Page 1

THE 570’S FREE ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY • THE570.C0M • VOL. 27 NO. 11 • MARCH 14-20, 2019

Scranton wrestler bring fearless persona to Shamrock Shakedown

FAB 5: YOUR GUIDE TO THE REGION’S TOP EVENTS PAGE 4 TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E01] | 03/13/19

14:42 | CORNELLCHR


Photos March 14-20, 2019

Contents

Back row, Miriam Sheehan of South Canaan, left, and Susan Darville of Honesdale. In front is Edith Sheehan of South Canaan.

From left, Julia Loury, Jacqueline Cunhar and Liam Hailstone, all of Scranton

From left, front row: Gabriella Cunhar; back row, Jacqueline Cunhar and Geisa Desouza, all of Scranton. Maya Black of Lake Ariel

Photos ......................................2,22 Fab 5.............................................. 4 Nightlife...........................................5 Concerts.......................................... 6 Hey, Beautiful ...........................7,12 Chef’s Table..................................... 8 Up Close & Personal......................10 Films.............................................13 Cover story ............................ 14-15 Calendar..........................16-20,26 Liquid, Empty Bottles.....................17 Sounds..........................................19 Cole ..............................................20 Astrology ......................................21 Advice Goddess .............................26 Crossword Puzzle ..........................27

Staff

Editor Faith Golay, 570-348-9127 Asst. editor Kristin O’Malley, 570-348-9100 x5257 Calendar editor Laura Rysz, 570-348-9100 x5228 Production editor Christopher Cornell, 570-348-9100 x5414 Staff writers Gia Mazur, 570-348-9127 Patrice Wilding, 570-348-9100 x5369 Caitlin Heaney West, 570-348-9100 x5107 Contributing editor Elizabeth Baumeister, 570-348-9100 x3492 Contributing writers David Falchek, James Crane, Brian Fulton, Emma Black and Mike Evans Graphic artist Kevin O’Neill, 570-348-9100 x5212 Photographers Butch Comegys, Jason Farmer, Jake Danna Stevens, Christopher Dolan and Emma Black (Up Close & Personal), 570-348-9100 x5447

Patrick and Ann Marie McDonald of Justin, left, and Levi Hayden of Lake Ariel Dunmore

Advertising

Sales manager Alice Manley, 570-348-9100 x9285 Account executive Cali Nataloni, 570-348-9100 x5458

Contact us

Phone 570-348-9100 x 5414 or 5447

Melody Gershey and Kyle Kroptavich, both of Lake Ariel Photos by Emma black

The Times-Tribune recently hosted its Artist of the Month exhibit opening reception. The artwork featured artwork submitted from area high school students. Artwork featured in the exhibit will also will be featured in Life and Times and Weekend Times throughout the year.

From left, Kyle, Peggy, Paul, Karen, Michael and Molly Driscoll of Roaring Brook Twp.

2 M arch 14, 2019

e le c tric c ity

TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E02] | 03/13/19

14:46 | CORNELLCHR

Visit the570.com/photostore to see more photos available for purchase.

Email electriccity@timesshamrock.com Mail 149 Penn Ave., Scranton, PA 18503 Online facebook.com/Calendar570 Twitter: @The570.com Website: The570.com

On the cover

Scranton wrestler brings fearless persona to Shamrock Shakedown .

SUBMITTED PHOTO


ALFREDO’S PIZZA • CAFE • COCKTAILS

Gift Certificates Available

South Side Shopping Center • 1040 S. Washington Ave., Scranton

We’re Not Fine Dining, We’re Just Fine Food r Let Ou our Y Make Chefs gether Get To l... Specia mises Off Pre On or ng Cateri

Lent is a time for PIZZA! Esp. our “Award Winning” Pizza! Many Lenten Friendly Dishes. Daily Food Specials • Daily Beer Specials • Drink Specials • Eat-In • Take-Out • Have It Delivered 1040 S. Washington Ave., Scranton : South Side Shopping Center

Sunday To Thursday 11 To 11 • Friday And Saturday 11 To Midnight

570-969-1910 Fax Your Orders To 570-969-2974

www.alfredoscafe.com facebook.com/ AlfredosCafeScranton e le c tric c ity M a rc h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

TS_CNG/ADVERTISING/AD_PAGES [ADE03] | 03/13/19

15:05 | BAIRDATHLE

3


5

Fab b Our

5 great things to do this week!

1

Arm Ja Army Jazz Ambassadors

The 19-member Army Jazz Ambassadors will swing into Northeast Pennsylvania for a performance Friday, March 15, at 7 p.m. The free concert will take place at the F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, 71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. The Ambassadors, aka “America’s Big Band,” formed in 1969 and perform a range of musical styles, including big band standards, patriotic favorites and contemporary jazz. The group has played in all 50 states and a number of countries. For more information, visit kirbycenter.org or call the box office at 570-826-1100.

2

Steamtown String Fling

Scranton Cultural Center at The Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave., will hold its second String Fling on Friday, March 15, at 7 p.m. in the Grand Ballroom. This year’s lineup features bluegrass and folk Americana players Dave Brown and the Dishonest Fiddlers along with Serene Green, Sara Hulse, Peck and Penn, Nick & Braids and Alan K. Stout. Tickets cost $25 in advance and $30 the day of the show. For tickets or more information, visit the box office or scrantonculturalcenter.org or call 570-344-1111

4

3

Dr. Seuss’ Birthday Bash

ative and Performing Arts Academy of NEPA during the Dr. Seuss Birthday Bash on SaturCelebrate Dr. Seuss’ birthday at Lackawanna day, March 16, at 2 p.m. County Children’s Library, 520 Vine St., Scranton. Registration is required. To register, call 570Children of all ages can check out crafts 348-3000, ext. 3015. For more information, along with musical performances by the Crevisit lclshome.org.

4 M arch 14, 2019

e le c tric c ity

TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E04] | 03/13/19

14:46 | CORNELLCHR

Women’s History Month program

Head to Steamtown National Historic Site, 350 Cliff St., Scranton, for a Women’s History Month program on Friday, March 15, and Saturday, March 16. The free, family-friendly indoor event starts at noon and 2 p.m. and features “Rosie the Railroader” and friends as they highlight women’s roles on the railroads during World War II and today. Guests should meet for the program at Steamtown’s theater desk a few minutes prior to its start. For more information, call 570-340-5200 or visit nps. gov/stea or the Facebook event page.

5

March Bagness Cornhole Tournament

Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp., hosts the March Bagness Cornhole Tournament in its Keystone Grand Ballroom on Saturday, March 16. Registration starts at 11 a.m., and the tournament follows at 1 p.m. Registration for teams costs $60 in advance and $80 for walk-ins. Participants must be 21 or older. Teams will compete in the double-elimination tournament for $5,000 in guaranteed payouts. The tournament will have three divisions — advanced, competitive and social — and is open to all skill levels. For more information and tickets to enter, visit nepacornhole.com.


Nightlife CLUBS

Thursday, March 14

279 Bar & Grill, 279 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre: Eddie Appnel Acoustic Backyard ale house, 523 Linden St., Scranton: Thursdaze featuring Newpy Hundo and Nick Spaceman Bartolai Winery, Route 92 and Coolidge Avenue, Falls: Open mic with Big Al and Billy Edwards Boulder View Tavern, 123 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony: Strawberry Jam chacko’s Memory Lane Lounge, 195 N. Wilkes-Barre Blvd., Wilkes-Barre: Kartune Finnegan’s Irish rock club, 514 Ash St., Scranton: Dan the Piano Man Grotto Pizza, 36 Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville: Bingo Night Grotto Pizza/skybox sports Bar, Wyoming Valley Mall, Wilkes-Barre Twp.: Know Limit Trivia hEaT Bar & Nightclub, 69-71 N. Main St., WilkesBarre: Karaoke Irish Wolf Pub, 503 Linden St., Scranton: The Qualia Trio The Keys, 244 Penn Ave., Scranton: Open Mic Circus Mil & Jim’s Parkway Inn, 24 W. Kirmar Ave., Alden: Open Mic Night ruth’s chris steak house at Mohegan sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Music for Models Trio The V-spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Chris Zawatsky Wise crackers comedy club at Mohegan sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: The Lab — Comedy Showcase

FrIday, March 15

279 Bar & Grill, 279 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre: Playing for Tips Bads, 415 Main St., Luzerne: Karaoke Bar Louie at Mohegan sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Triple Fret Bean and Vine cafe & Wine Bar at Mohegan sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Piano Night Benny Brewing co., 1429 Sans Souci Parkway, Wilkes-Barre: Doug and Sean Bobby Keen’s, 117 W. Market St., Scranton: Jack Bordo and Jim Cullen Boulder View Tavern, 123 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony: Toni Alosi Breakers at Mohegan sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: DJ Jay Velar chacko’s Memory Lane Lounge, 195 N. Wilkes-Barre Blvd., Wilkes-Barre: Chasing Ashlee The club at the highlands, 2700 Highland Blvd., Archbald: Bill and Donna Arnold Finnegan’s Irish rock club, 514 Ash St., Scranton: Ruck N Blowfish and Magic ’90s Three The Fireside Martini Grill Inc., 411 Chestnut St., Dunmore: Dashboard Mary Grotto Pizza, 36 Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville: Group Du Jour Trio Grotto Pizza/Grand slam sports Bar, RR 415, Harveys Lake: John P. Williams Blues Duo Grotto Pizza/skybox sports Bar, Wyoming Valley Mall, Wilkes-Barre Twp.: The Third Nut hEaT Bar & Nightclub, 69-71 N. Main St., WilkesBarre: Inferno Drag Show Irish Wolf Pub, 503 Linden St., Scranton: Gold Steps, the Maguas, Stay Loud, Dear Spring, Halea and the Holtzman Effect Karl hall, 57B N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: I Trust You To Kill Me, Toothless, Vulturepeak, Cruel Bomb The Keys, 244 Penn Ave., Scranton: Olivia Grace Mil & Jim’s Parkway Inn, 24 W. Kirmar Ave., Alden: Electricstein Molly O’shea’s at Mohegan sun Pocono, 1280 Route

FRANK WILKES LESNEFSKY / STAFF PHOTO

The Donnybrook Band will perform Sunday, March 17, at Kildare’s Irish Pub, 119 Jefferson Ave., Scranton. chacko’s Memory Lane Lounge, 195 N. Wilkes-Barre Blvd., Wilkes-Barre: Random Rock Evolution Nightclub at the Woodlands, 1073 Highway 315, Plains Twp.: Dance Party Finnegan’s Irish rock club, 514 Ash St., Scranton: Better Than Bad, DJ Famous harry’s Bar, 302 Penn Ave., Scranton: Daddy O & the Sax Maniax hog’s hollow saloon, 1459 Route 93, Berwick: Last Call Beautiful Irish Wolf Pub, 503 Linden St., Scranton: Attacker Karl hall, 57B N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre: Worst Ones, Gods of Space, Das Black Milk, Kali Ma and the Garland of Arms The Keys, 244 Penn Ave., Scranton: DHD Mil & Jim’s Parkway Inn, 24 W. Kirmar Ave., Alden: Strawberry Jam Molly O’shea’s at Mohegan sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Chasing Ashlee Duo r & J’s Wild rover Pub, 1315 Hamlin Highway, Lake saTurday, March 16 Ariel: Marilyn Kennedy 279 Bar & Grill, 279 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre: river street Jazz cafe, 665 N. River St., Plains The Wanabees Twp.: Professor Louie and the Crowmatix with the ale Mary’s at the Bittenbender, 126 Franklin Ave., Woodstock Horns Scranton: The Boastfuls Duo ruth’s chris steak house at Mohegan sun Pocono, arlo’s Tavern, 10340 Route 171, Union Dale: Lonnie 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: The Ruth’s Chris Jazz Trio Griffiths Band skytop Lodge, 1 Skytop Lodge Road, Skytop: Doug Bar Louie at Mohegan sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Smith Orchestra Plains Twp.: Tommy Guns Band stage West, 301 N. Main Ave., Scranton: Nowhere Slow Barrett’s Pub, 474 Main St., Archbald: John Quinn streamside Bandstand at the Woodlands, 1073 Bean and Vine cafe & Wine Bar at Mohegan sun Route 315, Plains Twp.: Jeffrey James Band Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Piano Night Thirst T’s Bar & Grill, 120 Lincoln St., Olyphant: Benny Brewing co., 1429 Sans Souci Parkway, Anytime Soon and Buzz Buzzyrd, Marilyn Kennedy Wilkes-Barre: Cruise Control The V-spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Bobby Keen’s, 117 W. Market St., Scranton: DJ Ewin Valez Young Lion Boulder View Tavern, 123 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Waldo’s Tavern, 406 Green Ridge St., Scranton: Harmony: Andy Sleboda D-West Breakers at Mohegan sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Wegmans, 220 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-Barre: Plains Twp.: Screaming Broccoli The Classics Brickhouse Tavern, 319 Main St., Dupont: Wise crackers comedy club at Mohegan sun Friendly FYRE Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Richie Byrne and Budd’s Pizza cafe & sports hub, 134 Page Ave., Andy Beningo Kingston: Dee Maple Band Live 315, Plains Twp.: Mama’s Black Sheep ruth’s chris steak house at Mohegan sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: The Ruth’s Chris Jazz Trio shenanigans & Boomers Night club, 98 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony: Donnybrook stage West, 301 N. Main Ave., Scranton: Tommy Guns Band susquehanna Brewing co., 635 S. Main St., Pittston: Jon & Kate + Fate Thirst T’s Bar & Grill, 120 Lincoln St., Olyphant: The Wanabees and the Antidepressants The V-spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Pink Slip Waldo’s Tavern, 406 Green Ridge St., Scranton: Speaker Jam Karaoke Wise crackers comedy club at Mohegan sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Richie Byrne and Andy Beningo The Woodlands Inn & resort, 1073 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Popshop featuring Eric Klein

suNday, March 17

arlo’s Tavern, 10340 Route 171, Union Dale: Clarence Spady Band hEaT Bar & Nightclub, 69-71 N. Main St., WilkesBarre: Not Yo Granny’s Bingo Irish Wolf Pub, 503 Linden St., Scranton: Joe Lombardo’s Birthday Bash Kildare’s Irish Pub, 119 Jefferson Ave., Scranton: Donnybrook Molly O’shea’s at Mohegan sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: St. Patrick’s Day Karaoke and DJ stage West, 301 N. Main Ave., Scranton: Sponge The V-spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Karaoke with DJ Huff Waldo’s Tavern, 406 Green Ridge St., Scranton: Asialena

MONday, March 18

Border Bar, 170 Laurel Plaza, Pittston: Whiskey Hill Project Finnegan’s Irish rock club, 514 Ash St., Scranton: Green Light Go Duo Kevin and Tiffany ruth’s chris steak house at Mohegan sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Erin McClelland sabatini’s Bottleshop & Bar, 1901 Wyoming Ave., Exeter: Sabatini’s Bottleshop Quartet featuring Jamie Orfanello and friends The V-spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: DJ Aptrik

TuEsday, March 19

ruth’s chris steak house at Mohegan sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Erin McClelland The V-spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Tom Osbourne Waldo’s Tavern, 406 Green Ridge St., Scranton: Trivia Night

WEdNEsday, March 20

Bads, 415 Main St., Luzerne: Open mic night Pour Boys Bar, 932 Wyoming Ave., Scranton: Village Idiots ruth’s chris steak house at Mohegan sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp.: Erin McClelland The V-spot Bar, 906 Providence Road, Scranton: Always Undecided

e le c tric c ity M a rc h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E05] | 03/13/19

14:46 | CORNELLCHR

5


concerts shows you can’t miss F.M. Kirby Center, Wilkes-Barre Tickets: 570-826-1100

The Bizzare World of Frank Zappa, Wednesday, May 1 One Night in Memphis, Friday, May 3 Rocktopia, Wednesday, May 8

Lee Brice, Friday, March 29 Strand of Oaks, Wednesday, April 10 REO Speedwagon, Thursday, April 11 Kris Kristofferson and the Strangers, Sunday, April 14 Jon Anderson, Monday, April 15 Blue October, Friday, April 19 Arrival from Sweden, Friday, April 26

Mount Airy Casino Resort, Mount Pocono Tickets: 877-682-4791

Classic Stones featuring the Glimmer Twins, Saturday, March 16 Unforgettable Fire, Saturday, March 23 Mr. Speed, Saturday, March 30

Rocketman, Saturday, April 6 River Street Jazz Cafe, Plains Twp. Tickets: 570-822-2992

Professor Louie and the Crowmatrix with Woodstock Horns performing music from the Band and more, Saturday, March 16 Clarence Spady Band, Friday, March 22 Screaming Infidelities, Saturday, March 23 Hub City Stompers/Scofflaws and Rude Boy George, Friday, March 29 Jordan Ramirez and the Tribe and Root Shock, Saturday, March 30 Philadelphia Freedom, Saturday, April 6 Goose and Kluster Phunk, Thursday, April 11 Halfway to Hell, Saturday, April 13 A Proud Monkey, Friday, April 19 The Englishtown Project, Saturday, April 20 The Grass Is Dead, Friday, April 26 Penn’s Peak, Jim Thorpe Tickets: 570-325-0371

The Wall Live, Friday, March 15 Boat House Row, Saturday, March 16 Umphrey’s McGee, Thursday, March 21 WAR, Friday, March 22 Mike Tramp of White Lion, Saturday, March 23 Buckcherry, Thursday, March 28 Randy Houser, Friday, March 29 Jay & the Americans and the Brooklyn Bridge, Saturday, March 30 Bay City Rollers, Thursday, April 25 Bruce in the USA, Friday, April 26 Sherman Theater, Stroudsburg Tickets: 570-420-2808

The Lizard, Friday, March 15 Dire, Saturday, March 16 YYNOT, Saturday, March 23 Pigeons Playing Ping Pong, Friday, March 29 Zoso, Saturday, March 30 Almost, Friday, April 5 Golden Gate, Wingmen, Friday, April 12 Start Making Sense, Saturday, April 13 Granger Smith, Thursday, April 18 Blue October, Friday, April 19

Franklin Music Hall, Philadelphia Tickets: 215-627-1332

Tritonal, Friday, March 15 Gogol Bordello, Sunday, March 17 Jawbreaker, Wednesday, March 27 Hatebreed, Thursday, April 4 Dance Gavin Dance, Saturday, April 13 Parkway Drive and Killswitch Engage, Saturday, May 11 Rodrigo Y Gabriela, Friday, May 17 The Hives/Refused, Saturday, May 18 George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic, Thursday, June 6 New Found Glory, Friday, June 7 Wells Fargo Center, Philadelphia Tickets: 800-298-4200

Fleetwood Mac, Friday, March 22, and Friday, April 5 Ariana Grande, Tuesday, March 26, and Monday, June 24 Kiss, Friday, March 29 Muse, Sunday, April 7 Justin Timberlake, Tuesday, April 9 Cher, Saturday, April 20 Hugh Jackman, Sunday, June 30 Jeff Lynne’s ELO, Saturday, July 13 John Mayer, Monday, July 22 Iron Maiden, Tuesday, July 30 Madison Square Garden, New York City Tickets: 212-307-7171

Kiss, Wednesday, March 27 Muse, Monday, April 8

Beacon Theater, New York City Tickets: 866-858-0008

Guster, Saturday, March 16 Gary Clark Jr., Thursday, March 21, through Saturday, March 23 Brit Floyd, Monday, April 1 Il Divo, Saturday, April 6 Mott the Hoople, Wednesday, April 10

SteelStacks, Bethlehem Tickets: 610-332-1300

Cunningham & Associates, Thursday, March 14 Scythian, Friday, March 15 The Celtic Tenors, Saturday, March 16 Portland Cello Project, Thursday, March 21 Paul Thorn Band, Thursday, March 21 Funky Dawgz, Friday, March 22 Vanessa Collier, Saturday, March 23 Pat Metheny Side Eye, Thursday, March 28 Mom Jeans, Thursday, March 28 Cyrille Aimee, Friday, March 19 Marc Broussard, Saturday, March 30

6 M arch 14, 2019

e le c tric c ity

TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E06] | 03/13/19

14:44 | CORNELLCHR

CHRIS PIZZELLO / INVISION / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ariana Grande will perform Thursday, March 26, and Monday, June 24, at 8 p.m. at Wells Fargo Center, 3601 S. Broad St., Philadelphia. Tickets start at $39.95 and can be purchased by calling 215-336-3600 or visiting wellsfargocenterphilly.com.


