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Business Journal NORTHEAST

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May 2019 VOL. 34 NO. 5

Change is routine in the evolution of regional tourism to as true immersion into the dark and cold In a region where supposedly nothing world of the by-gone new ever happens, change within the touranthracite miners. ism industry has become routine along with “The mine tour the implementation of evolving business really shows how plans. these people from Curt Camoni, executive director of the our regional past had Camoni Lackawanna County Convention & Visitors guts and a great work Bureau, explained his organization is now ethic,” said Camoni. striving to complete a digital marketing “Most of them were very ambitious people, showcase featuring the county’s numerous and their goal in life was for their kids and tourist attractions. The updated internet grandchildren to have a better life that they site, which delivers targeted messages had.” emphasizing high-resolution pictures and He credited the Steamtown National videos, is scheduled to be launched this Historic Site with maintaining its mission of month and marks a sharp departure from preservation and education, versus a focus what Camoni called the high-priced generic solely on operational profits. Meanwhile, the advertising of the past. nearby Houdini Museum, Tour, and Magic He highlighted some of the county’s Show is the most for requested Lackawanna hottest attractions, such as the Lackawanna attraction by national travel writers. County wine trail, the upcoming concert The big move to digital advertising for season within the Pavilion at Montage the county, according to Camoni, focuses Mountain including two big music festivals, on search engine optimization. He said the county’s AAA baseball team and the the participants in the county’s marketrelatively new Montage Mountain water park ing efforts are acutely aware Lackawanna which allows operator income to be reguattractions must be among the first five larly derived from the facility apart from the names that Google pulls up during a search, ski season. requiring every event in Lackawanna County This year also will feature the inaugural to be on the web and relevant. Lackawanna County Heritage Fair, plus “Google runs the world, and we are at once again Saint Ubaldo Day in Jessup that the mercy of their search algorithms,” said includes a 5K race. Perhaps, above all, the Camoni. “Therefore, we must design for county’s biggest attraction is the Lackawathis. If you’re not in the top five on a search nna Coal Mine Tour, which Camoni refers you might as well be number 50.” by Dave Gardner

Lackawanna’s hotel fund revenues, which fund Camoni’s agency, appear to support the idea that the county’s marketing efforts are paying off to some degree. He cited data indicating that these tax funds rose 9.5 percent during 2018, and for 2019 so far are up six percent. Pocono expansion Efforts are underway within the Poconos for the region to expand the markets from which tourists are drawn. Christopher Barrett, president and CEO of the Pocono Mountain Visitor’s Bureau, noted the primary advertising locales from which the 27,000 square mile Poconos have solicited business have been the New York and Philadelphia areas, but a recent expansion now Barrett is seeking to also recruit visitors from the Harrisburg, Lebanon, Lancaster, Baltimore and Washington, D.C. areas. “You have to be aggressive with digital advertising and strive to educate potential visitors,” said Barrett. “We no longer utilize outside advertising agencies, and instead use our own in-house marketing department to save money, do our advertising buys, and promote the use of digital platforms.” Please see Tourism, Page 18

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Business Journal PeNNSylVaNia

Vol. 34, No. 5 • May 2019 149 PeNN aVe., ScraNtoN, Pa 18503 www.biz570.coM The Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal is a member of Times-Shamrock Publishing Division

BRAND

the evolution of regional tourism

Does your brand have to have a slogan? yes, no, and maybe.

A subsequent tagline, “Everything you’ve always wanted in a beer and less” was the next Apple, Whole Foods and Starbucks don’t have evolution. Fast forward 45 years to present day and one. Subaru has one but doesn’t emphasize it. Miller Lite’s slogan has advanced to a far more subCoke changes theirs every few years. And Nationjective one that makes more of an emotional appeal wide and BMW haven’t changed theirs in more with, “Hold True.” This one harkens to their roots then 40 years. as a pioneer of the light beer category as proof of I’m referring, of course, to taglines – or slogans the quality and legacy of their beer. – and the big question is, “does a company or a “Hold True” is in the same category of tagline as brand have to have a slogan?” “Just do it,” though the former has yet to prove it The answer is … complicated. has the staying power of Nike’s legendary line. (I’ll Every marketer dreams of that killer tagline, one bet a case of Bud Light that it never will.) Lines like that customers can bring to mind, or even better, these seek to connect with customers’ self-esteem one that becomes such a part of our culture that by hoping they will see themselves as loyal in the it is imitated, parodied and sometimes blatantly case of “Hold True,” or as doers or competitors in stolen (“Got Milk” anyone?) Yet perhaps the bigthe case of Nike. These are both emotions that can gest status symbol is the brand that doesn’t have a create connections to a brand, given enough time tagline and doesn’t really need one. and exposure to the concept. Slogans have been part of branding since Of course, there are taglines that are a waste marketing and advertising were invented. Using of ink and pixels. Brands that use lines like “Since a handful of words (the fewer the better in most 1912” should rethink their selling proposition cases) to sum up a key point of difference works immediately. No one, and I mean nobody, makes a as a kind of shorthand for the customer to form an buying decision about products based on how old opinion about a brand. Slogans are also different the company is that provides it. Would you buy a from descriptor lines, which usually indicate a busi- Honda because it’s older than Toyota? No. (They’re TIMES-TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO ness or service category, but make no claims or the same age, by the way.) A woman cruises down a water slide at promises, as in Hellman’s “Real Mayonnaise.” Another common tagline is “The brand you can the Montage Mountain water park in A slogan for a brand may start by simply stating trust” or “We provide solutions.” Here’s the thing: Moosic. a clear point of difference. When Miller Lite was all brands are about trust. That’s what a brand introduced, it was not the first light beer on the is. And all companies provide solutions or they FEATURES market. But Miller was the first to make a lighter wouldn’t be in business. So, please, just don’t even Travel trends ............................ 3 version of an established brand and used a now bother with taglines that promise the obvious. Home care presidency ................. 4 famous tagline to do it, “Tastes great. Less filling.” So do you have to have a tagline? No. But most Women Entrepreneur Spotlight ....... 4 That tagline was a clever way of saying “fewer strong brands have had good ones in their history, even if, like Apple, they no longer need one. A look at rural broadband ............. 5 calories” while promising no flavor was lost. by Dave Taylor

CNG MANAGING EDITOR elizabeth baumeister — ext. 3492 CNG SALES MANAGER alice Manley — ext. 9285 CONTRIBUTING REPORTERS catherine Farrell Dave Gardner Howard J. Grossman Jaclyn riefenhauser Dave taylor Phil yacuboski FiND US oNliNe: WWW.BIz570.COM facebook.com/570 • twitter.com/biz570

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NPBJ is protected under the federal Copyright Act. Reproductions of any part by any means or facsimiles without the express written permission of the publisher are not permitted. Reprints of NPBJ articles are available. Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited materials — manuscripts or photographs — with or without the inclusion of a stamped, self-addressed return envelope. Information in this publication is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy and completeness of the information cannot be guaranteed. No information expressed herein constitutes a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any securities. Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal (ISSN 1078-5698) is published monthly except twice in the month of May by The Scranton Times from offices located at 149 Penn Ave., Scranton, PA. Periodicals postage paid at Scranton, PA. The Journal serves business owners, managers and professionals in a 10-county region. Subscriptions are available for $28 per year, $49 two years or $64 for three years. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal, 149 Penn Avenue, Scranton, PA 18503.

Dairy operation expansion ............ 6 Pennsylvania student debt ............ 8

EXECUTIVE SUITE Brand ..................................... 2 Banking & finance .................... 16 Economic development .............. 16

BUSINESS BULLETINS

Personnel File..................... 20-24 Deeds ............................... 25-26 Mortgages ......................... 26-27

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FEATURE

Travel trends by Dave Gardner

now available and allow occupants to experience the glory of the ocean up close and personal. For other passengers, a virtual display screen inside their room allows digital viewing of what’s happening outside. Another key concept that appeals to NEPA tourists involves the destination package. This concept provides pre-arranged stops with arranged excursions, as opposed to voyages where the ship-board activities are the main draw. “Destination cruise activities are each unique, so the tourist can make their vacation whatever they want,” said Waskevich.

Mix up a batch of old favorites, digital marketing plus a global focus, and you’ll have a clear understanding of how Northeast Pennsylvania residents spend their tourism dollars. According to metrics released by the Travel Channel, on a national scale, the top “trending” vacation spots within the lower 48 include locations that may not be on the radar of many NEPA residents. These include the Alabama gulf shores, South Carolina’s Hilton Head Island and sunny Key West, Florida. Meanwhile, round-trip flights to and from the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport include some familiar spots. According to Carl Up-front costs Beardsley, airport executive director, preliminary Apart from cruising, all-inclusive vacations data from 2019 indicates that regional people have increased in popularity. This packaged conare traveling to Charlotte, Philadelphia and cept allows a traveler to stay at a resort where Chicago, plus Orlando, where they undoubteverything is included. edly visit the ever-evolving Walt Disney World Select dining opportunities, golf, water Resort. sports and kayaking are popular. Various resorts Cruises continue to remain popular, accord- also offer packages targeted at families, honeying to Nina Waskevich, vice president of brand mooners or singles. and membership with AAA North Penn. She “One of the big attractions with this allexplained the only deterrent to cruising appears inclusive concept is that the travelers can know to be forecasts of bad weather and rough water, how much they are going to spend up front,” with the recent missteps afflicting a few cruise said Waskevich. “Plus, you can match your own opening of the Disney Star Wars attractions this lines quickly forgotten by a public hungry for the individual personality with the vacation.” fall, and has noted that despite ever-increasing ocean liner experience. Vacations appetites continue to change as ticket prices, the rides with Disney continue to “It’s obvious that when you look at the cruise the world grows smaller. According to Waskevattract huge crowds. market, certain activities that bring specific ich, demand for European riverboat cruises is “Disney will never die because they keep groups are powerful factors,” said Waskevich. expanding as the benefits doing new things,” said Waskevich. “We even book cruises with activiof a slower-paced vaca“The company is loaded with staff ties such as basketball, go-carting, tion within a small group talent who know what they work bumper cars and wave riders.” become known via effective for, and always strive to maintain a She explained many cruises now digital marketing. family mindset and display pride in allow a relaxed dress code for dining, These captive trips their work. You’ll never see a piece while also including family-oriented usually feature a group of of garbage in the park, and there’s entertainment. Occasionally a specific travelers numbering fewer always something for people of every cruise may deliver a format with than 200 people, who leiage group with constant change Waskevich Beardsley ornate cuisine, or be constructed surely navigate a European occurring, such as the new system to around a famous theme such as Alice river, such as the Rhine or pre-book a ride at a specific time and avoid the in Wonderland. Danube, and stop at various attractions. Often, long waits.” Cruise accommodations have also evolved, these vacations are targeted at a more upscale sometimes reflecting the ornate glory days audience and may require formal dress for dinof sailing between continents. According to Market defiance ing, but casual voyages are also available. Waskevich, select rooms and suites may now be Perhaps in a defiance of market dynamics, Of course, Disney in Orlando remains one of so lush the occupants will never know they’re the ever-increasing dollars a tourist will spend at the top and ever-popular destinations for NEPA on a ship without a trip to the deck. Disney do not seem to be a factor with demand vacationers of all ages. Waskevich is among Balcony rooms with chairs and a table are the industry participants looking forward to the for this resort. This makes Disney, in the opinion

of Waskevich, one of the great success stories with tourism, over a long period of time, and there appears to be no end in sight. “The Disney business plan is 100 percent guest-oriented, and they have proven this is the key to long-term success,” said Waskevich. While Disney may be thriving on oldfashioned customer service, the vast reach of digital marketing is now firmly established with the lodging industry. According to industry giant Vrbo, its 1995 launch was targeted at creating a “new way” to match property owners with vacationers. The company is now part of the HomeAway and the Expedia Group family of brands and offers homeowners and property managers exposure to more than 750 million visits to Expedia Group sites each month. The digital rental listing at any given time, according to the company, includes 208,000 houses, 173,000 condos and apartments, 51,000 cabins, 40,000 studios and 27,000 town houses.

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FEATURES

NEPA native assumes home care presidency

are not Medicaid eligible, leaving them with few financial options. Rising costs for elder care, steeply increasing “My sincere hope is that during my term we are numbers of seniors and the advantages of caring able to make access to homecare a quicker and easier for the needy apart from a nursing home are process,” said Haney. “The system today is challengamong the issues confronted by the new president ing across all types of home health care, whether of the Pennsylvania Homecare Associait’s the lengthy process of applying for tion (PHA), Mia Haney. Medicaid waivers or the challenge of In a way, Haney’s ascension to training physicians and other healthcare the PHA’s presidency is a family affair. professionals about what is truly available, Her father Paul Bartoletti, a long-time all the way through the hospice benefit.” owner-operator of personal care homes She emphasized that, across the and later the creator of his own home state, staffing remains the number one care agency then known as CareGivers challenge being confronted by home America, served as PHA president from care agencies. In addition, an endless Haney 2012 to 2013. chain of government regulatory changes With Pennsylvania among the top must be dealt with, plus tight budgets, states in regard to the number of elderly residents, as well as the reality that massive federal governHaney is immersed in a bustling profession. She ment deficits must eventually be controlled. holds the post of president with the Pennsylvania “It would be shortsighted not to express concern Operations for All Metro Health Care – CareGivers about the future of government funding,” said a conAmerica, which is based in Clarks Summit and cerned Haney. “This is one of the reasons I’m so into serves 4,000 to 5,000 clients in their homes via the what I do, and I am a champion for the rights of the efforts of 4,000 employees who usually work a per elderly. Our primary concern must be to ensure that diem flex schedule. the right for basic health care is maintained, including Haney grew up in Clarks Summit and attended simple things such as hot meals and a bath.” Scranton Prep, where she participated in soccer and cheerleading. She became comfortable with Quality of life the presence of the elderly while helping out in her Haney describes herself as an operationallyfather’s care facilities, which later were sold and minded leader who continually addresses issues affollowed by the launch of CareGivers America. fecting quality of life. Another focus during her term All Metro Health Care purchased CareGivers as PHA president will be to manage the transition America several years ago, and the organization to managed care currently occurring in Pennsylvais now squarely within the crosshairs of increased nia courtesy of Harrisburg. budgetary pressures for senior services. Financial “I believe that this new model now being reality tells the story, where a month’s residence in instituted in Harrisburg has the potential to benefit a care home tallies about $10,000 versus $4,000 patients significantly,” said Haney. “Yet, our biggest per month for home care. challenge will be to proving the worth of home care across the health care continuum while making our Exploding metrics voices heard.” Haney added that, from an operational standOn a national level, approximately 10,000 point, she also will continue efforts for the home people celebrate their 65th birthday every day care industry to standardize the way it collects and and enter the ranks of senior citizens. Many are co-morbid with multiple health problems requiring shares data to drive outcomes for its clients. This will accentuate the industry’s ability to deliver its care or chronic treatment. services in both health and cost-effective manners, As president of the PHA, Haney is expressing while saving significant dollars within preventative, her passion for increased access to care for these curative and palliative systems. folks. Most of the clients needing extended care

by Dave Gardner

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CELEBRATING WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS

by Jaclyn Riefenhauser and Catherine Farrell

Tamara Pilger of Tammy’s Stained Glass Treasures lived in Western Pennsylvania for a majority of her life and moved to Scranton in 2003. Times were not always easy. Not only did she have to make critical decisions for herself, but she also had to care for her son, Brandon. She also faced major devastation when her husband Bill’s daughter, Erica was killed in an automobile accident. Pilger had to take care of her dying parents during that time period as well. But rather than dwelling on ill-fated events of the past, she decided to pursue a different way of life. She and her husband decided to become foster parents for Lackawanna County CYS. They brought love and guidance to many children during their seven years in this role. During that time, they adopted their loving daughter, Brittany. Mother-daughter bonding resulted in taking a stained glass class together, which is when Pilger started to fall in love with creating glass items. Impressed by her work and passion, the instructor of the stained glass classes decided to hire and mentor Pilger for two years. Pilger’s love for stained and fused glass intensified over the years, driving her to eventually open her own stained glass business. Over the years, she had worked a variety of jobs to support her family. But she always knew she wanted to run her own business. She wanted to sell items she made through the years, bringing the beauty of her art to the homes of peers and to facilities in the community. Even though the dream of opening her own business was always in her mind, the actual process to make it a reality was not always in the picture. She was hesitant to try anything that would get her business off the ground. The fear of the unknown and associated distress of losing money and time prevented her from actualizing her aspirations. “I was afraid of failure and did not know how or where to start,” she said. Despite her hesitation, Pilger began researching how to start and run a business that would

