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nomos ……… catalogue april 2009

nomos ……… catalogue april 2009

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auction 2

nomos 2

zürich, 18 may 2010

nomos ag, numismatists

zähringerstrasse 27, postfach 2664, ch-8022 zürich, switzerland telephone +41 44 250 51 80, fax +41 44 250 51 89 info@nomosag.com, www.nomosag.com

03_cover_mey10.indd 6-7

nomos ag, numismatists zürich, switzerland 26.3.2010 18:02:16 Uhr


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nomos ……… auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010


nomos ……… auction 2, zürich

may 2010

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zürich, switzerland

auction 2

zürich, 18 may 2010 greek, roman, early medieval and early modern coins and medals

Widder Hotel

Rennweg 7, 8001 Zürich, Switzerland Tel. + 41 44 224 25 26 www.widderhotel.ch

nomos ag, numismatists

zähringerstrasse 27, postfach 2664, ch-8022 zürich, switzerland telephone +41 44 250 51 80, fax +41 44 250 51 89, mobile +41 79 701 90 96 info@nomosag.com, www.nomosag.com


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nomos ……… auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010


nomos ……… auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

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time table – zeittafel – ordre de vente tuesday, 18 may 2010 9:30 -12:00 lots 1 – 232

viewing – besichtigung – exposition the coins can be viewed mondays through fridays from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m., and at other times by appointment.

the coins can also be viewed online at www.nomosag.com and at

during the auction live online bidding is available at www.the-saleroom.com

Die Auktion erfolgt unter Mitwirkung eines Beamten des Stadtammannamtes Zürich 1. Jede Haftung des anwesenden Beamten, der Gemeinde und des Staates für Handlungen des Auktionators entfällt. © 20

Nomos AG, Zürich


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nomos ……… auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

Versteigerungsbedingungen

Conditions de la vente aux enchères

Die Auktion erfolgt gegen Barzahlung in Schweizer Franken mit einem Aufgeld von 18% auf dem Zuschlagspreis. Für Auslieferungen in der Schweiz erhöht sich der Endpreis (Zuschlagspreis, Aufgeld und Versandspesen) für Silber- und Bronzemünzen, und Medaillen um die MwSt von 7.6%. Im Ausland erhobene Gebühren irgendwelcher Art sind vom Käufer zu bezahlen. Der Gesamtpreis ist nach erfolgtem Zuschalg fällig. Das Eigentumsrecht wird erst mit der vollständigen Bezahlung vom Käufer erworben. Für verspätete Zahlungen wird ein Verzugszins vom 1% pro Monat in Rechnung gestellt. Gebote, die 80% des Schätzpreises unterschreiten, können nicht berücksichtigt werden. Schriftliche Gebote haben den Vorrang. Jeder Ersteigerer verpflichtet sich für die durch ihn gestätigte Er- werbung persönlich haftbar. Er kann nicht geltend machen, für Rechnung Dritter gehandelt zu haben. Der Zuschlag verpflichtet zur Abnahme. Die Beschreibung der Stücke und deren Erhaltungsgrade erfolgt nach bestem Wissen und Gewissen. Die Echtheit der Stücke wird garantiert. Berechtigte Reklamationen werden bis 8 Tage nach Erhalt der Stücke berücksichtigt. Der Versand der ersteigerten Stücke erfolgt nach vollständiger Bezahlung der Rechnung auf Kosten und Risiko des Käufers. Im übrigen kommen die ortsüblichen Gantbedingungen zur Anwendung. Gerichtsstand für alle Verfahren ist Zürich 1. Nur der deutsche Text der Auktionsbedingungen ist rechtsgültig. Durch Abgabe eines mündlichen oder schriftlichen Gebotes werden die vorliegenden Auktionsbedingungen anerkannt.

La vente a lieu au comptant en francs suisses et le prix d’adjudication est augmenté d’une taxe de vente de 18%. En cas de livraison en Suisse, la prix total (prix d’adjudication + taxe de vente et frais d’expédition) est augmenté de la TVA Suisse de 7.6% pour les monnaies en argent et en bronze et les médailles. Les droits et taxes dus à l’étranger sont à la charge de l’acheteur. Le paiement est dû au moment de l’adjudication. Un intérêt de 1% par mois sera facturé pour tout retard. Le transfer de propriété n’est effectif qu’au moment où le prix d’achat est payé intégralement. Les orders écrits de moins de 80% de nos estimations ne seront pas prix en consideration. A prix égal, les offers écrites ont la priorité. Chaque participant à la vente s’oblige pour les achats effectués par lui-même; il ne peut pretender avoir agi pour le compte d’un tiers. L’adjudication oblige irrévocablement l’acheteur. La description et l’état de conservation des pieces sont donnés en bonne foi. L’authenticité des monnaies est garantie. Des reclamations justifiées ne peuvent être prises en consideration que dans les huit jours suivant le remise des monnaies. L’envoi des lots adjugés sera effectué, après paiement, aux frais et risques de l’acheteur. Les conditions locales de mise aux enchères seront appliqués. Le for juridque pour toutes procedures est fixé à Zürich 1. Seul le texte allemand des présentes conditions de vente fait foi. Celui qui donne une enchère orale ou écrite reconnait avoir pris connaissance des conditions de vente ci-dessus.


Conditions of Sale All sales will be made through payment in Swiss Francs, with the addition of a buyer’s premium of 18% on the hammer price. For all lots delivered in Switzerland there is an additional Swiss VAT of 7.6% due on the hammer price and on the buyer’s premium for silver and bronze coins, and for medals. The purchaser is responsible for all taxes and fees due for delivery of lots outside of Switzerland. Payment is due immediately following conclusion of the sale. Full title to purchases is only obtained upon full payment. A charge of 1% per month will be assessed for delayed payments. Bids below 80% of the estimated prices will not be accepted. Written bids take preference over room bids. Buyers are personally responsible for their own purchases and cannot claim to act on the account or instructions of a third party. Adjudication occurs on the fall of the hammer and commits the bidder to acceptance of the lot. The lot descriptions, including the degree of preservation, are opinions and made in good faith. The authenticity of all coins is guaranteed. Justified complaints can only be considered if made within eight days of the auction. Upon receipt of full payment, shipment of lots will be arranged for the purchaser at his expense and risk. In general, the usual conditions applied to auctions held in Zürich apply here. Exclusive jurisdiction for any legal proceedings shall be Zürich 1. Although the Conditions of Sale are provided in English, French and German, only the German text is legally valid. The bidder accepts these conditions of sale by the submission of a bid, whether verbal or written.

nomos ……… auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

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nomos ……… auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

