortunately. ■ A Certified Financial Planner. If your advisor is not one, they should have one sitting next to them at your meetings. Academic credentials and expertise in all aspects of wealth should be table stakes in our industry but are not. We would not trust a lawyer without a law degree or a surgeon who dropped out of medical school, but people do entrust their money to someone best described as the “top salesman.” ■ Engaged. He or she has both hands on the wheel and shows up to do the hard work of planning, investing and staying informed. If someone has one foot in the business and one foot in retirement/golf/Florida, it may work for them, but it doesn’t work for the families they serve. It

should be very clear how the advisor spends his or her time. An advisor does not/is not: ■ Focus on “production.” The best advisor practices are run like law or accounting firms, not sales organizations. An advisor should be measured on client outcomes, not how much product they sell. Top sales or president’s club are not the credentials of an advisor. ■ Have a passion for life insurance. If someone is passionate about any one of the tools at their disposal at the expense of the others, then they aren’t objective. This is especially true if their strongly held beliefs relate to a high commission product that disproportionately benefits them. A true advisor is passionate about the outcome and agnostic when it comes to the means.

■ Try to beat the market. If you want to hire someone to beat the market with their stock picks or complex products, great. It is difficult to do most times, impossible to do consistently, but people keep trying. All of the energy spent trying to beat the market takes away from the ability to be a true wealth manager. ■ Answer to the incentives of a bank or brokerage. In too many cases, the interests of the bank and brokerage come first. Stories abound recently about sales contests to open new accounts and sell loans to clients. Pay incentives, product offerings and business models are often aligned against the client. The brokers employed in these situations find themselves in a position similar to their clients: at the mercy of the parent company.

Customizing investment strategies by generation by Jeff Deloglos

Many studies have illustrated that millennials, gen-xers, baby boomers and the silent generation all prioritize for some type of savings. However, their approach differs based on behavioral biases, socioecoDeloglos nomic status, educational background and attitudes toward sustainable investing. Additionally, each group deems different tools important in measuring its investment choices. To understand how societal generations differ when handling their wealth, it’s important to note the context of their upbringing. The silent generation, now ages 75-91, grew up in challenging economic times and war economies. Many experienced high inflation rates, food shortages and lived within their means through frugal convention. Baby boomers, now 55-74, watched their parents struggle financially in a single income household. The post war economy supported expansion and improved economic conditions. Gen-xer’s, currently 39-54, initiated the era of the two-income family and rising divorce rates, and latchkey kids became more independent. In this generation, disposable income was used for sav-

ings, long-term investment, home ownership and small business ventures. Millennials, ages 24 to 40, represent the largest and fastest growing consumer generation. This generation is largely affected by technological interaction and prioritize more connectivity with less personal interactivity. It’s evident that due to these differences, generational groups do, in fact, have distinct outlooks when it comes to investing. A study by BMO Wealth Management, echoes this and reports that people with similar characteristics such as age range, gender or economic background tend to demonstrate similar biases. OppenheimerFunds conducted research as part of their “The generations project” which pointed to three broad categories that differentiate generations in deciding what is most important when interacting with investments: relationship quality, investment types and performance and added value. The silent generation, for instance, is less likely to use a robo investing platform but define a relationship quality, as one that involves personal interaction with an advisor, while boomers and genxers are likely to have a personal relationship but a growing number enlist an online service. On the other hand, millennials initially prefer robo opportunities but some graduate to a personal advisor. Investment types is probably one of the hottest topics of discussion. All generational groups, when surveyed, shared in a part of this common

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interest. The silent generation, for instance, is less likely to use a web-based platform but seek quality in personal interaction with an advisor. Concerns for sustainable incomes and long-term healthcare coverage, taxation and social security issues are reflected in their asset mix including the use of many FDIC products. Most boomers use an online service or the web and their investment goals include planning for retirement, wealth management and business succession. They will also use an actively managed portfolio but are moving into passive index-oriented options as well. Gen-xers are heading to their highest earning years and choose to research advice before accepting it from an advisor. Many prefer to use passive funds, or an equity-driven portfolio with an appropriate time line. Finally, millennials grew up immersed in technology relationships, however, sustainable investing is a popular concern. This generation is the most socially conscious investor group the market has ever seen and therefore, demand clean energy and technologies. Performance and value added may be derived from delivery of innovative tools and services. Index funds are increasingly popular with investors. According to Morningstar, a global investment research company, actively managed mutual funds and exchange-traded funds in the U.S. saw outflows of $514 billion, while passively managed funds saw nearly $1.6 trillion in new money from April 2014 to April 2017. New technologies have

expanded the industry. Self-directed investing has created large investor pools. Goals such as diversification, risk aversion and cost concerns need to be met. Technologies and those generations who grew up immersed in them have enabled the creation of new investment tools and formats. The silent generation and gen-xers are more likely to use a trusted advisor or discuss investments with family. Boomers and millennials are more willing to add a low cost robo relationship such as Stash or Robinhood to the mix, with fewer conversations with family or an advisor. The popularity of Index investing has added to the growth of this segment and the popularity of low-cost Index Funds and Exchange-traded funds (ETFs), self-directed accounts, and phone advisors are attractive to genxers and boomers. Ultimately, communication to build trust and positive relationships will continue to evolve and less dependence on human interaction will be required. Regardless of what interface works best, diversification, discipline and long-term planning remain bedrocks of healthy investing habits and delineating what is specific to generations presents information data advisors can use to develop best practices for interactions. At the next family gathering look around the room and reflect on how each generation has been influenced by the previous ones. The tools we use today started with ideas from yesterday. Jeff Deloglos is a trust officer at ESSA Bank & Trust.


FEATURE

Stroudsburg charges forward to green future “We’re doing this to combat climate change. The less pollution we are putting into the air, the easier it is for the sun’s rays to reflect back off the planet and to keep the planet from warming.”

sions cheating. The goal of the grant program is to help Stroudsburg is about Pennsylvania meet its emisto get a lot more envisions goals, according to the ronmentally friendly. The Wolf Administration. borough recently installed “We have one station, but two new electric vehicle it has two plugs so two cars charging stations and will can charge with one stasoon add solar-powered tion,” Maier said. It’s located compacting trash cans. at South Six and Ann streets The charging stations in the borough. Jennifer Maier, Stroudsburg are being funded through The unit cost $5,000 borough manager and was purchased through a grant called ‘Driving PA Forward.’ ChargePoint, which has an “We are happy to see them and people are app that users of electric vehicles can downusing them,” said Jennifer Maier, Stroudsburg load to their smartphone. They can locate borough manager. them using the technology. The grant program is being funded by the There is a small fee to use the charging Volkswagen settlement with the state of Penn- service. sylvania and other states. More than $2.6 “Anybody can drive up and use them,” million is being made available statewide due the settlement with the car maker over emisPlease see Green, Page 18 by Phil Yacuboski

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We stand united

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

be re-examined as a tool for advancement of out the region and can be a way to expand this process. services without necessarily adding taxes, Is the Pocono-Northeast united as a true None of this is to suggest that all local especially in small communities that have constant for the benefit of all our citizens? governments should be removed difficulty adding new independent Some would argue that with so may loand regionalism substituted in the services, but could utilize a council cal governments, with so many nonprofits commonwealth, but it does mean of governments for that purpose. providing needed services and with a history Even in places such as the Twin that a review of actions that may of independence, there is little to call attenbe important for the next decade Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, tion to regionalism and working together. would be helpful and beneficial. a shared taxation system has been Yet, this may not be true as more and more There are ideas which could be used for many years. And while steps are being taken to gather a collective implemented in the region such as this may not be adaptable to this Grossman spirit for many different types of functions, the following: region, it at least should be examwhether they be economic development, ■ Inventory the extent to which ined as a new tool for meeting the emergency services, regional marketing, regionalism exists and point out examples of financial conditions. family service or other purposes. The system has been used in some other where it has proven effective in this region. United efforts should become even more ■ Create a regional task force on steps regions of the nation as well. Regional govcrucial in coming years as it becomes finan- ernance means that a support structure can that can be considered across the region and cially beneficial to join together and not only be recast, using more than one government, use the entities previously mentioned as well save some monies but provide more efficient whether it be county or municipality, and as many colleges and universities and others services. The interesting process is that in to focus attention on this topic. there are organizations with much experiother counties of the Commonwealth, newer ence in this region who can assist such as ■ Bring in specialists from other jurisdicways have been found to stand united. This tions who can discuss their situation and prothe Pennsylvania Economy League and the includes the Center County Council of Govvide ideas for consideration inside this region. Institute for Public Policy and Economic ernments where police services and other ■ Conduct a specific research study on Development. These entities are recognized service-related activities have proven to be ways to advance regionalism in the region specialists in providing specialized service effective for up to eight local governments. and develop electronic and print media and research capability. A regional asset district in Allegheny events that can highlight this approach. Among the activities that could be County has proven beneficial for libraries, ■ Create more councils of government established would be an updated regional public works and cultural and art entities where needed and empower their activities plan, dealing with land use, environment, through a special one percent sales tax that dealing with a united process for meeting social services and other needs. Such a plan was approved by the General Assembly and programmatic need. Begin a system that was created in the 1970s, following Tropical signed into law by the governor close to 20 Storm Agnes, by the then Economic Develop- identifies the need for a regional system. years ago, yet has not been adopted in any ■ Expand and further support regional ment Council of Northeastern Pennsylvania other geographic area of the Commonwealth. (EDCNP), now called NEPA Alliance, and that marketing as a means to advance economic It should be considered in the Poconodevelopment through the Penns Northeast event was used for close to 10 years as a Northeast and would add value to the overall guide to review and comment on all federal process. quality of life of this region. It was studied ■ Create where appropriate, such actions projects proposed inside this region. EDCNP in this region about two decades ago, but was careful in seeking ways to meet the needs a regional sports commission to further this never enacted. While there are police regions of the review and comment system, and if this function as has been done in perhaps 70-80 in this part of the state, there should be other places across the nation. This region approach is ever recast, it could easily find many more found to be effective as a way to ways to accomplish this goal in coming years should examine ideas such as this for other enhance police services and actually add dol- through the work of the NEPA Alliance. purposes as well. lars for such protection in law enforcement ■ Initiate mergers and expansions where In still other situations, such as a social activities. At the very least, the opportunity index of regional conditions, a regional plan needed to cause new approaches to happen exists to evaluate how various councils of as a means to cause regionalism to be concould be established that would help all government in this region can define their sidered in a programmatic way throughout social service agencies and be an advocate role through delivering services through that for such enhancement across the entire this region. mechanism. These and many other steps can help region. In some respects, such an approach Regionalism is a tool that deserves more was suggested by then Lieutenant Governor generate a quality of life that benefits this focus and study in coming years throughWilliam Scranton many years ago, and could and future generations in coming years. Howard J. Grossman, AICP

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FROM PAGE 17

“It puts us in the 21st Century. A lot of towns don’t change and if you don’t change, you die. We also want to be good on the carbon footprint and we know that electric cars are growing in popularity.”