Submitted photo

Tamara Pilger of Tammy’s Stained Glass Treasures. make her dream a reality. She started selling her authentic items at local stores and arts and craft shows prior to opening her store. Things took a turn for the better in March 2016, when she was offered to open her own small classroom in the back of an art gallery in Pittston. With her saved-up funds to buy associated supplies and tools, she was able to start teaching four students at a time. With her impressive skills and warm personality, she was able to teach outside the room to 35 students in a matter of six months. The triumph continued when she decided to take the next big step, opening her own store. She officially opened her own shop at 348 Adams Ave. in downtown Scranton during November of 2016. Please see Women, Page 5


FEATURE

FROM PAGE 4

Pilger is a stained glass and fused glass artist. “These are two very different techniques that both required much studying, learning, patience and practice,” she said. “I am still learning and developing my skills every day.” In her gift shop, Pilger sells her own glass items and some other handmade pieces on consignment. In the studio, she creates items for her gift shop, makes custom orders for clients for their homes and offices as well as memorial pieces, performs repairs on stained glass, instructs stained glass and fused glass classes, hosts private parties and team building sessions and has a children’s fusing club and birthday parties. “With a lot of new businesses, I believe the biggest struggle is capital needs and marketing yourself,” Pilger said, when asked about the struggles of entrepreneurship. “I have struggled and am still struggling with capital needs, but I budget myself to the best of my ability to be able to get through those first few years and to make a name for myself in the area. I was able to obtain a small business loan from Women in Philanthropy, which was a big help to me. My marketing is mostly done on social media and word of mouth.” Now that her business is taking off, she could use an assistant, she said. In the future, Pilger plans to get more involved with unique corporate and luxury gift items on her website. She has plans for new items in the gift shop and to offer new classes. “I am also still working on cremation memorial pieces as well as personalized items,” she said. “I would love to be a large full-service stained glass and fused glass warehouse with a hot glass shop but that is a huge dream.” Her advice to other female entrepreneurs is to “always be open to learning.” “Research ideas and information as much as you can,” she said. “Find a class or a seminar to attend for what you are searching for. Talk to other business owners who have a similar business. Ask lots of questions and really listen to the answers. Read books. Have a business plan and update it as needed.” For more information about Tammy’s Stained Glass Treasures, visit tammysstainedglasstreasures.com, the “Pilger’s Stained Glass” Facebook page and @Pilgerssgtreasures on Instagram. Jaclyn Riefenhauser and Catherine Farrell are University of Scranton Women’s Entrepreneurship Center interns working under the supervision of Donna Simpson, Consultant Manager.

Speeding up the pace by Phil Yacuboski

Among what many would consider a slower pace of life along Pennsylvania’s northern tier, there’s also something else that is slowing down the pace of life – slow access to the internet. “It does exist in places like Wellsboro and Mansfield, but getting direct access to businesses can often mean an additional expense,” said Keith Kuzio, a civil engineer and president and CEO of the Larson Design Group. “It could cost $10,000 or more to get an extension into an office where higher speeds are needed.” Rural parts of Pennsylvania have limited high speed access to the internet, according to the Federal Communications Commission. About 6% – or about 800,000 – are affected. The federal government defines broadband as 25 megabits per second for download speeds and three megabits per second for upload speeds. Areas close to the larger urban areas have quicker broadband speeds; rural areas do not. Rural access to broadband is the top legislative priority of the Pennsylvania State Grange, said Vince Phillips, who works on behalf of the group on legislation in Harrisburg. The Grange played a large part in ‘rural electrification’ in parts of the U.S. in the 1870s to make electricity available to those living in rural parts of the country. “To us, rural broadband access is rural electrification of the 21st century,” said Phillips. “If you don’t have access to the internet or cell phones, how can you compete effectively? Those areas who don’t have it are at a competitive disadvantage. It’s a basic tool just like electric power was in the 1930s.” Phillips said you could be leaving a number of people behind who might otherwise look elsewhere. “You’re also missing the next generation folks who only think electronically,” he said. Governor Tom Wolf, in his latest budget proposal, is calling for $4.5 billion for the rebuilding of Pennsylvania’s infrastructure. Part of the money would be used for rural broadband access; the rest would go for flooding improvements and fighting blight. The money would come from a severance tax on natural gas drilling, something that the state legislation has been uneasy about for nearly a decade.

“It’s not enough,” said Phillips. “To grow a business in a rural community, you need to attract talent and it’s difficult to build a workforce of the future without access to broadband,” said Kuzio. “If they can’t get access to it as students, that’s going to challenge them in their development for technology-based careers.” Some argue Pennsylvania (and other states) have lagged behind in putting money into broadband. “We have under-invested in rural broadband throughout the country,” said Dr. Sascha Meinrath, the Palmer chair of telecommunications at Penn State University. “It just hasn’t been a priority.” Meinrath, who believes the number of Pennsylvanians who do not have access to high speed internet is actually higher than already stated, said the way the federal government calculates the number is flawed. “We have to invest in this the way we invest in primary education and roads,” said Meinrath. “That being said, we have to look at accountability like how are these services being effectively delivered and we need to be collecting more accurate information about how what the on-the-ground realities look like.”

Earlier this year, the Tri-County Rural Electric Co-Operative announced a six-year plan to bring high speed internet to counties in their service area. The $3.2 million in federal support as part of the Connect America Fund II Auction, will roll out fiber optic lines in north-central Pennsylvania to more than 16,000 customers in Bradford, Clinton, Lycoming and Tioga counties. “Our goal is to bring broadband to rural communities just like we brought electricity to them back in the 1930s,” said Craig Eccher, Tri-County president and chief executive officer. “The entire initiative is a six-year project with 2,700 miles of fiber delivering high-speed internet to our members. We are eager to move forward with a project that has such transformational possibilities for our region.” Construction will begin this year. “The opportunity cost, meaning the cost of nondeployment of university broadband connectivity, is really the most harmful to the economies in areas of the state where they have the most mom and pop businesses and the places that aren’t serviced by the larger corporations,” said Meinrath. “And that’s a real problem.”

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FEATURE

Upstate New York dairy operation expands to NEPA

Farm-to-table is becoming a popular concept with many restaurants and consumers with both using A group of upstate New York farmers is offering locally sourced products from smaller producers of new choices on the shelves of Northeast Pennsylva- agricultural products. nia grocery stores. Noble said his family farm worked with a number “We set this creamery and cheese operation about of the farms involved in the co-op through Dairy four to five years ago, and we thought it was imporFarms of America. All of the cheese is made on the tant to bring that story of local sustainability to the farm. He said the farms are powered by with biofuel marketplace,” said Chris Noble, a seventh-generation – animal waste and food scraps that are turned into farmer at Noblehurst Farms in western New York, who electricity. He said with the investment in such equiprecently launched Craigs Creamery. Founded by eight ment and machinery, it’s a long-term. It’s the only local farms in Pavillion, NY, the group is now selling on-site creamery that is powered by such technology. their cheese brand throughout Northeast Pennsylvania. Twenty million pounds of waste and food scraps have The products are available in several other states been used to power the creamery. including Maryland, Delaware, Massachusetts and “We thought we could consolidate some of the Rhode Island. The cheeses currently offered are operations and offer something different to the marSwiss, mozzarella, mild, sharp and medium Cheddar ketplace,” he said. “We got together and put together a and Muenster. They come in slices and shreds. regional presence to bring that cheese brand to stores.” “People like the idea of supporting the local farm,” Noble said the history of cheese brands in the Noble said, adding that the consumer’s shift in going United States is such that you can produce “a lot” of local is powering businesses such as Craigs Cream- cheese and the product isn’t that great, or you can ery. “Especially the farm-to-table type of brand.” do it on the hand-crafted level, which is what Craigs by Phil Yacuboski

Submitted Photo

For generations, Craigs Creamery farmers have dedicated their lives to producing New York dairy products — and now its farm-to-table, all-natural cheese is available in local Pocono Mountains grocery stores.

Creamery aims to accomplish. “We want to bring that high-quality to more consumers,” he said. Noble said you can find Craigs Creamery products in four Shop-Rite and Giant locations in Northeast Pennsylvania areas including Scranton, Wilkes-Barre, Pittston and Mount Pocono, with 900 locations throughout the northeast. They are also working with Wegmans Supermarkets in western New York and hope to be in more stores soon.

“There will be more locations to come,” he said. Noble acknowledged that oftentimes a challenge is a potential customer not knowing what product tastes like. He said this summer, they hope to put together some sampling events where customers can try the cheese in-store. “It has a more premium price point to it, but I think because of the taste and the quality, consumers really like it,” said Noble. “People like to know where their food comes from and our product does just that.”

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FEATURE

Study finds Pennsylvania’s student debt highest in nation by Phil Yacuboski

Going to college is an expensive venture everywhere, but especially in Pennsylvania. As people across the country are struggling to pay back mountains of student debt, Pennsylvania students have by far, the biggest bill. A 2018 LendEDU study found that at $36,193, Pennsylvania students owe the most of students in any other state in the nation. “We counsel families on all options for paying for school, including grants, scholarships and loans,” said Amanda Kishbaugh, director of financial aid at Bloomsburg University. “Many parents come to us who have no money saved for school or just not enough and they’re shocked to learn their students cannot borrow all of the funds in their own names.” During the 2017-2018 school year, 89% of students attending Bloomsburg University received financial aid, according to Kishbaugh. The average student graduating from BU carries $34,916 in student debt, according to information supplied by the school. “Some parents are willing to take on the loan burden by borrowing through the Federal PLUS program or private loans but some simply cannot afford to do that, and we have to tell them to examine other school options that may be less expensive,” she said. The LendEDU study found two out of three graduating college students leave school with some debt. According to the study, Alvernia University had the highest amount of student debt

at $51,958, Delaware Valley University at $47,640 and Lebanon Valley College at $43,346. Penn State Hazleton ranked sixth at $43,579, Wilkes University ranked eighth at $43,241, Misericorida University ranked ninth at $42,686, Marywood University ranked 10th at $42,603, King’s College ranked 38th at $37,874, Penn State University Park ranked 42nd at $37,213, Penn State Worthing-Scranton ranked 40th at $36,098, and Bloomsburg ranked 44th. “I don’t think families are shocked about the cost,” said Kishbaugh, “but more are surprised by the amount of aid they qualify for. There are so many myths that low-income families won’t have to come up with any funding out-of-pocket, and that’s simply not true. Parents especially are confused because they may be struggling to pay household bills and they don’t understand how the federal government would expect them to find money for school.” She said the FAFSA process really doesn’t take bills into consideration and is looking mostly at the income coming into the household. Kishbaugh said parents often borrow money for costs not directly associated with college – like off-campus housing. She said

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they often advise parents that there are ways to cut costs including commuting to school, staying on track academically (so it doesn’t take extra semesters to complete your degree) and living on campus. According to the U.S. Department of Education, 9.6% of Pennsylvania students default on their student loans. At four-year schools, the default rate drops to 6.7%. At Lackawanna College, 19.9% of those who borrow money to attend are in default. “We always stress to our students to borrow smartly and only what they need,” said Matt Peters, director of financial aid at Lackawanna College. “We do try to counsel those students who borrow over what is needed by just reminding them that these are loans and they will need to be paid back. In the end, it is ultimately up to the student to make the decision of what and how much to borrow.” Peters said in some cases, financial aid can’t cover the cost of full-time tuition; those students are advised to attend part-time. “In some cases, that makes college more affordable to them,” he said. Peters said as college costs go up every year, financial aid sometimes does not. “Annual loan limits have been the same amount for years now, the Federal PELL Grant has only increased $100 this past year, and state grants are declining every year,” he said. “Today’s student does have a harder time covering college costs and has become more reliant on student borrowing.”

“I don’t think families are shocked about the cost. But more are surprised by the amount of aid they qualify for. There are so many myths that low-income families won’t have to come up with any funding out-of-pocket, and that’s simply not true. Parents especially are confused because they may be struggling to pay household bills and they don’t understand how the federal government would expect them to find money for school.”

Amanda Kishbaugh Director of financial aid Bloomsburg University


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EDUCATION Fidelity Bank donates to F.M. Kirby Center

M&T Bank supports F.M. Kirby Center

Photo courtesy of the F.M. Kirby Center

Fidelity Bank made a contribution to the F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts as part of its Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) contribution. This gift will support the Kirby Center’s Young People’s Theater Series, which is a key focus in the venue’s Arts and Education program. From left: Joell Yarmel, associate director of development, F.M. Kirby Center; Lauren Pluskey McLain, director of development, F.M. Kirby Center; Will Beekman, executive director, F.M. Kirby Center; Daniel Santaniello, president and chief executive officer, Fidelity Bank; Angelo DeCesaris, vice president, business relationship manager, Fidelity Bank; and Robert Riley, assistant vice president, business relationship manager, Fidelity Bank.