Foreword We at Nomos AG are happy to present our second auction in Zurich. The past year has been an exciting one, with a buoyant market for numismatic material, especially for pieces that are rare, beautiful and in particularly fine condition. Our auction reflects these trends: there are many rarities, many superb pieces, and many coins that can only be described as beautiful. The sale begins with a nice group of Celtic issues, and then moves on to the Greek world, ranging from a small but lovely piece minted in the Provence, in the area of modern Marseilles to coins minted by Greek kings in far off India and Egypt. Some of these are marvels: such as the exceptional Stater from Thebes, bearing a facing head of Dionysos who seems flushed with wine and power, or the tiny, gem-like facing head of Silenos on a Hekte from Phokaia; both of these coins are the best examples known of their type. Others have an unusual, even eerie strangeness, such as the unique Half-stater from an uncertain mint in Caria or Lycia. Among the Roman coins is an astonishingly rare denarius of Geta Caesar with a detailed view of the Temple of Roma in Rome, and a medallion of Constantine I, struck to celebrate the dedication of Constantinople in 330. The sale ends with a small group of great rarities: a unique Byzantine usurper, an extremely rare Islamic dinar minted in Carthage, and two very rare Renaissance gold pieces – from Ferrara and Rhodes. Nomos AG was also honored to have been selected to exhibit at TEFAF 2010, the world’s leading art and antiques fair, held in Maastricht, in The Netherlands. We brought a very fine small group of ancient coins as well as a splendid series of Renaissance and Baroque medals, including many from the Dutch Golden Age. The Fair, which has an exceptionally capable organization backing it, was exciting and very successful, and we are pleased to have sold a good number of pieces to both new and established private collectors, other exhibitors at the fair, and institutions. Lastly, we would like to thank all those, both collectors and institutions, who acquired coins and medals from our third Fixed Price List, which came out in January. It contained some truly stunning examples of numismatic art, and we are happy to say that it was very successful. Dr. Alan S. Walker Nomos AG, www.nomosag.com

Dr. A. Peter Weiss

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nomos ……… auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

Bibliography ACG ACGC ACNAC AMNG AMUGS ANSNNM ANSNS Armand Arnold-Biucchi Ash. Ashton Asyut Azz. Babelon Baldwin Barron Basel Bastien, Buste, Baumgarten Bauten BCD Akarnania BCD Boiotia BCD Euboia BCD Olympia BCD Peloponnesos Belfort Bellinger, Philippi Bérend, l’or Biaggi BMC BMFA Bodenstedt Boerhringer “Katan...” Bopearachchi Boudeau Burlington Exhibition Cahn Calicó Caltabiano

C.M. Kraay, The Aes Coinage of Galba. ANSNNM 133 (1956). C. Kraay. Archaic and Classical Greek Coins (London, 1976). Ancient Coins in North American Collections. American Numismatic Society. New York. Die antiken Münzen Nord-Griechenland (Berlin, 1898–1935). Antike Münzen und Geschnittene Steine. Berlin. American Numismatic Society Numismatic Notes and Monographs. American Numismatic Society. New York. American Numismatic Society Numismatic Studies. American Numismatic Society. New York. A. Armand, Les Médailleurs italiens des quinzième et seizième siècles. Second edition (Paris, 1883) C. Arnold-Biucchi, “The Beginnings of Coinage in the West: Archaic Selinus”, FlorNum. D. M. Metcalf, Coinage of the Crusades and the Latin East in the Ashmolean Museum Oxford. 2nd edition (London, 1995) R. Ashton, “The Coinage of Rhodes 408-c. 190 BC”, Money and its Uses in the Ancient Greek World (Oxford, 2001). M.J. Price & N. Waggoner, Archaic Greek Silver Coinage: The Asyut Hoard (London, 1975). E. Azzopardi, Malta – The History of the Coinage (Valetta, 2004). E. Babelon, Monnaies de la Republique Romaine (Paris, 1885). A. Baldwin, “Lampsakos: The Gold Staters, Silver and Bronze Coinages”, AJN 53 (1924). J.P. Barron, The Silver Coins of Samos (London, 1966). H.A. Cahn et al. Griechischen Münzen aus Grossgriechenland und Sizilien (Basel, 1988). P. Bastien, Le buste monétaire des empereurs romains (Wetteren, 1992). J. G. Baumgarten, Historisch-genealogisch- chronologisch-kritisches Verzeichnis aller bekannten ducatenförmigen Goldmünzen der albertinischen Hauptlinie des uralten sächsischen Hauses (Dresden, 1812). H. Küthmann et al., Bauten Roms auf Münzen und Medaillen (Munich, 1973). Münzen & Medaillen GmbH 23, 18 October 2007. Sammlung BCD. Akarnanien und Aetolien. Triton IX, 10 January 2006, The BCD Collection of the Coinage of Boiotia. Lanz 111, 25 November 2002, Münzen von Euboia: Sammlung BCD. Leu 90, 10 May 2004, Coins of Olympia: The BCD Collection. LHS 96, 8 May 2006, Coins of Peloponnesos:The BCD Collection. A. de Belfort, Description générale des monnaies mérovingiennes (Paris, 1895). A. R. Bellinger, “Philippi in Macedonia”, ANSMN 11 (1964). D. Bérend. “De l’or d’Agathocle”, Studies Price. Privately printed photographic record plates of the collection of Roman gold coins and medallions belonging to L. Biaggi, made in the late 1970s. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, 29 Vols. (London, 1873–1927). H. Mattingly et al., Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum. 6 Vols. (London, 1932–1962). A.B. Brett Catalogue of Greek Coins, Boston Museum of Fine Arts (Boston, 1955). F. Bodenstedt, Die Elektronmünzen von Phokaia und Mytilene (Tübingen, 1981). C. Boehringer, “Kataneische Probleme, Silberne Kleinstmünzen”, Proceedings Berne (1982) O. Bopearachchi, Monnaies Gréco-Bactriennes et Indo-Grecques (Paris, 1991). E. Boudeau, Monnaies Françaises Provinciales. Revised ed. (Maastricht, 1970). Burlington Fine Arts Club. Exhibition of Ancient Art (London, 1904) H.A. Cahn, Die Münzen der sizilischen Stadt Naxos (Basel, 1940). X. Calicó, The Roman Aurei. 2 Vols. (Barcelona, 2003). M.C. Caltabiano, La monetazione di Messana con le emissioni di Rhegion dell’etaa’ della Tirannid (Berlin, 1993).


Carradice CNS Cohen Crawford CRI CSE Dav. De Hirsch De la Tour De Luynes Delmonte Depeyrot Desneux Dewing Divo DOC Domanig Egg ESM Essays Robinson F. Fischer-Bossert Fr. Franke/Marathaki Gallatin Gamberini Grandjean Grunauer Gulbenkian Habich Hendin