Tarah Probst, Stroudsburg mayor

said Maier. “Typically they will be used in two ways. Either someone works in Stroudsburg and they want to recharge there while they are at work, or they are en route on I-80 and they want to stop and charge their car and grab something to eat while they are waiting and then head back out on the road.” Stroudsburg Mayor Tarah Probst said in early 2016, Tesla reached out to her about charging stations. She said the borough’s parking committee decided to pursue the matter through a state grant. “It puts us in the 21st Century,” Probst said. “A lot of towns don’t change and if you don’t change, you die. We also want to be good on the carbon footprint and we know that electric cars are growing in popularity.” Probst said it also attracts people to small town America. “It’s a good way to experience the Poconos and it’s a way for people to see what we offer,” she said. “It brings more people to our downtown to visit.” The borough also has 38 solar compacting stations that will line the streets. The money for the trash cans came via a gaming grant. They will be installed by the fall. “Each of them will automatically tell the borough when its full,” she said. “Oftentimes on a Monday morning, the trash is full because we’ve had a busy weekend, and this will tell our public works crews which trash cans are full.” Maier said the green initiatives have been received “very well” so far. “We’re doing this to combat climate change,” said Maier. “The less pollution we are putting into the air, the easier it is for the sun’s rays to reflect back off the planet and to keep the planet from warming.” “We are trying to change with the times and be better with the planet,” said Probst.


BUSINESS BRIEFS Sanctuary plans new construction Lacawac Sanctuary is seeking funding from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Department of Conservation and Natural Resources and from private foundations and donors to renovate and construct an environmental education center where children and educators can come together to understand, appreciate and protect natural resources. Lacawac’s future Environmental Education Center will also be a gathering place in a stunning setting for the entire community. For more than 50 years, Lacawac Sanctuary Field Station and Environmental Education Center has inspired a love for nature and ecology among families, researchers and students throughout Pennsylvania and beyond. Local law firm relocates Vinsko & Associates P.C., a general practice law firm with offices in Wilkes-Barre and Philadelphia, recently relocated to a larger building in downtown WilkesBarre at 37 N. River St. The move reflects Vinsko’s growth and expansion since the firm opened 15 years ago. The Philadelphia location remains at 1700 Market St., Suite 1005. Vinsko & Associates P.C. provides legal counsel and exceptional representation to individuals, families and professionals throughout Pennsylvania. Colleges announce transfer agreement Wilkes University and Lackawanna College have entered into a new articulation agreement that will help Lackawanna graduates transfer to Wilkes to complete their bachelor’s degree. Under the new agreement, students who earn an associate degree in early childhood education from Lackawanna can transfer into the Wilkes bachelor’s degree in elementary and early childhood education as a junior. Wilkes President Patrick F. Leahy and Lackawanna President Mark Volk signed the agreement on March 27 at Wilkes University. It formalizes the relationship between the institutions, streamlining the admission process for interested students. As part of the agreement, 60 credits earned at Lackawanna College may be applied toward the bachelor’s degree at Wilkes.

Law school degree affiliation inked The University of Scranton and Boston College Law School have signed an early admissions agreement that will allow Scranton students who meet program requirements to be eligible for admission to the prestigious Jesuit law school after three years at Scranton. The agreement will take effect beginning with the 2019-20 academic year. The agreement, commonly referred to as a “3-3 program,” will allow Scranton students to earn a bachelor’s degree from Scranton and a juris doctor degree from Boston College in six, rather than seven, years. After completion of their junior year at Scranton, the agreement allows eligible students to earn up to 30 credits for their bachelor’s degree requirements during the first year at Boston College Law School. Orthopedic office joins network Orthopedic Consultants, Luzerne County’s longeststanding and most established orthopedic practice, has joined Commonwealth Health Physician Network, the area’s largest physician network. Board-certified orthopedic surgeons William Charlton, M.D., Johnny Hernandez, M.D., James Mattucci, M.D., and Michael Raklewicz, M.D., officially became Commonwealth Health physicians April 1. The office will remain at 390 Pierce St., Kingston, specializing in orthopedic surgery (knee, hip and shoulder joint replacement, robotic-assisted knee replacement, arthroscopy, sports medicine and fracture care), as well as nonoperative care of orthopedic patients (arthritis, autoimmune disorders and osteoporosis). On-site radiology services are also offered at the same location.

Hospitals receive recognition Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center and Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre achieved Magnet Recognition on April 17 as a reflection of their nursing professionalism, teamwork and superiority in patient care. The American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Magnet Recognition Program distinguishes organizations that meet rigorous standards for nursing excellence. With this credential, GWV and GSWB join the global community of Magnet-recognized organizations. Just Travel agency marks milestone Boscov’s Travel, a local travel agency with 18 locations 484 U.S. health care organizations out of more than 6,200 hospitals have achieved Magnet recognition. in five states, announced their 45th anniversary since the company’s founding in April 1974, with more than half a million trips planned for leisure, group and Med school launches degree program Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine corporate clients. announced it will offer a master’s degree that In 1974, local businessmen Albert Boscov and Edwin will prepare scientists for careers in laboratory Lakin — along with Eunice Boscov and Alma Lakin research in industries including biotech, life science, — decided affordable vacations should be available pharmaceutical, academia and government. The to everyone. The operation began as a small travel agency at Boscov’s East in Reading, Pennsylvania. The program is designed for working professionals, with company has grown into a full-service travel manage- evening classes held exclusively at the Doylestown campus located within the Pennsylvania Biotechnolment company specializing in leisure, corporate, ogy Center. Applications are now being accepted at group, and meetings and incentive travel. geisinger.edu/PSM. The Boscov and Lakin families set out to create The U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Ema then-revolutionary approach toward travel, and ployment projects the need for medical scientists will four-and-a-half decades years later, Boscov’s Travel operates on the same basic principles and community grow 13 percent through 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. service as the family-owned department stores. Nursing program achieves ranking Career Technology Center of Lackawanna County has been named the No. 8 PN school program out of 53 accredited practical nursing schools in Pennsylvania by PracticalNursing.org in its sixth annual State PN Program Rankings.

College offering new degree Lackawanna College announced the launch of a new online cyber security associate degree starting in the fall. The program addresses a global cyber security staffing shortage. This shortage of IT professionals dedicated to cyber security is leaving businesses open to cyber security attacks. Without properly trained

staffing, corporations could continue to experience major security breaches that compromise consumer data and cost millions of dollars. Lackawanna’s new Cyber Security program curriculum is structured around guidelines set by the National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security, which sponsor the National Centers of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense. UGI named in national survey UGI Utilities Inc. was among 29 utility companies nationwide that were named a 2019 “Environmental Champion” in a recent study by Cogent Reports, a division of Market Strategies International – Morpace. This is the second consecutive year that UGI has been named an Environmental Champion. The Utility Trusted Brand and Customer Engagement: Residential study measures such company attributes as its dedication to supporting the environment by promoting clean energy, enabling consumption management, facilitating environmental causes, encouraging environmentally friendly fleets and buildings and consistently seeking ways to protect the environment. Wayne Bank opens new office The bank recently opened a new community office at 734 Sans Souci Parkway in Hanover Twp., its first location in the Luzerne County market. This full-service office houses both retail banking and commercial lending professionals, offering the bank’s complete line of products and services for consumers and businesses. Health foundation announces grants Nonprofit groups providing health-related programs or services in Wayne or Pike counties, or Carbondale or Forest City areas, in need of support funding may qualify for a Community Grant from the Wayne Memorial Health Foundation (WMHF). Applications will be accepted from organizations whose focus includes health care-related services in the areas of injury and disease prevention and treatment and the promotion of good health and wellbeing for residents in the Wayne Memorial Health System service area. Applications and guidelines are available at wmh. org, or may be obtained from Wayne Memorial Health Foundation, Attn: Jack Dennis, executive director, 601 Park St., Honesdale, PA 18431, or by calling 570-2516533 or emailing dennis@wmh.org. Applications are due no later than June 30.

ment Tax Credit donation to Scranton Preparatory School’s P.J.H.S. Scholarship Fund. The donation to Scranton Prep will help provide scholarship assistance to students and families who cannot afford full tuition costs. The support of Scranton Prep is part of FNCB’s larger Community Caring initiative. As a true, local community bank, FNCB Bank is making a difference through volunteerism, donations and outreach programs. Local hospice receives award Hospice of the Sacred Heart has been named a 2019 Hospice Honors recipient by HEALTHCAREfirst, a leading provider of billing and coding services and advanced analytics. Hospice Honors is a prestigious program that recognizes hospices providing the highest level of quality as measured from the caregiver’s point of view. FCC warns of phone scam The Federal Communications Commission is alerting consumers to reported waves of “One Ring” or “Wangiri” scam robocalls targeting specific area codes in bursts, often calling multiple times in the middle of the night. The calls are likely trying to prompt consumers to call the number back, often resulting in per-minute toll charges similar to a 900 number. Consumers should not call these numbers back. Recent reports indicate the calls are using the “222” country code of the West African nation of Mauritania. News reports have indicated widespread overnight calling in New York state and Arizona. Center announces inaugural season Farm Arts Collective, a newly formed agricultural center based on Willow Wisp Organic Farm, announced its season events. Founded by organic farmer and artistic director Tannis Kowalchuk and Sue Currier (formerly of Delaware Highlands Conservancy), the collective’s mission is to nourish community through programs in farming, art, food and ecology. Workshops, performances and events are planned through November.

Senior center receives grant The Wayne County Area Agency on Aging received part of $2 million in funding from the state Department of Aging’s Senior Community Center grants from the Pennsylvania Lottery. The grant, totaling $57,656, will be used for upgrades at the Hamlin Senior Center, with the funding earmarked for a new roof, flooring and painting, as well as a new wellness program for the seniors.

University faculty, staff honored Wilkes University recognized more than 95 students, faculty and staff April 25 at the Extracurricular Awards Luncheon for their contributions to activities outside the classroom. Honored by Wilkes Student Government, Michael Steele, professor of biology was the recipient of the Faculty Choice Award. Jill Price adventure education coordinator was the recipient of the Staff Choice Award. The Faculty and Staff Choice award recipients are nominated by members Student Government who select a variety of faculty and staff each year who have shaped their Wilkes experience. The final nominees are then put to a vote by the Wilkes student body.

Tire business expands internships McCarthy Tire Service, a family-owned company and one of the top 10 independent commercial tire dealers in the United States, has expanded its corporate internship program with multiple placements at its headquarters in Wilkes-Barre. McCarthy Tire’s internship program offers high-caliber high school and college students the opportunity to gain firsthand experience in a fast-paced business environment. They develop tangible professional skills that make them competitive in the marketplace. They also learn what it takes to be successful in a multimillion-dollar corporation.

Bank donates to scholarship fund FNCB Bank, locally based for more than 100 years, announced a $27,500 Pennsylvania Education Improve-

SUBMIT BUSINESS BRIEFS to business@ timesshamrock.com or The Times-Tribune, 149 Penn Ave., Scranton, PA 18503.

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Penn’s Northeast hosts second annual NEPA Real Estate Summit Penn’s Northeast hosted its Second Annual Northeastern Pennsylvania Real Estate Summit Wednesday, April 24 at the Hilton Scranton & Conference Center in downtown Scranton. More than 225 business and community leaders attended the event to learn more about the local, regional and international real estate market. Penn’s Northeast President/CEO, John Augustine welcomed the crowd and served as moderator for the panelists. Panelists included local and national leaders in the commercial real estate world including Jeff Algatt, senior vice president at Colliers International Group; John T. Cognetti, owner and SIOR, CCIM of Hinerfeld Commercial Real Estate; Jim Cummings, vice president of marketing at Mericle Commercial Real Estate; Ronda Beemer, business development director at Quandel Construction Group; and Brian Knowles, principal with Lee & Associates of Eastern Pennsylvania. Another panel discussed the significance and opportunities within the new federal Qualified Opportunity Zones (QOZs). Kevin Rogers, senior vice president with PNC Bank and Evan Weiss, director of Pennsylvania Economy League, explained how investments made by individuals through funds in these zones can defer or eliminate federal taxes on capital gains. There are numerous parcels in Northeast Pennsylvania that qualify. “Currently we are seeing the largest industrial boom that we’ve ever experienced,” Augustine said. “We have over 9 million square feet of buildings under construction, we have announced more than 5,000 jobs since last year and have over $1 billion worth of capital invested right now in NEPA. So, certainly, from a market standpoint, we are exploding with growth.” Knowles identified about 90 million square feet worth of projects across the eastern part of the state that haven’t started yet. “Being close to major Interstates 80 and 81, we are only a day’s drive from a third of the U.S. population and half of the Canadian population,” Augustine said. “We are also seeing an increase in manufacturing due to our utility infrastructure with affordable natural gas reliability, electric, water and power systems.” Augustine attributes the growth that the region has had to location and an increase in manufacturing. “I think that it’s a good time to be doing business in NEPA. All the presentations today showed that our region is growing,” Augustine said.