U of S staff members honored

Photo courtesy of The University of Scranton

The University of Scranton presented Sursum Corda (Lift Up Your Hearts) Awards to four staff members at a convocation held on campus in February. The award recognizes members of the university’s professional/paraprofessional staff, clerical/technical staff and maintenance/public safety staff who have made outstanding contributions to the life and mission of the university. From left: Jeffrey Gingerich, senior provost and vice president of academic affairs; Rev. Scott R. Pilarz, president; Sursum Corda Award recipients Tara Seely, Kevin Rude, Maureen Castaldi and Jane Johnson and Patricia Tetreault, vice president for human resources.

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Photo courtesy of the F.M. Kirby Center

M&T Bank made a contribution to the F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts as part of its participation in the Pennsylvania Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) program. This gift will support the Kirby Center’s Young People’s Theater Series, which is a key focus in the venue’s Arts and Education program. From left: Philip Johnson, regional president, M&T Bank, and Will Beekman, executive director, F.M. Kirby Center.

Waste Management supports University of Success

Submitted photo

Waste Management contributed $8,000 to support The University of Scranton’s University of Success, a multi-year, pre-college program for high school students designed to develop the skills needed to successfully gain entrance to college. The University of Success, offered free of charge to participants, is funded almost entirely by corporate and foundation grants. Debra Pellegrino, Ed.D., dean of the University’s Panuska College of Professional Studies, left, accepts a donation for the University of Scranton’s University of Success program from Christina Weaver, account manager for Waste Management.


EDUCATION Williams awards Lackawanna College $20k grant

FNCB Bank donates scholarship funds to Allied Services dePaul School for Dylsexia

Submitted photo

Photo courtesy of Lackawanna College

Williams Companies, Inc., through the Williams Foundation Fund at the Tulsa Community Foundation, awarded Lackawanna College with a $20,000 grant to be directed toward scholarships for students in the School of Petroleum and Natural Gas (PNG). From left: Lackawanna College Vice President for College Advancement Brian Costanzo; Williams Companies, Inc. Community Outreach Assistant Tammy Bonnice; Lackawanna College School of PNG Technology Degree Manager Susan Gumble and Lackawanna College School of PNG Program Director Jeannine McKnight.

Fidelity Bank supports United Way scholarships

FNCB Bank presents a $12,500 Education Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) donation to Allied Services in support of the dePaul School for Dyslexia. The school is committed to helping children overcome learning disabilities so they can return to conventional classrooms equipped with the academic skills and confidence they need to succeed. The donation will help provide tuition assistance to students enrolled in the program. Since 2010, FNCB has contributed more than $1,600,000 to local educational and scholarship organizations through the EITC initiative. From left: Michael Ferguson, assistant vice president, dePaul School; Mike Avvisato, senior vice president/CFO of Allied Services Integrated Health System; Suzanne Rickard, director and principal of Allied Services dePaul School for Dyslexia; Brian Mahlstedt, FNCB Bank executive vice president and chief lending officer.

FNCB Bank supports pre-kindergarten program

Submitted photo

Submitted photo

Fidelity Bank recently presented a check for $110,000 to the United Way of Lackawanna and Wayne counties through the state’s Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) program to support the United Way’s pre-kindergarten scholarship program. From left: John Orbin, vice president, Resource Development/Campaign of United Way of Lackawanna and Wayne counties; Alex Fried of Procter & Gamble, 2018-19 United Way campaign chair and Dan Santaniello, president and CEO of Fidelity Bank.

Kirk S. Borchert, vice president, technology services officer and Debra Skurkis, associate vice president, community office manager for FNCB Bank recently visited King’s College to present Rev. John Ryan, president of King’s College with a check for $3,000. FNCB Bank donated to King’s as part of the state’s Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) Program, which is administered by the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development. King’s College will utilize the funds for its Pre-Kindergarten Scholarship Program, in which scholarships are provided to income-eligible families with young children enrolled in King’s College’s Early Learning Center’s Pre-K program located in O’Hara Hall. From left: Borchert, Ryan and Debra Skurkis, associate vice president, community office manager, FNCB Bank.

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LOCAL

SLIBCO board members installed

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Photo courtesy of The Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce

Scranton Lackawanna Industrial Building Company (SLIBCO) recently named its board of directors for 2018-19. SLIBCO is the not-for-profit industrial development affiliate of the Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce. From left, first row: Penny Common, SLIBCO board vice president; Marianne Gilmartin, SLIBCO board president; Andrew Hailstone; Bob Durkin, SLIBCO board executive vice president, and Jennifer Davis. Back row: Alex Stark; Amy Luyster, Scranton Chamber vice president; Vincent A. Bonaddio; Charles C. Jefferson; Alana Roberts; Kenneth G. Okrepkie; Richard R. Beasley; Donald Brominski; Joseph Ferretti; Christopher L. DiMattio; Thomas Baileys; Philip P. Condron; Frank J. Fata; Paul D. Horger and Andrew Skrip, Scranton Chamber vice president. Patricia P. Acker; Raymond S. Angeli; Susan Duckworth, SLIBCO board treasurer; Lawrence C. Malski; Robert Markowski and James J. Peters, SLIBCO board vice president, are also board members.


LOCAL ESSA Bank & Trust employees raise funds for Meals on Wheels of NEPA

FNCB employees dress down for Children’s Advocacy Center of NEPA

Submitted photo

PHOTO COURTESY OF ESSA BANK & TRUST

ESSA Bank & Trust employees raised $915 through its monthly casual denim dress day. All of the money raised will benefit Meals on Wheels of NEPA in its mission to provide nutritional and supportive services to home-bound residents of Lackawanna County, nourishing approximately 500 clients per day. Many ESSA employees also give of their time, volunteering more than 8,500 hours per year at more than 100 organizations. From left: Kristen Kosin, executive director, Meals on Wheels of NEPA and Maria Kelly, branch manager, ESSA Bank & Trust, Scranton.

Highmark Foundation awards grant

FNCB Bank recently presented a check for $630 to the Children’s Advocacy Center of NEPA. The money was raised through a bank-wide “Jeans for a Cause” dress down day. Since 1998, the Children’s Advocacy Center of NEPA has helped more than 13,000 children and teens by effectively assessing and treating child abuse and neglect. These children need the time, compassion and specialized treatment they receive at CAC/NEPA to begin the healing process to keep the abuse from having a lasting effect on their adulthood. FNCB’s monthly fundraising effort encourages employees to make small donations in exchange for the opportunity to wear jeans to work. All employee donations are matched dollar for dollar by the bank. From left, first row: Jennifer Aglialoro, CAC associate director, child forensic interviewer and trauma therapist; Rosemary Bohenek, CAC fundraising and events coordinator and Angel Saar, CAC fiscal manager. Second row: Cheryl Friedman, CRNP, SABE-P, CAC forensic nurse practitioner; Julie Rudolf, CAC child advocate; Mary Ann LaPorta, CAC executive director; Mike Cummings, FNCB Bank vice president and marketing manager, and Jordan Aebli, CAC forensic interviewer and family advocate.

Wayne Bank participates in Pink Out Day

Submitted photo

The Highmark Foundation recently awarded the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute with a $25,000 grant to support the Community-Based Cancer Screening Navigation Program. This investment will ensure the continuous work of the Community-Based Cancer Screening Navigation Program for underserved residents of Northeast Pennsylvania to facilitate colon, breast and cervical cancer screenings. From left: Jane Brooks, regional manager for Highmark Blue Shield and program officer for Highmark Foundation, presents the check to Laura Toole, executive vice president of the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute.

Submitted photo

Wayne Bank employees recently took part in a Pink Out Day, wearing special “Pink Out Day 2019” T-shirts along with casual dress. Businesses, organizations and individuals throughout Wayne County participated in this day, which was organized by Lake Ariel resident, Kelly Enslin-Kyzer, in memory of her friend, Doreen Swingle. Swingle was a long-time employee of Wayne Bank who died from breast cancer in 2018.

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Top 25 Women in Business honored

Staff Report

The Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal honored its 2019 Top 25 Women in Business award recipients at a reception and ceremony, sponsored by The Wright Center for Community Health, Wednesday evening, April 24 at the Scranton Times building in downtown Scranton. In addition to her trophy, each woman received a gift sponsored by Glint of Gold. The keynote speaker for the event was Jennifer J. Walsh, Esq., senior vice president and general counsel, The Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education.

Emma Black / Staff Photos

Event sponsor, Glint of Gold donated a gift for each of the 25 women.

Twenty-five women were honored as the Top Women in Business at a reception and award ceremony Wednesday, April 24 at the Scranton Times Building.

The Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal’s 2019 Top 25 Women in Business honorees are, from left, first row: Dena Cambra, Donna Eget, Cathy Walsh Gavin, Gina Prokop-Malsky, Lindsay Griffin and Nina Waskevich. Second row: Valerie Kiser, Erica Lesniak Burns, Mary Rossi, Judith Bloom, Donna Martin and Stephanie Milewski. Third row: Lauren Woodard, Amy Sosik Luyster, Carolyn Beers, Sheila Saidman, Lynn DeSanto, Bonnie Haluska, Leigh Fennie and Cassandra Coleman. Fourth row: Amy Clegg, Linda Thomas-Hemak and Bridget Moran Gianino. Genevieve Logan Reese and Barbara A. Sciandra are also recipients of this year’s award.

Honoree Lindsay Griffin and guest Charles Griffin.

From left, Mia Bridy and honorees Gina Malsky and Cassandra Coleman.

From left, Mark Destefano, Suzanne Fletcher and keynote speaker Jennifer Walsh.

Congratulations to all of this year’s Top 25 Women in Business We provide comprehensive and affordable primary care, dental and behavioral health services for children and adults in Clarks Summit, Jermyn, Scranton and Wilkes-Barre.

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TheWrightCenter.org


A cocktail reception took place in the Historic Press Room of the Times Building prior to the ceremony on Wednesday evening, April 24.

From left, Jim Martin, Mary Koval, honoree Honoree Mary Rossi, with her son, Nico Rossi. Donna Martin and Loriane Dezinski. Keynote speaker Jennifer Walsh, Esq, senior vice president and general counsel at The Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education.

Representatives of the presenting sponsor, The Wright Center for Community Health gather on stage after the ceremony.

Honoree Valerie Kiser accepts a gift, courtesy of Glint of Gold, from Vanessa Baptista, TimesShamrock regional marketing consultant.

Honoree Cathy Walsh Gavin, right, accepts her award from Elizabeth Baumeister, Business Journal editor.

Nina Waskevich, left, smiles on stage with Alice Manley, advertising manager.

Honoree Lynn DeSanto, right, accepts her award from Elizabeth Baumeister, Business Journal editor.

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BANKING & FINANCE

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

sider changing your will if you are worried about a loved one’s ability to handle Estate planning should be an ongoing an inheritance. For example, if you have process that adapts to changed concerns about a beneficiary’s circumstances in your life. That’s maturity, you could delay or why it is so important to periimpose conditions on when that odically review the arrangements beneficiary would gain access to you have made for your estate. his or her inheritance by creating Consider the following questions a trust in your will. in your review. Are you still comfortable with Has the size of my estate your choice of trustee? Naming changed? an experienced professional to KLEINMAN If you have enjoyed signifiserve as co-trustee or sole trustcant capital gains, received an ee of your estate can help ensure inheritance, cashed out stock options or that your beneficiaries will be provided for otherwise seen your net worth increase according to your instructions. substantially, you may need to adjust some Are my minor children protected? aspects of your estate plan. Adjustments If you have named a guardian for your may also be needed if the size of your minor children, check to ensure that perestate has decreased significantly. A large son is still willing to serve in that role. And change in the total value of your assets ask yourself if you still have confidence in could affect their distribution, particularly your choice of guardian. A new job, added if you have made specific bequests to responsibilities or a move out of state individuals or charities rather than dividing may make your original choice no longer your estate proportionally. optimal. Do I have up-to-date documents? In addition, it may make sense to keep A will is the cornerstone of estate the financial responsibilities of guardianplanning. You should keep it current. Any ship separate from the actual care of births, deaths or divorces in your family the minor children. You could choose a should trigger a review of your will. Also, professional fiduciary to provide financial check to ensure that your beneficiary des- management on behalf of the minor chilignations are up to date. dren and name a family member to provide A durable power of attorney for health their actual day-to-day care. care, also known as a health care proxy, is Are my trusts funded? a legal document that names a person who It can happen – you may have created can make medical decisions on your behalf a trust but failed to complete the arrangeif you are unable to make those decisions ment by transferring assets to the trust. If yourself. A living will is another contingen- you have one or more living trusts, be sure cy arrangement that specifies what type of to fund them. medical care you will accept or refuse as it Contact Keith Kleinman: Janney relates to life-sustaining treatments. Montgomery Scott LLC, 270 Pierce Street, Kingston, PA, 18704; 570-283-8140; janIf you already have these documents ney.com. Janney Montgomery Scott LLC is in place, check to ensure the person you a member NYSE, FINRA, SIPC. Janney named in your health care proxy is still Montgomery Scott LLC, its affiliates, and willing and able to serve and that your liv- its employees are not in the business of providing tax, regulatory, accounting or ing will still expresses your wishes. If you legal advice. These materials and any taxdon’t have these documents, give some related statements are not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used or thought to having them drawn up. relied upon, by any taxpayer for the purAm I confident my assets will be dispose of avoiding tax penalties. Any such tributed exactly as I wish? taxpayer should seek advice based on the taxpayer’s particular circumstances from an You may want to change your will if independent tax advisor. Prepared by DST there have been deaths, births or divorces Systems, Inc. Copyright 2019. in your family. And you could also con-