nomos ……… auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

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I. Carradice, Coinage and Administration in the Athenian and Persian Empires. British Archaeological Reports 343. (Oxford, 1987). R. Calciati, Corpus Nummorum Siculorum: La Monetazione di Bronzo. 3 Vols. (Mortara, 1983–1987). H. Cohen, Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l’Empire Romain. 8 Vols. (Paris, 1880–1892). M. Crawford, Roman Republican Coinage. 2 Vols. (Cambridge, 1974). D. Sear, The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49–27 BC (London, 1998). A. Houghton, Coins of the Seleucid Empire from the Collection of Arthur Houghton. ACNAC 4. (New York, 1983). J. Davenport, German Talers 1500–1600 (Frankfurt, 1979). P. Naster, La collection Lucien de Hirsch (Bruxelles, 1959). H. de la Tour, Atlas de monnaies Gauloises (Paris, 1892). J. Babelon, Catalogue de la collection de Luynes. 4 vols. (Paris, 1924–1936). A. Delmonte, Le Bénélux d’or (Amsterdam, 1964). G. Depeyrot, Les monnaies d’or. 2 vols. (Wetteren, 1995–1996). J. Desneux, “Les tétradrachmes d’Akanthos”, RBN 95 (1949). L. Mildenberg & S. Hurter, The Dewing Collection of Greek Coins. ACNAC 6. (New York, 1985). J.-P. Divo, Catalogue des médailles de Louis XIV (Zurich, 1982). -, Numismatique de Dombes (Monaco, 2004) A. Bellinger, P. Grierson et al., Catalogue of Byzantine Coins in the Dumbarton Oaks Collection and the Whittemore Collection. 5 Vols. (Washington, D.C., 1966–1999). K. Domanig, Porträtmedaillen des Erzhauses Oesterreich von Kaiser Friedrich III bis Kaiser Franz II (Vienna, 1896). E. Egg, Die Münzen Kaiser Maximilians I (Innsbruck, 1971). E.T. Newell & O. Mørkholm, The Coinage of the Eastern Seleucid Mints from Seleucus I to Antiochus III. Revised second edition. ANSNS 1 (1978). C.M. Kraay & G.K. Jenkins, eds., Essays in Greek Coinage Presented to Stanley Robinson (Oxford, 1968). E. H. Furse, Mémoires numismatiques de l’order souverain de Saint-Jean de Jérusalem (Rome, 1885). W. Fischer-Bossert, Chronologie Der Didrachmenprägung von Tarent 510–280 v.Chr. (Berlin, 1999). A. L. and I. S. Friedberg, Gold Coins of the World. 7th edition (Clifton, N.J., 2003). P. R. Franke and I. Marathaki, Wine and Coins in Ancient Greece (Athens, 1999). A. Gallatin, Syracusan Dekadrachms of the Euainetos Type (Cambridge, MA., 1930). C. Gamberini de Scarfea, Le imitazione e le contraffazioni monetary nel Mondo. Parte Terza (Bologna, 1956) -, Prontuario prezzario delle monete, oselle e bolle di Venezia (Bologna, 1969). C. Grandjean, Les Messéniens de 370/369 au 1er siècle de notre èr: Monnayages et histoire (Paris, 2003). S. Grunauer von Hoerschelmann, Die Münzprägung der Lakedaimonier. AMUGS VII. (Berlin, 1978). E.S.G. Robinson, et al., A Catalogue of the Calouste Gulbenkian Collection of Greek Coins. 2 Parts. (Lisbon, 1971, 1990). G. Habich, Die deutschen Schaumünzen des XVI. Jahrhunderts (Munich, 1929–1934). D. Hendin, Guide to Biblical Coins. 4th edition. (New York, 2001).


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nomos ……… auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

Herzfelder Hill HN III Holloway Holloway & Jenkins Holt Houghton, Double Hunterian IGCH Ives Jameson Jenkins Jenkins & Lewis Jones Keilitz & Kohl KF KMW Kraay/Hirmer Kress Lacam Lanna Lanz Le Rider Locker-Lampson May, Abdera May, Ainos, May, Damastion McClean MEC Merserberger Milbank MIRB Montenuovo Moser & Tursky NC Nicolet-Pierre Nicolet & Oeconomides Noe, Mende

H. Herzfelder, Les monnaies d’argent de Rhegium (Paris, 1957). P.V. Hill, The Monuments of Ancient Rome as Coin Types (London, 1989). -, The Undated Coins of Rome A.D. 98–148 (London, 1970). N.K. Rutter, ed. Historia Numorum. Third edition. Italy. (London, 2001). R. R. Holloway, “The Crown of Naxos“, ANSMN 10 (1962). R.R. Holloway & G.K. Jenkins, Terina (Bellinzona, 1983). F. Holt, Thundering Zeus: The Making of Hellenistic Bactria (Berkeley, 1999). A. Houghton, “The Double Portrait Coins of Alexander I Balas and Cleopatra Thea”, SNR 67 (1988). G. MacDonald, Catalogue of Greek Coins in the Hunterian Museum, Glasgow. 3 Vols. (Glasgow, 1899–1905). O. Mørkholm & M. Thompson, eds., An Inventory of Greek Coin Hoards (New York, 1973). H.E. Ives and P. Grierson, The Venetian Gold Ducat and its Imitations. ANSNNM 128 (1954). R. Jameson, Collection R. Jameson. Monnaies grecques antiques. 4 Vols. (Paris, 1913–1932). G.K. Jenkins, The Coinage of Gela (Berlin, 1970). G.K. Jenkins & R.B. Lewis, Carthaginian Gold and Electrum Coins (London, 1963). M. Jones, A Catalogue of the French Medals in the British Museum (London, 1988). C. Keilitz & C. Kohl, Talerteilstücke des Kurfürstentums Sachsen: Ernestinische Linie 1500–1547 (Leipzig, 1996). Bank Leu & Münzen und Medaillen, 28 May 1974, Griechische Münzen aus der Sammlung eines Kunstfreundes. G. Dembski, Münzen der Kelten. Sammlungskataloge des Kunsthistorischen Museums. Band 1. (Vienna, 1998). C. Kraay & M. Hirmer, Greek Coins (New York 1966). G.F. Hill & G. Pollard, Renaissance Medals from the Samuel H. Kress Collection (London, 1967). G. Lacam, La fin de L’Empire Romain et le monnayage or en Italie (Lucerne, 1983). Lepke, Berlin, 16 May 1911, Sammlung Adalbert von Lanna. M. Kostial, Kelten im Osten. Gold und Silber der Kelten in Mittel und Osteuropa. Sammlung Lanz (München, 1997). G. Le Rider, Le monnayage d’argent et d’or de Philippe II (Paris, 1977). E.S.G. Robinson, Catalogue of Ancient Greek coins Collected by Godfrey Locker Lampson (London, 1923). J.M.F. May, The Coinage of Abdera, 540–345 BC. (London, 1966). -, Ainos, Its History and Coinage (London, 1950). --, The Coinage of Damastion (London, 1939). S. Grose, Catalogue of the McClean Collection, Fitzwilliam Museum. 3 Vols. (Cambridge, 1923– 1929). P. Grierson & M. Blackburn, Medieval European Coinage. Vol. I (Cambridge, 1986). Sammlung O. Merserberger, Münzen und Medaillen von Sachsen. FPL, Zschiesche und Köder (Leipzig, 1894). S.R. Milbank, The Coinage of Aegina. ANSNNM 24 (1924). W. Hahn, Moneta Imperii Romani-Byzantinii (Vienna, 1989). Sammlung Montenuovo. Oesterreichische Medaillen. FPL Hess, Frankfurt, 1895. H. Moser & H. Tursky, Die Münzstätte Hall in Tyrol (Innsbruck, 1977). The Numismatic Chronicle. Royal Numismatic Society. London. 1838–. H. Nicolet-Pierre, “Naxos (Cyclades) archaique : monnaie et histoire. La frappe des “canthares”, de la fin du VIe siècle”, QT 1997. - & M. Oeconomides, “La circulation monétaire dans le Péloponnèse et la trésor de Zakynthos”, QT 1991. S. Noe, The Mende (Kaliandra) Hoard, ANSNNM 27 (1926).