PSU film series focuses on NEPA natives in Hollywood

N

BY PATRICE WILDING Staff Writer

ortheast Pennsylvania often is refer red to as a “vortex,” because connections to people and places here seem impossible to avoid anywhere in the world — even in Hollywood. P e n n S t a t e Wi l k e s - B a r r e w i l l highlight this phenomenon with the film series “Meet Your Neighb o r s ! ” , w h i c h i nv i t e s g u e s t s t o take a look at local talent who made their way into the movies we love. Co-sponsored by the Greater Wilkes-Bar re Chamber of Commerce a n d RC Wi l ke s - B a r re M ov i e s 1 4 , t h e s e r i e s w i l l c e l e b r a t e N E PA n a t iv e s w i t h s c r e e n i n g s a t t h e downtown theater as well as block parties. It all starts Thursday, March 14, with “ Wa l l S t re e t , ” the R-rated 1987 crime drama starring Michael

CASUAL DAY

IS MARCH 28

Douglas, Charlie Sheen and WilkesBar re native the late James Karen (also memorable for his role in “Poltergeist”). T he following T hursday, March 2 1 , 1 9 9 1 ’s “ C i t y S l i ck e rs , ” r at e d PG-13, highlights an Oscar-winning p e r fo r m a n c e by t h e l at e ve t e r a n a c t o r Ja ck Pa l a n c e, wh o l ive d i n Lattimer and Conyngham Valley. O n T h u r s d ay, M a r c h 2 8 , “ T h e Best Man,” a 1964 political thriller written by Gore Vidal, showcases t w o Wyo m i n g Va l l e y r e s i d e n t s : E d i e A d a m s, a n E m my a n d To ny winner who hailed from Kingston, and Lee T racy, who maintained a home in Dallas. S c r a n t o n’s l at e P u l i t z e r P r i z e w i n n i n g n at ive s o n Ja s o n M i l l e r gets his due Thursday, April 4, with a screening of 1982’s R-rated film a d ap t at i o n o f “ T h at C h a m p i o n ship Season,” which Miller directed and shot on location in Lacka-

wanna County. The series wraps up on Thursday, April 11, with “T he Fugiti v e,” a PG-13-rated action flick from 1993 t h a t s t a r r e d H a r r i s o n Fo r d a n d To m m y L e e Jo n e s. Fo r t y Fo r t native and acclaimed set designer Maher Ahmad served as art director on that movie. Movies start at 7 p.m. each week, cost $25 per person and are eligible for Act 48 continuing education credits. For more infor mation or to r e g i s t e r, c a l l 5 7 0 - 6 7 5 - 9 2 5 3 , e m a i l wbce@outreach.psu.edu or visit wilkesbarre.psu.edu/ce. Bill Bachman, assistant teaching professor of communications at Penn State Wilkes-Barre, began the film series nearly 20 years ago, giving it a different theme each semest e r. A f t e r n u m e r o u s e n c o u n t e r s through the years with locals who h a d a h a n d i n t h e f i l m i n d u s t r y, B a c h m a n s aw a s t r o n g t h r e a d

HELP US RAISE AWARENESS FOR COLON CANCER SCREENING. GET A TEAM. BUY A SHIRT.

emerge and put together this year’s lineup to reflect NEPA’s talent. “You need to acknowledge people who came from this area, but there’s another reason we do it,” Bachman said. “It becomes, hopefully, a guidepost and some kind of inspiration for young people. “ I t h i n k w e h ave a lw ay s b e e n e x t r e m e ly fo r t u n a t e i n h av i n g a large pool of folks from this area w h o wo u n d u p b e i n g b e f o r e t h e r i g h t p e o p l e a t t h e r i g h t t i m e. I think (guests) will see local natives at the peak of their crafts, whether i n s e t d e s i g n , a c t i n g , e t c. I w a n t p e o p l e t o c o m e aw ay k n ow i n g they’ve seen people in this area in some of the best pieces of professional work they’ve ever done, and h ave a re l a xe d eve n i n g at i t . I t ’s just going to be such a delight.” Contact the writer: pwilding@timesshamrock.com; 570-348-9100 x5369; @pwildingtt on twitter

LEARN MORE AND REGISTER BY VISITING CANCERNEPA.ORG OR CALL (570) 941.7984 T-SHIRT ORDER DEADLINE IS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13

e le c tric c ity M a rc h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E07] | 03/13/19

15:54 | CORNELLCHR

7


Mark Flaherty, co-owner of CrisNics Irish Pub, prepares for a wave of business in honor of St. Patrick’s Day, when “everybody’s a wee bit Irish” at the Wilkes-Barre tavern. PatriCe Wilding / Staff Photo

CrisNics Irish Pub whips up dishes beyond the Emerald Isle BY PATRICE WILDING Staff Writer

A

t CrisNics Irish Pub in Wilkes-Barre, St. Patrick’s Day is an all-inclusive holiday when guests can celebrate love, loyalty and friendship, even if their ancestors didn’t hail from the Emerald Isle. “It’s high energy that day,” bar owner Mark Flaherty said on a recent afternoon as he stood below a large Irish flag and glittering shamrocks suspended from his ceiling. “Everybody’s a wee bit Irish here,” he added with a smile. Located on Bar ney Street in the building that formerly housed the Bar-

8 M arch 14, 2019

ney Inn, CrisNics has been in place since 2012. “This place was a landmark for 50 years,” Flaherty said. “It was a hub of South Wilkes-Barre, and we carry on that tradition.” A longtime restaurateur, Flaherty has owned and managed various businesses in the Wilkes-Barre area since 1984, starting with Mark’s Corner Cafe, a small corner bar, followed by Beer Bellies, a sports bar Flaherty opened in 1986 and maintained for almost 25 years. Flaherty also had a catering business, Touch of Class, before he opened up CrisNics — named for his daugh-

e le c tric c ity

TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E08] | 03/13/19

15:17 | CORNELLCHR

ters, Christina and Nicole — to create a more familyfriendly tavern. Among the bar and adjoining dining room — both swathed in various shades of hunter and Kelly greens — and an enclosed tiki-style outer bar, CrisNics can accommodate seating for upward of 150 people. The menu is eclectic, with everything from Italian specialties to Polish dishes, and it runs the gamut of popular pub food, such as wings, to higher-end dinners, including lobster and surf-and-turf. On Wednesdays, things get even more interesting with Wild Game Burger Night. “We put our own spin on

CrisNics Irish Pub Address: 189 Barney St., Wilkes-Barre Phone: 570-823-5199 Established: 2012 Owners: Mark and Colleen flaherty Cuisine: Pub fare plus eclectic ethnic dishes Hours: Bar and kitchen open Sundays through thursdays, 11 a.m. to midnight; fridays and Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 1:30 a.m. Online: Visit the facebook page. everything,” Flaherty said. The Shepherd’s Pie is made with tenderloin beef tips, and seafood is in high demand. The creamy garlic shrimp sauce is “second to none,” Flaherty said, while the Dublin Coddle combines pork sausage, bacon, onions

and sliced potatoes, topped with a fried egg. On most Fridays and Saturdays, CrisNics hosts music by singles and duos that cover all types of music. For St. Paddy’s, it also will offer Corned Beef and Cabbage as well as Ham and

Cabbage among its food specials, plus music by bagpipe/drumming group the Malloy Brothers. The diversity of the pub fare and entertainment makes CrisNics a destination for all sorts of clientele, Flaherty noted, from the “old-timers” who have come in for 50 or more years to the families that stop in for a well-made meal. “It’s a local establishment with good food and reasonable prices,” Flaherty said. “People aren’t afraid to bring kids here.” Contact the writer: pwilding@timesshamrock.com; 570-348-9100 x5369; @pwildingtt on twitter


t u l i f u e a , y e B H

Northeastern Eye Institute

Welcomes

Emily Jones, O.D. O.D D.

WITH GIA MAZUR

Feed your soul with creative self-care

I

’m lucky enough that my job includes playing with makeup, testing out skin care, interviewing people with amazing style and learning new things about the beauty world every day. Another part of my job involves food. I go to people’s homes around the region and share their favorite meals with them. We talk about it: the recipe, the ingredients, the story behind the food. Then we talk about cooking and why they love to cook. Someone’s grandmother brought them into the kitchen to help powder the cookie sheet. Another person’s mom handed down all of her recipes. A person gets really into cooking as a form of self-care because it just makes them feel better. There also are people who hate to cook because no one ever showed them how. Or they don’t feel like they need to. Cooking is just like beauty. Some cook because they love it. They enjoy every aspect of the process from selecting ingredients to tasting as they go to putting the finishing touches on the dish. Others loathe cooking and have a utilitarian approach to it. They boil pasta, brown meat and steam vegetables just to get by. Some have beauty routines because they love it. They enjoy every aspect of the routine, from choosing their products to soaking in how each product feels to putting the finishing touches on their look. Others loathe the process of beauty and have a utilitarian approach to it. They wash their face, brush their teeth and style their hair just to get by. There also are people who hate the process of beauty or getting ready because no one ever showed them how. Or they don’t feel like they need to. The relationship we have with beauty can be similar to cooking, too. Someone sat with her grandmother at her vanity, and she let her powder her face. Another person’s mom handed down all of her

eived her Bachelor’s Degree in Biology Dr. Jones rece from Mille ersville Un niversity in Millersville, PA. She e then earned d her Do octor off Optometry degree from the Pen nnsylva ania College e of Optometry at Salus Univversity. • Member of the American Optometric Asso ociation • Member of the Pennsylvania Optometric A Association Ca all to Schedule an appointmentt with Dr. Jones in our Honesdale office.

Eye Care for a New Generation 626 Park Street, Honesdale beauty secrets. A person can get really into beauty as a form of self-care because it just makes them feel better. Lots of people think there are rules in cooking, but there aren’t. Cooking allows people to be creative — there are no rules in the kitchen. It’s all about how you feel and what you want to do. Same with beauty. There are no hard and fast rules. Use what makes you feel good; wear what you want. If you want to try something new, you can look online for new recipes and tips from cooks around the world. Do the same with beauty if you’re curious. And follow a recipe the same way you’d follow a makeup tutorial or blog post: listen to it until you don’t want to anymore. If something doesn’t work for you or your skin or you like a certain product better than what that person is using, then you use what you want. Same as following a recipe. Add in more garlic if you think that’s what it needs. Skip it if you don’t like it. That’s the beauty of doing something creative. Whether it’s cooking a meal or doing a 12-step skin care routine, it’s all a form of taking care of ourselves in some way or another. It always should feed your soul.

Gia Mazur is a staff writer for Times-Shamrock Communications. Contact her at gmazur@timesshamrock.com, 570-348-9127 or @gmazurTT on Twitter.

timestribuneblogs.com/hey-beautiful/

VOTED BEST EYE CENTER

570.253.1720

Emily Jones, O.D. Accepting New Patients & Most Insurances

www.neivision.com

126 FRANKLIN AVE. DOWNTOWN SCRANTON now on

Saturday March 16th Saturday, the boastfuls duo MON & TUES: 4PM-12AM WED & THURS: 11AM-12AM FRI: 11AM-2AM SAT: 12PM-2AM • SUN: 12PM-2AM SUN: MON: TUES: THURS: FRI: SAT:

new menu coming soon

$10 Bud Light Buckets $2 Coors Light Drafts $2 Coors Light Drafts $2 Bud Light Drafts $3 Fat Tire Drafts $2 Coors Light 16oz. Aluminum Cans

e le c tric c ity M a rc h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E09] | 03/13/19

14:44 | CORNELLCHR

9


Up Close & Personal

play and learn songs together. I think it’s cool because not everyone has that kind of bond with an immediate family member. He still comes out to my shows and sometimes runs sound for us.

As a kid picking up a guitar for the first time, Alex Olivetti was unsure if music was for him. At that age, he was more interested in playing video games. But a short time later, he found a love for music and now plays across the country with his band Threatpoint. He is a graduate of Mid Valley High School and Penn State University, where he studied information science technology. A Throop resident, he is employed by Mondelez International in Hanover Twp., where he works as a customer order fulfilment analyst. Meet Alex Olivetti...

Q: A:

How did you first get into music, particularly metal music? I got into music at 8 or 9 years old. I was pretty young. My dad is also a guitar player. There were always guitars around the house. I was looking at a guitar one day and asked my dad to show me something on it. I took lessons off of him for about a year. Like every other kid, I just wanted to play video games and eat potato chips, so I gave it up for a while. In high school, I started taking it more seriously. I actually started listening to Metallica and Nirvana on the radio at a young age. When I was taking lessons and trying to balance video games, there was a game I used to play that had a lot of heavymetal music in its soundtrack. I played the game so much that I naturally got into it.

Q: A:

What were some particular challenges of learning to be a metal musician? With the style we do, the music is pretty fast. You’re not just strumming chords; you’ve got to make sure both your hands are coordinated and in sync. I have to go over different scales and practice stamina so I can play a full set of music.

Q: A:

Describe the father-son bond you were able to establish through music. We used to play out together a lot. We don’t play out anymore, but around the house we’ll still jam quite a bit. It is really cool to have a bond on that level. When I was younger, I kind of took it for granted, not having to go somewhere for lessons or pay a lot of money. I got to the point where I lost interest in it. As I got older, I took it for what it was, and it was so cool to be able to jam with him and share the stage with him. We’re almost like best friends, so I get to hang out with him on weekends. We can

10 M a r c h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

Q: A:

Who are your musical inspirations? I listened to Metallica and Rob Zombie on the radio. That was kind of my introduction to hard rock and heavy metal. In high school, when I started taking it more seriously, bands like Pantera and Trivium were big influences on me. Lately, there are a few guitar players I’ve really been into. One is Paul Gilbert; he’s one of the shred guys, a really fast and technical player. I got an instructional DVD by him, and I really nerded out over that one summer. Another one is Mark Tremonti. He has a solo band and plays in a band called Alter Bridge. A couple weeks ago, I got to do a guitar clinic with him. It was really cool. Some of the more modern bands I like are Shadows Fall and Sevendust.

Q: A:

Threatpoint released its fourth album last month. What can people expect from it? We’ve definitely progressed as musicians and songwriters. We’re trying to expand our horizon. It’s more upbeat and a little bit faster than our previous stuff. I think it has more energy overall, which translates well into playing live. I think it’s our best to date, and every album you want to get better. I think it’s high-energy, and the songs are more diverse with the vocals too.

Q: A:

What is something people might be surprised to learn about Threatpoint? Believe it or not, as heavy and aggressive as our music is, we try to stay positive with our lyrics. A lot of our lyrics take the spiritual realm and are about going through everyday life or relationships and trying to keep your head up. A lot of metal music can get stereotyped that it’s like devilworshipping, evil or negative. We try to flip it and stay positive. I think that sort of sets us apart from some of our counterparts.

A:

I enjoy soccer. I like movies a lot and watch a lot of movies. I also like guitar as a hobby. I play guitar a lot even outside of working with the band. I’m a big music listener. At work, we’re allowed to listen to music, so I always have headphones in. Outside of work, I spend a lot of time listening to music on YouTube looking for new bands and guitar videos. I also like hanging out with friends in my free time, too. I’m an Eagles fan, which was great last year.

Q: A:

Tell me about your work at Mondelez International. Working at Mondelez, we handle a lot of the Nabisco products, and I’m a big What is your favorite thing snack guy, so it’s great. I do a lot of reportabout being part of the Northeast ing. I work with our distribution centers Pennsylvania music scene? who send the product to our customers. I NEPA as a whole is really strong in the look at how we can prevent item cuts in the music scene. There are a lot of really tal- future. It’s based around the supply chain, ented bands, musicians and artists. It’s really looking at inventory and getting products to cool to be in your hometown and play with all the customers and fulfilling their orders. these good bands. Everyone gets along too, so it’s like you’re hanging out with friends, then Have you had a particular time in suddenly you’re playing a set of music. your life that helped shape the person you are today? What other hobbies and In terms of outlook, I’m going to be 30 interests do you have? this year. I realize we’re not going to be

Q: A:

Q:

e le c tric c ity

TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E10] | 03/13/19

photo by emma black

WITH EMMA BLACK

14:46 | CORNELLCHR

Q: A:

here forever, so I want to enjoy my time here. It makes me like playing in the band more, being able to do what I love, the travel and going to places I never would have been otherwise. The band has gotten to play in almost 40 states. We’re going to Canada next month to play. Seeing different places, meeting new people and trying different food is great. The coolest thing in the world is playing in a place we’ve never been with bands we’ve never heard of and people are singing our songs and buying merchandise. When we go back to that place, they bring their friends, and it really builds. To go from the first time playing there to the 10th time and seeing growth is really something. Being able to travel is something I want to do more of. I never would have gotten to go places like Maine and up that way, so I’ve come to enjoy taking it all in.

EMMA BLACK UP CLOSE & PERSONAL is a regular feature in electric city, profiling people from all walks of life throughout NEPA.


Music Catch the Celtic Rebels Band on Friday, March 15, from 5 to 8 p.m. for a St. Patr i c k ’s C e l e b r a t i o n a t Kildare’s, 119 Jefferson Ave., Scranton. (kildarespub.com/ scranton or 570-344-4030) Members of a Harrisburg pipe-and-drum band formed a band known for its highenergy Celtic sound, the Kilmaine Saints. It’ll play March 15 at 8 p.m. at Mauch Chunk Opera House, 14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe. Tickets cost $18. (mcohjt.com or 570-325-0249) Kluster Phunk and Static in the Attic will perform at the Cooperage’s St. Patrick’s Day Party on Saturday, March 16. Doors open at 6 p.m. at 1030 Main St., Honesdale, with music following at 7. The show is open to all ages, and Wallenpaupack Brewing Co. will have beer for guests 21 or older to buy. Tickets cost $7 and are available at Players Row Music Supply, 221 Main Ave., Hawley; through members of the bands; and online at facebook.com/ klusterphunk. They also can be purchased at the door. (thecooperageproject.org, 570253-2020 or klusterphunk booking@gmail.com)

Just your luck

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with events and activities across region BY CAITLIN HEANEY WEST STAFF WRITER

The region’s St. Patrick’s parades have come and gone, but that doesn’t mean Northeast Pennsylvania has packed away its green just yet. With St. Patrick’s Day this Sunday, March 17, the area has plenty more ways to celebrate all things Irish this month.