Another force multiplier is represented by the print and electronic media The two-word phrase, “force multiplier,” is which are giants of information, added to by used in military circles as a way to the social media, and if this all could explain the extent to which a given be identified by a special evaluation, expression of military might is availit would become a new way to focus able for use when needed. It can be attention on their contributions to the used, however, to define regional overall economy of the region. economies as found in the PoconoThis region has a plethora of Northeast. industrial and economic development For example, within the three agencies that add great strength at sectors of this region – private, public the local, county and regional levels. GROSSMAN and nonprofit – are found leadership An examination of this strength would skills in abundance that are brought demonstrate the extent to which they into play in both positive and negative times. contribute to job creation and economic advanThis has been proven many times over as the tage. Many of these entities started the battle to region has experienced recessions as well as bring the region have being fully distressed to bright and healthy years. The latter bring a circle a fighting strength that caused a turnaround in of economic development that creates jobs and the economy over several decades of recent vinresponsible actions and removes negativity and tage. They are a significant force multiplier and showcases the assets generated throughout continue to offer new initiatives for the appropriregional landscapes. ate growth of this region. A support system Another force multiplier is the creativity exists to enhance the role toward regionalism which led to funding programs that are used as typified by the NEPA Alliance, the Northeaststate-wide, such as the State Industrial Develop- ern Pennsylvania Industrial Resource Center, ment Fund and other measures that have come Emergency Medical Services of Northeastern from the brains and minds of regional leaders. Pennsylvania, Family Service Association of The region is the birthplace of the Industrial Northeastern Pennsylvania and other similar exRevolution that spread across the United States amples. Sports and entertainment entities have and is the locale that has been the greatest changed the regional landscape of what this regional economic comeback in American life, region was like thirty years ago with the addition as witnessed by the startling loss of 250,000 of the F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, people in prior decades and the extensive the Scranton Cultural Center, the Hazleton Pereconomic diversity across the entire region. forming Arts venue, the Scranton-Wilkes-Barre There are strong and specific non-governmental RailRiders, the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins, organizations( NGO) found in many areas of the Pocono International Raceway and more, this region that take on responsibilities the gov- including a substantial listing of arts and enterernment would have to accomplish, and these tainment entities across the region. entities deserve much credit for, in many places, While history may have said that “there is being downtown headquarters, that help bring nothing to do in this region,” that is clearly no business to central business districts. longer the case. These are all force multipliers They have become the heart and soul of for the benefit of the one-million-plus people regional life. who reside here. In fact, their role needs to be highlighted The condition that exists where much of through a regional study that could showcase this region provides support and sympathy what these leading organizations provide to for needy people is a part of this region’s the economy and as well as reaching out to beauty when it comes to taking care of our own. engender human services. The belief is that this Services are plentiful, and while some may be research would add much value to knowledge having monetary problems, the intent to meet that could be important to the force multiplier needs has always been an important element of theme. It would be an awesome force for think- regional life. This force multiplier grows as new ing of what this sector means to a better quality Please see Force, Page 18 of life throughout the Pocono-Northeast.

What’s changed? Reviewing your estate by Keith Kleinman

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by Howard J. Grossman, AICP

Force multiplier


Empower, the Fifth Annual NEPA Women’s Leadership Conference Held More than 500 professionals from throughout the region attended Empower, the fifth annual NEPA Women’s Leadership Conference at Mohegan Sun Pocono. This regional, day-long conference is designed to emphasize women’s ability to forge a positive change in their communities and in their personal and professional lives while highlighting the incredible energy created when women come together to support one another. This year’s keynote speakers were Lucy O’Malley-Brady, senior vice president, corporate strategy and business development for McDonald’s, and Sharon Delaney McCloud, Emmy Award-winning broadcaster and partner and vice president of professional development at Walk West. Other speakers included Loryn Copley, Amanda Faneck, Judith G. Price Esq., Talia Walsh and Caroline Williams. Dr. Kristine Kelley and Dr. Susan Summerton of Delta Medix Breast Care Center held a joint presentation, and Kathrine Bondi, Mary Erwine, and Megan Millo were featured panelists. Empower, the NEPA Women’s Leadership Conference is a regional event presented by the Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce, in conjunction with the Greater Pittston, Wilkes-Barre, Hazleton and Back Mountain Chambers of Commerce. NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA BUSINESS JOURNAL MAY 2019 17 TS_CNG/ADVERTISING/AD_PAGES [ADB17] | 05/07/19

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FEATURE FROM PAGE 1

Outdoor resources remain ample in the Poconos, but according to Barrett the hottest attractions now involve the indoor water parks, such as Great Wolf Lodge, Camelback Lodge and Kalahari Resort. Each one of these offers a different set of amenities, and such as Kalahari may also target the corporate world with a physical location for combined business meetings and extended family vacations. As with Montage, the numerous Pocono water parks allow facility operators to generate revenues apart from the ski season, thereby contributing to the Pocono’s brand as a multi-season region. The romantic bathtub and honeymoon resorts also still exist to some degree within the Pocono’s legacy facilities. “Overall, the region’s guests now see a bigger and diverse picture, and it’s paying off,” said Barrett. “Tourism revenues in the Poconos have experienced 27 percent growth over three years for our four counties, creating an estimated economic impact of $3.5 billion. A lot of this is because of the water parks which, after a great deal of investment, created a big push on return business.” He credited the owner-operators of the Pocono resorts, and the water parks in particular, as progressive visionaries who are good are reading the “tea leaves” of commerce and not afraid of change. In addition, more traditional resorts such as Woodloch, continue to strive for exceptional guest service with a focus on return visitors. This long-term success, in a way, contrasts with the historical experience of Jim Thorpe, where Barret is now

FROM PAGE 16

issues become priorities, and the likelihood is that more will unfold in coming years and perhaps lead to mergers and consolidations of such organizations, equipped to explore ways to handle situations that need addressing. One example is the Dinners for Kids program in the greater Wilkes-Barre area, which is expanding and was started without any governmental support by the former owners of Ollies Restaurant, David and Edna Tevet and provides hot meals for youngsters. It is expected that this

seeing a new renaissance. “I can remember not long ago when many business fronts in Jim Thorpe were boarded up,” said Barrett. “This is certainly not the case now, because business within the town is booming.” Expanding market According to information supplied by the Mohegan Sun Pocono complex, more than two million people visited the vast facility over the past year. The company mainParfrey tains a strong analytics department so that it can identify where these guests arise from, with the emphasis on patrons from longer distances now expanding greatly, according to David Parfrey, vice president of marketing. A series of formal expansion initiatives ushered in for Mohegan Sun Pocono what Parfrey calls the destination era. This included the launch of table games plus the 238-room hotel and corporate convention center, marking the facility’s direct challenge to peers in Atlantic City. “We had to discover the right fit, and our business plan is still evolving,” said Parfrey. “What hasn’t changed is our pride in guest services, and since day one this has been our strongest focus. We treat every patron in a way that they can’t wait to come back.” Gaming is the facility’s top revenue producer, but according to Parfrey, the company clearly understands that not every patron is only a traditional gamer. To create revenues from this reality, the Mohegan Sun offers a retail mix that includes restau-

type of service will expand in the future. Another force multiplier is the abundance of community foundations that now exist in much of this region. They are a creative and critical factor in reaching many new initiatives they have organized as tool for helping nonprofits, and their role needs to be extended in the future by perhaps joining together in regional priority setting. The NEPA Alliance Nonprofit Community Assistance Center is another key asset for the benefit of many citizens and entities concerned with serving their clientele.

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rants, shows, music and races that create return business. “There are so many opportunities to lose patrons to the competitors, and because of this, the staff must receive positive energy from management and pass this down to the guests as everyone out on the floor smiles and reaches out,” said Parfrey. He also explained that the regional labor market is tight at all levels, and with this in mind, the facility management is continually evolving its compensation packages. An orientation process and the training program from day one, with films and speakers, is also administered to train the workforce as thoroughly as possible and promote the belief that Mohegan Sun jobs are not just about a paycheck, but also must include striving for a higher purpose. With Pennsylvania now allowing increased forms of entertainment such as satellite casinos and online gaming, the competition for entertainment dollars continues to increase. Mohegan Sun is fighting back with social media monitoring and guest surveys to rate its performance as a host, plus an imminent expansion into sports wagering. The facility will also continue its decadelong, highly-successful summer program of offering free cover bands that specialize in a famous artist’s music. Each free two-hour show is attended by 2,000 to 3,000 patrons who enjoy the sounds of artists performing the music of national acts such as Bon Jovi, Heart, and new for this year Dave Matthews. “We’re always dealing with limits to discretionary spending for entertainment, and people have only so much money,”

There are some activities that perhaps could add to the force mutiplier system inside the region. Here are some ideas: ■ Create a Regional Asset District similar to what exists in Allegheny County to help fund libraries, cultural facilities and other types of public entities. ■ Advance STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics) across the whole region within school districts and other locations. ■ Enhance the Sister Cities program as a

said Parfrey. “Therefore, this has to be their destination above any competitors.” People persons The regional workforce needs mentioned by Parfrey are being confronted by many of the region’s colleges through their hospitality management programs. Wilkes University is about to roll out its first class of four-year graduates, which includes business and leadership training. HyeRyeon Lee, Ph.D, assistant professor of hospitality leadership with the Jay S. Sidhu School of Business and Leadership at Wilkes University, said hospitality careers are best Lee for students who genuinely like people and enjoy close human interaction. The Wilkes curriculum, which also serves two-year graduates from regional culinary programs, is heavy on customer service and business training, and students must develop a business plan to graduate. Instruction in hotel maintenance, leadership, finance and marketing are also included. According to Lee, modern resorts don’t want only a business degree, but instead require a well-rounded graduate who truly is people-oriented and preferably has been officially certified. “Unfortunately, some parents may discourage their children from going into hospitality despite all of the great opportunities that exist,” said Lee. “The career may be considered a negative, but we’re trying to change this image.”

way to focus attention on global factors. ■ Hold a National-Regional Expo by identifying partners who could support such a venture. ■ Place a time capsule in the region that showcases what this region has to offer in this era and make sure the location is identified as well as encouraging this to occur in the future, perhaps every fifty years or so. There are many other activities that could be defined as force multipliers, and an evaluation of others should become a part of our region’s future.


LOCAL

FNCB Bank honors employees for years of service

FNCB Bank recently recognized 23 employees with 10 or more years of service during a luncheon at Glenmaura Country Club in Moosic. The following employees were honored: 30 years of service: Madolyn “Midge” MacArthur (Retail Banking). 20 years of service: Dawn Gronski (Human Resources), Walter Jurgiewicz (Technology Services), Nadine Limongelli (Retail Banking), Maria Lombardi (Retail Lending) and Marsha Matthews (Deposit Operations). 15 years of service: Sandra Brandmier (Retail Banking), Cheryl Carter (Human Resources), Jeanette Colarusso (Retail Banking), Lisa Hettes (Information Technology & Operations), Katie King (Human Resources) and Lori Quinn (Retail Lending). 10 years of service: Jack Costanzi (Loan Operations), Christina Evans (Retail Banking), Katiemae Goryl (Retail Banking), Christina Koval (Deposit Operations), Bernadine Lello (Retail Banking), Kathy Martino (Customer Care Center), Joseph Moffitt (Commercial), Lori Sabia (Loan Operations), Heather Schramm (Commercial), Theresa Verdine (Deposit Operations) and Dana Warholic (Audit). FNCB Bank recently recognized 23 employees for their combined 330 years of service.

Fidelity Bank celebrates professional milestones through Service Awards Fidelity Bank recently honored financial professionals celebrating career milestones at its annual gala at the Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple. The following bankers earned Service Awards: ■ Katelyn Abraham, Cynthia Cacioppo, James Igoe, Michael Karpovich, Carol Petliski, David Saxton and Sarah Sorrells were acknowledged for 5 years of service. ■ Michael Coury, Cynthia Dopko, Carey Garvey, Delbert James, Lisa Minor, Tim O’Brien, Joanne Pezzuti, Marian Puzycki, Jill Valentini and Amanda Vinciguerra were honored for 10 years of service. ■ Joann Marsili, Jason McCabe, Michelle McMaster and Wayne Parker celebrated 15 years of service. ■ Frank Cimino, Yvonne Del Rosso, Mary Ann Marranca and Melissa Sadaka were recognized for 20 years of service. ■ Susan Lucas, Maureen Polster and Chris Sledzinski were acknowledged for 25 years of service. ■ Jack Ferrett celebrated 35 years of service, and Patricia Bohan was honored for 50 years of service.

Submitted photo

Fidelity Bank recently honored financial professionals celebrating career milestones. From left, first row: Joann Marsili, Yvonne DelRosso, Susan Lucas, Chris Sledzinski, Michelle McMaster, Melissa Sadaka, Maureen Polster and James Igoe. Second row: Tim O’Brien, David Saxton, Jill Valentini, Lisa Minor, Frank Cimino, Michael Karpovich, Daniel J. Santaniello, Carey Garvey, Kate Abraham, Carol Petliski, Joanne Pezzuti and Cynthia Dopko.

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PERSONNEL FILE ALLIED SERVICES

Chief Nursing Innovation Officer Laura Piazza Smith, RN, BSN, NHA, was recently appointed to Misericordia University’s Health Care Advisory Board. The advisory board is composed of regional professionals in health care and higher education. Smith will draw on 25 years of diverse nursing experience. As chief nursing innovation officer, Smith works closely with other members of the management team to advance the highest SMITH standards of care, and directs the development and implementation of new best practices and training, and innovative nursing initiatives across all levels of nursing throughout the Integrated Health System.

ANN BROWNELL’S TRAVEL

Laurie Burke has completed her certification as an AmaWaterways River Cruise Specialist. As a specialist, she has gained in-depth knowledge of AmaWaterways, including details on their award-winning ships, upscale amenities and one-of-a-kind destinations. River cruises are the fastest growing trend in the entire travel industry. Included in the fares of most river cruises are shore excurBURKE sions in every port of call, all dining on board, internet access and Wi-Fi. She has been a travel professional for more than five years, planning her clients’ vacations like she was planning her own.

AQUA PENNSYLVANIA

President Marc Lucca has been elected to the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry’s board of directors. Lucca was one of five newly elected directors selected to serve the board at the group’s annual membership meeting. The Pennsylvania Chamber is the largest broad-based business association in the state, with nearly 10,000 member businesses. Lucca has served as president of Aqua Pennsylvania since 2016 and is responsible for the utility’s overall operations, including distribution, production, water treatment and quality, water resources, and maintenance and construction throughout the commonwealth.

ASSUREDPARTNERS OF NORTHEASTERN PA.

Chad DeBona joined the company as a member of the commercial sales team. As a licensed producer, DeBona will identify prospects for new business, service existing and new business and develop longterm relationships with clients, carriers and underwriters. He formerly worked as an underwriting analyst at Berkshire Hathaway GUARD. He is a graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania with a degree in finance.

DeBONA

CLASSIC PROPERTIES

Jared Ward, a resident of the Back Mountain, has joined the Kingston office. He was raised in the Kingston area and followed his grandfather, Jim Ward of WARD Radio, into a career in sales. Ward started as an automobile salesman and is currently a licensed auto, life and health insurance producer in Shavertown.