Penn’s Northeast is a membership-based organization, with a mission is to enhance the region’s economy through new investments, job creation and increasing the amount of potential business opportunities for regional businesses through targeted business recruitment and unique lead generation activities. This is done in part by promoting the region’s assets to regional, national and international businesses. Focus is placed on the counties of Lackawanna, Luzerne, Monroe, Pike, Schuylkill and Wayne, as well the greater Berwick area. Penn’s Northeast was created through a joint effort of private business leaders, local utility companies, governments, economic development organizations and chambers of commerce to market the collective assets of Northeast Pennsylvania and to facilitate the creation and retention of quality jobs. This is accomplished by providing site selection, labor and incentive financing assistance to businesses, real estate brokers, developers and site selection consultants. For more information, visit pennsnortheast.com. Photos courtesy of Rachel Antosh Hawk / Penn’s Northeast

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PERSONNEL FILE AAA NORTH PENN

The board of directors announced the appointment of Glenn Zumbach, a native of Taylor, as president and chief executive officer. Zumbach joined in 1983 as director of information technology and most recently was senior vice president and chief operating officer, overseeing all business lines, which included emergency road ZUMBACH service, membership, insurance and travel. His most recent accomplishment was heading up a management team that purchased, remodeled and relocated the new Scranton Member Service Office. Zumbach has participated in a number of national AAA committees and task forces. Zumbach replaces Glenn Smith, who retired at the end of March. Smith joined in 1981 as director of services and held positions of increasing responsibility throughout the organization, becoming president and CEO in 1998. Under Smith’s leadership, the club expanded to seven offices in 11 counties throughout Northeast and North Central Pennsylvania, with 150 employees and more than 194,000 members.

AMGEN CORP.

Ned Endler, formerly of Wilkes-Barre, has been promoted to executive director of nephrology sales for Amgen Corp. in Thousand Oaks, California. In this position, he will lead both the nephrology sales team and the KAM Team. Endler brings more than 20 years of experience across sales, marketing and strategic leadership to this role. He began ENDLER his career with the company in the OBU as a sales representative and district sales manager. Most recently, Endler served as regional sales director, INBU Nephrology West Region, where his leadership has been recognized as RSD Coach of the Year and has been instrumental to the success of the nephrology portfolio.

THE ARC OF NORTHEASTERN PA.

The organization announced recent promotions and new hires. Patrick Quinn is the director of program operations. He has made his career with the organization for more than 35 years, starting as a teenager providing direct support for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities served by the organization. After graduating from college, he moved into a QUINN series of progressively responsible agency positions, including supervisor, program specialist, departmental program manager, and most recently director of residential and adult day services. Quinn is a graduate of the National Leadership Consortium on Developmental Disabilities at the University of Delaware, as well as the first cohort of the Nonprofit Leadership Program at the University of Scranton. Kelly Peters has recently been promoted to senior

manager of licensed services. For a brief period of time, he worked for the Scranton Counseling Center as a behavioral consultant before joining the organization in 2000. After working as a program specialist in residential services and then as the program manager in adult day services for the past 18 years, Peters now PETERS directly oversees all licensed services. He is a 2017 graduate of the National Leadership Consortium on Developmental Disabilities. Mike Williams is manager of adult day services. He began his career in human services in 2005 as a direct support staffer. Since that time, he has assisted children and adults with disabilities in many roles, from advocate and outreach coordinator to program manager, and more recently program director. WilWILLIAMS liams holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from Penn State University and a Master of Public Administration degree from Marywood University, where he was the 2018 recipient of Marywood’s Walton Medal of Excellence in Public Administration. Mary Ann O’Shea is an HR generalist who assists in pursuing the mission of the organization by recruiting and retaining the human resources necessary to meet the needs of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Notably, she has passed the Professional Human O’SHEA Resource Exam. She previously served as senior talent acquisition specialist at TMG Health (a Cognizant company), as well as a recruiter for the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education. In her current role, O’Shea is responsible for the oversight of human resources functions for the agency, with a focused commitment and priority of recruiting a quality, caring staff. Mari Pizur is recreation services manager. Employed by the organization since 2001, she began her career as a recreation direct care professional, promoted to recreation services coordinator/camp director and was recently promoted to recreation services manager. She also assists with advocacy and PIZUR is the organization chairwoman for the local task force and state task force. Pizur was the past chairwoman for “Arc Responds” and also sits on the health and safety committee. Roseann Polishan is the new advocate. Advocacy for those with autism and intellectual and developmental disabilities has been her passion since her son, Hunter Polishan, was diagnosed with autism at 2 years old and POLISHAN

later with an intellectual disability. Over the years, she has been increasing her knowledge in the field of advocacy, in particular with education and legislative affairs, including taking a number of trainings, classes and workshops on the IEP process, evaluations/reevaluations, assistive technology, inclusive practices and transition planning. She also has led with the Scranton School District on development of a parent group and the Right to Education Task Force Local 19 as the parent chairwoman.

BARRY ISETT & ASSOCIATES INC.

Donald “Don” Totino, PE, of Bear Creek Twp., joined the municipal department as a senior project manager. He brings more than 15 years of experience in project management, transportation engineering, construction engineering and municipal engineering. Previously of Reilly Associates of Pittston, Totino’s responsibilities included design TOTINO and project management within multiple engineering disciplines, in addition to marketing and grant writing tasks. As a municipal engineer, he has supported various communities in the Northeast Pennsylvania region by developing cost-effective solutions for infrastructure and municipal matters. He holds a certification in the OSHA 10-Hour Training program.

BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS REAL ESTATE WILKINS & ASSOCIATES

Dawn R. Miller, associate broker, has joined the real estate firm. Miller has been licensed since 2000 as a real estate salesperson and holds a Certified Negotiation Expert designation. After opening her company, she MILLER took the required broker courses and passed the required exam becoming broker of record for Timeshare Oasis, located in Wind Gap, in 2017.

BUSCARINI LAW FIRM PC

The American Institute of Family Law Attorneys recognized the exceptional performance of family law attorney Carrie Buscarini as Six Years 10 Best Family Law Attorney for Client Satisfaction. The American Institute of Family Law Attorneys is a third-party attorney rating organization that publishes an annual list of the Top 10 Family Law Attorneys in each state. Attorneys who are selected to the list must pass the organization’s rigorous selection process, which is based on client and/or peer nominations, thorough research, and the organization’s independent evaluation. The organization’s annual list was created to be used as a resource for clients during the attorney selection process.

CAMPOLIETO-RUGGIERO LAW OFFICES

The American Institute of Family Law Attorneys has recognized the exceptional performance of family law attorney Frank J. Ruggiero as Four Years 10 Best Family Law Attorney for Client Satisfaction. The American Institute of Family Law Attorneys is a third-party attorney rating organization that publishes an annual list of the Top 10 Family Law Attorneys in each state. Attorneys who are selected to the list must pass the organization’s rigorous selection process, which is based

on client and/or peer nominations, thorough research, and the organization’s independent evaluation. The organization’s annual list was created to be used as a resource for clients during the attorney selection process.

CHICK’S CLEANING

Kerri Burakowski, Milford, was promoted to the position of managing chick. Burakowski will be responsible for client relationship management, quality control and business growth and acquisition. The Milford company is a residential and commercial cleaning company providing services such as move-in and -out cleans, rental BURAKOWSKI turnovers, maintenance and deep cleaning. Burakowski has served as a lead cleaner since last year. She has been an instrumental part of the company’s operations, consistently finding ways to better serve clients and improve work methods.

CLASSIC PROPERTIES

Roxanne Neutts has joined the Clarks Summit office. She resides in Greenfield Twp. and is the co-owner/ manager of Skyline Golf Course, also located in Greenfield Twp. Neutts recently completed her real estate education through Vintage Academy in Dickson City. Katrina Mackey has also joined the Clarks Summit office. A life resident of Northeast Pennsylvania, she was raised in Taylor and is a resident of West Scranton. Mackey attended Lackawanna College and Penn State University and holds an associate degree in business administration. She received her real estate training online MACKEY through the CE Shop. Danielle Harris has joined the Kingston office. She grew up in Brooklyn, New York, and earned a degree in business management and administration. Harris worked in materials management and customer service management. She recently completed her real estate education at Vintage Real Estate HARRIS Academy. The real estate firm also announced Derek Brodginski has joined the Kingston office. He was raised in Wilkes-Barre and currently resides in Kingston. Brodginski recently completed his real estate education at the Pa. Real Estate Academy in Kingston.

COMMONWEALTH HEALTH

BRODGINSKI

Wilkes-Barre General Hospital’s first DAISY Award went to Diane Reisser, R.N., in the Ortho/Neuro Unit on 4 East at the hospital. The DAISY Award is a nationwide program that Please see Personnel, Page 22

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PERSONNEL FILE

FROM PAGE 21 rewards and celebrates the extraordinary clinical skill and compassionate care given by nurses every day. The DAISY (which stands for Diseases Attacking the Immune System) Award was started by the DAISY Foundation, which formed in 2000, after J. Patrick Barnes, then 33, died of complications of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, an auto-immune disease. DAISY Award recipients are nominated by their peers, physicians, patients and families, and other staff and administrators.

EVERCOR FACILITY MANAGEMENT

The self-performing facilities maintenance firm specializing in the maintenance and support of commercial and industrial facilities recently announced the promotion of Morgan Yohey. Yohey joined the team in 2016 as an administrative assistant. In her new role, she is tasked with keeping the corporate office running smoothly and works with YOHEY various departments including operations, accounts payable, marketing, sales and human resources. Yohey brings her great attention to detail, as well as a commitment to follow through, to her new position.

GEISINGER COMMONWEALTH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

Vicki T. Sapp, Ph.D., director of student engagement, diversity and inclusion and an assistant professor, has been invited to serve on the American Association of Medical Colleges’ Undergraduate Medical Education First Generation Work Group. The newly created work group is tasked with improving programs and strategies to assist SAPP first-generation students, who often lack mentors and resources to guide and support them throughout their medical education.

JACOBI CAPITAL MANAGEMENT

Michael Hirthler of the Wilkes-Barre firm was recently recognized among the Top 1,200 Financial Advisors in America by Barron’s. The annual list highlights esteemed financial advisers who were assessed on varying factors contributing to the quality of their practice. This is the fourth year Hirthler has been named to this list. HIRTHLER Hirthler has worked in the financial services industry for more than 30 years. He is founder and chief investment officer of the firm and a Registered Investment Adviser. He resides in Shavertown and is affiliated with LPL Financial, the nation’s largest independent broker-dealer and a leader in the retail financial advice market.

JOHNSON COLLEGE

Stephenie Vergnetti has been promoted to vice president of human resources and senior adviser to the president and CEO. She holds a bachelor’s degree in

business administration from Marywood University and a master’s in human resources from the University of Scranton. Vergnetti has been with the college since 2012 and resides in Clarks Summit. Barbara Byrne M.Ed., R.T. (R) (MR) has been promoted to associate vice president of faculty and continuing education and also is the program director for radiologic technology. She holds a bachelor’s degree in science from Misericordia University and a master’s of education from Concordia University. Byrne has been with the college since 2011 and resides in Moosic.