Eats and drinks Harvest Seasonal Grill & Wine Bar, 7011 Shoppes Blvd., Moosic, presents its Irish Whiskey Dinner on Thursday, March 14, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. The meal costs $69, plus tax and gratuity, and includes multiple courses and whiskey pairings. Seating is limited, and reservations are required. (harvestseasonalgrill.com or 570-3423330) Italian restaurant Armetta’s Pizzeria & Pub, 2092 Route 848, New Milford, turns Irish for the weekend when it serves Corned Beef and Cabbage, Corned Beef and Cabbage Pizza, and Mint Grasshopper Martinis on

March 15 and 16 from 4 to 10:30 p.m. (570-465-5492) Kol Steakhouse at Hotel Anthracite, 25 S. Main St., Carbondale, offers Irish-style drinks and specials from March 15 through 17. The menu includes Colcannon Soup, Irish Lamb Stew, Corned Beef and Cabbage, and more. Tickets cost $39. (hotelanthracite.com or 570536-6020) Dine on an Irish-style din-

ner including Ruben Stew, Corned Beef and Cabbage, Shepherd’s Pie, Lamb Chops and Soda Bread plus drink specials at Boulder View Tavern, 123 Lake Harmony Road, Lake Harmony, from March 15 through 17. (boulderview tavern.com or 570-722-9696) Glass — Wine Bar Kitchen at Ledges Hotel, 119 Falls Ave., Hawley, serves Irishstyle specials March 15 from 5 to 11 p.m. Kevin Campion

will provide live music. Reservations are suggested. (ledgeshotel.com/glass-winebar-kitchen or 570-226-1337) At Gravity Restaurant & Bar, 40 Gravity Planes Road, Waymart, $14.95 gets you allyou-can-eat Corned Beef, ham, Shepherd’s Pie, cabbage, carrots, potatoes, salad, bread and cake on March 16 from 4 to 9 p.m. (gravityinn. com or 570-488-6918)

cElEbrations M o l l y O ’ S h e a ’s a t Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp. will offer drink specials, Irishthemed mixed drinks and build-your-own whiskey flights at its St. Patrick’s Day Celebration running from March 15 through 17. Entertainment includes Mama’s Black Sheep on March 15 from 9 p.m. to midnight; Chasing Ashlee Duo, March 16, 9 p.m. to midnight; and a DJ and karaoke, March 17, 8 to 11 p.m. (mohegansun pocono.com or 570-831-2100) All three Cove Haven resorts — C ov e H av e n Resort, 194 Lakeview Drive, Jefferson Twp.; Pocono Palace Resort, 206 Fantasy Road, Middle Smithfield Twp.; and Paradise Stream, 6213 Carlton Road, Paradise Twp. — will offer drink specials and entertainment at the St. Patrick’s Day Celebration from March 15 through 17. And at Pocono Palace Resort, guests can enjoy Guinness and Irish whiskey tastings and a cooking class featuring traditional Irish dishes. (covepoconoresorts. com or 877-500-2080) At Wa l l e n p a u p a c k Brewing Co., 73 Welwood Ave., Hawley, the St. Patrick’s Day Celebration on March 16 starting at noon features a “leprechaun” pouring the brewery’s St. Patrick’s Day Green Cream Ale, Black & Tan, and Nitro Red IPA. There also will be draft and food specials, and festively

attired guests 21 and older can compete in the Lucky Charm Challenge at 4 p.m. for a chance to win a prize pack. Then, on March 17, the brewery will offer a St. Patrick’s Day brunch along with food and drink specials. (wallenpaupackbrewingco. com or 570-390-7933) The annual Society of Irish Women St. Patrick’s Day Dinner this year features Scranton author Barbara Taylor as the guest speaker March 16 at Radisson at Lackawanna Station hotel, 700 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. For reservations, call Mamie Eckenrode at 570-4988363. Tickets will not be available at the door. Fiddler’s Green Irish Pub, 259 E. State St., Larksville, hosts its annual Pie-Eyed All Paddy’s Eve on Saturday, March 16, at 9 p.m. There is no cover for the event that includes music by the Pie-Eyed Preachers p l u s fo o d a n d d r i n k s. ( fa c eb o o k . c o m / f i d d l e rs greenirish or 570-714-3220) Guests at the Jive, 113 Van Brunt St., Moscow, will find Celtic dishes such as Corned Beef along with music, drinks and prizes for the best costumes on March 16 and 17. (570-843-6673) Wear green and find allday specials plus dishes such as homemade Ham and Cabbage at Carey’s Pub, 147 Division St., Kingston, on March 17 starting at noon. Special events include music by the Malloy Brothers Bagpipes at 3 p.m., happy hour from 9 to 11 and karaoke at 9:30. The kitchen will stay open until 12:30 a.m. (570-718-1818) Failte Irish Pub & Steak House, 1492 Route 739, Delaware Twp., marks the holiday with Irish food, drinks and music by the Tara Minstrels on March 17 from 5 to 9 p.m. (failtepa.com or 570828-6505) Enjoy live music by the Blarney Boys while you dine on Irish-style specials at the

Settlers Inn, 4 Main Ave., Hawley, on March 17 from 5 : 3 0 t o 9 : 3 0 p. m . ( t h e settlersinn.com or 570-226-2993)

For all agEs

Indoor cycling studio Back Mountain Revolution, 106 S. Lehigh St., Shavertown, hosts the “St. Patrick’s Day Ryde” on March 15 at 5:45 p.m. The ride will include Irish music, and the studio recommends wearing green and reserving a bike in advance. Beginners are welcome. (backmountain revolution.com or 570-760-4554) On March 16, Leprechaun Lore features storyteller Hal Pratt sharing such details as how to catch a leprechaun. The free, all-ages program starts at 11 a.m. at the Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. (dietrich theater.com or 570-996-1500) For the Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton Penguins’ St. Patrick’s Day Celebration, the hockey team will wear special shamrock-themed jerseys at its March 16 game against the Providence Bruins, which it then will auction off that night. Live Irish entertainment will be on hand, too. The puck drops at 7:05 p.m. at Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza, WilkesBarre Twp. (wbspenguins. com or 800-745-3000) The free St. Patrick’s Day Family Party on March 16 runs from 10 a.m. to noon at Waverly Community House, 1115 North Abington Road, and includes crafts, games and raffles. (waverlycomm. org or 570-586-8191) On March 17 starting at 9 a.m., bowlers at Chacko’s Family Bowling Center, 195 N. Wilkes Barre Blvd., WilkesBarre, can pick a prize from a “pot of gold” when they’re done. (chackosfamilybowlingcenter.com or 570-208-2695) Contact the writer: cwest@timesshamrock.com; 570-348-9100 x5107; @cheaneywest on Twitter

e le c tric c ity M a rc h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E11] | 03/13/19

14:47 | CORNELLCHR

11


The World’s CleanesT laundromaTs

Free shuttle everyday

Free soap everyday

3 locations

355 south main st., Wilkes-Barre 210 east end Center, Wilkes-Barre (near Gabes) 150 s. Wyoming ave., Kingston Coin operated Debit Cards

Hungry?

Washer specials Tues, Weds, Thurs

s P oT s laundr B e omaT Gone

80914583A

THE BEST IN LIVE ENTERTAINMENT IS COMING TO SCRANTON

at The Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel MARCH 23

Join staff writer Patrice Wilding at the Chef's Table as she explores local restaurants Email your suggestions to pwilding@timesshamrock.com

10th Anniversary Celebration! Saturday, March 23, 2019 • 8:00PM-Midnight

ENJOY A NIGHT OUT OF GREAT MUSIC AND DANCING

$20 Per Person

(INCLUDES 1 DRINK TICKET) TICKETS ON SALE NOW AND AT THE DOOR ON DAY OF THE SHOW. CALL OR STOP BY THE RADISSON LACKAWANNA STATION HOTEL SALES OFFICE 700 LACKAWANNA AVE., SCRANTON BETWEEN 8:00PM AND 4:30PM • M-F 570.342.8300 FOR ADVANCE TICKETS. Into the Spin has been entertaining audiences since 2009 with the most exciting energetic LIVE entertainment for the dance floor! Performing favorites of Modern, Classic Pop, Motown, Rock and Soul!

www.intothespin.com I Facebook 12 M a r c h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

e le c tric c ity

TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E12] | 03/13/19

15:54 | CORNELLCHR


FILM

Larson, Jackson share great chemistry in ‘Captain Marvel’

W

hen Captain Marvel comes down to Earth, that’s when she really soars. It’s a bit of a slow buildup to get there, as the newest Marvel superhero origin story kicks off on one of those far-toofamiliar planets where the skyscrapers seem to extend into forever, and commuters are zipping about in flying-cartype thingees, and nobody ever seems to be having any fun because they’re constantly at odds with beings from other planets and other galaxies. Ah, but when the wonderful Brie Larson’s Captain Marvel crash-lands in a Blockbuster store on planet Earth in the year 1995, that’s when the real fun begins, and that’s where this girl-power/ woman-power adventure finds its heart and its stride and its super-cool whiz-bang sense of humor. This isn’t the greatest Marvel movie ever made, but it’s definitely one of the funniest, and one of the sweetest. For a film virtually devoid of romance, there’s a lot of love on display, whether it’s a shared bond between two best friends, the beauty in seeing a family reunited, or when Nick Fury turns into a puddle of cuddly goo whenever he’s in the presence of an alien cat named Goose. No, really. “Captain Marvel” starts o f f w i t h a d re a m a n d remains deliberately hazy and confusing through the setup scenes, reflecting the uncertainty of Larson’s Vers, who has spent the last half-dozen years living on the planet Kree, unable to remember her life before she was rescued from an earlier crash by the military commander Yon-Rogg (Jude Law). Vers has been gifted with seemingly unlimited superpowers, starting with the

Brie Larson stars in the newest superhero origin story, “Captain Marvel.” DISNEY-MARvEL STUDIoS vIA AP

‘Captain Marvel’ RICHARD ROEPER

Movie critic

ability to shoot high-energy fireballs from her fingertips. But as her mentor Yon-Rogg constantly reminds her, she must learn to control her emotions (silly girl!), and she also needs to reconcile her past and learn her true purpose in life by connecting with a higher power known as the Supreme Intelligence, which takes on the form of Annette Bening when Vers communicates with her. But wait, there’s more! Kree is at war with a race of shape-shifting aliens known as Skrulls, who will stop at nothing to, well, win the war. (I told you nobody’s ever having any fun way out there in Superhero Galaxy Land.) A covert mission to

Stars: Brie Larson, Samuel L. Jackson, Ben Mendelsohn, Jude Law Rated: PG-13 for sequences of sci-fi violence and action, and brief suggestive language Running time: 124 minutes Grade: ★★★ 1/2 (out of four) rescue a Kree operative from the clutches of the Skrulls sets off a chain of events that literally propels Vers to the California of the mid-1990s. Vers has never been on this insignificant, relatively un-advanced planet in her life — or has she? Off we go on the Earthbound adventure, set to a crackling-good soundtrack laden with ’90s hits, and filled with fun cultural references, from Radio Shack to “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” to “The Silence of the Lambs” to the technology of the times. (Anyone remember when Alta Vista was THE dominant search engine?) Within hours of Vers’ arriv-

al, she attracts the attention of one Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson), who at this point on the Marvel timeline still has both of his eyes and is a midlevel bureaucrat at S.H.I.E.L.D. who spends most of his time behind his desk, blissfully unaware of all the frighteningly powerful superheroes and archvillains in his future. (There’s also a new guy with S.H.I.E.L.D. who shows a spark of potential. Guy by the name of Coulson.) The initially skeptical Fury quickly comes around to Vers’ side once he gets a glimpse of her powers, not to mention a good look at one of the shapeshifting Skrulls that has followed Vers to Earth, hoping

she’ll lead them to a special light-speed contraption that could change everything in the war with Kree. Larson and Jackson have terrific buddy-movie chemistry, whether they’re giving each other grief or covering each other’s behinds. We’ve seen “de-aging” technology before, e.g., Michael Douglas in “Ant-Man,” Kurt Russell in “Guardians Vol. 2” and Robert Downey Jr. in “Captain America: Civil War,” but the magic reaches new levels here. The 70-year-old Jackson and the 56-year-old Clark Gregg, who plays Coulson, look 30 years younger. Even seen on an enormous Imax screen, there was never a moment when I didn’t buy into these younger versions of Agents Fury and Coulson. Lashana Lynch gives a quietly powerful performance as Maria Rambeau, a single mother and former pilot who might be able to help Vers, aka Carol Danvers, aka the future Captain Marvel, unlock her past. Akira Akbar is instantly endearing as Maria’s whipsmart daughter Monica. Amidst all the scenes with intergalactic warships and fireball-flinging, co-directors Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck wisely find plenty of room to take the foot off the accelerator and cede center stage to Larson, Jackson and the rest of the greatly talented cast. It’s a real treat to see Carol Danvers find her footing and her wings, so to speak, while at the same time Nick Fury is taking the first steps toward becoming NICK FURY. Also, there’s that cat named Goose, who is one of the coolest cats in movie history. Keep your eye on that cat. He’s got some hidden talents too. RichaRd RoepeR reviews movies for The Chicago SunTimes. Distributed by Universal Press Syndicate.

Mini movies

Fighting with My Family: I loved hanging out with this movie, the story of a WWE diva known as Paige and her origins in a small-time wrestling family in Norwich, England. The broad physical shtick and dryly funny one-liners win laughs, but what comes as a surprise is how often the film is genuinely moving. It’s just a big bowl of uplifting fun. Rated PG-13 for crude and sexual material, language throughout, some violence and drug content. 108 minutes. ★★★ 1/2 — RICHARD ROEPER

Greta: A new arrival in New York (Chloe Grace Moretz) befriends a refined, much older widow (Isabelle Huppert) who turns into a classic movie stalker. The wheels come flying off when just about everyone, including the stalker, behaves like an idiot. Rated R for some violence and disturbing images. 99 minutes. ★★ — RICHARD ROEPER

How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World: Hiccup and his dragon, Toothless, seek a mythical land in this entry in Dreamworks’ animated franchise. With the voices of Jay Baruchel, America Ferrera, Cate Blanchett, Kit Harrington, Jonah Hill, Kristen Wiig, Craig Ferguson, F. Murray Abraham. Written and directed by Dean DeBlois; based on the book series by Cressida Cowell. Rated PG. 104 mintues. — LOs AnGELEs TImEs

The Upside: Competent if pat remake of the French hit “The Intouchables” about a streetwise guy (Kevin Hart) who bluffs his way into a job as caregiver to a wealthy man (Bryan Cranston) whose paralysis has left him depressed. The story is predictable, but the two leads work well together, and Hart gets to add emotional sincerity to his brand of antic comedy. With Nicole Kidman, Julianna Margulies. Rated PG-13 for language. 126 minutes. ★★ 1/2 — GARy THOmPsOn GRade: ★★★★ Excellent, ★★★ Good, ★★ Fair, ★ Poor. movie RevieWS BY Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate; Gary Thomspson, Philadelphia Inquirer; Los Angeles Times.

e le c tric c ity M a rc h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E13] | 03/13/19

14:49 | CORNELLCHR

13


COVER STORY

Scranton wrestler bring fearless persona to Shamrock Shakedown BY GIA MAZUR Staff Writer

By day, Brianna Spindler uses scissors, a blowdryer or bleach to do her job. At night, she’s more likely to pick up a table, ladder, chair — or another person. The Scranton resident and lead stylist and color specialist at the city’s Salon a Go Go is making her mark in the professional wrestling world, competing in matches in Northeast Pennsylvania as well as across the state. Decked out in metallic black and silver gear, Spindler goes by the ring name Adena Steele, an out-of-this-world persona based on her own platinum hair and tattoos that adorn most of her body, plus her interest in astrology and the moon, stars and space.

PiNHat PHOtO / CONtriBUtiNG PHOtOGraPHer

Brianna Spindler of Scranton goes by the name Adena Steele when in the ring and works by day at the city’s Salon a Go Go.

14 M a r c h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

e le c tric c ity

TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E14-15] | 03/13/19

14:44 | CORNELLCHR

“I was playing around with a couple (ideas), and it kind of just clicked into place,” Spindler said. “I wanted it to have that kind of vibe — just a strong, badass, fearless chick.” Spindler will soar into the ring during United Wrestling Revolution Presents: Shamrock Shakedown on Saturday, March 16, inside the Casey Ballroom at Hilton Scranton and Conference Center, 100 Adams Ave. The show also features Chris Masters, known for his work with World Wrestling Entertainment and Total Nonstop Action. Doors open at 6 p.m. with bell time at 7. Tickets to the family-friendly show cost $15 for general admission and $5 for children 10 and younger. Ringside tickets cost $20. Spindler’s decision to chase her wres-


PiNHat PHOtO / CONtriBUtiNG PHOtOGraPHer

Spindler goes by the ring name Adena Steele, an out-of-this-world persona based on her platinum hair and tattoos and her interest in astrology and the moon, stars and space. tling dream sprung from her interest in fitness and her childhood pastime. She watched wrestling as a kid and always held the idea in the back of her mind but never realized she could make it a reality. After a friend saw an open tryout for Back Breakers Training Center, Archbald, she convinced Spindler to go. Spindler earned a spot to train as the only woman in the class. “I was comfortable with it, but I think it took a little to get everyone else to get comfortable,” she said, laughing. “Fighting a girl goes against everything you’re ever taught. It’s awkward, but once we all got used to it, that strangeness wore off.” After she graduated, Spindler had to adapt and get used to wrestling with women but found support in those she’s met in the industry. It’s nice to find someone to relate to in certain aspects of wrestling, she said,

and it’s also cool to see women getting into the ring. They not only display their hard work and talent but also inspire others to follow in their footsteps. Management at Salon a Go Go supports Spindler’s career. While she’s still works as a stylist during the week, she has Saturdays off for wrestling shows. Crowds have been receptive to her, incorporating her name into chants, such “Steele the show,” and Spindler is working on developing her signature moves. This includes her finisher, the “Steele force,” a nod to Knoebels’ rollercoaster and her NEPA roots. Right now, she’s working her way up in an industry built on paying one’s dues. Spindler tries to get out in front of as many people as possible and show off her skills. The physicality and mental aspects of the sport can be brutal, but it’s all a part of the ride.

“I’m always going to go where I need to go and put in the effort,” she said. “This is just life. Why not try to do something you want to do? What do you have to lose? I’d rather try it now than look back and regret it.” Contact the writer: gmazur@timesshamrock.com; 570-348-9127; @gmazurtt on twitter

If you go What: United Wrestling revolution Presents: Shamrock Shakedown featuring Brianna Spindler aka adena Steele When: Saturday, March 16; doors open, 6 p.m.; bell time, 7 Where: Casey Ballroom, Hilton Scranton and Conference Center, 100 adams ave. Details: tickets to the family-friendly show cost $15 for general admission and $5 for children 10 and younger. ringside tickets cost $20.