COMMONWEALTH HEALTH

Kenneth Polacheck, shift coordinator at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital, has been named 2018 Officer of the Year by DSI Security Services. Polacheck has 33 years of experience as a security officer at the hospital, including two years as shift supervisor. He was nominated for his hard work, attention to detail, organizational skills, professional demeanor and can-do attitude. In his role as shift coordinator, he oversees POLACHECK and ensures paperwork requirements and assigned training are completed accurately and timely for all three shifts. Five primary care health care providers associated with Medical Associates of NEPA have joined the physician network. They will continue to see patients at 1789 N. Keyser Ave., Suite 8, Scranton, and are on the medical staffs of Commonwealth Health Regional Hospital of Scranton and Moses Taylor Hospital. The group includes three GALARDI physicians: Tracey Galardi, M.D., internal medicine; Michael G. Gilhooley, M.D., internal medicine, and Daniel Kazmierski, M.D., family medicine. Also practicing at the site are physician assistants Kristen Maritato, internal medicine, and Marisa Siekierka, internal medicine. Galardi is a graduate of Hahnemann University Medical College and completed a residency at the Wright Center of Graduate Medical Education. Gilhooley is a graduate of GILHOOLEY the Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, and completed a residency at the Wright Center of Graduate Medical Education. He is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine. Kazmierski earned a medical degree from the Temple University School of Medicine and completed a residency at Williamsport Hospital and Medical Center. He is certified by the American Board of Family Medicine. Cardiologist Michael Rupp, M.D., has been selected to serve on the Community Health KAZMIERSKI Systems Drug Eluting Stent

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Supply Chain Physician Advisory Committee. Rupp is affiliated with the Physician Network, sees patients at 672 S. River St., Plains Twp. (in the Waterfront Complex), and is on the medical staff of Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. He earned a medical degree and completed a fellowship RUPP at Allegheny University of the Health Sciences and completed a residency at Robert Packer Hospital. He is board certified in cardiovascular disease. Jill Monko of West Wyoming has been named Employee of the Year at Regional Hospital of Scranton. Each hospital names an Employee of the Year, Clinical Manager of the Year and Manager of the Year. The Employee of the Year and a guest are honored at an awards celebration in Franklin, Tennessee. Monko, a staffing coordinator in the hospital’s nursing MONKO administration department, joined the staff in 2007. In her role, she works with the director of nursing and nurse managers to schedule staff for all departments and shifts. Monko was singled out for her dedication to the staff and for her positive attitude even during challenging times.

COMMUNITY BANK NA

Susanne Mullin was promoted to district manager of Luzerne County. She brings to the position more than 20 years of experience in the financial industry. In her new role, Mullin will oversee six branches within Luzerne County, including Pittston, Back Mountain, Kingston, Edwardsville, and South Main Street and North Franklin Street in Wilkes-Barre. She has been with the bank since 2004 when the bank merged with First Heritage and has served the Northeast Pennsylvania market since 1994. During her time at the bank, Mullin has served as branch manager for the North Franklin MULLIN Street, Wilkes-Barre, and Back Mountain locations.

CHRISTIE BONNICE STATE FARM

Christie Bonnice CLU, agency owner, earned the Chartered Financial Consultant professional designation from the American College, Bryn Mawr. Candidates for the designation must complete a minimum of eight courses and 16 hours of supervised examinations. They must also fulfill stringent experience and ethics requirements. The professional designaBONNICE tion acknowledges an adviser has a comprehensive education in financial planning, with an emphasis on modern, applications-based concepts. Bonnice has owned and operated the Wilkes-Barre

agency for three years. She resides in Dallas.

DISTASIO & KOWALSKI LLC

Attorney Peter J. Biscontini has been appointed by Luzerne County Council to the Luzerne County Convention Center Authority for a five-year term ending Dec. 31, 2023. The Luzerne County Convention Center Authority oversees the Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza. At the Wilkes-Barre personal injury law firm, Biscontini focuses on representing plaintiffs in cases involving personal BISCONTINI injury, medical malpractice and workers’ compensation. He is a member of the Pennsylvania Bar Association and the Luzerne County Bar Association.

FIDELITY BANK

William P. McAndrew and Thomas G. Regenski, financial advisers at Fidelity Asset Management located at the bank, have been awarded the Accredited Investment Fiduciary designation from the Center for Fiduciary Studies, the standardssetting body for Fi360. McAndrew, a resident of Forest City, is senior vice president and LPL financial advisor. He has McANDREW more than 30 years of experience in the wealth management industry specializing in retirement income planning, including 401(k)s and IRAs, liability-driven investing techniques, structuring tax-free income portfolios and developing integrated financial and estate plans. Regenski, a resident of Hawley, is assistant vice president and LPL financial adviser. He has more than 20 years of wealth management experience specializing in exemplary customer service skills in the health care, technology and the hospitality industry as a small-business owner. The bank honored three REGENSKI local bankers for their achievements at its gala on Feb. 9 at the Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple. Michelle McMaster was named Banker of the Year. Mary Blasi was awarded Outstanding Service Partner, and James Igoe was recognized for Excellence in Customer Service. McMaster, a resident of Olyphant, is the branch manager of the financial center office in Scranton with 15 years of service to the bank community. Before her current position, she served as a customer service representative and assistant branch manager. She was named McMASTER Banker of the Year in honor of her commitment to her teamPlease see Personnel, Page 21


PERSONNEL FILE FROM PAGE 20 mates, clients, shareholders and community, and for her contributions in the areas of relationship, integrity, commitment, passion, innovation and success. Throughout her career, McMaster has gained vast knowledge of banking, and she is always willing to share her expertise. An active community volunteer, she is a member of the 2019 Leadership Lackawanna core class. Blasi, a resident of Dunmore, is the deposit operations team lead for the bank. She was named Outstanding Service Partner for providing exceptional service to internal partners, delivering high-quality work in a collaborative way, assisting in meeting the needs of service partners to develop and build client relationships, and forging internal relationships that result in strong, passionate teams. Specializing in IRAs, Blasi continually updates her BLASI knowledge in this area, and in other financial matters. She has been a vital part of the bank’s team for 14 years. Igoe, a resident of Scranton, is the electronic banking specialist, with five years of service to the bank. He was recognized for Excellence in Customer Service for providing exceptional service to all banking clients, striving to deepen relationships through a professional, knowledgeable IGOE partnership, and bringing success to the bank through strong relationship management. Specializing in electronic banking processes, Igoe’s colleagues and clients rely on his expertise in this area. He is also an active member of the community.

GEISINGER COMMONWEALTH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

Tanja Adonizio, M.D., and Michelle Schmude, Ed.D., recently delivered two presentations on the school’s innovative approach to professional identity formation. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has identified professionalism as a core competency that must be demonstrated by doctors in training. Professional identity formation gives students the tools and skills necessary to ADONIZIO master this competency. Adonizio, associate dean for student affairs, and Schmude, the school’s associate dean for admissions, enrollment management and financial aid and assistant professor, presented at the Philadelphia-area network meeting of the Northeast Association for Advisors for the Health Professions and at the Association of American Colleges and Universities annual meeting in Atlanta. The presentations focused on ePortfolio, which GCSOM developed as a means to assess medical students’ competency in the crucial area of profesSCHMUDE sionalism.

Vicki T. Sapp, Ph.D., director of student engagement, diversity and inclusion and a faculty member, was named to the Geisinger Diversity and Inclusion Council. The council includes a cross section of representatives drawn from Geisinger’s more than 33,000 employees. Geisinger’s Diversity and InSAPP clusion Council is a new initiative just launched in January. Sapp said its purpose is to define what diversity and inclusion mean at Geisinger and then to examine the experiences of Geisinger patients, members, employees and students to be sure they correspond to the vision. Two members of the leadership team at the school published an article in the November edition of the magazine of the National Association of Colleges and Employers. The co-authors are Michelle Schmude, Ed.D., and V. Scott Koerwer, Ed.D. Schmude is associate dean for admissions, enrollment management and financial aid and assistant professor in the Medical Education Department. Koerwer is vice president for strategy, planning and communication and vice dean for the School of Graduate Studies, as well as professor of organizational systems and innovation. KOERWER The article, titled “Incorporating Appreciative Advising and Positive Psychology for Student Success,” examines the school’s experience in building positive psychology and appreciative advising into a course dedicated to professional development for the school’s master of biomedical sciences students. Appreciative advising is an approach to academic advising that encourages students to examine their own strengths, skills and abilities and to visualize how they translate to a professional future. Thomas Martin, M.D., long-time assistant chairman for pediatric education who played an integral role in the development and founding of the Geisinger Janet Weis Children’s Hospital, will become professor emeritus. Ashley Shamansky, D.O., will assume the duties of assistant chair for pediatric education in the Department of Medical Education at the school. She will continue to hold the title of assistant professor of pediatrics. In addition to his role at the medical school, Martin was also named professor emeritus in the Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation at Hershey Medical Center. He practiced pediatrics and served as associate medical director of the Family Practice Residency at Williamsport Hospital. He is board-certified both in pediatrics and in the subspecialty of sports medicine. In addition to numerous clinical and academic MARTIN appointments in pediatrics, Martin served as team physician for the Penn State University football and wrestling teams from 1997 to 2004. Shamansky is a graduate of Bucknell University and the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. Additionally, she holds a master’s degree in public health from the Ohio State University. She completed her residency in pediatrics, as well as an academic general pediatric

fellowship at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. She is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American College of Osteopathic Pediatricians and the American Osteopathic Association.

GOLDEN TECHNOLOGIES INC.

Brady Panusky, Old Forge, was selected as Employee of the Month for February. He has been employed since 2012 in the lift chair division. The Employee Recognition Committee received compelling support for Panusky’s selection, noting his professionalism, attention to detail and ability to work as a team player. Panusky was awarded a framed plaque, preferred parking for the month and a monetary gift.

LEADERSHIP WILKESBARRE

Nicole Sowinski Hurchick has been hired as communications and program coordinator. Born and raised in Pittston, she has recently returned to the area after spending three years in Central Pennsylvania, where she worked as a marketing specialist at an insurance brokerage firm. She is a longtime volunteer with the Pittston Tomato Festival.

HURCHICK

MARYWOOD UNIVERSITY

PANUSKY

HONESDALE NATIONAL BANK

Ten employees were recognized for five years of service at the bank’s annual employee recognition dinner at Lukan’s Farm Resort. The employees received a special gift in recognition of their service. Those recognized were William Carmody, financial consultant, corporate center; Charlie Curtin, vice president, trust officer, corporate center; Nick D’Alberto, assistant vice president, branch manager, 733 Main Street Office; Ann Marie Grado, loan closing coordinator, mortgage center; Jennifer Jaycox, vice president, chief operations officer, corporate center; Kathryn Jonas, head teller/ CSR, Forest City office; Lori Keller, mortgage underwriter, mortgage center; Jamie Shnipes, teller/CSR, Eynon office; Lisa Valentine, head teller/CSR, Clarks Summit office; and Judy Williams, loan closing coordinator, mortgage center.

IDEAWORKS MARKETING

Kerimcan Ozcan, M.S., M.A., Ph.D., assistant professor of marketing, was recently notified that his paper, “Offerings as Digitalized Interactive Platforms: A Conceptual Framework and Implications,” was selected as a finalist for the 2018 Shelby D. Hunt/Harold H. Maynard Award. This annual award recognizes the article published in the Journal of Marketing that made significant contributions to marketing theory in the year. All Journal of Marketing Awards are presented annually at OZCAN the Summer American Marketing Association Conference, which will take place in Chicago in August.

MCDONALD & MACGREGOR LLC

Founding partner Michael J. McDonald recently made two presentations at an auto injury seminar held by the National Business Institute. His presentations included “Detangling Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist Coverage” and “Recognizing and Countering Insurance Defense Tactics.” McDonald has been certified by the National Board of Trial Advocacy in civil trial law since 1992 and currently represents victims of automobile accidents in claims against negligent McDONALD drivers and insurance companies throughout Northeast Pennsylvania.

The Northeast Pa. Chapter of the American Advertising Federation has announced its 2019 Silver Medal Winner as Peter Steve of the Wyoming business. Before launching his marketing business in 1998, Steve enjoyed a 17-year career in the management services industry, serving as vice president of marketing for Sodexo. He has authored a number of STEVE feature articles for industry trade publications, and is an accomplished speaker on branding and MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY marketing strategy. His professional memberships include Denis Anson, M.S., O.T.R./L., director of research and the American Marketing Association and the American development at the university’s Advertising Federation. Assistive Technology Research Institute, recently presented his JOHNSON COLLEGE research at the 2019 Assistive The college recognized employees for milestone years Technology Industry Association of service on Jan. 4. The employees and milestones are: Conference in Orlando, Florida. Five years: Nicole Fabricatore, academic coordinator Anson presented “3D for the physical therapist assistant program; Sean Ann Printing Tactile Graphics: It’s Kelly, associate director of communications; and George Easier Than You think!’’ during a Torda, maintenance staff. 60-minute educational breakout 10 years: Josue Hernandez, maintenance staff. session. He demonstrated how ANSON 15 years: Michael Novak, chief administrative officer; to use 3D printers to create Joseph Polinsky, department chair of computer informaaccessible signage and tactile tion technology; Doug Hampton, department chair of graphics using the same simple tools used to create biomedical equipment technology; and Shirley Helbing, lithophanes. institutional effectiveness analyst. 40 years: Joseph Musheno, ’78, director of facilities. Please see Personnel, Page 23

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PERSONNEL FILE FROM PAGE 21 Anson, a resident of Noxen, has been actively involved in computer and assistive technology applications for rehabilitation for more than 38 years.

MUNLEY LAW

Attorney Melinda C. Ghilardi joined the firm Monday. Ghilardi worked as an assistant federal public defender for 33 years and served as first assistant federal public defender from 1988-2017. In 2005, she received the Lynette Norton Award presented by the Pennsylvania Bar Association’s Commission on Women in the Profession. The same year, she received the inaugural GHILARDI Athena Award presented by the Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce. She is past president of the Lackawanna Bar Association and is co-chairwoman of both Geisinger Health System’s Women’s Health Volunteer Leadership Council and of the Geisinger Northeast Advisory Council.

NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE CO.

George R. Shadie has received the NAIFA Quality Award from the National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors, the industry’s leading professional association. Shadie has been an agent for 29 years. Associated with the Northeast Pennsylvania Scranton General Office, he resides in Drums with his son, Alex. He volunteers as SHADIE chairman emeritus for Supporting Autism Families Everywhere. The award recognizes advisors for their commitment to excellence in service to their clients and industry, their pursuit of education and training and their adherence to the association’s code of ethics.