Nomisma North Paolucci PCG Pegasi Picard Pink Poey d’Avant Price Randazzo Raymond RBN Regling RIC Rizzo Robinson & Clement Rosen RPC RSC Rutter S. SC SCBC Schembri Scher Schlumberger Schnee Schönert-Geiss Schulten Selinus Hoard Seltman, Seltman, Sheedy Simonetta Smolderen SNG Alpha Bank SNG ANS SNG Ashmolean SNG Copenhagen SNG Delepierre SNG France SNG Kayhan

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H. von Fritze & H. Gaebler, eds., Nomisma-Untersuchung auf dem Gebiete der Antiken Münzkunde (Berlin, 1907–1923). J.J. North, English Hammered Coinage (London 1963, 1975). R. Paolucci, e monete dei dogi di venezia (Padua, 1990). G. K. Jenkins, A Guide to the Principal Coins of the Greeks (London, 1959). R. Calciati. Pegasi (Mortara, 1990). O. Picard, Chalcis et la Confédération Eubéenne (Paris, 1979). K. Pink, “Der Aufbau der Römischen münzprägung in der Kaiserzeit: VI/1. Probus”, NZ 73 (1949). F. Poey d’Avant, Monnaies Féodales de France (Paris, 1858). M.J. Price, The Coinage in the Name of Alexander the Great and Philip Arrhidaeus (London, 1991). C. Arnold-Biucchi, The Randazzo Hoard. ANSNS 18 (1990). D. Raymond, Macedonian Regal Coinages. ANSNNM 126 (1953). Revue belge de numismatique et de sigillographie. Société Royale de Numismatique de Belgique. (Brussels, 1875–). K. Regling, Terina (Berlin, 1906). H. Mattingly, et al., The Roman Imperial Coinage. 10 Vols. (London, 1923–2008). G. Rizzo, Monete greche della Sicilia (Rome, 1945). D.M. Robinson & P.A. Clement, The Chalcidic Mint and the Excavation Coins found in 1928– 1934. Excavations at Olynthus IX. (Baltimore, 1938). N. Waggoner, Early Greek Coins from the Collection of Jonathan P. Rosen. ACNAC 5. (New York, 1983). A. Burnett, et al., Roman Provincial Coinage (London, Paris, 1992–). D. Sear, et al., Roman Silver Coins. 5 Vols. (London, 1978–1987). N.K. Rutter, Campanian Coinages 475–380 BC (Edinburgh, 1979). D. Sear, et al., Byzantine Coins and Their Values. 2nd edition. (London, 1987). A. Houghton & C. Lorber, Seleucid Coins: A Comprehensive Catalog (Lancaster, PA., 2002–2008). Spink. Standard Catalogue of British Coins (London, issued annually). H.C. Schembri, Coins and Medals of the Knights of Malta (London, 1910). S. K. Scher, ed., The Currency of Fame (New York, 1994). G. Schlumberger, Numismatique de l’Orient Latin (Paris, 1878). G. Schnee, Sächsische Taler 1500–1800 (Frankfurt 1982). E. Schönert-Geiss, Die Münzprägung von Maroneia (Berlin, 1987). W. Schulten, Deutsche Münzen aus der Zeit Karls V. (Frankfurt, 1974). C. Arnold-Biucchi, et al., “A Greek Archaic Silver Hoard from Selinus”, MN 33 (1988). C.T. Seltman, “The Engravers of the Akragantine Decadrachms”, NC 1948. -, The Temple Coins of Olympia (Cambridge, 1921). K. A. Sheedy, The Archaic and Early Classical Coinages of the Cyclades (London, 2006). B. Simonetta, The Coins of the Cappadocian Kings (Fribourg, 1977). Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece II. The Alpha Bank Collection. Macedonia I: Alexander I - Perseus (Athens, 2000). -, American Numismatic Society (New York, 1969–). -, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford (London, 1962–69). -, Danish National Museum (Copenhagen, 1942–1979). -, Collection Delepierre, Bibliothèque National (Paris, 1983). -, Cabinet des Médailles, Bibliothèque Nationale (Paris, 1993–). -, Turkey 1: The Muharrem Kayhan Collection (Istanbul, 2002).


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SNG Keckman SNG Levante SNG Lloyd SNG Lockett SNG Spaer SNG von Aulock SNR SPNO Sutherland Svoronos Sydenham Thompson, Abydos Thompson Philip Traité Travaux Le Rider Tudeer Vagi Van Loon Vismara Vlasto Vlasto, Alexander Von Fritze Ward Wartenberg WCN Weber Weidauer West Westermark Williams WSM Zervos

nomos ……… auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

-, Finland; The Erkki Keckman Collection (Helsinki, 1994). -, Switzerland; E Levante – Cilicia (Berne, 1986). -, Lloyd Collection (London, 1933–1937). -, Lockett Collection (London, 1938–1949). -, Israel I, The Arnold Spaer Collection of Seleucid Coins (Jerusalem, 1998). -, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock (Berlin, 1957–1968). Schweizerische numismatische Rundschau. Swiss Numismatic Society. (Bern, 1891–). Studia Paulo Naster Oblata I: Numismatica Antiqua. (Louvain, 1982). C.H.V. Sutherland, et al., The Cistophori of Augustus (London, 1970). J. Svoronos, L’hellénisme primitif de la Macédoine, prouvé par la numismatique et l’or du Pangée (Paris and Athens, 1919). -, Numismatique de la Crète ancienne (Paris, 1890). -. Ta Nomismata tou Kratous ton Ptolemaion (Athens, 1904–08). E. Sydenham, The Coinage of the Roman Republic (London, 1952). M. Thompson, Alexander’s Drachm Mints II: Lampsacus and Abydus. ANSNS 19 (1991). -, “Posthumous Philip II Staters of Asia Minor”, SPNO. E. Babelon, Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines (Paris, 1901–1932). M. Amandry & S. Hurter, eds. Travaux de Numismatique Grecque offerts a Georges Le Rider (London, 1999). L.O. Tudeer, Die Tetradrachmenprägung von Syrakus in der Periode der Signierenden Künstler (Berlin, 1913). D. Vagi, Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. 2 Vols. (Sidney, Ohio, 1999). G. van Loon, Histoire métallique des XVII provinces des Pays-Bas depuis l’abdication de CharlesQuint jusqu’à la paix de Bade en MDCCXVI (The Hague, 1732–1737). N. Vismara, Monetazione Arcaica della Lycia. 3 Vols. (Milan, 1989–1996). O. Ravel, The Collection of Tarentine Coins Formed by M.P. Vlasto (London, 1947). M.P. Vlasto, “Alexander, son of Neoptolemos, of Epirus”, NC 1926. H. Von Fritze, “Die Elektronprägung von Kyzikus,” Nomisma VII (1912). J. Ward and G.F. Hill, Greek Coins and Their Parent Cities (London, 1902). U. Wartenberg, “The Alexander-Eagle Hoard: Thessaly 1992”, NC 1997. D.W. MacDowell, The Western Coinages of Nero. ANSNNM 161 (New York, 1979). L. Forrer, The Weber Collection of Greek Coins. 3 Vols. (London, 1922–1929). L. Weidauer, Probleme de Frühen Elektronprägung (Fribourg, 1975). A.B. West, Fifth and Fourth Century Gold Coins from the Thracian Coast. ANSNNM 40 (1929). U. Westermark, “Himera. The Coins of Akragantine Type. 2.”Travaux Le Rider. R.T. Williams, The Confederate Coinage of the Arcadians in the Fifth Century BC. ANSNNM 155 (1965). -, Silver Coinage of Velia (London, 1992). E.T. Newell & O. Mørkholm, The Coinage of the Western Seleucid Mints from Seleucus I to Antiochus III. Revised reprint. ANSNS 4 (1977). O. Zervos, “The Early Tetradrachms of Ptolemy I”, MN 13 (1967).