PiNHat PHOtO / CONtriBUtiNG PHOtOGraPHer

Adena Steele will be part of the crew in the ring for United Wrestling Revolution’s Shamrock Shakedown.

e le c tric c ity M a rc h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E14-15] | 03/13/19

14:45 | CORNELLCHR

15


CALENDAR SEASONAL

SS. Peter & Paul Russian Orthodox Church Soup Sale, Fridays, March 15 and 29, April 12 and 19, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Featured soups are Manhattan-style clam chowder and vegetarian vegetable. Advanced orders suggested. SS. Peter & Paul Russian Orthodox Church, 1720 Academy St., Scranton. $7 per quart. 570-343-8128 or saintspeterandpaulscranton.com. St. Patrick’s Day Weekend, Friday, March 15. Live entertainment and drink specials. Cove Haven Resort, 194 Lakeview Drive, Lakeville; Paradise Stream Resort, 6213 Carlton Road, Mount Pocono; and Pocono Manor Resort & Spa, 1 Manor Drive, Pocono Manor. 877-800-5380 or covepoconoresorts.com. St. Patrick’s Day Weekend at Molly O’Shea’s, Friday, March 15, through Sunday, March 17. Features entertainment and drink and food specials. Molly O’Shea’s at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp. 570-831-2100. Pizza and Chowder Sale, Fridays, March 15 through April 5, 3 to 7 p.m. William Walker Hose Company, 803 Penn Ave., Mayfield. Cooked or uncooked pizza: $10 per tray; Manhattan Clam Chowder: 32 ounces $10/16 ounces $5. 570-876-1671 or 59fire.com. Kilmaine Saints, Friday, March 15, 8 p.m. Mauch Chunk Opera House, 14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe. $18. 570-325-0249 or mcohjt.com. Paint the Town Green, Saturday, March 16. The Luongo Brothers Band and Mystic Rulers perform. Call for reservations. The Club at the Highlands, 2700 Highland Blvd., Archbald. $35 meal and show/$15 show only. 570-499-4904. Society of Irish Women Dinner, Saturday, March 16. Cocktail hour, 5:30 p.m.; dinner, 7. Speaker is author Barbara Taylor. For reservations, contact Mamie Eckenrode, 570-498-8263. Radisson at Lackawanna Station hotel, 700 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. $75. Leprechaun Lore, Saturday, March 16, 11 a.m. Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. 570-996-1500 or dietrichtheater.com. Main Street Farmer’s Markets, Saturdays, March 16 and 30, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Cooperage, 1030 Main St., Honesdale. 570-253-2020 or thecooperageproject.org. St. Patrick’s Day Book Bingo, Saturday, March 16, 11:30. Reservations required. Mill Memorial Library, 495 E. Main St., Nanticoke. 570-735-3030. St. Patrick’s Day Party with Kluster Phunk and Static in the Attic, Saturday, March 16, 6 p.m. The Cooperage, 1030 Main St., Honesdale. Suggested donation: $7. Wear Green for the Pink, Saturday, March 16, 7 p.m. Blindfolded Ham and Cabbage Bowling, basket and 50/50 raffles, food, drinks and cash bar. Entertainment by 2Rockaholix and DJ Quinn. Broadway Tavern, 259 Route 309, Mountain Top. $10 donation/$15 to bowl. thinkpinkmountaintop.org. St. Patrick’s Day Ham and Cabbage Dinner, Sunday, March 17, 4 p.m. Features Dr. Clair Kenny, Kerry Kenny, John F. Kennedy and Leo Schott. Kenny’s Pub, 153 Spruce St., Archbald. 570-904-1095. Annual PIAC St. Patrick’s Day Parade, Sunday, March 24, 1:30 p.m. Parade goes from Stroudsburg High School and concludes at Dansbury Depot. Downtown Stroudsburg. Catholic Choral Society Lenten Concert, Sunday, March 24, 3 p.m. St. Patrick’s Church, 1403 Jackson St., Scranton. Donations accepted. 570-575-1040 or catholicchoralsociety.org.

MUSIC

Second Steamtown String Fling, Friday, March 15, 7 p.m. Scranton Cultural Center at The Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave. $25. 570-344-1111. The Lizards, Friday, March 15, 9 p.m. Sherman Theater, 524

16

M arch 14, 2019

Shawn Klush Dinner Show, Saturday, March 30, and Sunday, March 31. Presented by JZ Tours. Nicole Rasmus also performs. Radisson at Lackawanna Station hotel, 700 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. Prices vary. 570-3442212 or jztours.com. Cody Jinks, Saturday, March 30, 8 p.m. The Steel Woods also perform. F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, 71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. $35, plus fees. 570826-1100 or kirbycenter.org. Mr. Speed, Saturday, March 30, 8 p.m. Kiss tribute performs. Gypsies Lounge & Night Club at Mount Airy Casino, 312 Woodland Road, Mount Pocono. $20. 877682-4791 or mountairycasino.com. Zoso: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Experience, Saturday, March 30, 8 p.m. Sherman Theater, 524 Main St., Stroudsburg. $17 advance/$20 day of show/$25 general seating. 570-420-2808 or shermantheater.com. Annelies, Sunday, March 31, 4 p.m. Presented by the Choral Society. Peoples Security Bank Theater at Lackawanna College, 501 Vine St., Scranton. $15 adults/free for ages 18 and younger. choralsociety.net. Bobby Valli, Saturday, April 6, 7 to 10 p.m. Wildcat Saloon, 247 Wildcat Road, Olyphant. $15 advance/$20 SUBMITTED PHOTO at door. In Concert, Saturday, April 6, 7:30 p.m. Features Music Box Dinner Playhouse presents “Company” from Friday, March 15, through of Scranton Jazz Band with the Alumni Blues Sunday, March 24, at Music Box Dinner Playhouse, 196 Hughes St., Swoyersville. University Doctors: Drs. Adonizio, Costello, Newman and Stopper. Performances take place Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 3 p.m. Houlihan-McLean Center at U of S, 800 Linden St. Free. Tickets cost $38 for dinner and the show and $20 for the show only. For more scranton.edu/music or music@scranton.edu. information, call 570-283-2195 or visit musicbox.org. Rocketman: A Tribute to Elton John, Saturday, April 6, 8 p.m. Gypsies Lounge & Night Club at Mount Airy Main St., Stroudsburg. $10 advance/$15 day of show. 570Kyle Athayde Dance Party. Houlihan-McLean Center at Casino, 312 Woodland Road, Mount Pocono. $25-$45. 420-2808 or shermantheater.com. University of Scranton, 800 Linden St. Free. 570-941877-682-4791 or mountairycasino.com. Boat House Row: Yacht Rock Experience, Saturday, 7624 or music@scranton.edu. Strand of Oaks, Wednesday, April 10, 7:30 p.m. F.M. March 16, 8 p.m. Penn’s Peak, 325 Maury Road, Jim Kyle Athayde Dance Party, Saturday, March 23, Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, 71 Public Square, Thorpe. $18 advance/$23 day of show. 866-605-7325 or 7:30 p.m. Houlihan-McLean Center at University of Wilkes-Barre. $15 advance/$20 day of show. 570-826pennspeak.com. Scranton, 800 Linden St. Free. 570-941-7624 or 1100 or kirbycenter.org. Classic Stones featuring the Glimmer Twins, Saturscranton.edu/music. REO Speedwagon, Thursday, April 11, 8 p.m. F.M. day, March 16, 8 p.m. Gypsies Lounge & Night Club at Loudon Wainwright III, Saturday, March 23, 8 p.m. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, 71 Public Square, Mount Airy Casino, 312 Woodland Road, Mount Pocono. Mauch Chunk Opera House, 14 W. Broadway, Jim Wilkes-Barre. $49.50-$99.50, plus fees. 570-826-1100 or $20. 877-682-4791 or mountairycasino.com. Thorpe. $28/$40 VIP. 570-325-0249 or mcohjt.com. kirbycenter.org. Into the Mystic: The Music of Van Morrison, Unforgettable Fire: A Tribute to U2, Saturday, March Alabama, Friday, April 12, 7 p.m. Mohegan Sun Arena Saturday, March 16, 8 p.m. Mauch Chunk Opera House, 23, 8 p.m. Gypsies Lounge & Night Club at Mount Airy at Casey Plaza, 255 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-Barre 14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe. $24. 570-325-0249 or Casino, 312 Woodland Road, Mount Pocono. $20. 877Twp. 570-970-7600 or mohegansunarenapa.com. mcohjt.com. 682-4791 or mountairycasino.com. Unforgettable Fire and 42, Saturday, April 13, 8 Mark Stuart, Sunday, March 17, 4 p.m. Nashville artist Senior High School Choral Competition, Sunday, p.m. Penn’s Peak, 325 Maury Road, Jim Thorpe. $20 performs. The Gathering Place, 304 S. State St., Clarks March 24, 2 p.m. Presented by Keystone Chapter advance/$25 day of show. Summit. $10. 570-881-7612 or GatheringPlaceCS.org. UNICO. Peoples Security Bank Theater at Lackawanna Kris Kristofferson & the Strangers, Sunday, April The Slambovian Circus of Dreams, Sunday, March College, 501 Vine St., Scranton. $10 adults/$5 students. 14, 7 p.m. F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, 71 17, 5 p.m. The Cooperage, 1030 Main St., Honesdale. 570-344-2388. $20 advance/$25 at door. 570-253-2020 or Barefoot Movement, Sunday, March 24, 7 p.m. Mauch Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. $29-$69, plus fees. 570826-1100 or kirbycenter.org. thecooperageproject.org. Chunk Opera House, 14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe. $15 In Concert, Sunday, April 14, 7:30 p.m. Features Pete Palladino and Friends, Sunday, March 17, 7 general/$25 VIP. 570-325-0249 or mcohjt.com. Mannes School of Music Brass Orchestra and University p.m. Mauch Chunk Opera House, 14 W. Broadway, Jim TobyMac Hits Deep Tour, Tuesday, March 26, 7 p.m. of Scranton Singers. U of S, 800 Linden St. Free. 570Thorpe. $15 general/$20 day of show/$25 VIP. 570-325Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza, 255 Highland Park 941-7624 or music@scranton.edu. 0249 or mcohjt.com. Blvd., Wilkes-Barre Twp. 570-970-7600 or An American Choral Mosaic: Art, Folk, Jazz and Acoustic Bluegrass Jam, Wednesday, March 20, 7 to mohegansunarenapa.com. Broadway Music, Wednesday, April 17, 7:30 p.m. 9 p.m. Led by Ron Penska. The Cooperage, 1030 Main Kick & Banjo, Thursday, March 28, 8 p.m. Mauch Features songs from “The Greatest Showman” and “The St., Honesdale. Donations accepted. 570-253-2020 or Chunk Opera House, 14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe. $15. Wizard of Oz,” along with the jazz favorite “Route 66.” thecooperageproject.org. 570-325-0249 or mcohjt.com. David Archuleta, Thursday, March 21. Stage West, Cantores Christi Regis Spring Concert, Friday, March Lemmond Theater at Misericordia University, 301 Lake St., Dallas. $5 general/$3 MU alumni and employees/free 301 N. Main Ave., Scranton. 570-343-7100 or 29, and Saturday, March 30, 7:30 p.m. The Chapel of stagewest570.com. Christ the King, 133 N. River St., Wilkes-Barre. Free. 570- for MU students and veterans. 570-674-1225. Rock 107 39th Birthday Bash, Thursday, April 18. The Reagan Years, Friday, March 22, 6:45 p.m. EJ 205-5360 or kings.edu. Performances by Fabulous Thunderbus, M-80, Flaxy the DJ also performs. Hilton Scranton and Conference Gary Hoey, Friday, March 29, 8 p.m. Mauch Chunk Morgan and Rockstar Revolution. The Woodlands Inn & Center, 100 Adams Ave. $20 and up. 570-344-2212 or Opera House, 14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe. $25 indiResort, 1073 Route 315, Plains Twp. rock107.com/rockjztours.com. vidual/$35 VIP. 570-325-0249 or mcohjt.com. 107-39th-birthday-bash/. Open Mic Night with Ben Keiser, Friday, March 22, 7 Lee Brice, Friday, March 29, 8 p.m. F.M. Kirby Center Blue October: The King Tour, Friday, April 19. F.M. p.m. Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. 570- for the Performing Arts, 71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, 71 Public Square, 996-1500 or dietrichtheater.com. $39.50-$75, plus fees. 570-826-1100 or kirbycenter.org. Wilkes-Barre. $29.50 advance/$32 day of show. 570-826Reckless Kelly, Friday, March 22, 8 p.m. Mauch Pigeons Playing Ping Pong, Friday, March 29, 8 1100 or kirbycenter.org. Chunk Opera House, 14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe. $27. p.m. Sherman Theater, 524 Main St., Stroudsburg. 570-325-0249 or mcohjt.com. $20 advance/$25 day of show. 570-420-2808 or Please see Calendar 1, Page 17 In Concert, Saturday, March 23, 7:30 p.m. Features shermantheater.com.

e le c tric c ity

TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E16] | 03/13/19

14:49 | CORNELLCHR


EMPTY BOTTLES / LIQUID / CALENDAR

Empty Bottles BY DAVID FALCHEK France’s Lillet aperitif works best in cocktails

B

ordeaux’s other wine actually is an aperitif. The region known for great red (and white) wine also produces one of the world’s best-known cocktail ingredients, Lillet. Technically an aromatized wine (one with ingredients and a bit of alcohol added), Lillet is produced in the wine region known as Graves, which makes outstanding dry, white wines from sauvignon blanc and semillon. These same grapes are used in Lillet, which you can get

for around $17. The French often drink Lillet by itself, chilled neat or on the rocks, just as many Italians would enjoy a vermouth. But straight-up, Lillet is more delicate than a white vermouth, tasting much more like a wine. You can see why many French enjoy a small glass of Lillet, with 17 percent alcohol, after work. For me, Lillet on the rocks dilutes the drink rather quickly, but straight-up can be a bit much. I found I like Lillet with one ice cube.

Lillet finds its best expression in cocktails, where it stretches and supports the drink. The 20th Century cocktail was named for the train that ran from New York City to Chicago starting near the turn of the last century. The drink includes 1.5 ounces of gin, a half-ounce of Lillet and a half-ounce of white creme de cacao shaken on ice and served in a coupe glass with a lemon twist. I used my workhorse Seagram’s Dry Gin and the inexpensive Jac-

quin’s Creme de Cacao. The chocolate and Lillet citrus cut into the gin’s extremism, resulting in a creamy sipper that tastes like a lemon cream filled with chocolate. The “Toy Story” of cocktails, the Corpse Reviver 2 is much better than the original. Equal parts gin, Lillet, and orange liqueur (Cointreau or Gran Gala) with two drops of absinthe, shaken on ice and strained into a cocktail glass, this yields a complex meshing of citrus

Liquid BY JAMES CRANE Clown Shoes continues streak of hits with Pecan Pie Porter

M

y dad has this joke that I’m sure he’s used longer than I’ve been alive. It comes up whenever someone says the word “pecan.” Well, at least when they pronounce it like PEE-can. He’ll kindly reply, “There are pick-AHNs and PEEcans. One you put in the pie, the other one you keep near your bed when it’s too cold to go out to the outhouse.” If any of you ever wonder where I get my charm, well let me tell ya... If you thought I was going to spend the rest of this article just espousing more of his witticisms, I apologize. I’m going to disappoint you. I only have so many words here, and I would in no way be able to do them justice. The real focus of this is pecans. More specifically, it’s about Clown Shoes Beer’s Coffee Pecan Pie Porter 2018. Like many of the fantastic beers I’ve been drinking lately, it’s been aged in bourbon barrels.

I’m not sad about that. First, let’s talk about the label. Like most of Clown Shoes’ labels, it’s like a well-composed waking nightmare of strange. This one has a blindfolded Genghis Khan rolling a barrel down a river followed by a bunch of turkeys. Sure, everything about this shouts that it w a s a T h a n k s g iv i n g themed brew. The turkeys make sense. For the life of me, I can’t quite figure out what Khan has to do with it. I guess some art is meant to be felt and not understood. Label aside, I was ready to start feeling the art that was the beer itself. The head was pretty thin, but the body was pretty thick. That makes a lot of sense for a porter. It did leave some lacing down the side of the glass and a caramelcolored ring around the outside of the brew. The color was a shade above pitch black, ever so slightly emulating a cola brown. It

was a good-looking ses. The vanilla lifted brew. it up a bit from all the This beer smelled strong flavors, and the fantastic. Brown boo z e cut through sugar and booze most of it at the end. definitely came on When all was said nice and strong and done, there was right at the forejust some bitterness front. Molasses, like one gets with a roasted malt, cup of coffee left to vanilla, bourlinger on the bon and oak tongue. All in all, then followed. it was fantastic. It made for Look, I don’t such a beautic a r e h ow yo u ful cacophony, pronounce it, and I had a you just need to welcome realdrink this beer. I ization that the had to search a taste followed little bit to still suit. find one, but I’m This brew so glad I did. It only got better was like I ate as it warmed. some pecan pie The bourbon and washed it and oak were down with a shot totally in there, of bourbon while a s w a s a n i c e SUBMITTED PHOTO smoking a cigar. boozy burn. It was That might sound delightfully smoky and like an obnoxious combicharred, which paired real nation, but when you drink well with the roasted malt. this, you’ll be sold. Thanks, T here definitely were Clown Shoes. You’ve never pecans and sweet molas- let me down yet.

and herbs accentuated by the absinthe. Mouthwatering, puckering and with a clean finish, the Corpse Reviver 2 is a complete package. James Bond’s drink, the Vesper, a twist on the martini, uses Lillet in lieu of French Dolin Vermouth or the more assertive Italian vermouths. With two ounces of gin, half an ounce of vodka and a quarter-ounce of Lillet stirred on ice and strained with a lemon garnish, the Vesper is a nice choice for those who can’t

decide between vodka or gin or who want to moderate the gin character. To avoid such a strong drink, I often prefer a “reverse” version of a martini/Vesper, where the Lillet or vermouth swaps ratios with the spirit. Once open, Lillet must be refrigerated. It will keep in the fridge for about a month, allowing plenty of time to enjoy it in cocktails or by itself. DAVID FALCHEK, executive director of the American Wine Society, reviews wine each week.

FROM PAGE 16 Masterworks: Inspired by Nature, Friday, April 19, 8 p.m. Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic presents Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6 “Pastorale” and Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons” with Yevgeny Kutik on violin. Peoples Security Bank Theater at Lackawanna College, 501 Vine St., Scranton. 570955-1490 or lackawanna.edu. Back Mountain Jazz Series: Music Through Time, Friday, April 26, 6 p.m. Features concert by award-winning trumpet and flugelhorn artist and educator John Maurer, Soyka Artist-in-Residence for 2018-19 at Misericordia University, and pianist Nate Petley. Lemmond Theater at Misericordia University, 301 Lake St., Dallas. rweber@misericoria.edu. Arrival from Sweden, Friday, April 26, 7 p.m. F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, 71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. $25-$35, plus fees. 570826-1100 or kirbycenter.org. Open Mic Night with Breaking Ground Poets, Friday, April 26, 7 p.m. Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. Free. 570-996-1500 or dietrichtheater.com. It Was a Very Good Year, Friday, April 26, 8 p.m. Tony Sands performs a multimedia tribute to Frank Sinatra. The Theater at North, 1539 N. Main Ave., Scranton. $25-$35. 570-800-5020 or thetheateratnorth.org. Rat Pack Together Again, Friday, April 26, 8 p.m. The Theater at North, 1539 N. Main Ave., Scranton. $25-$35. 570-800-5020 or thetheateratnorth.org. In Concert, Saturday, April 27, 7:30 p.m. Features University of Scranton String Orchestra with guest soloist Kako Miura. Houlihan-McLean Center at U of S, 800 Linden St. Free. 570-941-7624, scranton.edu/music or music@ scranton.edu.