NEXSTAR MEDIA GROUP INC.

WBRE-TV, the media group’s station in Northeast and Central Pennsylvania, has named Bryan Scofield as the co-host of “Pa Live!,” a live entertainment and lifestyle show. Scofield previously worked in Las Vegas as the chief meteorologist for ABC affiliate KTNV-TV. He joined the broadcast beginning March 4.

SCOFIELD

NORTH BRANCH LAND TRUST

Attorney Kelly A. Bray Snyder of Wilkes-Barre was appointed to the board of directors. She is an annual giving leadership officer within the office for institutional advancement at King’s College, Wilkes-Barre. Bray Snyder began her professional law career at Vinsko & Associates in WilkesBarre, went on to practice civil

BRAY SNYDER

rights law at Dyller Law Firm in Wilkes-Barre, and then served as an administrative law judge in the Pennsylvania Department of Human Services. She also practices residential and commercial real estate law.

NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA INDUSTRIAL RESOURCE CENTER

Janelle Farkas joined as an industrial engineer. She will work closely with clients to improve the three “Ps” that apply to any organization: processes, people and products. Her specialties FARKAS include Six Sigma, statistical analysis, continuous improvement strategy, data strategy, design and implementation of operational metrics and Lean Enterprise. Farkas brings nearly 10 years of continuous improvement expertise to her client engagements. Her experiences range from localized to organization-wide change efforts. Sheree Klemow joined in marketing and special events. She will be working with the team to help spread awareness of the center’s services, educational trainings, consultations and innovative hands-on programs offered by a top-notch professional team. Klemow brings more than 20 KLEMOW years of marketing, advertising, special events experience from various sectors and hopes to aid thought leaders in their service of enhancing the region’s manufacturing footprint. Before her work in business development, she served as WVIA Public Television and Radio’s public information director.

NORTHEAST REGIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE

The board of directors elected new officers in December. Susan Shoemaker was elected as chairwoman; Mary Sewatsky, M.D., vice chairwoman; the Rev. Herbert Keller, secretary; and Suzanne M. Fletcher, treasurer. In addition to the new officers, the board appointed Michael Greenberg, M.D., and Soumit Basu, M.D., Ph.D., to the board of directors. Greenberg is a physician on BASU the radiation oncology team at Geisinger. He attended Mount Sinai School of Medicine and completed his residency from Harvard Medical School Joint Center for Radiation Medicine. He also completed a fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital. He is board certified in radiation oncology. Basu has recently joined Geisinger as Northeast regional director of hematology/oncology and allogeneic blood and marrow transplantation director for the Geisinger Center for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. In his role, he will oversee the cancer programs at Geisinger Community Medical Center in Scranton GREENBERG

and Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center in Plains Twp. Board certified in internal medicine and hematology, he is trained in blood/bone marrow transplantation and the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of cancers, focusing on leukemia, lymphoma, myeloma and other blood cancers as well as noncancerous blood disorders and blood stem cell disorders. Both Greenberg and Basu see patients at the Frank M. and Dorothea Henry Cancer Center at Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center and Geisinger Community Medical Center Cancer Center.

PA CREDIT UNION ASSOCIATION

Dana Fischer, a native of Madison Twp., joined the association as an auditor after several years working in the credit union movement. She formerly worked at Penn East FCU. She has also worked as an internal accountant and auditor for several non-credit union entities. The Harrisburg-based trade association provides legislative, promotional, educational and operational support for credit unions in Pennsylvania.

FISCHER

PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY

Dr. Stephen Cheskiewicz, assistant professor of information technology from Harveys Lake, presented his research, “Learning Through Unlearning: What People Need to Re-learn about Using Digital Technologies,” in Barcelona, Spain, on March 11. The research and paper, co-authored with Dr. Miquel Colobran of Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, was presented at the 15th annual International Technology, Knowledge and Society conference at Museo de CosmoCaixa in Barcelona. This is Cheskiewicz’s CHESKIEWICZ third research project with Colobran. Previous projects were presented in Madrid and Seville, Spain, and the University of California at Berkeley.

PPL ELECTRIC UTILITIES

Lori Mueller has been named vice president of customer services. Mueller will oversee the company’s efforts to strengthen customer experience. As a member of the senior leadership team, she will play a vital role in supporting the company’s strategic priorities and commitment to deliver for its customers. Mueller most recently served as vice president of operations and customer experience for Affinegy Inc. in Austin, Texas, where she oversaw customer operations, customer engagement and satisfaction, and product road maps to improve product MUELLER success.

REP. MIKE PEIFER

The representative’s office welcomed Brian Stolarski, who will now serve as the American Legion veterans service representative in the 139th District, replacing

Dominick Nati, who retired at the end of 2018. Accredited American Legion service officers are specially trained to provide expert assistance, free of charge, to veterans and their families. While the majority of a service officer’s work involves application for VA disability benefits, these compassionate professionals also provide information, referrals and resources on education, employment and business, death benefits and other important topics.

SCRANTON SCHOOL DISTRICT

Angela Brigido, a first-grade teacher at John F. Kennedy Elementary School, is one of only 4,446 teachers across the United States to renew their certification as a National Board Certified Teacher, seen as the profession’s mark of accomplished teaching. The National Board is at work across the county, helping set the expectation that all teachers should demonstrate accomplished teaching via National Board Certification and become leaders in their schools and communities, and that every child should have the opportunity to learn from an accomplished teacher. Currently, more than 20,000 teachers are pursuing National Board Certification.

SHADOWBROOK RESORT

Helen Allen has been appointed executive chef. With a culinary background that spans more than 15 years, she will assume immediate oversight of the resort’s culinary operations, including Bogey’s Grille, banquet, event cuisine and menu development. She formerly worked at the University of Scranton as managing chef. A graduate of Lackawanna College’s Culinary Arts program, she will receive her Bachelor of Science in food and restaurant management from Lackawanna College in May. She is also ServeSafe certified through the National Restaurant Association.

SMILES 4 KEEPS

Lucas R. Carubia, DDS, MS, of Clarks Summit, and Alec C. Nguyen, DDS, MBA, of Clarks Summit, recently earned board certification status as pediatric dentists. They joined the practice in 2017. A board-certified pediatric dentist has completed a graduate program accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation in the specialty of pediatric dentistry. A dentist who graduates from a specialty program becomes a pediatric CARUBIA dentist and is eligible to become board certified through the voluntary examination process of the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry. Carubia earned his doctor of dental surgery from the University of Colorado School of Dental Medicine. He completed his pediatric dentistry residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he also earned a master’s degree in oral sciences. NGUYEN Nguyen earned a doctorate in dental surgery from Stony Brook University, N.Y., where he also earned an MBA in health system management. Please see Personnel, Page 24

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LOCAL Wayne Bank supports Wayne County libraries

WAYNE BANK

TIMES-SHAMROCK COMMUNICATIONS

Stephen Gacek was promoted to night shift production manager at the company’s Scott Twp. printing facility. Gacek began his employment with TimesShamrock in July 2008 as a mailroom employee, inserting GACEK flyers into the daily papers. An opening arose in the pressroom, and Gacek was transferred and entered a training program. He quickly advanced through the ranks and became a journeyman in the pressroom. His new responsibilities include overseeing all pressroom and production scheduling, work assignment, deadlines and assuring the presses are in good operating order.

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH HARRISBURG AREA — SUSQUEHANNA CONFERENCE

The Rev. Judy L. Walker was appointed superintendent of the Scranton Wilkes-Barre District effective July 1. She will succeed the Rev. Marian E. Hartman, who will retire at this year’s annual conference. Walker earned a Master of Divinity degree from Lancaster Theological Seminary. She became a local pastor in 2006, was commissioned in 2010 and was ordained in 2012. She served for several years on the Bishop’s Retreat Committee, including a time as cochairwoman of the committee. She is presently a member of the Conference Nominations Committee.

Julie Shenyo, a resident of Nanticoke, has joined the bank as a community office manager for the bank’s new Hanover Twp. location, which is scheduled to open at 734 Sans Souci Parkway in mid-April. With 24 years of local banking experience, she brings a wealth of knowledge to the new office.

SHENYO

WAYNE MEMORIAL COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTERS

Samuel Ganz, D.O., physician of the health centers, is now officially board certified in internal medicine. The American Osteopathic Association certification was awarded by the Bureau of Osteopathic Specialists. Ganz treats patients age 16 and older at the Carbondale Family Health GANZ Center and the McAndrew Family Health Center. He joined the organization in 2018. Ganz received his doctorate from Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine, New York City. He completed his internal medicine residency with the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education, Scranton.

SUBMIT PERSONNEL FILE items to business@ timesshamrock.com or The Times-Tribune, 149 Penn Ave., Scranton, PA 18503.

UNITED METHODIST HOMES

Submitted photo

Lewis J Critelli, president and chief executive officer of Wayne Bank, announced that the bank will support the seven public libraries of Wayne County in 2019 with a donation through the Educational Improvement Organization Program. Wayne County Public Library director, Tracy L. Schwarz, accepted a check in the amount of $15,000 from Wayne Bank’s executive vice president and chief credit officer, John F. Carmody. From left, Mary Fritz, outreach coordinator, Wayne County Public Library; John F. Carmody, executive vice president and chief credit officer, Wayne Bank; and Tracy L. Schwarz, director, Wayne County Public Library.

Wayne Bank Supports C.A.S.U.A.L. Day

The Chaplaincy and Spiritual Life Committee of the Local Development Committee welcomed Pastor Eugene Sperazza as the new chaplain for the Wesley Village Campus. His office will be located within the Partridge-Tippett SPERAZZA Nursing Facility. He will provide spiritual guidance and counseling to residents, staff and families, as well as enhancing the chaplaincy program and services on the campus.

UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON

Accounting professor Douglas M. Boyle, DBA, was profiled among six “Professors to Know in Business Programs Based in the Northeast,” selected by Bschools.org, an BOYLE online resource for entrepreneurs. The professors, who teach at business schools with online MBA programs, were selected based on their professional experience and knowledge. Boyle is chair of the university’s accounting department, director of the DBA program and founder and director of the Nonprofit Leadership Certificate Program. A certified public accountant as well as a certified management accountant, Boyle has more than 25 years of industry executive experience.

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Submitted photo

Wayne Bank employees recently participated in the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s 16th annual C.A.S.U.A.L. Day. The Bank’s vice president, retail operations and marketing manager, Julie Kuen, served as team captain and coordinated participants, who wore a specially designed pin and/or custom T-shirt, while dressing casually for the day. MAY 2019


FOR THE RECORD DEEDS Columbia County

Danko Holdings lP. Property Location: Main Twp. Seller: Julie A Klingerman. Amount: $350,000. Scott twp. Property Location: Scott Twp. Seller: Steve and Mariza Karp. Amount: $300,000. 8 State Route 118 owner llC. Property Location: Sugarloaf Twp. Seller: Benton (SR 118) DG LLC. Amount: $1,399,168.

laCkawanna County

lizabeth a Huston. Property Location: Clifton Twp. Seller: Oriol Josep Sunyer. Amount: $287,000. Derek J brader. Property Location: Clifton Twp. Seller: Eric M Gillenwater. Amount: $685,000. karl D knepley. Property Location: Clifton Twp. Seller: Larry Wyatt. Amount: $275,000. b&b Realty Co. Property Location: Covington Twp. Seller: McDonalds Corp. Amount: $350,000. Donna Strunk. Property Location: Dalton. Seller: Georgette Stancavage. Amount: $285,000. Stephen F audritsh. Property Location: Dunmore Boro. Seller: Goose Creek LLC. Amount: $253,000. Patrick Gavan Connors. Property Location: Dunmore Boro. Seller: Joseph Ferrario. Amount: $430,000. michael o barbetti. Property Location: Dunmore Boro. Seller: Lauren Ann Wilk. Amount: $235,000. Postal building and leasing Company. Property Location: Dunmore Boro. Seller: Mecca Family Limited Partnership. Amount: $475,000. Scrappy Realty llC. Property Location: Elmhurst Twp. Seller: Mecca Family Limited Partnership. Amount: $350,000. larry benzie. Property Location: Jefferson Twp. Seller: Susan Kayatin. Amount: $287,790. Christina Podrasky. Property Location: Jessup Boro. Seller: Thomas M Podrasky. Amount: $270,000. Shelley l Richards. Property Location: Madison Twp. Seller: John J Shedlock. Amount: $290,000. mayfield Realty Group llC. Property Location: Unknown. Seller: Mary Ann Phillips. Amount: $600,000. James V Reviello. Property Location: Moosic Boro. Seller: Glenmaura Commons LP. Amount: $349,900. lindsay m Smith. Property Location: Moosic Boro. Seller: Michael Melby. Amount: $685,000. nancy b Ceresko Revocable trust. Property Location: Moosic Boro. Seller: Glenmaura Commons LP. Amount: $379,900. matthew Pikulski. Property Location: Moosic Boro. Seller: Glenmaura Commons LP. Amount: $349,900. michael Patrick Ruane. Property Location: Moosic Boro. Seller: Lindsay M Smith. Amount: $260,000. laurie Cieciuch. Property Location: Moosic Boro. Seller: Robert S Tamburro. Amount: $367,000. Ethan Calafut. Property Location: Moosic Boro. Seller: Joe Pilarcik. Amount: $236,000. why be llC. Property Location: Newton Twp. Seller: Ernest Dagata. Amount: $400,000. Gerald J Calpin. Property Location: Newton Twp. Seller: Alice Keisling. Amount: $415,000. John a Copley. Property Location: North Abington Twp. Seller: Gerard A Snyder. Amount: $360,000. Raymond bartolai Jr. Property Location: North Abington Twp. Seller: Eric D Smith. Amount: $385,000. alphonse matrone. Property Location: Olyphant Boro. Seller: James D Sanderson. Amount: $265,000. kyle lukowski. Property Location: Olyphant Boro. Seller: Randy D Parry. Amount: $290,000. Colleen Rafferty. Property Location: Olyphant Boro. Seller: Thomas Nelson. Amount: $350,000. Stephen william Peters. Property Location: Ran-

som Twp. Seller: David C Maciak. Amount: $255,000. 314 n webster llC. Property Location: Scranton City. Seller: Dinamico Corp. Amount: $332,300. Cory Simpson. Property Location: South Abington Twp. Seller: David R Petty. Amount: $395,000. David R atcherley. Property Location: South Abington Twp. Seller: R D Noto & Son Construction Inc. Amount: $300,000. R D noto & Son Construction inc. Property Location: South Abington Twp. Seller: Clarks Summit University. Amount: $300,000. michael b Cottone. Property Location: Clarks Green Boro. Seller: Leonard A Wesolowski. Amount: $272,000. ling tomaine. Property Location: Clarks Summit Boro. Seller: Claire R Tedesco. Amount: $308,000. Ryan o’Donnell. Property Location: Archbald Boro. Seller: Elizabeth Gasper. Amount: $292,500. Julia R Campbell. Property Location: Clarks Green Boro. Seller: Luciana D Suraci Est of Decd. Amount: $257,500. Rorry C altmann. Property Location: Waverly Twp. Seller: Samuel Dennison. Amount: $390,000. nikolaos molfetas. Property Location: Archbald Boro. Seller: Kenroy C Cole. Amount: $310,500. Demetria trosky. Property Location: Clarks Green Boro. Seller: Nicholas A Costanzo. Amount: $250,000. Paul boccadori. Property Location: Archbald Boro. Seller: Frank T Mancuso. Amount: $304,000. Chad bogacz. Property Location: Archbald Boro. Seller: Brian Bojarsky. Amount: $327,000.