KING’S COLLEGE

VERGNETTI

BYRNE Two King’s College faculty were recently granted tenure by the college’s board of directors. Granted tenure and promoted to associate professor were Karen McCready, Ph.D., mathematics, and Anne Szklarski, Ph.D., organic chemistry. McCready was a graduate student, instructor and teaching assistant at Lehigh University, where she earned her master’s and doctorate degrees in mathematics. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the College of New Jersey. She has MCCREADY published research in notable journals, including Discussiones Mathematicae Graph Theory and Journal of Pure and Applied Algebra. She serves as the faculty adviser for the college’s chapter of the Sigma Zeta National Science and Mathematics Honors Society, and is a KC-WiSE mentor, a faculty-led group that encourages women in the STEM fields through social and professional development events. Szklarski earned her Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of California, Irvine, where she was also a graduate researcher. She holds a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the College of New Jersey. Szklarski has co-authored several articles which have appeared in multiple journals including Nature ChemSZKLARSKI istry and Journal of the American Chemical Society. She serves as a KC-WiSE member and mentor and member. The board of directors also announced that six faculty members earned promotions. Garold Lantz, Ph.D., marketing; and Ronald Supkowski, Ph.D., chemistry, were promoted to professor. Joseph Lohin and Joradana Shane were promoted to associate technical professor. Sports medicine faculty member David Marchetti, DAT, LAT, ATC, CSCS, was promoted to clinical professor of sports medicine. William Reynolds, MPAS, PA-C, was promoted to clinical professor in the physician assistant program. Robert Reese has been appointed vice president for enrollment management following a national search. He joined the college’s community April 15. Reese, who has held vice president-level positions

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at three religiously affiliated private colleges in the Philadelphia area, will be responsible for leading the critical admissions and financial aid functions of the college. A resident of Clarks Summit, Reese most recently served as vice president for enrollment services at La Salle University. He is a former member of the Coast Guard and Pennsylvania Army National Guard.

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LEWITH & FREEMAN REAL ESTATE

Carmen Winters has joined the Kingston office. A Wilkes University graduate and Pittston resident, he will retain his membership to both the Luzerne County Association of Realtors and the Greater Scranton Association of Realtors. Winters is an accomplished WINTERS Realtor whose experience and reputation in the industry has given him the qualifications to work with buyers and sellers on both commercial and residential properties for all of their real estate needs.

MERCYHURST UNIVERSITY

Dr. Pete Yaksick, a Johns Hopkins and Columbia trained developmental psychologist and former television journalist, recently co-published a cognitive science article as member of a five-person Ivy League research team based at Columbia University. The article is titled “How does discourse among like-minded individuals affect YAKSICK their thinking about a complex issue?” It was published in December in the peer-reviewed scholarly British journal Thinking And Reasoning, volume 24 number 4, 2018. He is an assistant professor of criminology and psychology at the Tom Ridge College of Intelligence Studies & Applied Sciences and maintains residences in Old Forge and at Mountain Lake, Bear Creek Twp.

MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY

Dawn M. Evans, OTD, OTR/L, assistant professor of occupational therapy, has been named president of the newly formed American Foundation for Suicide Prevention Eastern Pa. Chapter, which will serve 36 counties in the state. Four state chapters — Central, South Central, Greater Northeast and Greater Lehigh EVANS Valley — merged to form the Eastern Pa. Chapter. The merger will enable chapter volunteers to work more effectively and efficiently, while reaching more people and doing the most good with limited resources. Chapter board members include Evans, president; Teresa Perez, co-chair; Jim Presto, co-chair; Tricia Carbaugh, treasurer; Samantha Rynard, secretary; Mallory Weymer, Desiree Galdeieri, Joseph Calhoun and Connie Sutton. Linh Nguyen has been appointed manager of the office of multicultural and inclusion initiatives. Nguyen most recently held the position of assistant director for

the office of identity and inclusion at Bellarmine University in Louisville, Kentucky. In her new role, she will assist in the development and implementation of new programs and initiatives that promote multiculturalism and inclusion within the university. She will focus on creating and maintaining strong connections with other offices, departments and colleagues working on intersections of culture, identity and social justice. George A. Godlewski, Ph.D., MSW, was named director of the health care analytics graduate program that will be available fully online beginning in the fall semester. Health care analytics is a 36-credit Master of Science degree program. The new academic program prepares GODLEWSKI creative and diligent professionals who use data to communicate and enact meaningful imrovements in the delivery of health care. Godlewski earned his doctorate degree in humn development and social work at Marywood University, and his Master of Social Work from the University of Pennsylvania. A resident of Northumberland, he formerly spent 30 years with Geisinger Health System. The university recently awarded tenure and promotions to six members of the faculty. Those tenured and promoted to associate professor are Anna Fedor, Ph.D., chemistry; Jessica Sofranko Kisenwether, Ph.D., C.C.C.S.L.P., speech-language pathology; Jodi Piekarski Loughlin, D.Ed., teacher education; Susan McDonald, Ph.D., social work; Ryan Weber, Ph.D., fine arts, and Joshua D. Winneker, J.D., business. Fedor, a Dallas resident, is the chair of the department of chemistry and biochemistry, and has been a member of the faculty since 2008. She teaches courses in chemical principles, inorganic and physical chemFEDOR istry, and oversees a research program for undergraduates in the areas of physical and computational chemistry. An alumna and a Dallas resident, Kisenwether earned her Bachelor of Science in psychology and Master of Science in speech-language pathology. She has been a member of the faculty since 2015. Kisenwether KISENWETHER has published a book chapter, several articles in numerous peer-reviewed journals, and presented her work at numerous international, national and state conventions. Loughlin, a resident of Shenandoah Heights, joined the faculty in 2011. During her career, she served as an elementary school teacher, reading specialist, federal programs coordinator and Title LOUGHLIN 1 coordinator at Shenandoah Please see Personnel, Page 23


PERSONNEL FILE FROM PAGE 22 Valley School District. She teaches a range of courses, including reading methods, classroom management, language arts methods and collaborating with families. She has published scholarly work in Pennsylvania Teacher Educator, and presented at the Pennsylvania Council for Exceptional Children’s 59th Annual Convention and numerous Pennsylvania Association of Colleges and Teacher Education conferences. McDonald, of Kingston, who serves as the chair of the department of social work, joined the faculty in 2013. She holds a social work license in Pennsylvania and is a certified traumainformed yoga therapist. She served as the university’s director of field education for social work. McDonald previously served as MCDONALD professor of the MSW program for Temple University in Harrisburg, and program director of social work at Alvernia University. She has presented at conferences across the U.S. and in Belgium, China and Bosnia-Herzegovina. A resident of Hawley, Weber joined the faculty in 2013. He also serves as a member of the faculty of the medical and health humanities program. He recently authored the book “Cosmopolitanism and Transatlantic Circles in Music and Literature,” and presented details at an international music and political science conference in Athens in 2018. He WEBER has presented at the University of Huddersfield, England, and the University of Amsterdam, Netherlands. Winneker, a resident of Chester, N.J., holds a Juris Doctor magna cum laude from Seton Hall University School of Law and has been a member of the faculty since 2013. He teaches all legal courses in the undergraduate and graduate programs in the WINNEKER department of business, including business law, sports law, regulation of sports gambling, law, ethics and the legal environment, legal aspects of administration and regulation of human resources. He previously taught at the University of Delaware, where he won the Student Choice Excellence in Teaching Award for the Lerner College of Business & Economics. Prior to teaching, he practiced corporate litigation in New York City at several international law firms.

MOTORWORLD ACURA

George Thomas, a senior sales and leasing consultant, is one of only 12 individuals nationwide who have earned Acura’s 2018 Top Performer Client Satisfaction Status in the Council of Sales Excellence. To achieve this distinction, Thomas provided exceptional service and delivery solutions to his clients. He was also honored for attaining Gold Master Sales Status again in 2018.

THOMAS

Thomas received this high distinction from more than 2,200 Acura sales consultants who participated in the program. Acura’s prestigious Council of Sales Excellence annually recognizes extraordinary performers from across the nation who reflect exceptional performance in the areas of sales, client treatment and professional development.

NEPA MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATES INC.

Christina Serpico was promoted to the position of senior vice president/senior property manager. Serpico began her career with the company 18 years ago as an administrative assistant. Serpico grew with the company to become an assistant property manager, property manager, a senior property manager to her SERPICO position as a senior vice president/senior property manager with three portfolio managers and an administrative assistant reporting to her.

TIMES-SHAMROCK COMMUNICATIONS

Tom Ferguson, a Dunmore native, joined the company as program director of WFUZ-FM. Ferguson has been in the radio business locally for almost a decade, most recently employed at Entercom Communications. Prior to that, he was brand manager for WFUZ and WEJL. In his new position, he will be responsible for making programming decisions, creating promotions to benefit the radio station and its listeners, and managing the image of the radio station.

UNITED NEIGHBORHOOD CENTERS OF NORTHEASTERN PA

Jessica Wallo has been promoted to vice president of programs and services. She started at the agency in 2009 in the HIV/ AIDS prevention program before becoming a case manager in the community services department in 2011, then the emergency services supervisor in 2013, and finally the community services assistant director in 2014. She has a master’s degree in general theoretical psychology from Marywood University, and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from King’s College. Marty Fotta was promoted to vice president of community development. He started in 2010 as the director of community development for the center’s housing subsidiary, the United Neighborhood Community Development Corp., which works to identify and develop affordable

housing in Northeast Pennsylvania. Fotta has a Master of Public Administration and a bachelor’s degree in business management, both from Marywood University.

UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON

WALLO

FOTTA

Dr. Ana Ugarte, assistant professor of Spanish, has received the National Endowment for the Humanities grant for her project “Health Humanities Concentration and Community Based Learning at the University of Scranton.” The grant will allow her “to create a health humanities concentration that will emphasize the integral role of the humanities in transforming health care, health and well-being. It aims not only at providing a more comprehensive education to the students enrolled in the programs for the health professions at the university, but also seeks to develop new pedagogical practices informed by interdisciplinarity, communityUGARTE based learning and diversity and intercultural competence.”

SUBMIT PERSONNEL FILE items to business@ timesshamrock.com or The Times-Tribune, 149 Penn Ave., Scranton, PA 18503.

UGI UTILITIES INC.

Robert Krieger has been appointed to the newly created position of vice president — business process improvement. Krieger will be responsible for ensuring business and operations processes are consistent, efficient and effective. He will also lead the development of the company’s work and asset management information system KRIEGER improvement initiative. Krieger joined in 1988 as an engineer and has worked in various departments throughout the company. Most recently, he served as vice president — operations, a position he held since 2012. Timothy Angstadt has been named vice president — operations. Angstadt will be responsible for leading operations, construction and maintenance activities. He will ensure safe and reliable system operations, execution of fieldrelated regulatory compliance activities, and implementation of the infrastructure replacement ANGSTADT and betterment program. Angstadt joined in 1999 as an engineering intern and has worked in multiple departments within the company. Most recently, he served as program director of the UNITE initiative focused on upgrading the company’s customer information and enterprise resource planning information systems.

NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA BUSINESS JOURNAL JUNE 2019 23 TS_CNG/NPBJ/PAGES [B23] | 05/29/19

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FOR THE RECORD DEEDS

Columbia County

Richard S Duncan. Property Location: Catawissa Township. Seller: Matthew J. and Marie C. Miniter Living Trust. Amount: $431,000. thomas and nicole Stewart. Property Location: North Centre Township. Seller: Eric R. and Mary Schmeck. Amount: $325,000. Eric b and Emily R Kahn. Property Location: Scott Township. Seller: Amy E. Covill. Amount: $419,000. Valley Preservation llC. Property Location: Fishingcreek Township. Seller: Girl Scouts in the Heart of Pennsylvania. Amount: $320,000. Valley Preservation llC. Property Location: Briarcreek Township. Seller: Girl Scouts in the Heart of Pennsylvania. Amount: $520,000. aldi inc. Property location: Hemlock Township. Seller: JY’s Bethel LLC. Amount: $1,300,000. Jessica l and michael J Carney. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Seller: T&S Realty LLC. Price: $337,100. thomas R Ernst Jr. trust Estate. Property Location: Scott Township. Seller: Estate of Judith Ann Ernst. Price: $398,134. Jason m and Jessica l. Schauer. Property Location: Scott Township. Seller: Entrepreneurial Ventures Ltd. Price: $445,000. Kendra E Kile and Jonathan D. Eroh. Property Location: Mifflin Township. Seller: James R. and Karla M. Mungo. Price: $302,750. nicholas Purdy. Property Location: Hemlock Township. Seller: John W. and Noreen M. McKiniry Sr. Price: $568,250. Suez Water Pennsylvania inc. Property Location: Montour Township. Seller: Wayne C. and Debra A. Brouse. Price: $350,000. Calumet Enterprises llC. Property Location: Hemlock Township. Seller: Geisinger System Services. Price: $3,200,000. Corey D bower. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Seller: Margaret I. Marrfka Margaret I. Bower. Price: $440,000. matthew E and Elyse m Gilbert. Property Location: Montour Township. Seller: Jennie S. Beyer. Price: $340,000. t&S Realty llC. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Seller: Your Building Centers Inc. Price: $450,000. orange township. Property Location: Orange Township. Seller: Ronald W. and Janet H. Hunter. Price: $308,500 and $22,000 respectively. Reichard Real Estate llC. Property Location: Scott Township. Seller: Robert N. and Rhonda J. Seebold. Price: $742,000. Ryan C and Vanessa Ruckle. Property Location: Scott Township. Seller: Benjamin a. Carteza. Price: $326,000. bny melon n.a. successor trustee obRa 93 Special needs Disability trust for the benefit of Shannon lee Di blasi. Property Location: Montour Township. Seller: Estate of Myles W. Katerman. Price: $340,000.

laCKaWanna County

michael a Roy. Property location: Covington Twp. Seller: Perih Group LLC. Amount: $550,000. Henry Rose llC. Property location: Dickson CIty. Seller: SADG1 Inc. Amount: $500,000. Dileo Real Estate Holdings llC. Property location: Dickson City. Seller: BD Carbondale LP. Amount: $975,000. Christian missionary alliance Church of Peckville Pa. Property location: Dickson City. Seller: John Grow. Amount: $365,000. Joseph newark legg. Property location: Glenburn

Twp. Seller: Salman S Mirza. Amount: $775,000. Dashnay m Johnson. Property location: Jefferson Twp. Seller: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $333,000. brian Guse. Property location: Jefferson Twp. Seller: Robert A Mazzoni. Amount: $287,500. birney 1 lP. Property location: Moosic Borough. Seller: Light Acadia 11-89 LLC. Amount: $3,850,000. tD&F Realty llC. Property location: Moscow Borough. Seller: Robert Tinsley. Amount: $530,000. mark R nelson. Property location: Moscow Borough. Seller: Lynn Mendicino. Amount: $286,200. Gary a Howell. Property location: North Abington Twp. Seller: Richard K Hodges. Amount: $450,000. Patrick J Houlihan. Property location: North Abington Twp. Seller: Edward B Brown III. Amount: $465,000. leslie l Gleason. Property location: North Abington Twp. Seller: Nancy V Scaglione. Amount: 307,500. mimi Equities llC. Property location: Scranton. Seller: Peter J Bonacuse III. Amount: $1,200,000. mimi Equities llC. Property location: Scranton. Seller: Anne F Glauber, estate of the deceased. Amount: $675,000. mimi Equities llC. Property location: Scranton. Seller: East Scranton Properties LLC. Amount: $250,000. Christopher Piazza. Property location: Scranton. Seller: Gregory S Garvey. Amount: $270,000. Hunter Realty Partners lP. Property location: Scranton. Seller: Saint Stanislaus Polish National Church. Amount: $1,100,000. university of Scranton. Property location: Scranton. Seller: John L Chipak. Amount: $950,000. Harsh tEJ Real Estate llC. Property location: Scranton. Seller: Shree RR Real Estate LLC. Amount: $591,163. anil K Verma. Property location: South Abington Twp. Seller: Michael Paolucci Jr. Amount: $470,000. William beard iV. Property location: South Abington Twp. Seller: Thomas Hoecker. Amount: $265,000. acadia Property Group llC. Property location: Taylor Borough. Seller: Shawn Walsh. Amount: $520,000. Dolores a Karcheski. Property location: Throop Borough. Seller: Anthony E Yerka Sr. Amount: $294,000. brian J tinsley. Property location: unknown. Seller: Thomas Marino Curra. Amount: $420,000. Clifford t Capuano Jr. Property location: unknown. Seller: Kenneth Powell. Amount: $302,000. Quad blakely llC. Property location: unknown. Seller: BG Real Estate LP. Amount: $1,168,842. nP. Property location: unknown. Seller: Scranton Lackawanna Industrial Building Co. Amount: $4,564,300. Joseph Demko. Property location: unknown. Seller: Audrey Eisenstat Kaufman, per atty. in fact. Amount: $290,000.

luzERnE County

Justin t Gutsie. Property location: Butler Twp. Seller: Robert Maier Jr. Amount: $250,000. mark l lehman. Property location: Fairview Twp. Seller: Patrick Marshall. Amount: $272,000. 594 Humboldt llC. Property location: Hazle Twp. Seller: QG Printing II LLC. Amount: $6,625,000. Jacqueline J Champi. Property location: Dorrance Twp. Seller: Fairway Consumer Discount Company. Amount: $290,000. KbJ real Estate investments 2 llC. Property location: Wilkes-Barre. Seller: Westguard Insurance Company. Amount: $1,800,000. Jason Patrick Wolfe. Property location: West Wyoming. Seller: Thomas P. Ciampi. Amount: $300,000. Gabriel o Velasquez. Property location: Butler Twp. Seller: David L. Brown. Amount: $307,000. Kieran Casey. Property location: Dallas Twp. Seller:

24 NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA BUSINESS JOURNAL TS_CNG/NPBJ/PAGES [B24] | 05/29/19

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JUNE 2019

Quentin Reese. Amount: $305,000. meritage Properties llC. Property location: Kingston Twp. Seller: Kimberly Koehl. Amount: $385,000. Chad Wandel. Property location: Lehman Twp. Seller: Daniel R. Vnuk. Amount: $289,000. bbbD llC. Property location: Conyngham Twp. Seller: Theron I. Knouse Jr. Amount: $475,650. Civitas Real Estate llC. Property location: WilkesBarre. Seller: Civ-News LP. Amount: $2,912,505.82. William H Perry Jr. Property location: Harveys Lake. Seller: Kurt C. Jones. Amount: $275,000. tiffany Commer. Property location: Rice Twp. Seller: Jonathan R. Kroeger. Amount: $415,000. michael anthony Repcsik. Property location: Black Creek Twp. Seller: Joseph S. Zoldi. Amount: $375,000. Rhonda J Curcione. Property location: Union Twp. Seller: Jennifer Colon. Amount: $305,000. Paul J lauer iV. Property location: Dallas Twp. Seller: Steven W. McCrum. Amount: $761,000 James lawrence Heffers. Property location: Harveys Lake. Seller: Jean M. Eckroth. Amount: $400,000. Graphic Packaging international llC. Property location: Pittston Twp. Seller: Letica Corporation. $3,825,000 anz Wilkes boro llC. Property location: Plains Twp. Seller: Wilkes-Barre Hotel Group LLC. Amount: $5,560,000. thomas D Hovey. Property location: Fairview Twp. Seller: Steven Kutney. Amount: $325,000. matthew Kurt zeppenfeld. Property location: Jenkins Twp. Seller: Jordan Thomas. Amount: $348,000. John Siegal. Property location: Harveys Lake. Seller: Gail Ann Potter. Amount: $280,000. Eric D Patrick. Property location: Butler Twp. Seller: Anna Dorothy Morey. Amount: $515,000. leigh Hillman. Property location: Lehman Twp. Seller: Albert A. Krebs. Amount: $255,000. John David nebzykoski. Property location: Dorrance Twp. Seller: Thomas P. Godin II. Amount: $294,000. national transfer Services llC. Property location: Butler Twp. Seller: Cheryl E. English. Amount: $370,000. Jason Holly. Property location: Butler Twp. Seller: National Transfer Services LLC. Amount: $370,000. michael D Casari. Property location: Sugarloaf Twp. Seller: James E. Cibak. Amount: $385,000. mS Prime inc. Property location: Larksville. Seller: Itria Ventures LLC. Amount: $475,000. John lettich. Seller: Criag M. Hanson. Amount: $297,000. Property location: Rice Twp. John S berta. Property location: Black Creek Twp. Seller: Joseph A. Rush. Amount: $324,450. David Rakowski. Property location: Lake Twp. Seller: Joseph V. Zekas. Amount: $265,000. DDC Fox Run llC. Property location: Butler Twp. Seller: Fox Run Plaza LLC. Amount: $1,470,000. mS Prime inc. Property location: Larksville. Seller: Itria Ventures LLC. Amount: $475,000. John lettich. Property location: Rice Twp. Seller: Craig M. Hanson. Amount: $297,000. John S berta. Property location: Black Creek Twp. Seller: Joseph A. Rush. Amount: $324,450. David Rakowski. Property location: Lake Twp. Seller: Joseph V. Zekas. Amount: $265,000. baldoni investment Group llC. Property location: Dallas Twp. Seller: Prestige Development Group LLC. Amount: $350,000. Julie ann Kennedy. Property location: West Wyoming. Seller: Joseph V. Slakis. Amount: $262,000. lyn Godin. Property location: Butler Twp. Seller: Michael L. Schreder. Amount: $335,000. Randall Herring. Property location: Plains Twp. Seller: Joseph D. Spagnuolo Sr. Amount: $267,000. benjamin D Pearce. Property location: Wright Twp.