THEATER

Opening

The Jungle Book Kids, Friday, March 15, 7 p.m.; Saturday, March 16, 2 and 7 p.m.; Sunday, March 17, 2 p.m. Presented by Kiss Theatre Company. KISS Theatre Company, 400 East End Centre, Wilkes-Barre. Prices vary. 484-653-9553 or kisstheatre.org. The Clean House, Thursday, March 21, through Saturday, March 23, 8 p.m.; Sunday, March 24, 2 p.m.; Thursday, March 28, through Saturday, March 30, 8 p.m.; Sunday, March 31, 2 p.m. Providence Playhouse, 1256 Providence Road, Scranton. March 21 show: $8 general and seniors/$6 students; remaining performances: $12 general/$10 seniors/$8 students. 570-342-9707 or actorscircle.org. Mamma Mia!, Friday, March 22, and Saturday, March 23, 8 p.m.; Sunday, March 24, 3 p.m.; Friday, March 29, and Saturday, March 30, 8 p.m.; Sunday, March 31, 3 p.m. The Little Theatre of Wilkes-Barre, 537 N. Main St. 570-823-1875 or ltwb.org. Please see Calendar 1, Page 18

e le c tric c ity M a rc h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E17] | 03/13/19

14:45 | CORNELLCHR

17


CALENDAR

FROM PAGE 17

or showtix4u.com.

Continuing

Company, Friday, March 15, and Saturday, March 16, 8 p.m.; Sunday, March 17, 3 p.m.; Friday, March 22, and Saturday, March 23, 8 p.m.; Sunday, March 24, 3 p.m. Presented by Music Box Dinner Playhouse. Music Box Dinner Playhouse, 196 Hughes St., Swoyersville. $38 dinner and show/$20 show only. 570-283-2195 or musicbox.org.

STUDENT PRODUCTIONS

Opening

Mamma Mia, Friday, March 15, through Sunday, March 17. Valley View High School, 1 Columbus Drive, Archbald. 570-876-4110 or valleyviewsd.org. Little Shop of Horrors, Thursday, March 28, through Saturday, March 30, 6:30 p.m. Presented by West Scranton Intermediate School Junior Players. West Scranton Intermediate School, Fellows Avenue, Scranton. $5. 570-348-3475 or scrsd.org. Beehive: The ’60s Musical, Thursday, March 28, through Saturday, March 30, 7 p.m.; Sunday, March 31, 2 p.m.; Wednesday, April 3, and Thursday, April 4, 7 p.m.; Saturday, April 6, 7 p.m. Presented by Dunmore High School Crimson Company. Dunmore High School, 300 W. Warren St. $10 adults/$8 students and seniors/$5 children 5 and younger. 570-241-7488. Carnival, Friday, April 5, and Saturday, April 6, 7 p.m.; Sunday, April 7, 2 p.m. Presented by Scranton High School Knight Players. Scranton High School, 63 Mike Munchak Way. $10 general/$8 students and seniors. 570-348-3481 or jenny.brotherton@ssdedu. CHRIS PIZZELLO / ASSOCIATED PRESS org. Mary Poppins, Friday, April 5, and Saturday, April David Archuleta will perform Thursday, 6, 7 p.m. Mid Valley Secondary Center, 52 Underwood March 21, at 8 p.m. at Stage West, 301 Road, Throop.

N. Main Ave., Scranton. For more information, call 570-343-7100 or visit stagewest570.com. Prince Charming, Sunday, March 24, 3 p.m. Presented by Pennsylvania Ballet II. Kirby Center for Creative Arts at Wyoming Seminary, 260 N. Sprague Ave., Kingston. $10 adults/free for students. 570-2702192 or wyomingseminary.org. Rodgers and Hammerstien’s The King and I, Friday, March 29, 8 p.m.; Saturday, March 30, 2 and 8 p.m.; Sunday, March 31, 1 p.m. Presented by Broadway Theatre League of Northeastern Pennsylvania. Scranton Cultural Center at The Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave. Prices vary. 570-344-1111 or scrantonculturalcenter.org. CaPAA Summer Camp Open House and Free Kids Show, Saturday, March 30, 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Reservations required. The Ritz Building, 222 Wyoming Ave., Scranton. 570-252-4156 or sheri@capaa.org. Jesus Christ Superstar, Thursday, April 11, through Saturday, April 13, 8 p.m.; Sunday, April 14, 2 p.m. Presented by Misericordia University Players. Lemmond Theater at Misericordia University, 301 Lake St., Dallas. $8 general/$5 students, alumni and seniors. 570-674-6719 or misericordia.edu/superstar. Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, Thursday, April 11, and Friday, April 12, 8 p.m.; Saturday, April 13, 2 and 8 p.m. Presented by Liva Arts Company. PNC Auditorium, Loyola Science Center at University of Scranton, 204 Monroe Ave. $5. 570-9417401, scranton.edu or info@scranton.edu. CaPAA’s Spring Musical Theatre Dance Showcase, Wednesday, April 24, 7 p.m. The Ritz Building, 222 Wyoming Ave., Scranton. $12.50. 570-252-4156

18 M a r c h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

ART

Continuing

A Visual Playlist, through Friday, March 22. Features oil paintings by Honesdale resident Melissa Short. Widmann Gallery at King’s College, 133 N. River St., Wilkes-Barre. 570-208-5875 or kings.edu. Emerging Dimensions: Works by Li Hongbo and Cai Dongdong, through Sunday, March 24. Pauly

e le c tric c ity

TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E18] | 03/13/19

Opening

The Fire Inside, Thursday, March 14, 6 to 8 p.m. Opening reception takes place for Justin Hoch’s Photography Show. Kirby Center for Creative Arts at Wyoming Seminary, 260 N. Sprague Ave., Kingston. Free. 570-270-2192 or wyomingseminary.org. Altered States: Important Prints from the Maslow Collection, Sunday, March 24, through Friday, April 12. Public lecture: Friday, April 5, 5 to 6 p.m., Brennan Hall, room 228; public reception: April 5, 6 to 8 p.m., gallery. Hope Horn Gallery at University of Scranton, Hyland Hall. 570-941-4214 or scranton.edu/gallery. WCAA Celebrating Student’s Creativity Art Exhibit, Friday, April 5, 5 to 8 p.m.; Saturday, April 6, and Sunday, April 7, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Dorflinger Glass Museum, Elizabeth Street, White Mills. 570-253-1185 or dorflinger.org. Environmental Art Show, Wednesday, April 10, through Wednesday, April 24. Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Memorial Library at University of Scranton, 800 Linden St. scranton.edu. University of Scranton Student Exhibition, Sunday, April 28, through Friday, May 3. Reception: May 3, 6 to 8 p.m. Hope Horn Gallery at University of Scranton, Hyland Hall. 570-941-4214 or scranton.edu/gallery.

14:49 | CORNELLCHR

Friedman Art Gallery at Misericordia University, 301 Lake St., Dallas. 570-674-6250 or misericordia.edu. Pipeline to the Arts, through Friday, March 29. Works by members of Wyoming Valley Art League. Linde Corp., 118 Armstrong Road, Pittston. Stories from the Scraps, through Sunday, March 31. DJ Harvey Agency, 815 Main St., Honesdale. waynecountyartsalliance.org. Along the Way, through Tuesday, April 2. Circle Center for the Arts (WVAL), 130 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. wyomingvalleyartleague.org. Out of the Wood, through Tuesday, April 2. Works by Katie Novak. The Wonderstone Gallery, 100 N. Blakely St., Dunmore. 570-344-2360 or t hewonderstonegallery.com. Preserved: Traditions of the Andes, through Sunday, April 7. Open on weekends only. Everhart Museum, 1901 Mulberry St., Scranton. Museum prices vary 570-346-7186 or everhart-museum.org. Club Soda, through Sunday, April 14. Artspace Gallery, 221 Center St., Bloomsburg. 570-784-0737 or artspace-bloomsburg.com. Keystone College Visual Arts Program Faculty Exhibition, through Friday, April 19. Faculty panel lecture: Thursday, March 21, 4 to 6 p.m. Opening reception: Sunday, March 24, 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.; jazz ensemble concert follows, 7 to 9 p.m., Brooks Theatre. Linder Gallery at Keystone College, 1 College Green, La Plume. 570-945-8467 or keystone.edu. HerSELF: Through the eyes of Amy Kiser, through Monday, April 29. Everhart Museum, 1901 Mulberry St., Scranton. 570-346-7186 or everhart-museum.org. OurSELF, through Monday, April 29. Maslow Study Gallery at Marywood University, Marywood University, Scranton. everhart-museum.org. Art Events

Fiber Art Afternoon, Thursdays, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Bring supplies and make some new friends while working on crochet, knitting or felting. Pittston Memorial Library, 47 Broad St. 570-654-9565 or pittstonmemoriallibrary.org. Adult Coloring Club, Fridays, 1 p.m. Supplies provided, but feel free to bring fine-tip markers or colored pencils. Pittston Memorial Library, 47 Broad St. Free. 570-654-9565 or pittstonmemoriallibrary.org. Pop-Up Art Workshop, Friday, March 15, 2 p.m. Features Colette Fu, who will introduce the basics of paper engineering. Advanced students should bring digitally printed matte photos or laser prints, no larger than 8 1/2 inches by 11 inches. All materials provided. Alden Trust Room 219, Sandy and Marlene Insalaco Hall at Misericordia University, 301 Lake St., Dallas. $40 registration fee. Craft Show, Saturday, March 16, 10 a.m. Food and baked goods available for purchase. Tunkhannock Area Middle School, 200 Franklin Ave., Tunkhannock. National Puppy Day Craft, Monday, March 18, 5:30 p.m. Make a collage dog, have some snacks and watch a pet-themed movie. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. 570-821-1959 or osterhout.lib.pa.us or reference@luzernelibraries.org. The Art of Batik, Thursday, March 21, 6 p.m. Learn how to design fabric and paper using the batik technique. The Gathering Place, 304 S. State St., Clarks Summit. $20, plus $10 supply fee. 570-881-7612 or GatheringPlaceCS.org. Beginning Rigid Heddle Weaving, Saturday, March 23, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Learn how to warp a loom, weave and cut off your sample project. The Gathering Place, 304 S. State St., Clarks Summit. $60, plus $10 supply fee. 570-881-7612 or GatheringPlaceCS.org. Kitson Arts Alliance Member Show, Monday,

April 8, through Friday, June 28. Participating venues are Courthouse Art Gallery at the Wyoming County Courthouse, Tunkhannock; gallery at the Community Cup Coffee & Tea House, Towanda; Earnshaw & Sherwood Galleries at Wyoming County Cultural Center at the Dietrich Theater, Tunkhannock; gallery at Tina’s Cafe, Coffee House & Eatery at the Luzerne County Courthouse, Wilkes-Barre; and the Kitson Gallery at Pen Corners, Tunkhannock. Exhibits will remain open until June 28 at all venues except the Dietrich, where it will close May 25. Art in Bloom, Friday, April 26, 6 to 8 p.m.; Saturday, April 27, 1 to 4 p.m. Everhart Museum, 1901 Mulberry St., Scranton. $7 adults/$5 students and seniors/$3 children 6 to 12. 570-346-7186 or everhart-museum.org. Needles at Noon, Thursdays, noon, through Thursday, Dec. 26. Learn to knit or crochet or work on a project you’ve started. Penn State Wilkes-Barre, Old Route 115, Lehman. 570-675-2171 or wb.psu.edu.

FILM

Spring Film and Discussion Series: Meet Your Neighbors, Thursdays, March 14 through 11, 7 p.m. Every film in the series features someone who has connections to Northeast Pennsylvania. R/C WilkesBarre Movies 14, 24 E. Northampton St. 570-6759253 or wilkesbarre.psu.edu/ce/personal-enrichment/ film-discussion-series. Northeast Pennsylvania Film Festival, Friday, March 22, through Sunday, March 24. Festival takes place at Waverly Community House, the Ritz Theater and University of Scranton’s PNC Auditorium. nepafilmfest.com. Let’s Talk Argentina, Saturday, March 23, 11 a.m. Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. Free. 570-996-1500 or dietrichtheater.com. National Theatre Live on Screen: Antony and Cleopatra, Sunday, March 24, 2 p.m. Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. $14 general/$12 members and seniors/$10 children and students. 570996-1500 or dietrichtheater.com. Spring 2019 Film Festival Preview Day, Thursday, March 28, 1 p.m., 6 p.m. Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. Free. 570-996-1500 or dietrichtheater.com. American Creed Documentary Screening and Discussion, Thursday, March 28, 6:30 p.m. Facilitated by University of Scranton history professor Adam Pratt, Ph.D. Registration required. Albright Memorial Library, 500 Vine St., Scranton. Free. 570-348-3000 or albright.org. First Friday Kids Movie Night, Friday, April 5, 5:30 to 8:15 p.m. Features crafts, movie, pizza and popcorn. CaPAA Theater at the Ritz, 222 Wyoming Ave., Scranton. 570-252-4156, CaPAA.org or sheri@ capaa.org. Spring Film Festival, Friday, April 12, through Thursday, May 2. Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. $40 opening night gala/$8.50 individual movies. 570-996-1500 or dietrichtheater.com. Third annual Jim Thorpe Independent Film Festival, Thursday, April 25, through Sunday, April 28. Mauch Chunk Opera House, 14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe. jimthorpeindiefilmfest.com.

BOOKS

Friends of the Osterhout Library Book Shop, Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Thursdays, 5 to 7:30 p.m. New books stocked regularly. Shop held on the third floor. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. 570-823-0156 or Please see Calendar 1, Page 19


SOUNDS / CALENDAR

Sounds BY MIKE EVANS Twilight Sad’s fifth a sure bet against sophomore albums Demob Happy — ‘Holy Doom’ THE GOOD: British alt-rock group Demob Happy loses a member but still cranks out a decent sophomore record. THE BAD: “Holy Doom” has weaker moments but holds together well. THE NITTY GRITTY: Take Queens of the Stone Age, Rival Sons, some glam overtones and a whole lot of hard-rock basics and you end up with Demob Happy. These boys aren’t reinventing the wheel, but they know how to make a loose and loud album work. Guitarist Mathew Renforth bailed shortly after the release of “Dream Soda,” the band’s 2015 debut, essentially leaving Demob Happy a power trio. It’s adjusted to the change without missing a beat or riff. From the stomping “Fake Satan” to the shuffling, hazy title cut, “Holy Doom” is an album big on classic rock posturing and sheer attitude. Thankfully though, the guys don’t fall into any sort of nostalgia trap, simply ripping off wellworn influences. The band puts a fresh coat of paint on the past, creating something vital. BUY IT?: Sure.

Dilly Dally — ‘Heaven’ THE GOOD: Canadian indie rock outfit Dilly Dally returns with a blistering second record. THE BAD: Take this one in small doses. THE NITTY GRITTY: I’m still a believer in ALBUMS. The format, a bunch of individual songs going together conceptually or even randomly, remains my favorite way to digest music both new and old. Singles only tell half a story. Playlists become background noise. Unfortunately, “Heaven” is an album in which the individual songs actually gain momentum when separated. Dilly Dally starts off strong with the punchy “I Feel Free” and weighty “Doom.” After that, though, a mid-tempo grungy fog rolls in, tracks melt into one another, and by time we reach drug anthem “Marijuana,” the album almost slips into self-parody. Separate the songs, though, and you notice this band’s strengths. Katie Monks is a tough-as-nails frontwoman using a higher-pitched voice to great effect. The guitars are crunchy. The rhythm section keeps these fuzzed-out anthems from spinning into oblivion. That aforementioned fog begins to dissipate. BUY IT?: Your choice.

Twilight Sad — ‘It Won’t Be Like This All the Time’ THE GOOD: Scottish indie rock group Twilight Sad comes back with its fifth after a five-year hiatus. THE BAD: No. THE NITTY GRITTY: Despite splitting with founding member and original drummer Mark Devine just before recording, Twilight Sad picked up right where it left off without missing a beat (pun intended). James Alexander Graham covers the lyrics in his distinct Scottish brogue while the band bashes away in the background. These mid-tempo mopey rockers are reminiscent of both mid-period Cure and fellow countrymen We Were Promised Jetpacks. Speaking of the Cure, Robert Smith is listed within the album’s credits, although I’m not sure exactly what the recent Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame inductee did. It doesn’t really matter. If you loved these guys before, you’ll love them again. “All the Time” is an inspired, emotionally charged set of songs both aggressive and somewhat tender. Pessimistic and guitar-heavy one moment, hopeful and swirling the next, the record never stumbles into a predictable rut. BUY IT?: Surely. Contact the writer: mevans@shamrocknepa.com

FROM PAGE 18 osterhout.lib.pa.us. Author Talk, Thursday, March 14, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. John Harvey discusses his book “The Stillness of the Living Forest: A Year of Listening and Learning.” The Cooperage, 1030 Main St., Honesdale. Donations accepted. 570-253-2020 or thecooperageproject.org. National Women’s History Month Luncheon with Suzanne Fisher Staples, Friday, March 15, noon. Glen Oak Country Club, 250 Oakford Road, Clarks Summit. $35. waverlycomm.org. Friends of the Pittston Library, Mondays, March 18 and April 15, 3 p.m. Meetings always open to new members. Pittston Memorial Library, 47 Broad St. 570654-9565 or pittstonmemoriallibrary.org. Carmen Maria Machado, Monday, March 18, 7:30 p.m. Author wrote story collection “Her Body and Other Parties” and memoir “In the Dream House.” Kirby Hall at Wilkes University, 202 S. River St., Wilkes-Barre. 570-408-4200. Roaming Readers Book Club, Tuesdays, 11 a.m. Walk, talk and take in an audiobook. Pittston Memorial Library, 47 Broad St. 570-654-9565 or pittstonmemoriallibrary.org. Franklin Street Sleuths, Thursday, March 21, 6:30 p.m. Discuss “River Bodies” by Karen Katchur. Light refreshments will be served. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. 570-823-0156 or osterhout. lib.pa.us. All “Fore” Books Mini Golf Classic, Sunday, March 24, noon. Features 18 holes through and around the library stacks. Putter and ball provided to players of any age. Proceeds benefit Children’s Program at the Osterhout Free Library. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. $10 adults/$5 children 12 and younger. eventbrite.com. Harry Potter Book Discussion, Thursday, March 28, 6 p.m. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., WilkesBarre. 570-823-0156 or osterhout.lib.pa.us. Author visit with Elissa Schappell, Monday, April 1, 7:30 p.m. Burke Auditorium at King’s College, 133 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre. Free. 570-208-5900 or jenniferyonkoski@kings.edu. NoViolet Bulawayo, Wednesday, April 17, 7:30 p.m. Kirby Hall at Wilkes University, 202 S. River St., WilkesBarre. 570-408-4200. American Masters Lecture, Thursday, April 18, 7 p.m. Author Colson Whitehead, who wrote “Underground Railroad” speaks. Scranton Cultural Center at The Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave. lclshome.org.

16, 7 and 10 p.m. F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, 71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. 570-826-1100 or kirbycenter.org. #momtruths Podcasters Cat and Nat, Tuesday, March 19, 7 p.m. F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, 71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. $25-$100, plus fees. 570826-1100 or kirbycenter.org. Red Green, Thursday, March 28, 7 p.m. F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, 71 Public Square, WilkesBarre. $53.50, plus fees. 570-826-1100 or kirbycenter.org. Wanda Sykes, Saturday, April 6, 8 p.m. F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, 71 Public Square, WilkesBarre. $25-$95 general/$195 VIP, plus fees. 570-8261100 or kirbycenter.org.