luzERnE County

wapwallopen Creek nature Preserve llC. Property Location: Conyngham Twp. Seller: Wapwallopen Creek Gorge Real Estate LLC. Amount: $481,155. wapwallopen Creek nature Preserve llC. Property Location: Hollenback Twp. Seller: Wapwallopen Creek Gorge Real Estate LLC. Amount: $481,155. Patrick o’kane. Property Location: Exeter. Seller: K-N-B Group LLC. Amount: $315,000. Paul k o’Connell. Property Location: Wright Twp. Seller: Deryck G Bratton. Amount: $266,900. Josita a Hannen. Property Location: Sugarloaf Twp. Seller: Robert Boag. Amount: $254,000. maribel Hernandez. Property Location: Hazle Twp. Seller: John S Vercusky. Amount: $272,000. Scott C Dodgson. Property Location: Jenkins Twp. Seller: Josephine R Giacometti. Amount: $308,200. terry Gensel. Property Location: Ross Twp. Seller: David Huray. Amount: $250,000. alison neufeld. Property Location: Butler Twp. Seller: Sand Springs Development Corporation. Amount: $256,000. matthew lee Rossi. Property Location: Wright Twp. Seller: David Prezelski. Amount: $287,000. temple Senior apartments. Property Location: Edwardsville. Seller: Temple B’Nai B’Rith Housing for the Elderly Inc. Amount: $3,431,742. mid town Village mHP llC. Property Location: Larksville. Seller: Rosemarie A Kachinko. Amount: $1,500,000. michael J troxel. Property Location: Jenkins Twp. Seller: Audi Management IV LLC. Amount: $284,000. lion brewery inc. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre. Seller: EIC P/O Holdings Corp. Amount: $325,000. Daniel J barnes. Property Location: Kingston. Seller: Colleen Armstrong Grosek. Amount: $279,500. John Rosentel. Property Location: Jenkins Twp. Seller: Daniel P Mimnaugh. Amount: $298,000. James Foresman. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Seller: Arthur J Peoples. Amount: $419,000. James a wood. Property Location: Harveys Lake.

Seller: Albert R Klein. Amount: $538,000. norman J bauer. Property Location: Hazle Twp. Seller: Ronald E Duvall. Amount: $255, 000. Paula a winchester. Property Location: Butler Twp. Seller: Sand Springs Development Corp. Amount: $266,000. marvin metzger. Property Location: Rice Twp. Seller: Joseph N Legg. Amount: $535,000. Joseph a Ruotolo. Property Location: Harvey’s Lake. Seller: Carol Ann Bartus. Amount: $295,000. william H Hunt. Property Location: Hazle Twp. Seller: Christopher Cassetty. Amount: $315,000. Cedar Street apartments llC. Property Location: Exeter. Seller: REG Family Limited Partnership. Amount: $685,000. JJS Family Partnership lP. Property Location: Plains Twp. Seller: Slusser Real Estate LP. Amount: $425,000. Valley Country Club llC. Property Location: Sugarloaf Twp. Seller: Clark D Gerhart. Amount: $385,000. barry Dean. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Seller: Justin C Ash. Amount: $315,000. R&H investment Group llC. Property Location: Edwardsville. Seller: R&H Manufacturing Inc. Amount: $400,000.

monRoE County

Eleta boone and Raymond Gatling. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Seller: Fannie Mae. Amount: $349,900. mark and Catherine Ruppen. Property Location: Paradise Twp. Seller: Patricia Dembinski. Amount: $430,000. Jason Rothhaupt and april Hay. Property Location: Eldred Twp. Seller: Frank and Anne Magliola. Amount: $330,000. michael Henry and Susan list. Property Location: Barrett Twp. Seller: Jean and Milan Kofol. Amount: $550,000. kirk and lisa mensch. Property Location: Smithfield Twp. Seller: Daniel and Debra Eppley. Amount: $380,000. 123 Edgewood llC. Property Location: Chestnuthill Twp. Seller: Van Lauren Properties LLC. Amount: $2,730,000. Jonathan, Eva and Christopher Forster. Property Location: Stroud Twp. Seller: Mahase Maharaj. Amount: $335,000. Julius wilkes. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Seller: Kun Gao and Lin Bai. Amount: $298,000. Cindy and timothy Pilcher. Property Location: Stroud Twp. Seller: Delfim and Miguel Rodrigues, Judith Neno. Amount: $303,000. VRC llC. Property Location: Stroud Twp. Seller: John-Pierre Conques and Irina Shvekh. Amount: $270,000. zdravko kondouzov. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Seller: Barine Tee. Amount: $385,000. David and Jeanette orlando. Property Location: Hamilton Twp. Seller: Pocono Prime Rentals LP. Amount: $730,000. linghang ying. Property Location: Chestnuthill Twp. Seller: Ralph and Gloria Weichand. Amount: $354,000. Stuart trooskin and Qiru walder. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Mario and Melanie Balzano. Amount: $308,000. Steven and laura Demler. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Seller: Kim and Karen Cortright. Amount: $310,000. tannersville Point llC. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Seller: SB One Bank A/K/A Sussex Bank. Amount: $450,000.

baby bear Enterprise llC. Property Location: Smithfield Twp. Seller: Frank Feldmann. Amount: $900,000. Dwight and laura Evans. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Hannig Development LLC. Amount: $414,510. Jeffrey and Frances barlow. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Neil and Leigh Hymowitz. Amount: $290,000. william and amber anderson. Property Location: Eldred Twp. Seller: Anna Airapetina. Amount: $350,000. michael Rubin and Frank Fuentes. Property Location: Price Twp. Seller: Denise Croce and Frank Flynn. Amount: $310,000. Vashti and Sara Goulbourne and lacelles blake. Property Location: Paradise Twp. Seller: Emma Wengerd. Amount: $324,000. tishaun Cook. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Seller: DE&S Properties Inc. T/A Classic Quality Homes. Amount: $324,000. Perry and Carol appino. Property Location: Barrett Twp. Seller: Dorothy and David Yewer. Amount: $450,000. briar Hill Partners llC. Property Location: Barrett Twp. Seller: John Campbell. Amount: $279,000. iDoX two llC. Property Location: Chestnuthill Twp. Seller: Royal Investments LLC. Amount: $450,000.

PikE County

Steven a and Dale a black. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Edward J and Anneliese C Potter. Amount: $453,000. n P Dodge Jr. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Joseph John and Leah Renee Grier. Amount: $290,000. ognjen and Daniela klaric. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: N P Dodge Jr. Amount: $290,000. nancy J Grochowski. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Wallenpaupack Energy and Home Center Inc. Amount: $500,000. theodore C wiedenman. Property Location: Palymyra Twp. Seller: Ann M and Jeanne M Wiedenman. Amount: $275,000. alexandra E Delo and magdelena Skorski. Property Location: Westfall Twp. Seller: Robert Hagglund. Amount: $250,000. thomas morrison. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Jaimie J and Lisa A Iuculano. Amount: $320,000. Daniel and Dianne bowers. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Daniel J and Christopher Cardell. Amount: $525,000. theresa ann Salazer and nancy ann Dailey. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: G A Homes Inc. Amount: $341,050. Corey R and Emily C Durney. Property Location: Blooming Grove Twp. Seller: Chester Pontosky. Amount: $265,000. weis markets inc. Property Location: Delaware Twp. Seller: Route 739 LLC. Amount: $1,350,000. william a and Jennifer P onofry. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Seller: James and Sabrina Roe. Amount: $320,000. James Ebersole and lily Song. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Seller: Vincent J and Christie A Annunziato. Amount: $359,000.

SCHuylkill County

Rachel and Ryan Rhody. Property Location: North Manheim Twp. Seller: Justin and Heather Berger. Amount: $255,000. Please see Record, Page 26

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FOR THE RECORD FROM PAGE 25

Wayne County

Jeffrey and Hedy Schneller. Property Location: Cherry Ridge Twp. Seller: John H Vanhorn Jr. and Susan Vanhorn. Amount: $260,000 Lauren Bruno. Property Location: Cherry Ridge Twp. Seller: Two Three Eight White Mills Rd LLC. Amount: $250,000. Michael B and tracey t Delfiner. Property Location: Cherry Ridge Twp. Seller: Kenneth Battiato. Amount: $997,000. David C and Debby I Saidoff. Property Location: Damascus Twp. Seller: Richard H and Darlene Meeh. Amount: $579,000. Michael F Powers Jr and Rebecca S Long. Property Location: Dyberry Twp. Seller: David and Pamela Krol. Amount: $295,000. Gerald S and Paula a Lefever. Property Location: Lehigh Twp. Seller: Wilbur G and Mary Jane Diehm. Amount: $286,000. trust Between national equity Inc & n P. Property Location: Lehigh Twp. Seller: Thomas J Goff Jr. and Meghan Goff. Amount: $275,000. Robert D and Lee a Small. Property Location: Lehigh Twp. Seller: N P Dodge Jr Tr, Leslie A Delperdang Tr, Trust Between National Equity Inc & N P. Amount: $275,000. Manchester Hunting & Fishing Group LLC. Property Location: Manchester Twp. Seller: Allen S and Linda Sue Kraft, Ernest M Barnes III and Jessica Barnes. Amount: $740,000. e R Linde Construction Corp. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: William R Goodwin and E R Linde Construction Corp. Amount: $400,000. Bruce J Diamond. Property Location: Palymyra Twp. Seller: Mark R and Maria Skubicki. Amount: $630,000. Michael B and tracey t Delfiner. Property Location: Cherry Ridge Twp. Seller: Kenneth Battiato. Amount: $997,000. Jessica Keller. Property Location: Paupack Twp. Seller: One Nine Nine Four Holdings LLC. Amount: $250,000. Zbigniew and Barbara Polcwiartek. Property Location: Salem Twp. Seller: Sheila Mecca. Amount: $450,000. Welwood Studio Gallery LLC. Property Location: Texas Twp. Seller: Parker & Parker Consulting Inc. Amount: $800,000. Brian Hadden. Property Location: Buckingham Twp. Seller: Jack Cutrone. Amount: $440,000. Robert R Zellers Jr. and olga C Bonilla. Property Location: Cherry Ridge Twp. Seller: Anthony Martino. Amount: $250,000. Philip Molling. Property Location: Clinton Twp. Seller: Gerald B and Larissa Margraf. Amount: $437,500. yannick and Michele Vrod. Property Location: Damascus Twp. Seller: Marion Thol. Amount: $390,000. Mark J and Patricia J alfredson. Property Location: Damascus Twp. Seller: Gregory A and Rebecca A Senft. Amount: $364,000. Sassi Family enterprises. Property Location: Dreher Twp. Seller: Roger C and Ruth Ann Altemier. Amount: $305,000. nine one eight Church St Hldgs LLC. Property Location: Honesdale Boro. Seller: Peter E and Martha Carroll Rodgers. Amount: $476,500. Stanley e Brooks IV and Lisa a Brooks. Property Location: Lake Twp. Seller: Michael A and Sally Wilson Huffstutler. Amount: $305,000. Patrick and Donna Brennan. Property Location:

Lake Twp. Seller: Ionic Properties. Amount: $259,000. Bennet Vallet and Corinne L Blake. Property Location: Lake Twp. Seller: Vinod S and Ranjan V Shah. Amount: $402,500. Parkside Pocono Investment. Property Location: Paupack Twp. Seller: Suzanne M Merrill. Amount: $364,746. Sandra a Milligan and Darin B Wassmann. Property Location: Paupack Twp. Seller: Erik and Karen Schneider. Amount: $500,000. Weis Markets Inc. Property Location: Salem Twp. Seller: PPH Hamlin LLC. Amount: $365,000.

WyoMInG County

Lori terrana. Property Location: Northmoreland Twp. Seller: Outreach of Faith Church Ministries Inc. Amount: $250,090. timothy and Jennifer Susan Hayner. Property Location: Mehoopany Twp. Seller: Brian R and Jessica L Money. Amount: $450,000. Dale n and Chantel S Bennett. Property Location: Forkston Twp. Seller: Jacalyn S Krewson. Amount: $275,000. Paul a and Marlo t Conte. Property Location: Nicholson Twp. Seller: John M and Dawn Middleton Paradise. Amount: $255,000.

MORTGAGES

CoLuMBIa County

Jeffrey S and Maura ann Brunmeier. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $335,000. 20 Legion Road LLC. Property Location: Montour Twp. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $303,000. Mark C and Faith L thomas Sr. Property Location: Benton Twp. Lender: Mortgage Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $426,128. Steven n Wright and adele a Stevens. Property Location: North Centre Twp. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $350,000. Scott twp. Property Location: Scott Twp. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $300,000. Marr Development 14th Street LLC. Property Location: Berwick. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $800,000. C & a Holdings LLC. Property Location: Berwick. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $500,000. Raymond D Mason. Property Location: Berwick. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $500,000. 18 Industrial Drive LP. Property Location: South Centre Twp. Lender: Fulton Bank. Amount: $4,050,000. 8 State Route 118 owner LLC. Property Location: Sugarloaf Twp. Lender: Bank OZK. Amount: $965,000.

LaCKaWanna County

oriol Josep Sunyer. Property Location: Clifton Twp. Lender: Trident Mortgage Co LP. Amount: $258,300. Derek J Brader. Property Location: Clifton Twp. Lender: Santander Bank. Amount: $513,750. exeter 100 First LLC. Property Location: Covington Twp. Lender: Bank of America. Amount: $150,100,000. Donna M Strunk. Property Location: Dalton Boro. Lender: United Wholesale Mortgage. Amount: $255,075. James F McDonough. Property Location: Dunmore Boro. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $315,000. Stephen F audritsh. Property Location: Dunmore Boro. Lender: Finance of America Mortgage LLC. Amount: $261,349.