Seller: Carol J. Dural. Amount: $279,900. leonard Joseph Jankowski Jr. Property location: Rice Twp. Seller: Duane E. Deivert. Amount: $396,000. James J baldassari. Property location: Hazle Twp. Seller: Robert D. Loy. Amount: $287,000. misericordia university. Property location: Dallas Twp. Seller: Payne Printery Inc. Amount: $3,500,000. Raymond W merrill. Property location: Hazle Twp. Seller: U.S. Bank. Amount: $295,000. tanner long. Property location: Wright Twp. Seller: Jack Rosenzweig. Amount: $1,465,000. Genea Dobson. Property location: Jenkins Twp. Seller: Luchi Real Estate LLC. Amount: $323,900. Eileen Giambrone. Property location: Hazle Twp. Seller: John Eric Atherholt Amount: $275,000. Keith J Forshee. Property location: Pittston Twp. Seller: Scott Larson. Amount: $340,000. Juan manuel arreguin. Property location: West Pittston. Seller: Lauren P. Argenio. Amount: $352,500. Joseph E Heller. Property location: Fairmount Twp. Seller: John D. Klimchak. Amount: $361,500. Christina m Hogrebe. Property location: Franklin Twp. Seller: Keith Forshee. Amount: $340,000. leah l Gryboski. Property location: Rice Twp. Seller: Tanner A. Long. Amount: $520,000. matthew C Williams. Property location: Franklin Twp. Seller: John R. Blankensop Jr. Amount: $353,000. 2 Surfers llC. Property location: Pittston Twp. Seller: Tallison LLC. Amount: Amount: $569,500. new Day Storage llC. Property location: Hazle Twp. Seller: CTG Rentals Inc. Amount: $275,000. mya Valley llC. Property location: Wyoming. Seller: Lawrence Nicolais. Amount: $300,000. 115 brown Ventures llC. Property location: Yatesville. Seller: KMS Investments LLC. Amount: $375,000. imbRiaCo 1720 llC. Property location: Hazleton. Seller: Julio R. Rojas. Amount: $300,000. anthony J Ryba Jr. Property location: Conyngham. Seller: DB Investments Partners LLC. Amount: $1,200,000. Partha P Pramanik. Property location: Wright Twp. Seller: Joseph Blass. Amount: $365,000.

monRoE County

mariama Diallo. Property location: Middle Smithfield Township. Seller: LTS Homes LLC. Amount: $395,310. Justin moser. Property location: Coolbaugh Township. Seller: Thomas and Kelly Masselle. Amount: $400,000. irina and Quinn martin Jr. Property location: Tobyhanna Township. Seller: Jennifer and Michael Eggers. Amount: $448,000. 2158 West main llC. Property location: Stroud Township. Seller: American Cancer Society Inc. Amount: $310,000. Debabrata and anita banerjee. Property location: Jackson Township. Seller: Glenn Berdela. Amount: $360,000. mark and leslie Fundakowski. Property location: Coolbaugh Township. Seller: Thomas and Suzanne Dean. Amount: $505,000. Jennifer and Eugene Campbell iii. Property location: Pocono Township. Seller: Edward and Margaret Meinking. Amount: $329,000. lourdes Fernandez. Property location: Smithfield Township. Seller: Georgia Baez, N/B/M Georgia Henry, Lawrence Henry. Amount: $309,500. tyler Smith and Corrina lamonte. Property location: Township. Seller: Victor and Natalia Litchtchouk. Amount: $369,000. antonina, imer and latif Cami. Property location: Please see Record, Page 25


FOR THE RECORD FROM PAGE 24 Hamilton Township. Seller: Christopher and Linda Barnas. Amount: $335,000. Albert Giles. Property location: Middle Smithfield Township. Seller: Jeffrey and Lisa Wiedecki. Amount: $538,000. Novus Adult Care Services Inc. Property location: Stroudsburg. Seller: Oak Tree Properties Inc. Amount: $255,000. Mark Nisbett. Property location: Middle Smithfield Township. Seller: Miroslaw Kubis, Tadeusz Pokorski. Amount: $305,000. David and Lynette Quaresimo. Property location: Hamilton Township. Seller: Ross Roggio, John Martin (trus). Amount: $430,000. Bartonsville Investors LLC. Property location: Stroud Township. Seller: DEPG Bartonsville Route 611 Plaza LP, DEPG Brothers 611 LLC. Amount: $1,300,000. Michael McCollum. Property location: Middle Smithfield Township. Seller: Llorna Jacoba A/K/A Llorna Jacobs-Herring, Willie Herring. Amount: $330,000. Nikita Zorin and Yelena Shilkrut. Property location: Tobyhanna Township. Seller: Smith Family Trust, Rowland and Linda Smith (co-trus.). Amount: $306,000. Todd and Olivia Miller. Property location: Tobyhanna Township. Seller: Kevin and Kirsten Osland. Amount: $390,000. Earl and Joanne Rose. Property location: Pocono Township. Seller: Milton and Cynthia Flores. Amount: $330,000. Daniel and Elisabeth Hafler. Property location: Stroud Township. Seller: SR Inv. Co. Amount: $320,000. Montmarg LLC. Property location: Stroud Township. Seller: Dreher Farm LLC. Amount: $930,000. Kenneth and Helene MacDonald. Property location: Tobyhanna Township. Seller: Christopher and Lisa Politza. Amount: $362,500. Richard and Kimberlee McKenna. Property location: Smithfield Township. Seller: River and Abigail Robertson. Amount: $319,800. Salvatore and May Cuccia. Property location: Tobyhanna Township. Seller: Hannig Development LLC. Amount: $463,287. Van Lauren Properties LLC. Property location: Chestnuthill Township. Seller: Lawrence and Karen Buzzard. Amount: $400,000. Susan Roberts. Property location: Barrett Township. Seller: Richard Johnson Trust, Buck Hill Falls Co. Amount: $875,000. Jazmin Dejoie and Kenwyn Ramroop. Property location: Eldred Township. Seller: Michael Frost, Ginner Hagerman N/B/M Ginny Frost. Amount: $354,900. Mark and Alison Daugherty. Property location: Stroud Township. Seller: Michael and Janis Glenn. Amount: $440,000. L&C Jewelry Corp. Property location: Tobyhanna Township. Seller: Catherine Guydish. Amount: $450,000. Jessie and Heidi Johansen. Property location: Stroud Township. Seller: Gerard and Karen Brogna. Amount: $309,000. UGI Energy Services LLC. Property location: Smithfield Township. Seller: Kenbar Investment Group, Kenneth Schuchman and Barth Rubin (partners). Amount: $775,000. Skylark Holdings Inc. Property location: Pocono Township. Seller: Mark and Stephanie Maloney. Amount: $349,000. Lee Gelman and Helen Tran. Property location: Coolbaugh Township. Seller: William and Karen Babcock. Amount: $551,000. Moritz Embroidery Works Inc. Property location: East Stroudsburg. Seller: Russell and Linda Nohejl.

Amount: $310,000. Jesse and Sarah Zuba, David and Bonnie Angelone. Property location: Tunkhannock Township. Seller: Jeremy Frechette. Amount: $390,000. Debbie, Felicia and James Fielden, Timothy Gomez. Property location: Chestnuthill Township. Seller: Cheryl and William Dunnigan Sr. Amount: $445,000. Magna Properties LLC. Property location: Tobyhanna Township. Seller: Steve Zhou. Amount: $260,000. 210 Mt. Nebo LLC. Property location: Smithfield Township. Seller: RMR210 LLC. Amount: $850,000. Stephen and Amy Williams. Property location: Coolbaugh Township. Seller: Michael and Michelle Nardozzi. Amount: $342,500. Seraphina Nelson-Holder. Property location: Price Township. Seller: LTS Homes LLC. Amount: $352,318. David Kraemer and Jean Scheaffel. Property location: Chestnuthill Township. Seller: Jill Possinger. Amount: $330,000. Nepavr LLC. Property location: Tobyhanna Township. Seller: Angela Mosely and Stephen Watts. Amount: $260,000. Peter Hewitt and Alina Munteanu. Property location: Pocono Township. Seller: Bryan and Conception Lundberg. Amount: $345,000. SR Squared LLC. Property location: Coolbaugh Township. Seller: Moritz Embroidery Works Inc. Amount: $1,200,000. Christopher Adams. Property location: Stroud Township. Seller: John and Judith Stout. Amount: $500,000. Robert Howell. Property location: Stroud Township. Seller: Rosemarie Moore. Amount: $330,000.

PIKE COUNTY

Robert W O’Keefe and Laura K O’Keefe. Property location: Blooming Grove Twp. Seller: Bernard Schultz. Amount: $280,000. George Braadt. Property location: Blooming Grove Twp. Seller: Ebrahim Paybarah Family Trust. Amount: 318,000. William A Sanders and Nancy Sanders. Property location: Delaware Twp. Seller: Steven J Cullmann and Erica Cullmann. Amount: $250,000. Christopher J Martin and Marcia Mann Martin. Property location: Delaware Twp. Seller: Robert McCarthy and Celeste McCarthy. Amount: $315,000. Timothy Bradley. Property location: Dingman Twp. Seller: James Sorenson and Kristine Sorenson. Amount: $255,000. Javier Jara and Marisa Jara. Property location: Dingman Twp. Seller: Roberta Horna and Liliana Horna. Amount: $255,000. John Strowbridge and Jonnie Strowbridge. Property location: Dingman Twp. Seller: Mark Healey and Kathleen Healey. Amount: $349,900. Elan Steve Rome. Property location: Dignman Twp. Seller: Round Table Investments. Amount: $675,000. Jonathan Kelly. Property location: Dingman Twp. Seller: Gary J Meisenhelder and Crystal Meisenhelder. Amount: $255,000. Virginia S Rude and Amy E Rude. Property location: Dingman Twp. Seller: David L Scasta. Amount: $385,000. Cono Cimino and Ellie Cimino. Property location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Audrey Tveter by Susan Castiglione, agent. Amount: $320,000. Jay C Buchalski. Property location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Lakeview Road Realty, LLC. Amount: $325,000. Stanislaw W Skorupski and Agnieszka Skorupska. Property location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Kieran May and Katherine A May. Amount: $365,000. William Krzenski and Amanda Krzenski. Property location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Vincent Bochilo and Mariane Bochilo. Amount: $260,000.

Vincent Patrick Bochilo and Marianne Bochilo. Property location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Daniel Deluca and Jennifer Deluca. Amount: $340,000. Chris Burton and Michelle Burton. Property location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Joseph T Couch III and Pamela M Couch. Amount: $309,000. Steven Stravitz and Gloria Stravitz. Property location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: William P Murphy and Diane K Diliello. Amount: $250,000. Highland Village Development Co. LLC. Property location: Lehman Twp. Seller: Lehman’s Pointe Aquisition, LLC. Amount: $1,100,000. Lealta LLC. Property location: Milford Twp. Seller: Michele I Fleming. Amount: $550,000. Steven Baier and Susan Fiske. Property location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: William B Bessman and Margarete L Bessman as trustees of the Bessman Revocable Trust of 1995. Amount: $297,500. Robert J Devine and Cheryl A Devine. Property location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Joseph M McSweeny and Joan M McSweeny. Amount: $330,000. Ronald Victor Moraski and Donna Marie Moraski. Property location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Thomas C Gregory. Amount: $252,000. Quality Steel Pennsylvania Inc. Property location: Shohola Twp. Seller: Shohola Commercial Property, LLC. Amount: $3,400,000. Quality Steel Pennsylvania Inc. Property location: Shohola Twp. Seller: Tracy L Badgley, distribution trustee under the Maurice A Ryman Alaska Inheritance Trust. Amount: $1,175,000. Allan C Masters and Rebecca K Masters. Property location: Westfall Twp. Seller: North Atlantic Properties, Inc. Amount: $289,000.

SCHULYKILL COUNTY

Ad Trex, LLC. Property Location: Frackville. Seller: George Eyster. Amount: $265,000. Francis and Amy Doyle. Property Location: Seltzer City. Seller: Beth Senavatis. Amount: $254,000. James Wiest. Property Location: South Manheim Twp. Seller: Seth and Dinah Riffey. Amount: $293,000. Gregory Kenenitz. Property Location: Union Twp. Seller: Leandra Edmondson. Amount: $340,000. Snapcaster, LLC. Property Location: Butler Twp. Seller: Greg and Jen Kenenitz. Amount: $430,000. DG Distribution, LLC. Property Location: Highridge Business Park, Foster Twp. Seller: NE CAD, LLC. Amount: $10,255,000.

WYOMING COUNTY

Peter D Trosky and Rhonda Trosky. Property location: Lemon Twp. Seller: Daniel R Helman, administrator, for Jane L Helman, deceased. Amount: $395,000.