DANCE

Benise, Fuego: Spirit of Spain, Friday, March 22, 7:30 p.m. Community Arts Center, 220 W. Fourth St., Williamsport. $35 and up. 570-326-2424. Community Contra Dance, Saturday, April 6, 7 p.m. Features music by Contraintuitive with fiddler Ryck Kaiser and pianist Peg Kaiser along with calling by Anne Lutun. Potluck dinner starts at 6 p.m.; bring a dish to pass. Church of Christ Uniting, 190 S. Sprague Ave., Kingston. Donations accepted. 570-333-4007 or folkloresociety.org.

ETC.

Power Flow Yoga, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. Class is based on the vinyasa style of yoga with light weights used to build additional strength. Beginners are welcome but should expect a workout. Immaculate Conception Church, 605 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston. $7. Hypnosis Show, Thursday, March 14, 6 p.m. Hypnotist Jason Christopher will perform. Elk Lake Junior-Senior High School, 2380 Elk Lake School Road, Springville. $8 adults/$5 students. 570-278-1106. You, the Jury, Thursday, March 14, 6 p.m. Features an evening of discussion about the co-conspirators who were involved in Abraham Lincoln’s assassination. Six participants will be selected to act as the jury and share their thoughts and opinions. Seating is limited. Registration required. Albright Memorial Library, 500 Vine St., Scranton. Free. 570-348-3000. Socrates Cafe Discussion Group, Thursday, March 14, 6:30 p.m. Discussions to raise questions, listen and discuss a topic chosen by the group that evening. Free and open to the public. Coffee will be served. Osterhout Free Library, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. 570-8230156 or osterhout.lib.pa.us. Writers Group, Thursdays, 7 to 8:30 p.m. For ages 18 and older. Read work or listen to others speak. Learn the craft of writing and work toward the goal of publication. Snowman Contest, through Sunday, March 31. Take All genres and levels of writing welcome. Dietrich Theater, a picture of your snow creation and send it in. Entries 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. Free. 570-996-1500 or will be posted in the Gathering Place. Winners will be announced April 1. The Gathering Place, 304 S. State St., dietrichtheater.com. Eagle Watch, Friday, March 15, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 Clarks Summit. 570-881-7612 or GatheringPlaceCS.org. p.m. Participants should pack a lunch and binoculars Volunteers needed: Chainsaw Day, Saturday, April and dress for the weather. Registration required by the 13, 9 a.m. Bring chainsaws and trucks if you can. Free Tuesday before the outing; seating limited. Kettle Creek food and T-shirts for volunteers. Salt Springs State Park, Environmental Education Center, 8050 Running Valley Silver Creek Road, Franklin Forks. 570-945-3239 or Road, Stroudsburg. $32 nonmembers/$26 EE members friendsofsaltspringspark.org. (includes bus transportation). 570-629-3061 or Volunteers needed: Trail Day, Saturday, April 27, 11 a.m. Volunteer clean-up day at the Park. Food and T-shirts mcconservation.org. Lower Back Pain Workshop, Friday, March 15, 11 available for all volunteers. Salt Springs State Park, Silver a.m. Learn tips for lower back pain. Osterhout Free Creek Road, Franklin Forks. 570-945-3239 or Library, 71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre. 570-823-0156 or friendsofsaltspringspark.org. osterhout.lib.pa.us. Wally Gordon Community Singers, Tuesdays, 7:30 Music, Magic and Dance with the Great Dubini, to 8:30 p.m. No auditions required. Call for details. Clarks Summit United Methodist Church, 1310 Morgan Highway. Wilfredo and live Dee-Jays, Friday, March 15, 7:30 to 11 p.m. Ages 21 and older. The Cooperage, 1030 Main St., 570-561-6005 or wallygordoncommunitysingers.com. Honesdale. Suggested donation: $10. 570-253-2020 or

NOTICES

COMEDY

John Mulaney and Pete Davidson, Saturday, March

Please see Calendar 1, Page 20

e le c tric c ity M a rc h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E19] | 03/13/19

14:49 | CORNELLCHR

19


Calendar / Cole’s Corner

FROM PAGE 19 thecooperageproject.org. NEPA Cornhole Tournament, Saturday, March 16, 1 p.m. Registration, 11 a.m. Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp. $60 team of two advance/$80 team of two at the door. 570-831-2100 or mohegansunpocono.com. Shamrock Shakedown, Saturday, March 16, 7 p.m. Features former WWE Superstar Chris Masters, Sean Legacy, the tag team of InZanely Rude, Veronica Fairchild, Hunter Young, Sgt. Morder, Squid Sterling, Tyson Creed and Adena Steele. Hilton Scranton and Conference Center, 100 Adams Ave., Scranton. $15 general/$20 ringside. 570-343-3000 or scranton.hilton.com. Annual St. Joseph Day Breakfast, Sunday, March 17, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Takeouts available. Menu includes eggs, honey-baked ham, olives, hash browns, pancakes, bread, juice and hot beverages. St. Joseph Melkite Greek Catholic Church, 130 N. St. Frances Cabrini Ave., Scranton. $9 adults/$4.50 children 6 to 10/free for ages 5 and younger. 570-343-6092, melkitescranton. org or melkite.scranton@gmail.com. Yoga and Cooking, Sunday, March 17, 4 to 8:30 p.m. Features vinyasa yoga class and fresh pasta cooking class. Space is limited. Yoga West LLC, 311 Adams Ave., Scranton. $100. Conversational Italian, Mondays, March 18 through April 29. Beginners, 6:30 p.m.; returning students, 7:30. The Gathering Place, 304 S. State St., Clarks Summit. $60. 570-881-7612 or GatheringPlaceCS.org. Birdscaping and Bird Town, Monday, March 18, 7 p.m. Trinity Presbyterian Church, 105 Irem Road, Dallas. Free. Crochet Club, Tuesdays, 10 to 11:45 a.m. Bring supplies, including a crochet hook sized I, J or K and yarn. Pittston Memorial Library, 47 Broad St. 570-654-9565 or pittstonmemoriallibrary.org. Mahjong, Tuesdays, March 19 and 26, 10 a.m. to noon. Instructors will review and teach the basics of this ancient Chinese game. The Gathering Place, 304 S. State St., Clarks Summit. $15. 570-881-7612 or GatheringPlaceCS.org. Gardening Workshops, through Tuesday, March 19, 2 to 3:30 p.m. Learn how to create a thriving, manageable outdoor garden. Proceeds benefit the Comm’s Garden Project. Waverly Community House, 1115 North Abington Road, Waverly Twp. 570-586-8191 or waverlycomm.org. Dining with Friends, Wednesday, March 20. Proceeds benefit Luzerne County Historical Society. The Beaumont Inn, 4437 Route 309, Dallas. 570-675-7100 or thebeaumontinn.com. Introduction to Google Drive, Wednesday, March 20, 6 to 7:30 p.m. Learn how to use Google Drive for document sharing, making folders and overall organization of files. The Gathering Place, 304 S. State St., Clarks Summit. $25. 570-881-7612 or GatheringPlaceCS.org. Samuel J. Comroe, Wednesday, March 20, 8 to 10 p.m. Stand-up comedian who appeared on “America’s Got Talent” performs. The Ritz Building, 222 Wyoming Ave., Scranton. $25-$50. Game Night, Thursdays, March 21 and April 18, 6 p.m. Offers all kinds of games, from board games to card games to brain games. The Cooperage, 1030 Main St., Honesdale. Donations accepted. 570-253-2020 or thecooperageproject.org. Health Transformation Workshop, Saturday, March 23, 9 a.m. to noon. Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. $20 (includes lunch). 570-996-1500 or dietrichtheater.com. Angling and Hunting Luncheon, Saturday, March 23, 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Shawnee Inn and Golf Resort, 1 River Road, Shawnee on Delaware. $15. peec.org. Free Community Luncheon, Saturday, March 23, noon to 1 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church, 700 Delaware St., Forest City.

20 M a r c h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

Annual Ham Dinner, Saturday, March 23, 4:30 p.m. Menu includes baked ham with pineapples relish, scalloped potatoes au gratin, buttered peas, oven-baked fresh rolls, Cole slaw, applesauce, homemade pies, beverages. Banquet Hall of Triton Hose, 108 W. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. $10 adults/$5 children 12 and younger. 570-836-1229. Whooo Gives a Hoot? Owls and Night Hike, Saturday, March 23, 7 p.m. Salt Springs State Park, Silver Creek Road, Franklin Forks. $5 nonmembers/free members. 570-945-3239 or friendsofsaltspringspark.org. Office Pop Up, Saturday, March 23, 8 p.m. Features themed food and drink, DJ and multiple rounds of trivia with prizes awarded. “The Office” attire encouraged. 21 and older. Stage West, 301 N. Main Ave., Scranton. $10. 570-343-7100 or stagewest570.com. Health Transformation Workshop, Saturday, March 23, 9 to noon. Learn techniques through a proven plan for transformation health with a healthy lunch provided. Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. $20. 570996-1500 or dietrichtheater.com. Birding in Kirby Park Natural Area, Sunday, March 24, 8 a.m. Kirby Park, 301 Northampton St., Kingston. Free. 570-239-4369. Annual Spring Chicken Dinner, Sunday, March 24, noon to 4 p.m. Dinner menu includes half of a chicken, mashed potatoes with gravy, vegetable, homemade coleslaw, rolls, desserts and beverages. There also will be cash and themed basket raffles. Queen of Apostles Parish Hall, 742 Spring St., Avoca. $12 adults/$8 children. 570-457-3412. Meals on Wheels of NEPA’s Purse, Bag and Getaway Bingo, Sunday, March 24, 1 to 4:30 p.m. Features 20 game bingo packet, door prize entry and raffle. The Space at Olive, 541 Wyoming Ave., Scranton. $30. eventbrite.com. Fort Jenkins Bridge Construction Presentation, Sunday, March 24, 2 p.m. Learn about the photographic history. West Pittston Public Library, 200 Exeter Ave. Free. 570-654-9847 or wplibrary.org. Eight Women Who Changed the World, Monday, March 25, 7 a.m. Features 10-minute presentations by Misericordia faculty on influential women in their fields. Mary Kintz Bevevino Library at Misericordia University, 301 Lake St., Dallas. Free. Death of Democracy, Wednesday, March 27, noon. Professor discusses three theories explaining why democracy might be vulnerable. The Gathering Place, 304 S. State St., Clarks Summit. $5. 570-881-7612 or GatheringPlaceCS.org. Social Security Benefits, Wednesday, March 27, 6 p.m. Mill Memorial Library, 495 E. Main St., Nanticoke. 570-735-3030. Be Daring Open Mic, Wednesdays, March 27 and 24, 7 to 9 p.m. Open to all performers, from comedians to songwriters to poets. Sign up begins at 6:30 p.m. Adezzo, 515 Center St., Scranton. 570-955-0130 or facebook. com/BeDaringOpenMic. The Horizons of Business Education, Thursday, March 28, and Friday, March 29. Register online. SheehyFarmer Campus Center at King’s College, 133 N. River St., Wilkes-Barre. 570-208-5900 or kings.edu. McGlynn Center annual Recognition Reception, Thursday, March 28, 6 p.m. Employees of Berkshire Hathaway GUARD will be honored for their civic leadership. Genetti’s Best Western, 77 E. Market St., WilkesBarre. $35. 570-824-8891 or interland3.donorperfect.net/ weblink/weblink.aspx?name=E345747&id=7. Pruning, Thursday, March 28, 6 p.m. Learn about pruning and tree care for trees. The Gathering Place, 304 S. State St., Clarks Summit. $5. 570-881-7612 or GatheringPlaceCS.org. Reality Check with Jenna Johnson and Val Chmerkovskiy, Friday, March 29, 6 p.m. Talent will sign copies of headshots, one personal memorabilia per person. Signing personalization is prohibited. An

e le c tric c ity

TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E20] | 03/13/19

14:45 | CORNELLCHR

Cole’s Corner

in-house photographer will take photos. There will be no personal photos. Limited number of wrist bands available. Keystone Grand Ballroom at Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp. 570-831-2100 or mohegansunpocono.com. Benefit Breakfast for Ellie Kloss, Saturday, March 30, 8 a.m. to noon. Features breakfast, 50/50 and basket raffle. Ellie Kloss, 14, underwent surgery for a malignant brain tumor and is recovering. Proceeds benefit the Kloss family with medical expenses and travel costs. St. Catherine of Siena Church, 220 Church St., Moscow. $8. Holistic Fair, Saturday, March 30, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, March 31, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hilton Garden Inn, 242 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-Barre. 570-820-8595. SPCA of Luzerne County Pet Expo, Saturday, March 30, and Sunday, March 31, 10 a.m. Features food, vendors, animal welfare organizations, face painting and basket raffles. Kingston Armory, 280 Market St., Wilkes-Barre. Discovering Mongolia with Harry, Saturday, March 30, 10:30 a.m. Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. Free. 570-996-1500 or dietrichtheater.com. Tree Pruning Class, Saturday, March 30, 1 to 3 p.m. Salt Springs State Park, Silver Creek Road, Franklin Forks. $10 nonmembers/$5 members. 570-945-3239 or friendsofsaltspringspark.org. Northeast PA Heart Ball, Saturday, March 30, 6 p.m. “An Evening in Wonderland” features auctions, cocktails, a heart-healthy dinner, entertainment and dancing. The Room at 900, 900 Rutter Ave., Forty Fort. $200. northeastpaheartball.heart.org. Open Mics for Open Minds, Saturdays, March 30 and April 27, 6 to 8 p.m. This is an all-inclusive open mic. Poetry, music, spoken word, interpretive dance and all forms in between are welcome. The Wonderstone Gallery, 100 N. Blakely St., Dunmore. 570-344-2360 or facebook. com/SundaySessionsWonderstone.

Scranton Prep Auction, Saturday, March 30, 6 to 10 p.m. Theme is “Back to the ’80s.” Scranton Preparatory School, 1000 Wyoming Ave. 570-941-7737 or scrantonprep.com. Gourmet Gala: Singin’ in the Rain, Sunday, March 31. Proceeds benefit Ronald McDonald House of Scranton. Mohegan Sun Pocono, 1280 Route 315, Plains Twp. $50. rmhscranton.org. K-9 Day at the J, Sunday, March 31, 1 to 5 p.m. Features vendors, basket raffles and a doggy cafe. There also will be rescues on site. A portion of the proceeds benefit attending rescues. Jewish Community Center of Scranton, 601 Jefferson Ave. $15 at door. 570-346-6595 or scrantonjcc.com. Trivia and Happy Hour, Sunday, March 31, 1 p.m. Features trivia and raffles. Leadership Lackawanna Core Program class hosts happy hour to benefit their project of installing the Poli Historic Gallery at the Ritz Theater, Scranton. Cooper’s Seafood House, 701 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. $30. 570-346-6883. Whiskey, Cigars and Purse Bingo, Sunday, March 31, 1 p.m. Features food and drinks, 50/50 and raffles. Ages 21 or older. Irem Temple Country Club, 397 Country Club Road, Dallas. $25 advance/$30 at door. luzernecountycac.org. Restoring the American Chestnut, Monday, April 1, 1 p.m. Program discusses the American Chestnut Tree covering the cause of the trees demise and plans for restoration. Peggy Bancroft Hall, 465 S. Sterling Road, South Sterling. Free. 570-676-9816. 24th annual ACHE Healthcare Symposium, Thursday, April 4, 5 p.m. Registration required. Features dinner, presentation and panel discussion. University of Scranton, 800 Linden St., Scranton. Fees vary. 570-702Please see Calendar 1, Page 26


Free Will Astrology BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): The coming weeks might be a good time to acquire a flamethrower. It would come in handy if you felt the urge to go to a beach and incinerate mementoes from an ex-ally. It would also be useful if you wanted to burn stuff that reminds you of who you used to be and don’t want to be any more; or if you got in the mood to set ablaze symbols of questionable ideas you used to believe in but can’t afford to believe in any more. If you don’t want to spend $1,600-plus on a flamethrower, just close your eyes for 10 minutes and visualize yourself performing acts of creative destruction like those I mentioned.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Philip Boit was born and raised in Kenya, where it never snows except on the very top of Mount Kenya. Yet he represented his country in the cross-country skiing events at the Winter Olympics in 2002 and 2006. How did he do it? He trained up north in snowy Finland. Meanwhile, Kwame Nkrumah-Acheampong competed for Ghana in the slalom i n t h e 2 0 1 0 Wi n t e r Olympics. Since there was no snow in his homeland, he practiced his skills in the French Alps. These two are your role models for the coming months. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’ll have the potential to achieve success in tasks and activities TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Taurus aph- that may not seem like a natural fit. orist Olivia Dresher writes that she would LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In the process of like to be “a force of nature,” but “not causing any suffering.” The way I interpret her casting for his movie “The Girl with the longing is that she wants to be wild, elemen- Dragon Tattoo,” director David Fincher tal, uninhibited, primal, raw, pure — all the considered selecting A-list actress Scarlet while without inflicting Johansson to play the heroine. But ultiany hurt or damage on mately he decided she was too sexy and herself or anyone else. In radiant. He wanted a pale, thin, tougheraccordance with your looking actress, whom astrolo gical omens, he found in Rooney that’s a state I encourage Mara. I suspect that in a you to embody in the somewhat similar way, coming weeks. If you’re you may be perceived as feeling extra smart — being too much somewhich I suspect you will thing for a role you — you could go even furwould actually perform ther. You may be able to heal yourself and quite well. But in my others with your wild, elemental, uninhibit- astrological opinion, ed, primal, raw, pure energy. you’re not at all too much. In fact, you’re just right. Is there anyGEMINI (May 21-June 20): In some thing you can do — with full integrity — to major cities, the buttons you push at a cross- adjust how people see you and understand walk don’t actually work to make the traffic you without diluting your brightness and light turn green faster. The same is true about strength? the “Close Door” buttons in many elevators. Pushing them doesn’t have any effect on the VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 1993, an door. Harvard psychologist Ellen Langer said English gardener named Eric Lawes used these buttons are his metal detector to look for a hammer his like placebos that farmer friend had lost in give you “the illua field. Instead of the sion of control.” I hammer, he found the bring this phenomunexpected: a buried enon to your attenbox containing 15,234 tion in hope of old Roman silver and inspiring you to gold worth more than $4 scout around for million today. I bring comparable things this to your attention in your life. Is there any situation where you because I suspect that imagine you have power or influence, but you, too, will soon disprobably don’t? If so, now is an excellent time cover something different from what you’re to find out — and remedy that problem. searching for. Like the treasure Lawes locat-

ed, it might even be more valuable than transforming the way you express and preswhat you thought you wanted. ent yourself, you might want to consider such a shift. 2019 will be a favorable time to at least LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. add a new nickname or title. And I suspect 22): “The role of the artyou’ll have maximum inspiration to do so in the coming weeks. ist is exactly the same as the role of the lover,” CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): For wrote author James many of us, smell is our most neglected Baldwin. “If I love you, I sense. We see, hear, have to make you contaste and feel with vivscious of the things you idness and eagerness don’t see.” To fully but allow our olfactory endorse that statement, I’d need to add two adverbs. My version powers to go underwould be, “The role of the artist is exactly used. In accordance the same as the role of the lover. If I love you, w i t h a s t r o l o g i c a l I have to kindly and compassionately make omens, I hope you will you conscious of the things you don’t see.” In compensate for that accordance with current astrological omens, dearth in the coming weeks. There is subtle I recommend that you Libras enthusiastical- information you can obtain — and in my ly adopt that mission during the coming opinion, need quite strongly — that will weeks. With tenderness and care, help those come your way only with the help of your you care about to become aware of what nose. Trust the guidance provided by scent. they’ve been missing — and ask for the same AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Essayist Nasfrom them toward you. sim Nicholas Taleb says humans come in SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): For thou- three types: fragile, robust or antifragile. sands of generations, our early ancestors Those who are fragile work hard to shield themselves from life’s messiness. The downwere able to get some of side? They are deprived the food they needed of experiences that might t h ro u g h a p r a c t i c e spur them to grow smartknown as persistence er. As for robust people, hunting. They usually Taleb believes they are couldn’t run as fast as firm in the face of messithe animals they chased. ness. They remain who But they had a distinct they are even when advantage: they could they’re disrupted. The keep moving relentlessly potential problem? They until their prey grew exhausted. In part that’s because they had far may be too strong to surless hair than the animals, and thus could render to necessary transformations. If cool off better. I propose that we adopt this you’re the third type, antifragile, you engage theme as a metaphor for your life in the com- with the messiness and use it as motivation to ing weeks and months. You won’t need to be become more creative and resilient. The extra fast, super ferocious or impossibly clev- downside? None. In accordance with the er to get what you want. All you have to do is astrological omens, I urge you to adopt the antifragile approach in the coming weeks. be persistent, dogged and disciplined. S A G I T TA R I U S (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Wompsi’kuk Skeesucks Brooke is a Native American woman of the Mohegan tribe. According to her description of Mohegan naming traditions, and reported by author Elisabeth Pearson Waugaman, “Children receive names that are descriptive. They may be given new names at adolescence, and again as they go through life according to what their life experiences and accomplishments are.” She concluded that names “change as the individual changes.” If you have been thinking about

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In 2014, NASA managed to place its MAVEN spacecraft into orbit around Mars. The cost of the mission was $671 million. Soon thereafter, the Indian government put its own vehicle, the Mangalyaan, into orbit around the Red Planet. It spent $74 million. As you plan your own big project, I recommend you emulate the Mangalyaan rather than the MAVEN. I suspect you can do great things — maybe even your personal equivalent of sending a spacecraft to Mars — on a relatively modest budget.

e le c tric c ity M a rc h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E21] | 03/13/19

14:49 | CORNELLCHR

21


From left, Michele Potti of Scranton, Judy Zeiss of Nicholson and Amanda Mendez of Scanton

Double Vision, a Foreigner tribute band, performs.