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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, z端rich 18 may 2010

COINS OF THE CELTS BRITAIN

1

1.

Corieltauvi. Volisios Dumnocoveros. Circa AD 20-35. Stater (Gold, 5.22 g). VOLI / SIoS Vertical wreath (a deconstructed laureate head of Apollo!). Rev. DVMNOCOVE[ROS] Celticized horse to left with three pellets below its head. BMC 3330. SCBC 416. Van Arsdell 978. Toned and attractive. Minor flan crack, otherwise, extremely fine. 3000

3:1

2

2.

Trinovantes & Catuvellauni. Addedomaros. Circa 40-30 BC. Stater (Gold, 5.72 g). Crossed wreaths with two crescents back to back at the center. Rev. Traces of ADDEDIIDOM Horse rushing to right; below, pellet and wheel; above pellet within circle; to right, a pellet. SCBC 200. Van Arsdell 1605-1. Rare. Beautifully toned and very well struck, good extremely fine. 2800

3:1

3

3.

Trinovantes & Catuvellauni. Addedomaros. Circa 40-30 BC. Quarter stater (Gold, 1.36 g), First coinage. Rosette of seven petals with pellet at the center and seven pellets around. Rev. Celticized horse galloping to right; around, pellet-in-annulets. SCBC 203. Van Arsdell 1608-1. Lightly toned, well-centered and attractive. Good extremely fine. 1500

3:1

17


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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

4

3:1

4.

Trinovantes & Catuvellauni. Addedomaros. Circa 40-30 BC. Quarter Stater (Gold, 1.37 g), Second coinage. Star-shaped floral design with a pellet in an annulet at the center. Rev. Celticized horse to right, pellet in annulet on his shoulder; around, circular filling ornaments. SCBC 204. Van Arsdell 1623-1. Lightly toned and unusually nice. Good extremely fine. 1500

5

5.

Trinovantes & Catuvellauni. Cunobelin. Circa AD 10-43. Stater (Gold, 5.38 g 10), First issue. CAMVL Inscription on a central panel in a thunderbolt design (the deconstructed remains of a laureate head of Apollo!). Rev. [CV]NO Two horses galloping to left (the deconstructed remains of a biga) with a leaf above and a ‘wheel’ below. BMC 18361836A. SCBC 293. Van Arsdell 1913 . Beautifully toned and unusually nice. Reverse struck slightly off center, otherwise, extremely fine. 4000 3:1

6

6.

3:1

Trinovantes & Catuvellauni. Cunobelin. Circa AD 10-43. Quarter Stater (Gold, 1.40 g 10), First issue, Camulodunum. CAMVL Inscription on a central panel in a thunderbolt design (the deconstructed remains of a laureate head of Apollo!). Rev. CVNO Two horses galloping to left (the deconstructed remains of a biga) with a leaf above and a ‘wheel’ below. SCBC 290. Van Arsdell 1913-1. Rare. Nicely toned. Reverse slightly off center, otherwise, good very fine. 1500


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

CENTRAL EUROPE AND THE BALKANS

7

7.

Bellovaci. Stater (Gold, 6.04 g 11), Circa 55-30 BC. Abstracted face to right, with huge eye above and a radiant sun to left. Rev. Horned horse galloping to right; above and below, radiant sun. D&T 271. De la Tour 7235. Scheers 25, Classe II. Struck in a light, yellowish gold with a beautifully centered reverse. Nearly extremely fine. 4500 3:1

8

8.

Sequani or Helvetii. Late 2nd - first quarter of the 1st century BC. Quarter stater (Gold, 1.81 g 6). Male head to right with hair in confused locks; below neck, leaf; around, border of closed crescents. Rev. Remains of a biga to left, but devolved into a single horse with a driver seemingly flying left above and a wheel with remains of a chariot car to right; to left, uncertain creature (perhaps a bird) standing right; below, crescent with rays within it above simple thunderbolt. De la Tour 8928 = DT 3077 (and DT 3078 for the distinctive style of the obverse). Extremely rare. Has been rounded for mounting, otherwise, about very fine. 2000

2:1

This is an extraordinary item, which presumably only survived from ancient times thanks to having once been part of a piece of jewelry. The head, which is based on that of Apollo but has no trace of a laurel wreath in his hair (though there is a leaf under his neck) is surrounded by a most unusual border of closed crescents, only found on the so-called Crainvilliers au croissant type of gold pieces (full and quarter staters), which come from eastern France on the border with the territory of the Helvetii.

9

9.

Geto-Dacians. 1st century BC. Denarius (Silver, 4.80 g 9), an imitation of the issues of C. Norbanus, minted in BC 83. ΛEX VXΛIVΛ Diademed head of Venus to right. Rev. Corn ear, fasces with ax and caduceus. A remarkable piece, heavy and unusually well struck and preserved. Extremely fine. 850 The Balkan peoples seem to have had a particular fondness for the denarii of the Roman Republic. Not only were large numbers of those coins shipped there for use in antiquity, but the local peoples, the Geto-Dacians, made large numbers of imitations as well. These coins were usually of good silver, so we should not think of them as forgeries, but, rather, as supplementary issues produced due to their great popularity.

2:1

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

COINS OF THE GREEKS GAUL

10

10. 3:1

Massalia or an uncertain mint in the Provence. Circa 525/0-480/70 BC. Obol (Silver, 1.14 g). Head of a goddess to right, with long hair shown by dots, frontal almond-shaped eye and round earring. Rev. Irregular incuse square. Furtwängler Pl. 41, 11. G. E. Reynaud, Un trésor de monnaies Massaliètes du Ve siècle, RN 1983, p. 36, 4 = pl. VI, 4 (same obverse die). Very rare. A startlingly fine provincial archaic head, reminiscent of the issues of Knidos. Minor marks, but toned, and, extremely fine. 2500 Reynaud published a photographic record of a then recent hoard of Massaliote material that appeared on the Paris market, which contained a few pieces very much like this one. To this was joined a short but very erudite commentary by Mme Nicolet, in which she makes a good case for identifying the head on the obverse as that of Aphrodite rather than Artemis, as suggested by Furtwängler (pp. 38-39); she is undoubtedly right.

ETRURIA

11

11. 3:1

Populonia. Circa 380-350 BC. 50 Asses (Gold, 2.75 g). Lion’s head to right with open jaws and extended tongue; below Etruscan numeral for 50. Rev. Blank. AMB 8 (same dies). HN III 127. SNG ANS 1. Vecchi I 46 (same dies) . A well struck and attractive example. Good extremely fine. 10,000 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection, ex Numismatica Ars Classica 29, 11 May 2005, 3.