MORTGAGES

COLUMBIA COUNTY

Berwick Offray LLC. Property Location: Briarcreek. Lender: JP Morgan Chas Bank. Amount: $150,000,000. Carver Place LLC. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Lender: Willard H. Kile Jr. Amount: $6,645,000. MVRN One LLC. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $250,000. MVRN Four LLC. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $250,000. MVRN Three LLC. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $250,000. MVRN Two LLC. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $250,000. Dhwani Realty Inc. Property Location: Hemlock

Township. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $1,644,000. Tanishrushi Realty LLC. Property Location: South Centre Township. Lender: Northeastern Economic Development Company of PA-CDC Inc. Amount: $986,000. Derk A and Deanna Reed. Property Location: Hemlock Township. Lender: Fulton Bank. Amount: $343,931. Jessica L and Michael J Carney. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $337,000. MK-Menlo Second Street LP. Property Location: Berwick. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank. Amount: $139,666,488. Jason M and Jessica L Schauer. Property Location: Scott Township. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $422,750. Nicholas Purdy. Property Location: Hemlock Township. Lender: Service 1st Federal Credit Union. Amount: $568,250. Harrisberg Realty Inc. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Lender: The Muncy Bank and Trust Company. Amount: $250,000. Gerald J and Patricia A. Zeisloft. Property Location: Pine Township. Lender: AgChoice Farm Credit. Amount: $350,000. JAG Housing LLC. Property Location: Berwick. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $255,000. Gerald J and Patricia A. Zeisloft. Property Location: Madison Township. Lender: AgChoice Farm Credit. Amount: $850,000. Frederick J and Melissa J. Bennett III. Property Location: Orange Township. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co Amount: $350,000. Marr Development Mulbery II LLC. Property Location: Berwick. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $1,886,000. Richard D Kingsbury. Property Location: Benton Township. Lender: Members Choice Financial Credit Union. Amount: $355,000. Richard D Kingsbury. Property Location: Sugarloaf Township. Lender: Members Choice Financial Credit Union. Amount: $355,000. T&S Realty LLC. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $300,000. Reichard Real Estate LLC. Property Location: Scott Township. Lender: Robert N. Seebold. Amount: $697,673. Ryan C and Vanessa Ruckle. Property Location: Scott Township. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Amount: $320,095. Christopher L and Shawnna L Lupini. Property Location: Mifflin Township. Lender: First Citizens Community Bank. Amount: $730,000. Christopher A and Angela M Hess. Property Location: North Centre Township. Lender: Lancaster Mortgage Company. Amount: $392,255.

LACKAWANNA COUNTY

Colette Smith. Property location: Carbondale City. Lender: Lexington National Insurance Corp. Amount: $500,000. Costa Group Realty LLC. Property location: Carbondale Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $467,500. Raymond G Kuehner Jr. Property location: Covington Twp. Lender: NBT Bank. Amount: $316,800. Michael A Roy. Property location: Covington Twp. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $484,350. Please see Record, Page 26

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FOR THE RECORD

FROM PAGE 25 Jeb Co. Property location: Dickson City. Lender: PNC Bank. Amount: $4,033,687. Henry Rose LLC. Property location: Dickson City. Lender: First National Bank of PA. Amount: $425,000. Becrett LLC. Property location: Dickson City. Lender: Lakeland Bank. Amount: $4,950,000. PDM Realty Co. Property location: Dunmore. Lender: PNC Bank. Amount: $4,033,687. John J Gregory Jr. Property location: Dunmore. Lender: Fidelity Deposit and Discount Bank. Amount: $365,000. Joseph Newark Legg. Property location: Glenburn Twp. Lender: United Wholesale Mortgage. Amount: $542,500. Robert McCarthy. Property location: Greenfield Twp. Lender: NBT Bank. Amount: $310,000. Dashnay M Johnson. Property location: Jefferson Twp. Lender: Caliber Home Loans Inc. Amount: $316,350. Brian Guse. Property location: Jefferson Twp. Lender: Newrez LLC. Amount: $287,500. Jason B Hollister. Property location: Jefferson Twp. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $336,400. Joseph Vonderhey. Property location: Jefferson Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $320,000. MDBP LLC. Property location: Jessup. Lender: PA Industrial Development Authority. Amount: $2,250,000. Adam Reed Fuller. Property location: Madison Twp. Lender: Susan Innes. Amount: $325,000. Angela R Deluccie. Property location: Moosic. Lender: Finance of America Mortgage LLC. Amount: $370,000. Birney 1 LP. Property location: Moosic. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $3,850,000. TD&F Realty LLC. Property location: Moscow. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $372,000. Mark R Nelson. Property location: Moscow. Lender: USAA Federal Savings Bank. Amount: $286,200. Gary A Howell. Property location: North Abington Twp. Lender: Citizens Bank. Amount: $427,500. Leslie L Gleason. Property location: North Abington Twp. Lender: Stearns Lending LLC. Amount: $301,929. Patrick G Beatty. Property location: North Abington Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $336,000. Jamie Slupe Muchler. Property location: North Abington Twp. Lender: JG Wentworth Home Lending LLC. Amount: $340,000. Michael Washo Construction Co Inc. Property location: Olyphant. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $750,000. MCKT Realty Co. Property location: Olyphant. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $750,000. P&J Bros LLC. Property location: Olyphant. Lender: First National Bank of PA. Amount: $514,250. Michael Olenchak. Property location: Roaring Brook Twp. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $262,000. Alessandro J Tuzze. Property location: Scott Twp. Lender: NBT Bank. Amount: $260,000. MIMI Equities LLC. Property location: Scranton. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $3,500,000. MIMI Equities LLC. Property location: Scranton. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $3,500,000. MIMI Equities LLC. Property location: Scranton. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $3,500,000. MIMI Equities LLC. Property location: Scranton. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $3,500,000. Four One Company LP. Property location: Scranton.

JPC Equestrian Inc. Property location: Butler Twp. Lender: PNC Bank. Amount: $1,500,000. MK-Menlo North Main LP. Property location: Scran- Lender: Community Bank. Amount: $1,500,000. Wilkes-Barre South Main Street. Property locaton. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank. Amount: $139,666,488. tion: Wilkes-Barre. Lender: Bryn Mawr Trust Company. JS Realty SCR LLC. Property location: Scranton. Amount: $295,500. Lender: First National Bank of PA. Amount: $300,000. KP Tamaqua LP. Property location: Hazleton. Lender: ID Washington Property Group LLC. Property location: Scranton. Lender: Jersey Shore State Bank. Amount: York Traditions Bank. Amount: $465,000. Gabriel Velasquez. Property location: Butler Twp. $303,200. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Harsh TEJ Real Estate LLC. Property location: Scranton. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: Amount: $291,650. Michael Lewis Sampson. Property location: Hazle$473,000. ton. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $1,600,000. Anil K Verma. Property location: South Abington Gabriel Velasquez. Property location: Butler Twp. Twp. Lender: Loandepo com LLC. Amount: $376,000. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. William H Beard IV. Property location: South Amount: $291,650. Abington Twp. Lender: Residential Mortgage Services Kieran Casey. Property location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Inc. Amount: $260,200. Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: Joseph McDonald. Property location: South Abington Twp. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. $274,500. Chad Wandel. Property location: Lehman Twp. Amount: $422,000. Raymond Decesare. Property location: Springbrook Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $280,330. Twp. Lender: Third Federal Savings & Loan Association Wilkes-Barre South Main LLC. Property locaof Cleveland. Amount: $303,000. tion: Wilkes-Barre. Lender: Bryn Mawr Trust Company. Thomas J Cesarini. Property location: Springbrook Amount: $295,500. Twp. Lender: NBT Bank. Amount: $250,000. BBBD LLC. Property location: Conyngham Twp. Stephanie S Minkoff. Property location: Springbrook Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: Twp. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $800,000. $304,950. Kevin M Piekara. Property location: Jackson Twp. JBAS Realty LLC. Property location: Springbrook Lender: Community Bank. Amount: $336,000. Twp. Lender: First National Bank of PA. Amount: Stark Holdings Inc. Property location: Hanover Twp. $357,000. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $1,500,000. Steven Goul. Property location: Springbrook Twp. Back Mountain Harvest Assembly. Property locaLender: Navy Federal Credit Union. Amount: $280,810. Four P Realty LLC. Property location: Taylor. Lender: tion: Kingston Twp. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $350,000. Gary J Stack. Property location: Wyoming. Lender: John Patchoski. Amount: $810,000. Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $250,000. Acadia Property Group LLC. Property location: Paul H Lauer IV. Property location: Dallas Twp. Taylor. Lender: Branch Banking & Trust Co. Amount: Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. $318,750. Damski Builders and Design LLC. Property location: Amount: $346,750. Joseph Dohman. Property location: Dupont. Lender: Throop. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $293,400. $300,000. James Lawrence Heffers. Property location: Harveys Kellee Tinsley. Property location: unknown. Lender: Lake. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Nationstar Mortgage LLC. Amount: $367,675. Inc. Amount: $360,000. Jerome J Liuzzo. Property location: unknown. Prem Endeavors LLC. Property location: Hanover Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $277,000. $696,700. Theodore J Tomaszewski. Property location: Jonathan M Glynn. Property location: Fairview Twp. unknown. Lender: First National Bank of PA. Amount: Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. $296,000. Amount: $282,600. LuzERNE COuNTy ANz Wilkes Boro LLC. Property location: Plains Twp. Nanticoke Development Associates LLC. Property Lender: Daxa Patel Dynasty Trust. Amount: $6,300,000. location: Nanticoke. Lender: Peoples Security Bank and Michael Blessing. Property location: Jackson Twp. Trust Company. Amount: $1,150,000. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $368,582. Michael A Corga. Property location: Wilkes-Barre NP Hanover Industrial I LLC. Property locaTwp. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $1,900,000. tion: Hanover Twp. Lender: CIBC Bank USA. Amount: Insalco’s Foodline LP. Property location: Pittston. $133,000,000. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: Four One Company LP. Property location: Wyoming. $3,375,000. Lender: PNC Bank. Amount: $3,975,535. Gerald E Palermo Jr. Property location: Sugarloaf Four One Company LP. Property location: Wyoming. Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Lender: PNC Bank. Amount: $1,500,000. Inc. Amount: $575,000. PDM Company Inc. Property location: Hanover Twp. Mark L Lehman. Property location: Fairview Twp. Lender: PNC Bank. Amount: $4,033,687. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Homer H Cote. Property location: Kingston Twp. Amount: $258,400. Lender: Fifth Third Bank. Amount: $339,000. B’Nai B’Rith Apartments LP. Property location: Matthew Kurt zeppenfeld. Property location: Jenkins Wilkes-Barre. Lender: Mordechai SPira. Amount: Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems $2,400,000. Inc. Amount: $359,484. KBJ Real Estate Investments 2 LLC. Property locaJessica Dinko. Property location: Foster Twp. tion: Wilkes-Barre. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $317,600. Bank. Amount: $1,007,407. Lisa McElligott. Property location: Ross Twp. KBJ Real Estate Investments 2 LLC. Property locaLender: Citizens Savings Bank. Amount: $330,000. tion: Wilkes-Barre. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Eric D Patrick. Property location: Butler Twp. Bank. Amount: $1,000,000.