Billiejoe Confield, left, and Cindy Frederick, both of Scranton

Cole Randall of Flora Cash performs on the Alt. St. Paddy’s Day Stache Bash at POSH at the Scranton Club. The event raises money for the Lymphoma and Lukemia Society. 92.1 float.

Photos Photos by Emma black

The 58th annual Scranton St. Patrick’s Parade recently took place. The event attracted around 130,000 people to the downtown, many of whom made a day-long celebration out of the day.

David Richards marches with the Irem String Band.

22 M a r c h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

e le c tric c ity

TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E22] | 03/13/19

14:45 | CORNELLCHR

Shpresa Lleshaj of Flora Cash performs on the Alt. 92.1 float.

Visit the570.com/photostore to see more photos available for purchase.


THETIMES-TRIBUNE.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

EMAIL US:

IN-COLUMN DEADLINES:

570-348-9157 Fax: 570-348-9145

Thursday ............ Wednesday 4 p.m.

Recruitment: recruitmentads@timesshamrock.com Legal ads: legals@timesshamrock.com All other classifieds: classified@timesshamrock.com

Sunday & Monday........ Friday 4 p.m.

Friday ..................... Thursday 4 p.m.

149 Penn Avenue, Scranton, PA 18503

Tuesday....................Monday 4 p.m.

Saturday ..................... Friday 1 p.m.

Wednesday...............Tuesday 4 p.m.

Real Estate ............ Thursday 4 p.m.

General

DALLAS Chapel Lawn Memorial Park

FA IRVIEW MEMORIA L PA R K

Value $6,000 Will sell for $5,000 We will pay transfer fee $95.00

Call 570-346-3032

By the Bible. 4 lots, $700 each. (570) 655-2605

FAIRVIEW MEMORIAL CEMETERY

2 lots valued at $2,490, will sell for $1,200 or best offer. Call 570-586-6448

FAIRVIEW MEMORIAL PARK Elmhurst Mausoleum Crypt – 2

CUSTODIAL/ MAINTENANCE General

Need Extra Cash

ELMHURST, PA GARDEN OF 23rd PSALM 2 LOTS AND 2 VAULTS

FOR SALE

VALLEY VIEW MEMORIAL GARDEN

The Citizens' Voice has a very profitable delivery route available in

Need Extra Cash

Classifieds Work! FAIRVIEW MEMORIAL PARK Elmhurst Mausoleum Crypt – 2

*Applicant must be at least 18 years of age

*Applicant must be at least 18 years of age

*Reliable vehicle, valid driver's License & auto insurance required

*Reliable vehicle, valid driver's License & auto insurance required

Earn approx. $1,500 per month plus tips for just a couple of hours before sunrise each day.

DUPONT

Earn approx. $1,500 per month plus tips for just a couple of hours before sunrise each day. Ask about Scholarship Opportunities Contact 570-821-2078 E-mail: earnextracash@citizensvoice.com

Two (2) plots. $2,000. Scott Twp. 1 memorial monument bronze 44 x 13. Design crown crest rose with granite base 48 x 17. 570-780-9659

Value $8,000, Sell for $3,500 (570) 347-3145

FAIRVIEW MEMORIAL PARK

MAPLE HILL CEMETERY

One single mausoleum crypt with bronze memorial plate. They sell for $4,500. Asking $3,000 which includes transfer fee. 570-347-5922

FAIRVIEW MEMORIAL PARK,

MOSCOW. 2 lots, Garden of Prayer (Section A), 1 bronze marker, 1 burial vault. $2,500 including transfer fees. 570-815-9036 or gchakr@yahoo.com

OPEN HOUSE

The Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport is accepting applications for a custodial/maintenance position. Interested applicants can review job description and complete employment application at the Airport Administrative Office, Terminal Building, 2nd Floor, Suite 1 between the hours of 9:30 A.M. to 4:00 P.M., Monday through Friday. This application and job description can be downloaded from the Airport website at www.flyavp.com. Applications will be accepted until 4:00 P.M., Friday, April 5, 2019. Applicants must be able to work first, second or third shifts. The Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

The Citizens' Voice

has part time positions available in our warehouse. Positions involve inserting, bagging, strapping and clean up.

Requirements Include:

Lifting, bending and standing. Must be able to work early Sunday mornings and Holidays. Must be 18 years of age.

ONLY THOSE SEEKING PART TIME NEED APPLY Pre-employment drug test required Opportunity for advancement APPLY AT: The Citizens' Voice 75 N. Washington St. Wilkes-Barre, PA Monday through Friday 8:30 am - 4:00 pm

FAIR HOUSING REGULATIONS

The Times-Tribune, Citizens' Voice, Electric City & Diamond City Classifieds reserves the right to edit any copy that does not conform to Fair Housing Regulations.

PART TIME CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVES The right candidates must have customer service and communication skills, be able to handle interaction with customers in a fast paced environment and have basic computer knowledge.

Date: WWednesday, March 13th • Time: 4pm-7pm Address: 25 Lakeview Drive, Jessup, PA 18434

We offer a competitive wage with opportunities for monthly commissions. Weekends are required.

Managers will be available for immediate interviews

Interested applicants should send cover letter and resume to:

BURIAL SITES FOR SALE

Prime location in the beautiful Home Lawn section. 6 burial sites available. WILL SELL SEPARATELY or any combination. $2,400 for all or $650 each.

Classifieds WORK!

Customer Service Representatives

2 plots for sale. $500 each or $800 for both. 1-803-363-9827

MEMORIAL SHRINE CEMETERY

Ask about Scholarship Opportunities Contact 570-821-2078 E-mail: earnextracash@citizensvoice.com

NOW HIRING

HANOVER GREEN CEMETERY

2 plots for sale. Asking $1,300. Seller pays transfer fees. Call Tony at 570-655-0724 for more information.

SHICKSHINNY MOCANAQUA BENTON HUNTINGTON MILLS

The Citizens' Voice has a very profitable delivery route available in

BUYER PAYS TRANSFER FEES.

Value $8,000, Sell for $3,500 (570) 347-3145

General

General

**Immediate medical/dental/vision coverage, free Short Term and Long Term Disability, Match on 401K Plan after 12 months, Stock Plan Options, PTO and 9 Paid Holidays**

TheTimes-Tribune Attention: Amanda Lutz 149 Penn Avenue • Scranton, PA 18503

www.cognizant.com

ONLY APPLICANTS CONSIDERED WILL BE CONTACTED

Call 732—687-5524 with questions or offers.

Email: alutz@timesshamrock.com EOE. Drug free workplace.

e le c tric c ity M a rc h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 TS_CNG/ADVERTISING/AD_PAGES [ADE23] | 03/13/19

14:47 | BAIRDATHLE

23


ITEMS FOR SALE

UNFURNISHED

BE YOUR OWN BOSS IN

AVOCA!

Call 570-348-9157 | www.thetimes-tribune.com

Classified Ads

General

The Citizens' Voice and The Scranton Times-Tribune are looking for a reliable and dedicated independent contractor to deliver newspapers in the town of Avoca

MIDTOWNE APARTMENTS th

100 East 6 St., Wyoming, PA. Apartments for the elderly 62 & older and/or handicapped or disabled. Income limits do apply. All utilities are included. Non smoking building.

*Applicant must be at least 18 years of age *Reliable vehicle, valid driver's License & auto insurance required Earn approx. $1,500 per month plus tips for just a couple of hours before sunrise each day.

Ask about Scholarship Opportunities

Contact 570-821-2078 E-mail: earnextracash@citizensvoice.com

Professional

Resident Engineer / Senior Inspector McFarland Johnson, a multi-disciplinary consulting engineering firm seeks an experienced Resident Engineer for an upcoming airport construction inspection project. Responsibilities Include: • Performing airport construction inspection services, including acting as liaison between firm, owner and contractor. • Providing detailed inspection & monitoring of the construction of airfield pavements, airfield lighting, signage & NAVAIDS, sheeting & shoring, precast concrete culvert structures, & the oversight of quality control testing programs for the same. • Maintain daily, detailed job log with clear written communications. Qualifications: • AAS in Civil Engineering Technology or equivalent + 5-10 years of experience in heavy / highway, highway bridge and / or airfield construction field required. • NICET Level IV certification or equivalent experience/certification a must. • Experience in Airport Environment and with FAA construction specifications/methods a plus. • Full knowledge & adherence to QA standards, plans & specifications required. • Ability to manage contract payments to construction Contractors, including change orders. • Ability to represent MJ in a professional manner is a must. The position will be at Morristown Airport, starting Fall of 2019, and offers comprehensive compensation package, including travel expenses. Submit resume to: employment@mjinc.com A/EEO/M/F/D/V

Classifieds Work!

Classifieds WORK!

24 M a r c h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

e le c tric c ity

TS_CNG/ADVERTISING/AD_PAGES [ADE24] | 03/13/19

570-693-4256 Monday – Friday 8am – 4pm

NORTHWOOD LAKE WINOLA

Available Immediately 2 bedroom condo unfurnished, 2 floors, 1170 sf. 1st floor: living room, kitchen (includes refrigerator, stove, microwave, dishwasher), powder room, laundry hookup for washer & electric dryer. 2nd floor: 2 bedroom, full bath. central air/heat pump, covered rear porch, front deck overlooking Lake Winola. non smoking, no pets. 1 year lease. Rent $800/month + utilities. Security deposit $800. Call for appointment. 570-840-6364

PLAINS

Third floor – three small, cozy, warm in winter rooms. Gas heat, water, sewer and hot water....all included. Close to bus stop. $485 monthly. Lease. (570) 650-3803

PRIVATE H.O. BRASS TRAIN COLLECTION 40 engines + miscellaneous freight and passenger cars. All in excellent condition and at reasonable prices. $50 & Up. Call 570-341-6916 (Scranton)

CANADIAN FISCHER FUR COAT

PLYMOUTH

Immaculate spacious 1 bedroom apartment. Wall/wall carpeting, stove, refrigerator, heat, hot water included. Washer/dryer hook up. No pets. $550/month + security. 570-779-1604

WILKES BARRE SOUTH

1 bedroom apartment. 2nd floor. $400/month + utilities. Call 570-479-4993

UNFURNISHED

Excellent Condition! Size large. Paid over $3,000. Asking $950. or make an offer! 570-383-8677

NORTH WILKES BARRE

House in quiet area, 3 bedrooms, 2 bath, hardwood floors, yard, porches, nice sized rooms, $725 + utilities, lease, security deposit & references. No pets. 570-283-3041

Classifieds WORK! FAIR HOUSING REGULATIONS

The Times-Tribune, Citizens' Voice, Electric City & Diamond City Classifieds reserves the right to edit any copy that does not conform to Fair Housing Regulations.

NEWTON LAKE: Private lakefront cottage. $825/week. 3 bedrooms, sleeps 7. Dock, rowboat, fishing, etc. No pets. July available. 610-220-8454. www.newtonlakecottage.com

14:47 | BAIRDATHLE

Antique oak pedestal table with extensions & 6 chairs $1,500. Antique French Provincial armoire $1,100. Ethan Allen sleigh trundle bed – cream color with bunkie board $1,200. Ethan Allen 6 piece wall unit with desk, 3 bases & 3 bookshelves, cream colored $2,950. Antique reupholstered chaise lounge $700. Ethan Allen iron & glass coffee table $700. Coach, Michael Kors & Dooney & Bourke handbags – brand new - $75 - $300. Sabika jewelry – womens high custom - $25 - $150 per piece. Please call and leave a message and call will be returned as soon as possible. Serious inquires only. Negotiable pricing. 570-575-3292

ITEMS FOR SALE

Antique oak pedestal table with extensions & 6 chairs $1,500. Antique French Provincial armoire $1,100. Ethan Allen sleigh trundle bed – cream color with bunkie board $1,200. Ethan Allen 6 piece wall unit with desk, 3 bases & 3 bookshelves, cream colored $2,950. Antique reupholstered chaise lounge $700. Ethan Allen iron & glass coffee table $700. Coach, Michael Kors & Dooney & Bourke handbags – brand new - $75 - $300. Sabika jewelry – womens high custom - $25 - $150 per piece. Please call and leave a message and call will be returned as soon as possible. Serious inquires only. Negotiable pricing. 570-575-3292

LARGE WINDOW UNITS

for possible pole building or large residential project. Jems-Pella-Anderson all $150 negotiable. 48X48, 48x53, 88x75, 7'x61, 30x72, 34 x 8ft, 40x63, 76x65, 6x66, 6x62, 72x93, Triple 5 units crank-outs 21x26, 6x6, 2ftx42, 5'x6', 48x72, 6'x86, 80x69, round tops 40x48, 38x46, 36x70, 30x72, 30x74, 69x60, 71x30, 32x62, 12x7, 32x54, 48x94, 48x88, 48x90, 67x66.5, 6'x6', 68x82, 6x86, 36x72, 64x88, picture windows 32x64, 28x36, 32x34, 48x60, 4x6, 32x64, 76x76, 5x5, 4x4 8 units 66x75 (4) units, 6x6, 36x69, 36x64, 26x65 (2) units. Anderson Slider 6'wx8”H with screen new 3 units $300 each. 30 x 8” (4) units Entrance Door 64x82 with SD lights and road top 36 full view stain glass door $350. (4) full view 34” glass pre-hung $50 each. (2) 36x8ft, slab door $50 each. (2) 36” oak 15 lite French door $100 each. (50) hollow core many sizes $30 negotiable (30) solid cove pre-hung many sizes $50 negotiable – slab door without frames, many styles & sizes (100)doors $25 each negotiable. Sherman William Paint 1 gallon cans, $10 per gallon. (75) gallons white or off white. (60) gallons light & medium tan. (50) gallons grey & greens. (30) gallons water base premium. (25) gallons brown. (75) gallon exterior – many colors. (40) gallons Industrial water base enamels. (40) gallons protective marine coating oil base. (50) gallons semi-glass water base and many other colors. (20) gallon oil base semi0gloss. (60) gallon deck, concrete & house stain. (15) gallon Faux Impression texture paint. 5 gallon pails (40) pails finish stucco $40 each. (50) 5 gallon pails masonry – primer-interior-exterior many colors $50 per all. Sherman Williams miscellaneous items (2) steel work bench 4'x6' with sorter $75 each, Black Beauty and basting sand 4 bags $100. All Beker scaffold like new $300. Granite counter (2) 2' x 4” $40 each. Pallet lift $100. 6” DUC rubber slip lifting approximately 150 – approximately 150 glue PUC fitting drain 8” to 15” for large commercial jobs $500. All 5x10-5x12 Formica sheets-50 per sheet. Champion paper cutter, 3 phase $500 negotiable. 570-937-4055

Polaris 2001 Sportsman4 400 ATV. 48" Polaris snow blade. Superwinch Terra 25 2.5 ton winch with remote control. Hard case rear storage bin. located in Pike County. (570) 685-2095. $2,000.

Yamaha 2010 Quad YFZ450X Bill Balance Edition. Low hours. Pro taper bars, houser racing steering stem, houser racing nerf bars, FMF Factory 4.1 exhaust with FMF Mega Bomb header. Dyno jet fuel injection module installed and mapped by dealer. Cash only.$3,900/OBO. Bill (570) 239-8143

FOOD & OFFICE EQUIPMENT: Bakery/Deli Display Cases (FEDERAL) (1)50L. Refrigerator - $3,600 (retail $9,000) ; 6 Shelf Wire Display Rack with sign (1)-$80 (retail $200) ; ALL ABOVE ARE BRAND NEW CONDITION! While Supplies Last. Call or leave message 570-877-5317 (Scranton Area) FOOD EQUIPMENT: POS Register Complete System (DinerWare)$1,250 (retail $3,200); Laminated Retail/Food Commercial Counters (1) -70L with glass petition-$650(retail $1,475), (1) – 70L - $375 (retail $1,100), (2)-48L-$325 each (retail $975 each); Batter Filler Depositor Machine with accessories (EDHARD) - $3,250 (retail $7,000); PhotoCake IV Cake Decorating System $900 (retail $2,200);Cupcake Tower Display Stand(2)-$30 each (retail $70 each); White/Ivory Fiberglass Display Trays (50)- $5 each(retail $12 each); Commercial 24 Cup Muffin/Cupcake Baking Pans(Chicago Metallic) (16)-$35 each (retail $80 each); Clear Food Storage Box with lid, 18"x26"x3 ½"(CAMBRO) (50)-$15 each (retail $35 each); ½ Sheet Baking Pans (MagicLine)(30)-$9 each (retail $24 each); Cabinet Storage Box 28x18x31(GLADIATOR)- $95 (retail $220); ALL ARE NEW CONDITION AND NEGOTIABLE! Call, text or leave a message 570-877-5317 (Scranton, PA) FULL LENGTH MINK COAT: made from female skins. Asking $3,000. Call 570-862-8449. GLENMAURA – ORIGINAL FULL EQUITY GOLF CLUB MEMBERSHIP, for sale. Asking $4,000 or best offer. (570) 909-7369

HUGE COLLECTION OF PROCELAIN DOLLS: In great condition. Start your own collection. 75 dolls + Christmas carolers.