CALABRIA

12

12.

3:1

Tarentum. Circa 470-465 BC. Stater (Silver, 7.41 g 11). Phalanthos, nude, riding dolphin to left, both arms outstretched; below, scallop. Rev. Head of Apollo to left, his short hair bound with a taenia; all within linear circle. Fischer-Bossert 96 e (this coin, illustrated on pl.6). HN III 838. Jameson 91. Vlasto 145 var. Rare. Of splendid style with a fine, youthful head of Apollo. Good very fine. 4500 Ex Leu 83, 6 May 2002, 5 and Numismatica Ars Classica 9, 16 April, 1996.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

13

13.

-. Circa 302 BC. Stater (Silver, 7.94 g 11). Youthful nude jockey riding horse walking to right, holding the reins with his left hand and crowning himself with his right; below, ΣΑ above Ionic column capital. Rev. ΤΑΡΑΣ Phalanthos riding dolphin to left, holding snake in his outstretched right hand and whip in his left; below, ΚΟΝ. Fischer-Bossert 958. HN III 942. Nicely toned, attractive and well struck. Extremely fine. 2000

3:1

LUCANIA

14

14.

Herakleia. Circa 281-278 BC. Drachm (Silver, 3.81 g 8). Three-quarter facing head of Athena, turned slightly to right, wearing triple crested helmet adorned with Skylla; to left, ΦΙ. Rev. ΗΡΑΚΛΕΙΩΝ Owl standing right on olive branch, head facing front; to right, club; to left, ΣΩΣΙ . HN III 1411. Van Keuren 114. Well centered and pleasing. Good very fine. 750

2:1

Ex Triton V, 15 January 2002, 1089.

15

15.

Sybaris. Circa 550-510 BC. Stater (Silver, 7.91 g 12). VM Bull standing to left on dotted ground line, head turned back to right; border of dots. Rev. Bull standing to right, on dotted ground line; around, border of dots; all incuse. HN III 1729. SNG ANS 834 ff. Nicely toned and sharply struck. Minor metal faults on the reverse, otherwise, extremely fine. 5000 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection, ex UBS 63, 6 September 2005, 39.

2:1

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

BRUTTIUM

16

16. 2:1

Rhegion. Circa 450-445 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 17.16 g 11). Lion’s mask facing. Rev. RECI NOS (partially retrograde) Iokastos seated left on backless stool, holding long scepter in his right hand; all within olive wreath. Herzfelder 3 (obverse) and 2bis (reverse). HN III 2477. Toned and with a bold obverse in high relief. Good very fine. 5500 Acquired from E. J. Waddell in 2003.

SICILY

17

17.

2:1

Akragas. Tetradrachm (Silver, 17.13 g 9), circa 414-413 BC. ΑΚΡΑΓ Two eagles perching right on the body of a dead hare; the nearer, with closed wings, raises his head and screams in triumph; the further, with spread wings, bends his head down to tear at the prey. Rev. ΑΚΡΑΓΑΝΤΙΝΟΝ Crab with open claws seen from above; below, the monster Skylla swimming to left, her right hand raised to shade her eyes (the so-called aposkopein gesture) and her left trailing behind her; at her waist, between her human torso and her fish tail, the foreparts of two hunting dogs. Basel 258 = Kraay / Hirmer 175 (same dies). Gulbenkian 166 (same dies). Jameson 509 (same dies). Rizzo pl. I, 20 (same dies). SNG Lloyd 821 (same dies, and with similar flan faults). Very rare. One of the great masterpieces of the late fifth century coinage of Sicily. Lightly toned. Some minor flan breaks, as with the coin in the Lloyd collection, and a few minor traces of corrosion, otherwise, extremely fine. 200,000

Ex The New York Sale XIV, 10 January 2007, 26 and Sternberg XXXII, 28 October 1996, 6. During the last quarter of the 5th century BC the great cities of Sicily produced some of the most beautiful and beautifully designed coins ever minted. The wealthy aristocrats who ruled those cities - Akragas, Gela, Kamarina, Katane, Syracuse, et al. - competed with each other in the horse races that were their great passion, but also in the quality and elegance of the coinages they financed. No other part of the Greek world produced so many numismatic masterpieces in such a short period of time. This tetradrachm from Akragas, known in about a dozen examples, is superb in every way: the eagles are rendered in an impressively lifelike manner, while the figure of Skylla on the reverse is particularly elegant. It has been suggested that she appears here to commemorate the defeat of the Athenian invasion of 415-413 and this seems likely, though it is also probably a reference to Akragas’s own increasing late 5th century commercial and naval power. The city’s wealth was not enough to protect it from the Carthaginians, however: they stormed and sacked Akragas in 406 BC, a disaster from which it never fully recovered.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

18

18.

Entella. Punic issues. Circa 345/38-320/15 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 16.68 g 12). Head of Tanit-Persephone to right, wearing wreath of grain leaves, triple-pendant earring and pearl necklace; around, four dolphins, three swimming right and one swimming downwards to left. Rev. Horse prancing right before palm tree. BMFA 492. Jenkins, Punic 132 (O44/R119). SNG Copenhagen 82. SNG Lloyd 1615. SNG Lockett 1038. Some minor marks underneath lovely old toning. Extremely fine. 15,000

2:1

From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection, ex Nomos AG, FPL 1, Winter-Spring 2008, 6. Coins of this type had been attributed to an uncertain military mint, but they have been recently localized in Entella by I. Lee in NC 2000. Whether this theory will hold remains to be seen.

19

19.

"RSMLQRT". Circa 340-320 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 16.90 g 12), Kephaloidion (?, or a mint moving with the Carthaginian army in Sicily). Charioteer, holding the reins with his left hand and a goad in his right, driving quadriga galloping to left; above, Nike flying right to crown the driver. Rev. Head of Tanit to left, wearing wreath of grain leaves, triple pendant earring and pearl necklace; around, two dolphins swimming upwards to left and one swimming downwards to right. Jenkins, Punic I, p.67, 55 (this coin cited). SNG Lockett 742 . Of particularly fine style, nicely toned and very sharply struck. Flan crack, and with both sides slightly double struck, otherwise, extremely fine. 7500 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection, ex Hess-Divo 307, 7 June 2007, 1104 and Monnaies et Médailles 54, 26 October 1978, 144, from the collection of C. Gillet, Monnaies et Médailles 43, 12 November 1970, 60, ex Hess, Lucerne, 7 March 1935, 251, Hess 209, 12 April 1932, 15, 202, 28 October 1930, 2268, from the collection of H. Vogel, II, Hess 194, 25 March 1929, 131, ex J. Hirsch 34, 5 May 1914, 152, and from the collection of G. de Ciccio, Sambon & Canessa, 19 December 1907, 488 . This is one of those wonderful coins that goes back in collectors’ hands well into the 19th century! Even without the lovely toning, the traces of sealing wax in the flan cracks show that molds for plaster casts were made from it, either for study purposes or for the plates that illustrated this coin in so many fine auctions. The fact that it was owned by G. de Ciccio and Charles Gillet, both well-known for their appreciation of style, gives this coin a special cachet.