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MAY 2019

Patrick Gavan Connors. Property Location: Dunmore Boro. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $344,000. Delvi J olivetti Jr. Property Location: Dunmore Boro. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $520,000. Postal Building & Leasing Co. Property Location: Dunmore Boro. Lender: First Oklahoma Bank. Amount: $356,250. Scrappy Realty LLC. Property Location: Elmhurst Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $315,000. International Broker Services LLC. Property Location: Elmhurst Twp. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $500,000. Robert Parchinski. Property Location: Greenfield Twp. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $257,400. terrence e Chmil. Property Location: Jefferson Twp. Lender: Net Federal Credit Union. Amount: $250,000. Cinram Property Group LLC. Property Location: Jessup Boro. Lender: COM Real Estate 918 LLC. Amount: $12,500,000. Cinram Property Group LLC. Property Location: Jessup Boro. Lender: Technicolor Home Entertainment Services Inc. Amount: $1,855,339. JLM Management Services LLC. Property Location: Jessup Boro. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $3,000,000. Mayfield Realty Group LLC. Property Location: Mayfield Boro. Lender: Community Bank. Amount: $488,000. Lindsay M Smith. Property Location: Moosic Boro. Lender: Bank of America. Amount: $650,750. William S Gilchrist. Property Location: Moosic Boro. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $307,200. Christine Cohen. Property Location: Moosic Boro. Lender: City Bank. Amount: $320,300. Why Be LLC. Property Location: Newton Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $300,000. Gerald J Calpin. Property Location: Newton Twp. Lender: Citizens Bank. Amount: $373,500. John a Copley. Property Location: North Abington Twp. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $324,000. Rachael Bartolai. Property Location: North Abington Twp. Lender: Garden State Home Loans Inc. Amount: $308,000. Cinram Property Group LLC. Property Location: Olyphant Boro. Lender: COM Real Estate 918 LLC. Amount: $12,500,000. Cinram Property Group LLC. Property Location: Olyphant Boro. Lender: Technicolor Home Entertainment Services Inc. Amount: $1,855,339. alphonse Matrone. Property Location: Olyphant Boro. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $435,000. Kristin alfieri. Property Location: Olyphant Boro. Lender: Community Bank. Amount: $298,000. Kyle Lukowski. Property Location: Olyphant Boro. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $280,000. Colleen Rafferty. Property Location: Olyphant Boro. Lender: Stearns Lending LLC. Amount: $280,000. William J Fox. Property Location: Ransom Twp. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $500,000. William R Watson. Property Location: Roaring Brook Twp. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $420,000. Christopher D Ross. Property Location: Roaring Brook Twp. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $484,000. Christopher D Ross. Property Location: Roaring

Brook Twp. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $338,710. BRt Ice LP. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: 500,000. Robert Lewis Deluca Jr. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: Newrez LLC. Amount: $277,653. William J Fox. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $500,000. Skeeps oB LLC. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: Corevest American Finance Lender LLC. Amount: $4,000,000. Skeeps oB LLC. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: Corevest American Finance Lender LLC. Amount: $4,000,000. Wm Rosenstein Sons Co. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $342,000. olsen Realty Co. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $535,000. etK Jr. Realty LP. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: Community Bank. Amount: $360,000. Colleen a Simpson. Property Location: South Abington Twp. Lender: Guaranteed Rate Inc. Amount: $403,386. Kenneth Raymond Bonk. Property Location: South Abington Twp. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: 382,000. Paul F McDermott per atty in fact. Property Location: South Abington Twp. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $325,000. Jason t Burke. Property Location: Throop Boro. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $1,250,000. Martier Realty Co LLC. Property Location: Clarks Green Boro. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $575,000. Shannon oDonnell. Property Location: Archbald Boro. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $248,625. Rorry C altmann. Property Location: North Abington Twp. Lender: Freedom Mtge Corp. Amount: $312,000. Sammy Jo Boccadori. Property Location: Archbald Boro. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Reg Sys Inc. Amount: $294,880. Chad Bogacz. Property Location: Archbald Boro. Lender: Sirva Mortgage Inc. Amount: $310,650. Cloverleaf Developers LLC. Property Location: Archbald Boro. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $550,000. Cloverleaf Developers LLC. Property Location: Archbald Boro. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $400,000. Julie anne nicholas. Property Location: Clarks Green Boro. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $250,000.

LuZeRne County

D&D Realty Group Scranton City City LLC. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre. Lender: Innovative Capital Advisors LLC. Amount: $1,800.00 Ryan Farrell. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $309,600. Lawrence K Ide. Property Location: Hunlock Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $299,200. Byzantine Inc. Property Location: Ashley. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank. Amount: $7,250,000. Wapwallopen Creek nature Preserve LLC. Conygham Twp. Lender: New Tripoli Bank. Amount: $375,000. Jane M Wagner. Property Location: Butler Twp. Seller: Wayne Bank. Amount: $350,000. Please see Record, Page 27


FOR THE RECORD FROM PAGE 26 Salvatore DeLuca. Property Location: WilkesBarre. Lender: Community Bank. Amount: $289,000. Salvatore DeLuca. Property Location: WilkesBarre. Lender: Community Bank. Amount: $289,000. Patrick O’Kane. Property Location: Exeter. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $307,337. Paul K O’Connell. Property Location: Wright Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $253,555. Josita A Hannen. Property Location: Sugarloaf Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount $259,461. Scott C Dodgson. Property Location: Jenkins Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $292,790. Patrick E Dougherty. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $275,000. Richard T Hennigan. Property Location: Huntington Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Amount: $355,125. Midtown Village MHP LLC. Property Location: Larksville. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $862,500. James Foresman. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $335,200. PRD Realty Holdings LLC. Property Location: Duryea. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $700,000. James A Wood. Property Location: Harvey’s Lake. Lender: Jersey Shore State Bank. Amount: $438,000. Vincent M Bulzoni. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: JP Morgan Chase Bank. Amount: $310,000. Marvin Metzger. Property Location: Rice Twp Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registrations Systems Inc. Amount: $481,500. John Matteo. Property Location: Bulter Twp. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $407,700. Richard A Gilbert. Property Location: Black Creek Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $297,500. Cedar Street Apartments LLC. Property Location: Exeter. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $548,000. Girard Wadham Management LLC. Property Location: Plymouth. Lender: Lima One Capital LLC. Amount: $300,650. APIF – Pennsylvania LLC. Property Location: Butler Twp. Lender: Citizens Bank. Amount: $425,000. Jessica Maizel Jordan. Property Location: Harvey’s Lake. Lender: JP Morgan Chase Bank. Amount: $442,500. Colors Hospitality LLC. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre Twp. Lender: 275 Mundy St LLC. Amount: $600,000. R&H Investment Group. Property Location: Edwardsville. Lender: Byline Bank. Amount: $338,000.

MOnROE COunTy

Christopher Gardas. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $1,035,000 and $115,000. Elta Boone and Raymond Gatling. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $332,405. Robert and Leslie Rigby. Property Location: Coollbaugh Twp. Lender: Peapack-Gladstone Bank. Amount: $299,400. DCOn Developers LLC. Property Location: Stroudsburg and Smithfield Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank and Trust Co. Amount: $250,000. Exeter Blakeslee Lot 110 Land LLC, Exeter Oper-

ating Partnership IV LP, Exeter Operating Partnership IV GP LLC, Exeter Industrial REIT IV LLC. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: Bank of America NA. Amount: $21,500,000. Big A Restaurant Inc. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Lender: Edward Abraham and Jacqueline Durney. Amount: $250,000. E&A Investment Properties LLC. Property Location: Stroudsburg. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $375,000. Kirk and Lisa Mensch. Property Location: Smithfield Twp. Lender: USAA Federal Savings Bank. Amount: $304,000. LTS Homes LLC. Property Location: Price Twp. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $250,000. Thompson Logistics Assets LLC. Property Location: Coolbaugh Twp. Lender: Prudential Insurance Company of America. Amount: $472,000,000. 123 Edgewood LLC. Property Location: Chestnuthill Twp. Lender: Mauch Chunk Trust Co. Amount: $2,184,000. DS & BH Holdings LLC. Property Location: Barrett Twp. Lender: Mauch Chunk Trust Co. Amount: $1,211,000. Jonathan Eva and Christopher Forster. Property Location: Stroud Twp. Lender: Family First Funding LLC. Amount: $318,250. Julius Wilkes. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Lender: Mortgage Research Center LLC D/B/A Veterans United Home Loans. Amount: $298,000. Best Management ny LLC. Property Location: Stroud Twp. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $1,980,000. George Hamlen. Property Location: Smithfield Twp. Lender: HGPR Holdings. Amount: $500,000. David and Jeanette Orlando. Property Location: Hamilton Twp. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $547,500. Mountain Hollow Estate LLC. Property Location: Stroud Twp. Lender: Santander Bank NA. Amount: $18,600,000. Baby Bear Enterprise LLC. Property Location: Smithfield Twp. Lender: Firstrust Bank. Amount: $720,000. Kermit and Emely Wallact. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: Wyndham Capital Mortgage Inc. Amount: $331,700. Summit Aerospace uSA Inc. Property Location: Coolbaugh Twp. Lender: Bank of Nova Scotia. Amount: $460,000. Vashti and Sara Goulbourne, Lascelles Blake. Property Location: Paradise Twp. Lender: Homebridge Financial Services Inc. Amount: $318,131. Tishaun Cook. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Lender: Home Point Financial Corp. Amount: $305,250. Perry and Carol Appino. Property Location: Barrett Twp. Lender: PNC Bank NA. Amount: $315,000. James Ferraro. Property Location: Hamilton Twp. Lender: Robert Miller. Amount: $301,960. Richard and nancy Schmidt. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $484,350. IDOX Two LLC. Property Location: Chestnuthill Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $360,000.

PIKE COunTy

Robert Louis Santos and Kim L Ropke. Property Location: Westfall Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration System Inc. Amount: $398,249. Ognjen and Daniela Klaric. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration System Inc. Amount: $261,000. Robert J Maroney. Property Location: Milford Boro.

Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration System Inc. Amount: $294,000. Thomas Morrison. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration System Inc. Amount: $250,000. Christopher W Morgan and Patrick Cordova Pike County Septic & Environmental MGMT LLC. Property Location: Matamoras Boro. Lender: Jeff Bank. Amount: $475,000. Thomas R and Cheryl A Mueller. Property Location: Paupack. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $825,355. Todd and Carol Gannet. Property Location: Hawley. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration System Inc. Amount: $250,000. Madeline Fradella. Property Location: Lords Valley. Lender: Liberty Bail Bonds Inc. Amount: $250,000.

SCHuyLKILL COunTy

Brian Rodriguez . Property Location: Auburn. Lender: Santander. Amount: $293,000. TKC CXCII, LLC. Property Location: Pine Grove Twp. Lender: Costal Federal Credit Union. Amount: $2,625,000. A&A Real Estate Association, LP. Property Location: Kline Twp. Lender: Ag Choice Farm Credit ACA. Amount: $1,000,000. Jennifer and nathan nicke. Property Location: Washington Twp. Lender: Quicken Loans. Amount: $250,000.

WAynE COunTy

Timothy D and Julie Anne Barto. Property Location: Paupack Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Amount: $436,000. Lisa A Brooks and Stanley E Brooks IV. Property Location: Lake Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Amount: $289,750. Patricia J and Mark J Alfredson. Property Location: Damascus Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Amount: $282,000. Himalayan International Institute of yoga. Property Location: Dyberry Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $1,500,000. David J and Sharon E Flederbach. Property Location: Honesdale Boro. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $350,000. nine One Eight ChurchStHldgs LLC. Property Location: Honesdale Boro. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $383,000. Patrick T and Julia A Farley. Property Location: Clinton Twp. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $281,600. Sandra A Milligan and Darin B Wassmann. Property Location: Paupack Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Amount: $318,750. David C and Deborah I Saidoff. Property Location: Damascus Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Amount: $453,100. Patrick T and Julia A Farley. Property Location: Clinton Twp. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $303,000. Mary Kay Logan. Property Location: Dreher Twp. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $2,000,000. Russon W Ganner and Harold Dennis Christie. Property Location: Bethany Boro. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Amount: $562,500. Russon W Ganner and Harold Dennis Christie. Property Location: Bethany Boro. Lender: Federal Housing Commissioner. Amount: $562,500. Robert D and Lee A Small. Property Location: Lehigh Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Amount: $275,000. Tazz Inc. Property Location: Paupack Twp. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $337,000. Welwood Studio Gallery LLC. Property Location: Texas Twp. Lender: Parker & Parker Consulting Inc.

Amount: $400,000. Shursky Companies Inc. Property Location: Manchester Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $2,765,000. Shursky Companies Inc. Property Location: Manchester Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $400,000. Lance and Joanna Maiocco. Property Location: Lake Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $273,000. Bruce J Diamond. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Amount: $484,350.

WyOMInG COunTy

Shey M and Heather Sterling. Property Location: Braintrim Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $269,637. K&B Holdings LLC. Property Location: Northmoreland Twp. Lender: Community Bank. Amount: $300,000. K&B Holdings LLC. Property Location: Laceyville Boro. Lender: Community Bank. Amount: $300,000. Matthew Fritze and Amanda Hirkey. Property Location: Meshoppen Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $250,000. Timothy and Jennifer Susan Hayner. Property Location: Mehoopany Twp. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank NA. Amount: $360,000. Mary Elizabeth and Joseph Patrick Hart Jr. Property Location: Overfield Twp. Lender: Community Bank. Amount: $610,000. Mahaganapati Realty LLC. Property Location: Tunkhannock Boro. Lender: ESSA Bank and Trust. Amount: $856,000.

Relocation Opportunities Wanted

Bring us any and all potential locations. We will determine if we can develop or relocate to your site. Pennsylvania Counties of Interest Include: • Bradford, Bucks, Carbon, Columbia, Lackawanna, Lehigh, Luzerne, Lycoming, Monroe, Northampton, Pike, Schuylkill, Sullivan, Susquehanna, Tioga, Wayne, Wyoming

Types of Locations Wanted: • End Cap, In-Line, Drive-Thru, Free Standing PLEASE CONTACT Abbie Muto muto_a@sdepa.com Cheryl Green green_c@sdepa.com (610) 366-8120 • www.sdepa.com

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Northeast Pa. Business Journal--May '19  

Northeast Pa. Business Journal--May '19  

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