BUY INDIVIDUAL OR ENTIRE COLLECTION! CALL 570-876-2164 FOR MORE INFORMATION

LADIES DIAMOND SOLITAIRE ENGAGEMENT RING:

Fashioned of 14K white gold & mounted with 1 round brilliant cut diamond weighing .79 carat and mounted in 6 prong basket style setting. Appraisal papers available. $1,300. 570-956-9265

WANTED FREON R12.

We pay CA$H. R12 R500 R11. Convenient. Certified professionals. www.refrigerantfinders.com 312-291-9169


Paperless Billing

EASTERN AUTO

816 Moosic Rd., Old Forge

570-457-0034

You're In Luck! We Specialize In Quality Used Vehicles Under $5,000!

Puppy

SHIBA PUPPY FOR SALE

Female, 5 months old. Has all shots. Sells for $3,500 in pet stores. Asking $2,500. Call 570-892-8345

CHECK OUT SOME SWEET DEALS!

Classifieds WORK! #1 in Customer Satisfaction! Example:

TOYOTA'05 HIGHLANDER

07 Ford F-150 X-Cab 4x4 $10,995 11 Ford Escape XLT, 4x4, 108K $8995 08 Mercury Mariner,Sunroof, 94K $7995 08 Ford Fusion, Sunroof, Leather, 70K $6995 05 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 110K $5995 05 Nissan Xterra, 93K, 4x4, New Car Trade, Very Clean! $6995 08 Chevy van, V8, Auto., Shelves & Roof Racks, New Car Trade $9995 04 Mercury Sable, White, Sunroof 94K $4500 07 Chevy Aveo Sedan Runs Good $3195

Ford 2004 F-150 Crew

with

EZ Pay

The Automatic Billing Plan

All Vehicles Are Serviced, Inspected & Come With A Warranty

Home Delivery + Digital Access

Family Owned & Operated Since 1965

Includes: 24/7 Unlimited Access to

Convenient Monthly

Classifieds WORK! FAIR HOUSING REGULATIONS

The Times-Tribune, Citizens' Voice, Electric City & Diamond City Classifieds reserves the right to edit any copy that does not conform to Fair Housing Regulations.

ALL Our Digital Content

Payments to Match YOUR Budget!

• TheTimes-Tribune.com • Times Smart Edition

Save UP TO

• Subscriber Contests & Events • News Apps (iPhone & Android)

30% OFF

the newsstand price!

• Press Pass

(over 175 businesses!)

Why sign up for EZ Pay?

Get Better Results

✓Saves Time ✓No Stamps ✓ Saves Money ✓It’s Convenient

V6, Moonroof, 141K, Runs & Drives Like Brand New! $5995

IT'S TAX TIME!

Hurry before the BEST Cars & SUVs in the area are ALL GONE!

$ BUYING $

Warranty. 112k. Warranty. $7,495. Dealer. David 570-815-4141

HIGHEST PRICES PAID

Tom Driebe Auto Sales

Trucks, Vans & SUVs

Specializing In Vehicles Under $5,000!

Tom Driebe Auto Sales

531 N. Keyser Ave., Scranton ( Near Bolus Motor Lines )

( Near Bolus Motor Lines )

Call: 570-350-4541

We CAN Get You Financed! www.tomdriebeonline.com Call: 570-344-8000

We CAN Get You Financed! www.tomdriebeonline.com Call: 570-344-8000

Under $5,000!

subsidizing charge

employing subsidizing

sold listings span online cost

classified sizes

farm description subsidizing sizes

subsidizing

sold

description

10 Chevy Cobalt LT, 4 Cyl., Auto., Air, Newest Inspection, Looks & Runs Like New! $5975 09 Nissan Sentra S, 4 Cyl., Auto., Air, Local Trade, Looks & Runs Great! SOLD! 08 Chrysler Sebring Ltd., V6, Air, Auto., Alloys, AWD, Boston Acoustics Nav., Rear Entertainment w/ TV, 97K, Looks & Runs Like New! SOLD! 07 Chevy HHR, 4 Cyl., Auto., Alloys, Air, Local Trade REDUCED! $3875 06 Mazda 3 Hatchback, 4 Cyl., Auto. Air, Alloys, Power Moonroof, Rare 5 Speed, Leather, Fresh Inspection REDUCED! $3975 06 Subaru Legacy Ltd., 4 Cyl., Auto., Air, Alloys, Newest Inspection, Local Trade SOLD! 05 Chevy Cobalt L4, 4 Door, 4 Cyl., Auto., Air, Alloys, Newest Inspection, Local Trade $3875 97 Chevy Camaro RS, V6, Auto., Air, Alloys, Fresh Inspection, Not many of these left! Steal This One!... ONLY $2375

08 GMC Envoy SLE-XL, 4WD, V6, Auto., Air, Alloys, Fresh Inspection, Looks & Runs Great! $5975 08 Kia Sorento, Auto., Air, Alloys, Newest Inspection, Nice Vehicle! $5875 07 Ford Escape 4WD, 4 Cyl., Auto., Air, Alloys, Newest Inspection, Only 105K, Looks & Runs LIKE NEW! $4275 06 Toyota Sienna Van, V6, Auto., Air, Leather, Looks & Runs Great! SOLD! 06 Chrysler Pacifica Touring, V6, Auto., Air, Alloys, AWD, Leather, Nice Car, Fresh Inspection Reduced! $3975 04 Chevy Tracker ZR2, 4WD, 6 Cyl. Auto., Air, Alloys, Just Traded, Newest Inspection! ONLY! $3975 04 Chevy Silverado 1500 4x4, 4.8L, Auto., Air, Alloys, Great Work Truck! $3975 01 Rav4 XL, 4 Cyl., Auto., Air, Alloys, Newest Inspection Reduced! $3975 00 Ford F-150 Styleside Super Cab XL, 6 Cyl., 5 Spd., Power Windows, Jump Seat, Looks & Runs Great!... Nice Work Truck!! $2875 00 GMC Yukon XL SLE, ¾ Ton V8, Auto., Air, Alloys, Leather, 4WD, A BIG Beauty! Book $5000...Now $2475

Call: 570-350-4541 Specializing In Vehicles

particularly items proving maps

sold farm

Automobiles

headings

531 N. Keyser Ave., Scranton

description

CA$H PAID • 570-574-1275 (Used Tires $20 & Up)!

headings sale

charge distributed services short subsidizing among cost span online

farm

Junk Cars &Trucks... Also Buying USED Cars & Trucks!

When you place your ad with a photo. Call today for pricing!

sizes informational

Go To:

ALL Subscribers Get 24/7 Access

THETIMES-TRIBUNE.COM/ACTIVATE

If you are not currently a Home Delivered Subscriber Become an All-Access Member today by calling

570-348-9190

Call 570-348-9157 www.thetimes-tribune.com e le c tric c ity M a rc h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

TS_CNG/ADVERTISING/AD_PAGES [ADE25] | 03/13/19

14:47 | BAIRDATHLE

25


CALENDAR / ADVICE GODDESS

FROM PAGE 20 5734 or elizabeth.steele@scranton.edu. Food, Health, Planet, Our Future as a Species, Thursday, April 4, 6 p.m. Brennan Hall at University of Scranton, 800 Linden St., Scranton. 570-941-7400 or scranton.edu. Food. Health. Planet. The Connection!, Thursday, April 4, 6 p.m. Learn the connection between food choices and health. Healthy snacks will be served. Brennan Hall at University of Scranton, 800 Linden St., Scranton. $5. www.scrantongreenhouse.org. Nickelodeon Double Dare Live, Friday, April 5. Hosted by Marc Summers. F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, 71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. 570-826-1100 or kirbycenter.org. Pinwheel Dedication Ceremony, Friday, April 5, 11 a.m. Luzerne County Courthouse, 200 N. River St., Wilkes-Barre. luzernecountycac.org. BikeScranton Kick-Off Bike Share, Friday, April 5, 5 to 8 p.m. Ages 16 and older with valid driver’s license or state-issued photo identification. Adults must accompany participants under 18. Lackawanna County Courthouse Square, 200 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. 570-9636800 or lackawannacounty.org. Parkinson’s and the Power of Exercise and Diet, Saturday, April 6, 11 a.m. Local panel of experts will bring their stories and research. Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. Free. 570-996-1500 or dietrichtheater.com. Designer Purse Bingo, Saturday, April 6, 1 to 4 p.m. Features 20 games of bingo and 50/50 raffle. Doors open at 11 a.m. St. Maria Goretti Parish Center, 42 Redwood Drive, Laflin. $20 advance/$25 at the door. Take a Break Hike, Saturday, April 6, 1 p.m. 3-mile hike. Salt Springs State Park, Silver Creek Road, Franklin

Forks. $5 non-members/free members. 570-945-3239 or friendsofsaltspringspark.org. Scranton Half Marathon, Sunday, April 7, 9 a.m. to noon. Scranton Memorial Stadium, 801 Providence Road, Scranton. Prices vary. scrantonhalf.com. Marvine Dutch Gap Softball Cash and Purse Bingo, Sunday, April 7, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Doors open at 11 a.m. Features 16 games of bingo and chances to win a purse or $100, 50/50, basket raffle and specials. Grand prize is $500. St. Johns Russian Orthodox Church, 706 Hill St., Mayfield. $20. 570-876-0730. Spring Fling Gift Card Bingo, Sunday, April 7, 11:45 a.m. Features 16 regular games, three special games and jackpot. Tickets are limited. For tickets, call Irene McCarthy, 570-789-1837; Diana Shreffler, 570-4343029 or Maria Cina 607-242-4239. St. Lawrence Church, Trinity Center, 380 Franklin St., Great Bend. $20. SUBMISSIONS Seniors GotCALENDAR Talent, Sunday, April 7, 2 p.m. Features a variety of acts by individuals ages 55 and older who comEmail your to the electriccity@ pete to win cashevent prizes! information Proceeds benefit programs attimesshamrock.com UNCs four Active OlderorAdult Centers throughout we will accept submissions Lackawanna College, 501149 VinePenn St., mailed to County. CurrentLackawanna Events, Electric City, Scranton. $15 advance/$20 at the door. 570-346-0759 or Ave.,Scranton,PA18503.Highresolution(min.200 uncnepa.org/seniors-got-talent/. Main Wearare Expo: A Fashion Show Fundraiser, dpi) photos welcome. Deadline for submissions Sunday, 7, 2:30 p.m.to Proceeds benefit The Cooperis the April Monday prior the Thursday edition by age. The Cooperage, 1030 Main St., Honesdale. $40 noon. Due to the high demand for submissions, advance/$50 at the door. 570-253-2020 or thecooperagewe cannot guarantee all events will be printed on project.org. at basis. the Race by Rotary of the a Night weekly Most eventsClub do not runPocono more than Mountains, Sunday, April 7, 4 p.m. Proceeds benefit two to three weeks in advance. Regardless, the Rotary Club of the Pocono Mountains. The Pour all events submitted Bar are &published The570.com. House Neighborhood Grille, 1014atRoute 390, Mountainhome. $5 suggested donation. 570-590-6494 or

The Area’s Premier Adult Store. Go head, Get ozy Tonight!

Largest Selection of DVD’s, Magazines, Novelties, & Lingerie!

2 Great Locations! Look ook for our in-store in store specials speci

Visit us at adultworldx.com Female Friendly Environment

Larksville, Rt. 11 • 570-779-9130 | Berwick, Rt. 11 • 570-759-9151

26 M a r c h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

e le c tric c ity

TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E26] | 03/13/19

14:45 | CORNELLCHR

Advice Goddess BY AMY ALKON Boyfriend uncertain about moving forward with relationship A hard yuk story I’m a 34-year-old struggling comic. My girlfriend is a 29-year-old children’s therapist. We’ve been together for a year. She wants to move in with me, wants me to meet her parents — adult relationship stuff that I don’t feel ready for now. I love her, but I live in a studio without a kitchen. I don’t even have a car. As a man, I want to be a “provider” for the woman in my life. She doesn’t want to wait. — Don’t Wanna Lose Her On the upside, you aren’t without savings. There’s that jar with all the change that you take to the Coinstar twice a year. Your reluctance to be all “let’s move in together and start a life over my hot plate” probably comes out of how (according to cross-cultural research by David Buss and other evolutionary psychologists) women seem to have evolved to seek men with the ability to acquire resources — that is, to “provide.” Men co-evolved to expect this — and feel they need to rise to the occasion in order to get (and retain) the ladies. In other words, you, as a man, are psychologically driven to feel unsettled when, in terms of sheer earning power, you’re just this side of living in your car. This might lead you to wonder why, if you’re so wigged out about being broke, your girlfriend’s evolved psychology seems to be all “yeah, whatever.” Well, there was no such thing as “wealth” in ancestral times, so cues to the ability to acquire resources seem to point to mate quality. As I’ve written before, a

woman’s seeing ambition, entrepreneurial thinking and high intelligence in a guy who isn’t exactly raking in the bucks with a crop harvester may ring enough of her psychological bells to make him a choice. A woman who isn’t yet in “let’s make babies!” mode might also be more openminded than realistic. Think about the life you want, and ask your girlfriend to think about the future she wants, and then put your wants together (along with the timetable for each) and see how well they fit. Sure, comedy is a career that can eventually pay off Seinfeldenormously, but for many, it never goes beyond driving around to do $50 sets in suburban Yuk-Yuk Huts. If it’s “babies or bust!” for her, consider how willing you’d be to trade your comedy dream for a dad job — the boringly stable kind with a reasonable weekly paycheck. Unfortunately, actual money tends to go over better at the kids’ dentist than a pair of free tickets to The Chuckle Castle plus a garbage bag of recyclables and a pledge to come back with more every day until mid-2024.

A scar is born My guy friend said my problem with men is that I keep forgetting who I am. According to him, I’m smart, beautiful, accomplished, funny and supercool but the moment I like a guy, I act weirdly needy and it turn guys off. How do I change this? — Clingy In presenting yourself to others, you’re like the world’s worst used-car salesman: “Fantastic deathtrap for the

price! Just the thing to strand you on a desert highway and leave you crawling on your hands and knees over rocky, snake-infested terrain!” Unfortunately, self-loathing is only stylish for about 20 minutes — and only if you are a newly Goth 13-year-old. Also unfortunate is a big, long-standing error in psychology, overvaluing talking and undervaluing action as the way to change our default behavior — meaning the way we typically (and pretty much automatically) react. Granted, recognizing where you’re going wrong and how you could behave less counterproductively isn’t unimportant or useless. But research by clinical psychologist Stefan G. Hofmann and his colleagues suggests that taking action alone — without talk therapy — leads to dramatic shifts in thinking, including significantly diminishing “negative selfperception” and other counterproductive beliefs. As for your tendency to go all needypants around a guy you like, ask yourself why you do this. Not the underlying reason but why you let your emotions drive your behavior. People don’t think to ask themselves that, but as I write in “Unf--kology: A Field Guide to Living with Guts and Confidence” — my science-based book on how action is the key to emotional and behavioral transformation — “your feelings are not the boss of you.” In short, it isn’t how you feel that matters; it’s what you do. When you’re around a guy you like, act in a way that serves your interests — like a person with self-respect, which is to say, one who has no problem walking away.


Crossword puzzle

“Double Up”--the middle two from all five. ACROSS 1 “Downton Abbey” countess 5 Pokémon protagonist 8 Fix, as the end of a pool cue 13 Strong cards 14 “SmackDown!” org. 15 High grade 17 Johnny Carson’s predecessor 19 “Sorry Not Sorry” singer Demi 20 Magic, on a scoreboard 21 Like toast without butter 22 So far 23 “Weetzie Bat” author Francesca ___ Block 24 Get a sense of importance, say 26 Children’s author Blyton 28 E-mail address part 29 Ancient Roman road 30 Indian restaurant appetizer 33 Hospital count 36 Places with IVs 37 “The Battle With the Slum” author and social reformer 40 ___ A. Bank (menswear retailer) 43 “Don’t move!” 44 Super Bowl XLI halftime headliner 48 Actress Hathaway of “Ocean’s 8” 50 1010, in binary 52 Gloom and ___ 53 Figure out group emotions, maybe 58 Replacement

59 Wrigley Field judges 60 Boy band that sang “Girl on TV” 61 She, in Brazil 62 Surgeon for whom a mouthwash is named 63 Some purchases for vape pens 65 Prefix meaning “insect” 66 Their capacity is measured in BTUs 67 Attila’s band 68 “Quiz Show” figure Charles Van ___ 69 1950s White House nickname 70 ___-bitty DOWN 1 Persuades 2 Instrument in a Legend of Zelda title 3 Win back 4 Inquire of 5 In the know 6 Began to convince 7 She/___ pronouns 8 Chief Wiggum’s kid 9 Melodramatize 10 Copenhagen’s ___ Gardens 11 How short messages may be sent 12 Bring off, slangily 16 Seeders 18 Adobe file format 22 Say out loud 25 Legislative persuader 27 Gp. that oversees the ATF

31 Airline based in Stockholm 32 False front 34 Slight decrease 35 Knightly title 38 Hall’s partner 39 PBS’s “Science Kid” 40 Rapper in the Fyre Festival documentaries 41 With “of,” in total agreement 42 Shapes up quickly 45 Barely defeat 46 Was unable to 47 Diplomat’s building 49 Podcast staffer 51 “I couldn’t find it” 54 HBO series set in New Orleans 55 “Great blue” marsh bird 56 Good for something 57 Actress Gretchen of “Boardwalk Empire” 63 “___ Ho” (“Slumdog Millionaire” song) 64 ___ Beta Kappa

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION

©2019 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com). For answers to this puzzle, call (900) 226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Reference puzzle No. 923.

e le c tric c ity M a rc h 1 4 , 2 0 1 9 TS_CNG/EC_DC/PAGES [E27] | 03/13/19

14:50 | CORNELLCHR

27


THE CLUB AT THE HIGHLANDS

Golf Course • Bar & Restaurant • Gym • Pool • All of our facilities are available to the public

Virtual Golf Now Available! Call To Make Reservations

THE HIGHLANDS AT ARCHBALD ENJOY A NEW LIFESTYLE IN NORTHEAST PA AT THE HIGHLANDS IN ARCHBALD STARTING AT $215,000!

Maintenance Free Living at Shadow Wood Village, Hawks Ridge Estates and the new Golden Gate Village. GOLDEN GATE

Custom 2 Story Home • $245,000 1950 Sq. Ft. Livable area.

Master Bedroom First Floor, 2 1/2 baths, 3 car garage, Large covered rear porch, lots of storage space, gas heat, central air conditioning, open loft overlooking dining and living room

SHADOW WOOD

2 and 3 Bedroom Units • $215,000/$249,000 1650 Sq. Ft./2300 Sq. Ft. Livable area. Master Bedroom First Floor, 2 1/2 baths, open loft, 1/2 Car Garage, Covered rear porch and much more!

COMING MID-LATE 2019...WHITE BIRCH VILLAGE 1 Highland Boulevard S • Archbald, PA Ken Powell (570) 536-8082 • PowellDevelopment.com • kpowell531@aol.com 28

M arch 14, 2019

e le c tric c ity

TS_CNG/ADVERTISING/AD_PAGES [ADE28] | 03/13/19

15:05 | BAIRDATHLE

Profile for CNG Newspaper Group

Electric City--03-14-19  

Electric City--03-14-19  

Advertisement