2:1

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

20

20.

Leontinoi. Circa 430-425 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 17.08 g 1). Laureate head of Apollo to left. Rev. ΛΕΟΝΤΙΝΟΝ Head of a lion with open jaws to left; around, three barley grains and, behind the head, a laurel leaf. Basel 353. Boehringer, Münzgeschichte 55. Rizzo pl. XXIV, 4. SNG ANS 257. An attractive example of fine style. Some traces of corrosion, especially on the reverse, otherwise, extremely fine. 2500

2:1

21 2:1

21.

Messana. 425-421 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 17.23 g 6). Charioteer driving biga of mules walking to right; in exergue, olive leaf with fruit. Rev. ΜΕΣΣΑΝΙΟΝ Hare springing to right; below, fly to right. Caltabiano; 480 (D196/R191). SNG ANS 376. Nicely toned. Good very fine. 3500 Ex Triton V, 15 January 2002, 1189.

2:1 22

22.

-. 420-413 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 17.49 g 8). ΜΕΣΣΑΝΑ (retrograde) The Nymph Messana, wearing long chiton and holding whip and reins with both hands, driving biga of mules to right; in exergue, two opposed dolphins. Rev. ΜΕΣΣΑΝΙΟΝ Hare springing to right; below, dolphin swimming to right. Caltabiano 534. A bold, fresh, beautifully struck example. Lightly toned, good extremely fine. 6750


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

23 2:1

23.

-. 412-408 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 17.26 g 10). The Nymph Messana, wearing long chiton and holding goad and reins, driving mule-drawn biga to left; above, Nike flying right to crown her; in exergue, two opposed dolphins. Rev. ΜΕΣΣΑΝΙΩΝ Hare springing left above ear of grain; above, eagle flying left. Caltabiano 622. Schefold, Meisterwerke griechischer Kunst, 479. SNG Lockett 831. A sharp and attractive coin. Lightly toned , good extremely fine. 7500

24

24.

Syracuse. Under the Deinomenids . 485-466 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 16.97 g 1), struck circa 485-483. Male charioteer, wearing a long chiton and holding a goad in his right hand and the reins in both, driving a walking quadriga to right; above Nike flying right to crown the horses. Rev. ΣVRΑΚΟΣΙΟΝ Head of Arethusa to right, wearing necklace and pearl diadem, and with her hair tied in a krobylos that is bound up and falls over her diadem; around, four dolphins swimming clockwise. Boehringer 45. Rizzo pl. XXXIV, 22 var. Very rare. Attractively toned and of fine late archaic style. About extremely fine. 10,000 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection, ex LHS 202, 29 April 2008, 78, Leu 81, 16 May 2001, 101, from the collections of N. B. Hunt, II, Sotheby’s 21 June 1990, 246 and of C. Gillet, ex Ars Classica XVI, 3 July 1933, 651.

2:1

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

25

25.

Syracuse. Under the Deinomenids. 485-466 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 17.49 g 6), struck circa 480/478-475. Male charioteer, wearing a long chiton and holding a goad in his right hand and the reins in both, driving a walking quadriga to right; above Nike flying right to crown the horses. Rev. ΣVRΑΚΟΣΙΟΝ Head of Arethusa to right, wearing necklace and pearl diadem, and with her hair hanging down the back of her neck and tied at the end; around, four dolphins swimming clockwise. Boehringer - (this combination of dies not listed, though the dies are known: V 85/R 132). SNG ANS 71 var. A finely toned and attractive coin with an unusually small and delicate head of Arethusa. Minor die break on the obverse, extremely fine. 10,000 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection.

3:1

Boehringer’s great corpus was written in 1925 as his doctoral dissertation and was expanded in the interval before its publication in 1929: during that time he was able to see many coins that he had hitherto known only from casts. The list of people he thanks on pp. v-vi includes all the great collectors and scholars (often one and the same) of the day. The cooperation he received was exemplary. In the intervening eighty years the great worth of Boehringer’s masterwork on Syracuse has been proven again and again: his chronology has been modified, and a few new dies and die combinations have appeared, but the general structure he established for the coinage is still fully valid (among the 308 tetradrachms in the great Randazzo hoard, there were only 3 obverse and 8 reverse dies unknown to Boehringer, as well as 25 new combinations - including those with the new dies). The present example provides us with yet another new link: between obverse V 85 (hitherto only known combined with a single reverse - R 129) and reverse R 132 (hitherto known combined with V87 and V 94).

26

26.

-. Second Democracy. 466-405 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 17.31 g 11), struck circa 430-420. Male charioteer, wearing a long chiton and holding a goad in his right hand and the reins in both, driving a walking quadriga to right; above, Nike flying right to crown the horses; in exergue, olive branch. Rev. ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΟΝ Head of Arethusa to right, wearing a double spiral earring and a simple necklace, and with her hair bound in a sakkos ornamented with a patterned band over her forehead; before Arethusa’s head, two dolphins swimming downwards and two swimming upwards. Boehringer 652 (V330/R447). Lightly toned and with an unusually beautiful head on the reverse. Obverse lightly struck, otherwise, extremely fine. 7500 3:1

From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection. During the 420s the Syracusan engravers began showing Arethusa wearing a sakkos, or ornamental net, over her hair; this must have reflected contemporary fashions. Some of the dies are really quite beautiful but others have a ‘hardness’ about them that makes Arethusa look somewhat severe and unpleasant. This die, however, shows us a young woman with a hint of a smile who looks as if she is intelligent, attractive and rather kind. Here we have a real person, not an abstract goddess: she was someone the die cutter knew.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

27

27.

-. Second Democracy. 466-405 BC. Dilitron (Gold, 1.86 g 11), signed by the engraver Im..., struck circa 406. ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΩΝ Head of Athena to left, wearing crested Attic helmet ornamented with a coiled serpent and a palmette; below neck, engraver's initials; to left, fillet bearing the name of the Syrakusans. Rev. Facing head of the Medusa, with tongue outstretched, at the center of an aegis ornamented with coiling snakes. C. Boehringer, “Zu Finanzpolitik und Münzprägung des Dionysios von Syrakus,” Essays Thompson, pl. 38, 12. Extremely rare, the best of three known examples. A lovely coin of superb style. Traces of die rust on the obverse, otherwise, good extremely fine. 22,500

3:1

This lovely gold coin was struck just at the end of the 5th century, when all Sicily was going through the crisis caused by the Carthaginian invasion. Akragas had probably already fallen when this coin was struck and Dionysios I was just coming to power in Syracuse - he soon authorized a much more extensive coinage of gold for military use. The dies for this coin were engraved by the artist Im..., (or perhaps Mi...) who also signed a tetradrachm die (Tudeer 67: for the beautiful but worn example in the British Museum, see Kraay /Hirmer 113).

28

28.