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JUNE 2019

Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $463,500. Mary Deborah Vilegi-Peters. Property location: Rice Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $322,000. John David Nebzydoski. Property location: Dorrance Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $394,000. Michael D Casari. Property location: Sugarloaf Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $308,000. Stephen Carone. Property location: Rice Twp. Lender: Community Bank. Amount: $700,000. Carone’s Realty LP. Property location: Freeland. Lender: Community Bank. Amount: $700,000. Charles M Eckman. Property location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $330,000. Wilkes-Barre Hotel Group LLC. Property location: Plains Twp. Lender: M&T Bank. Amount: $6,420,000. MS Prime Inc. Property location: Larksville. Lender: Itria Ventures LLC. Amount: $670,000. John Leettich. Property location: Rice Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $267,300. John S Berta. Property location: Black Creek Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $308,228. Ronald G Harvey. Property location: Huntington Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $429,000. Wilkes-Barre Hotel Group LLC. Property location: Plains Twp. Lender: M&T Bank. Amount: $6,420,000. Wilkes-Barre Hotel Group LLC. Property location: Plains Twp. Lender: M&T Bank. Amount: $6,420,000. Lyn Godin. Property location: Butler Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $268,000. Randall Herring. Property location: Plains Twp. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank. Amount: $267,000. Benjamin D Pearce. Property location: Wright Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $265,905. Leonard Joseph Jankowski. Property location: Rice Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $376,200. Stuart Gerhick. Property location: Hazle Twp. Lender: Walden Savings Bank. Amount: $334,000. John Whitehead. Property location: Jackson Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $286,000. Bre Diagostino Leonard. Property location: Salem Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $403,200. John Strelish. Property location: Jenkins Twp. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $353,600. Tanner Long. Property location: Wright Twp. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $1,245,205. Eileen Giambrone. Property location: Hazle Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $261,250. Frank J Carey Jr. Property location: Jenkins Twp. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $389,700. David Havrilla. Property location: Butler Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $325,000. Please see Record, Page 27


FOR THE RECORD FROM PAGE 26 Christopher M Phillips. Property location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $484,000. Bre Diagostino Leonard. Property location: Salem Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $403,200. Civitas Real Estate LLC. Property location: WilkesBarre. Lender: DOCE HLP Investments 1 LLC. Amount: $6,391,554. Mickey P Dudish. Property location: Hanover Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $320,000. Mark E Morris. Property location: Jackson Twp. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $701,487. Keith J Forshee. Property location: Pittston Twp. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $272,000. Anthony M Badamo. Property location: Sugarloaf Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $295,000. Raymond W Merrill. Property location: Hazle Twp. Lender: Blaise Alexander. Amount: $302,551. Kur Real Estate LLC. Property location: Hazle Twp. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $475,000. Juan Manuel Arreguin. Property location: West Pittston. Lender: Community Bank. Amount: $323,000. Benton S Snider. Property location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $250,000. DDC Fox Run LLC. Property location: Butler Twp. Lender: Innovative Capital Advisors LLC. Amount: $1,218,500. Joseph E Heller. Property location: Fairmount Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $289,200. Christina M Hogrebe. Property location: Franklin Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $272,000. Kathleen C Kelly-Ostrowski. Property location: Lake Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $304,000. Leah L Gryboski. Property location: Rice Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $441,000. John W Falzone. Property location: Lehman Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $402,677. Matthew C Williams. Property location: Franklin Twp. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $282,400. 2 Surfers LLC. Property location: Pittston Twp. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $460,000. Q Thomas Novinger. Property location: Wright Twp. Lender: Third Federal Savings & Loan Association of Cleveland. Amount: $273,000. 115 Brown Ventures LLC. Property location: Yatesville. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $300,000. Richard D Kingsbury. Property location: Fairmount Twp. Lender: Members Choice Financial Credit Union. Amount: $355,000. White Haven RE LLC. Property location: White Haven. Lender: Bio Alpha Venture LLC. Amount: $8,000,000. Anthony J Ryba Jr. Property location: Conyngham. Lender: Mid Penn Bank. Amount: $1,200,000. Norman A R Dick. Property location: Sugarloaf Twp. Lender: Mid Penn Bank. Amount: $286,500. Pinnacle Roofing & Sheet Metal Inc. Property location: Nanticoke. Lender: Community Bank. Amount: $300,000. Paul J Eyerman. Property location: Wright Twp. Lender: Community Bank, Amount: $300,000. U.S. Metro Enterprises Inc. Property location: Kingston. Lender: Honesdale National Bank, Amount: $321,000.

Stroud Township. Lender: Summit Mortgage Corp. Amount: $313,030. Lee Gelman and Helen Tran. Property location: Coolbaugh Township. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank NA. Amount: $381,600. SC Stream PA LLC, SC Palace PA LLC. Property location: Paradise Township. Lender: Sterling National Bank. Amount: $24,000,000. Jesse and Sarah Zuba. Property location: TunkhanMONROE COUNTy nock Township. Lender: Guaranteed Rate Inc. Amount: Irina and Quinn Martin Jr. Property location: Tobyhanna Township. Lender: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA. $351,000. Debbie, Felicia and James Fielden, Timothy GoAmount: $403,200. mez. Property location: Chestnuthill Township. Lender: Carlos Berrios, Dania Berrios F/K/A Dania Vera. Property location: Tobyhanna Township. Lender: Quicken Univest Bank and Trust Co. Amount: $356,000. 210 Mt Nebo LLC. Property location: Smithfield Loans Inc. Amount: $418,500. Four One Company LP, Four One Management LLC. Township. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $907,500. Property location: Mt. Pocono. Lender: PNC Bank NA. Seraphina Nelson-Holder. Property location: Price Amount: $3,975,535. Township. Lender: Acre Mortgage & Financial Inc. Mark and Leslie Fundakowski. Property location: Coolbaugh Township. Lender: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA. Amount: $334,703. SR Squared LLC. Property location: Coolbaugh Amount: $400,000. Jennifer and Eugene Campbell III. Property location: Township. Lender: PNC Bank NA. Amount: $960,000. Christopher Adams. Property location: Stroud Pocono Township. Lender: Veterans United Home Loan. Township. Lender: First Internet Bank of Indiana. Amount: Amount: $339,857. $450,000. Dreher Avenue Holdings LLC. Property location: LTS Homes LLC. Property location: Stroud TownChestnuthill Township. Lender: Branch Banking and Trust ship. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $250,000. Co. Amount: $250,000. PIKE COUNTy Albert Giles. Property location: Middle Smithfield Mark Culin Spragg and Janelle Marie Spragg. Township. Lender: American Neighborhood Mortgage Property location: Shohola Twp. Lender: Citizens Savings Acceptance Co. LLC. Amount: $484,000. Bank. Amount: $400,000. Dushyant and Minalben Patel. Property locaKelly A Gaughan and Martin C Gaughan. Property tion: Middle Smithfield Township. Lender: Noah Bank. location: Milford Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Amount: $675,000. Registration System Inc. Amount: $374,000. Seth and Lauzanne Melnick. Property location: Thomas W Jurlando Sr and Cecilia Jurlando. PropTobyhanna Township. Lender: LoanDepot.com LLC. erty location: Greene Twp. Lender: Secretary of Housing Amount: $334,900. & Urban Development. Amount: $382,500. David and Lynette Quaresimo. Property location: Thomas W Jurlando Sr and Cecilia Jurlando. PropHamilton Township. Lender: First Keystone Community erty location: Greene Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Bank. Amount: $387,000. Michael McCollum. Property location: Middle Smith- Registration System Inc. Amount: $382,500. Thomas W Jurlando Sr and Cecilia Jurlando. Propfield Township. Lender: Real Estate Mortgage Network. erty location: Greene Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Amount: $320,336. Todd and Olivia Miller. Property location: Tobyhanna Registration System Inc. Amount: $382,500. Thomas W Jurlando Sr and Cecilia Jurlando. PropTownship. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank NA. Amount: erty location: Greene Twp. Lender: Secretary of Housing $312,000. & Urban Development. Amount: $382,500. Anthony and Nancy Zaferiou. Property location: John G Hannes and Valerie J Hannes. Property Ross Township. Lender: Residential Home Funding Corp. location: Shohola Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic and Federal Housing Commissioner. Amount: $435,000. Registration System Inc. Amount: $333,000. Earl and Joanne Rose. Property location: Pocono Jerrilyn Coulter and George J Vanvugt. Property Township. Lender: USAA Federal Savings Bank. Amount: location: Blooming Grove Twp. Lender: Mortgage Elec$330,000. Montmarg LLC. Property location: Stroud Township. tronic Registration System Inc. Amount: $787,500. Jerrilyn Coulter and George J Vanvugt. Property Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $697,500. Kenneth and Helene MacDonald. Property location: location: Blooming Grove Twp. Lender: Federal Housing Commissioner. Amount: $787,500. Tobyhanna Township. Lender: US Bank NA. Amount: Cono Cimino and Ellie Cimino. Property location: $326,250. Kimberlee and Richard McKenna. Property location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $256,000. Smithfield Township. Lender: US Bank NA. Amount: Quality Steel Pennsylvania Inc. Property loca$299,800. tion: Shohola Twp. Lender: Regions Bank. Amount: John and Michelle Vaticano. Property location: $10,430,000. Pocono Township. Lender: New Day Financial LLC. Jay C Buchalski. Property location: Lackawaxen Amount: $310,500. Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $260,000. Jazmin Dejoie and Kenwyn Ramroop. Property Belle Meade-Shohola LLC. Property location: location: Eldred Township. Lender: Atlantic Home Loans Shohola Twp. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $1,000,000. Inc. Amount: $337,155. Edward J Eppler and Sandra Eppler. Property locaMark and Alison Daugherty. Property location: tion: Porter Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $283,977. Stroud Township. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: David R Cummings and Kathy J Hopta-Cummings. $352,000. Property location: Dingman Twp. Lender: MERS. L&C Jewelry Corp. Property location: Tobyhanna Amount: $288,750. Township. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. George Braadt. Property location: Blooming Grove Amount: $360,000. Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $318,000. Jesse and Heidi Johansen. Property location: Kaival Food & Petroleum Inc. Property location: Newport Twp. Lender: Landmark Community Bank, Amount: $588,000. New Lexington Associates II LP. Property location: Nanticoke. Lender: Lakeland Bank, Amount: $5,000,000. Partha P Pramanik. Property location: Wright Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $310,250.

Chris Burton and Jennifer Sommers. Property location: Dingman Twp. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank. Amount: $278,100. William A Sanders and Nancy Sanders. Property location: Delaware Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $250,000. Elan Steve Rome. Property location: Dingman Twp. Lender: PNC Bank. Amount: $485,000. Virginia S Rude and Amy E Rude. Property location: Dingman Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $378,026. George A Barbier and Jill B Barbier. Property location: Blooming Grove Twp. Lender: Secretary of Housing & Urban Development. Amount: $340,500. John S McKay and Patricia J McKay. Property location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $250,700.

SCHULyKILL COUNTy

Marsha Moyer. Property Location: Andreas. Lender: Quicken Loans. Amount: $289,750. James Wiest. Property Location: South Manheim Twp. Lender: Allied Mortgage Group, Inc. Amount: $293,854. Gerard and Susanne DiCicco. Property Location: North Union Twp. Lender: Parke Bank. Amount: $353,000.

WyOMING COUNTy

Peter D Trosky and Rhonda K Trosky. Property location: Lemon Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $295,000. Four One Company LP. Property location: Eaton Twp. Lender: PNC Bank. Amount: $3,975,535. Chad R Patton and Diana J Patton. Property location: Eaton Twp. Lender: PNC Bank. Amount: $250,000.

Relocation Opportunities Wanted

Bring us any and all potential locations. We will determine if we can develop or relocate to your site. Pennsylvania Counties of Interest Include: • Bradford, Bucks, Carbon, Columbia, Lackawanna, Lehigh, Luzerne, Lycoming, Monroe, Northampton, Pike, Schuylkill, Sullivan, Susquehanna, Tioga, Wayne, Wyoming

Types of Locations Wanted: • End Cap, In-Line, Drive-Thru, Free Standing PLEASE CONTACT Abbie Muto muto_a@sdepa.com Cheryl Green green_c@sdepa.com (610) 366-8120 • www.sdepa.com

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Northeastern PA Business Journal--06-19  

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