-. Late Third Democracy or early in the reign of Agathocles . Drachm (Silver, 4.12 g 2), struck circa 317/316. ΣΥΡΑΚΟΣΙΩΝ Laureate head of the youthful Ares to left; behind, Palladion. Rev. Triskeles of three human legs with winged feet; at the center, gorgoneion. Basel 503. BMC 353. Jameson 864 = KF 229 (this coin). Giesecke, Sicilia Numismatica pl. 19, 13 (same dies). Extremely rare, one of perhaps five known examples. Toned and of superb style. Very fine. 9000 From the collections of A. Moretti, Triton II, 1 December 1998, 261, C. Gillet ( ‘ Kunstfreund ’ ), Bank Leu/Münzen und Medaillen, 28 May 1974, 229, R. Jameson 864 and Sir Arthur J. Evans. One of the great rarities of the Syracusan series, only a collector like A. Moretti is ever likely to have owned two of them! There is a great controversy over whether these drachms were issued at the very end of the Third Democracy in Syracuse, or at the beginning of the rule of Agathocles, perhaps when he was just starting to consolidate his power. In fact, the triskeles was a favorite symbol of Agathocles since it recalled the mythological name for Sicily, Trinakria; he used it as an emblem of his power over the island. The five known examples of this type are: 1) the present piece, ex Moretti, Jameson and Evans; 2) Giesecke, Sicilia Numismatica pl. 19, 13 = Hirsch XVI (1906), 311; 3) BMC 353; 4) NAC 13, 503 - ex Moretti; and 5) Imhoof-Blumer, MG p. 32, 73. These five coins were apparently struck using at least two pairs of dies: 1 and 2 were struck from one set (though this was not realized by the erudite cataloguer of the KF sale due to the poor condition of the Giesecke example - corroded and with a serious flan crack), and the BM and second Moretti piece in NAC 13 from another (the piece published by Imhoof-Blumer remains to be examined). In many ways it is the most enigmatic of all Syracusan issues.

3:1

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

29

29.

2:1

-. Agathokles. 317-289 BC. Dekadrachm (Gold, 4.29 g 7), circa 317-310. Laureate head of Apollo to right; behind, ear of barley. Rev. ΣΥΡΑ ΚΟΣΙΩΝ Charioteer, holding reins in his left hand and goad in his right, driving biga galloping to right; below, triskeles running to right. Dewing 934. Jameson 858. SNG ANS 552. SNG Lockett 1000. SNG Munich 1190 (but on all of these the triskeles runs to left). A rare variant, with a fine head of Apollo. Extremely fine. 7500 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection.

NORTH AFRICA – ZEUGITANIA

30

30.

Carthage. Circa 350-320 BC. Stater (Gold, 9.30 g 9). Head of Tanit to left, wearing grain wreath, triple-pendant earring and necklace, tied at the back, with seven pendants. Rev. Horse standing right; on ground line, three pellets. Jenkins & Lewis Group IIIi, 111-4. MAA 4. An attractive, bold example. Good extremely fine. 10,000 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection, ex Triton X, 9 January 2007, 106. 2:1

CIMMERIAN BOSPOROS

31

31.

Pantikapaion. Circa 340-325 BC. Stater (Gold, 9.09 g 2). Head of a satyr to left, wearing ivy wreath. Rev. ΠΑΝ Griffin prancing to left, his head facing with a spear in his jaws, his right forepaw raised and with his left on a grain ear. MacDonald 54. SNG BM Black Sea 867. Some scattered marks and scratches, otherwise, good very fine. 30,000

3:1

The gold issues of Pantikapaion are a fascinating series, even a romantic one. The city was where the gold from the steppes in the East reached the Greek world, but mystery shrouded its origins. It was said to be hoarded by griffins from which it was stolen by intrepid adventurers. In fact, the gold came from sources far to the east, where the fossilized bones of a dinosaur, the protoceratops, undoubtedly gave rise to the myth of the griffin. The grain ear betneath the creature refers to another source of Pantikapaion’s great wealth.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

MOESIA

32

32.

Istros. 4th century BC. Drachm (Silver, 5.75 g 12), circa 350. Two facing male heads side by side, one upright and the other inverted - a tête-bêche pair. Rev. ΙΣΤΡΙΗ Sea eagle standing left on dolphin; below eagle's tail, Η; below dolphin, Δ. AMNG I 431. SNG BM Black Sea 245. Of excellent style and well struck. A remarkably nice example. Lightly toned, good extremely fine. 750

2:1

Ex Tkalec, 29 February 2000, 48.

33

33.

-. 4th century BC. Drachm (Silver, 5.70 g 12), circa 350. Two facing male heads side by side, one upright and the other inverted - a tête-bêche pair. Rev. ΙΣΤΡΙΗ Sea eagle standing left on dolphin; below dolphin, monogram of ΑΠ. AMNG 417. SNG BM 246. SNG Stancomb 147. A superb piece, beautifully struck and centered. Attractively toned, virtually as struck. 750

2:1

The drachms of Istros with the tête-bêche heads (symbols of the mouths of the Danube) began in the mid 4th century and were struck in impressive numbers. Needless to say, the large numbers struck resulted in many coins of poor style and even poorer workmanship; but the early pieces, of which this and the following lot are perfect examples, were really very well done.

THRACE

34

34.

Apollonia Pontika. Mid 4th century BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 16.83 g 7). Laureate head of Apollo to right. Rev. [...]ΥΣΤΡΑΤΟ... Anchor; to left, Α; to right, crayfish. For similar obverse dies cf. BMFA 797 and SNG Copenhagen 455, otherwise, apparently unpublished and with an unknown magistrate’s name. Very rare. With a rather rustic, albeit attractive style, undoubtedly engraved by a local die cutter. Traces of corrosion on the reverse, otherwise, extremely fine. 9000 The coinage of Apollonia Pontika, the modern day Sozopol in Bulgaria, a sea side resort, is very extensive but, in part, little known. It produced an extensive tetradrachm coinage in the mid 4th century BC, which featured a head of Apollo on their obverses and the city’s symbol, an anchor, on the reverses. These coins were modeled on coins from the Greek mainland but they were clearly produced by local artisans who were basically provincial in their skills. Nevertheless, the coins have a charm of their own as a representative of an outpost of Hellenism surrounded by more primitive peoples.

2:1

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

35

35.

2:1

Maroneia. Circa 386/5-348/7 BC. Hemidrachm (Silver, 2.81 g 12), Neomenias. ΜΑΡΩ Forepart of horse to right. Rev. ΕΠΙ Ν[ΕΟΜΗ]ΝΙΟΥ Bunch of grapes within dotted linear square. Schönert-Geiss 582 (this coin illustrated). Attractively toned and nicely centered. Nearly extremely fine. 450

KINGS OF THRACE

36

36.

2:1

Lysimachos. 305-281 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 17.07 g 3), Lysimacheia, struck 297/6-282/1 BC. Diademed head of Alexander the Great to right with horn of Ammon over his ear. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ Athena seated to left on throne, leaning her left elbow on her shield and holding Nike, crowning the king’s name, in her right; behind, transverse spear without point; inner left, lion’s head to left; on throne, monogram. Müller 51. Thompson 16. Bold and impressive with a rather special portrait of distinctive style. Good extremely fine. 3000 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection, ex Triton VIII, 11 January 2005, 265. The reverses of the tetradrachm coinage of Lysimachos from Lysimacheia have one rather interesting particularity: Athena’s spear very seldom has a pointed spearhead! Normally she seems to be just holding a long pole, as if she were resting after having competed in the pole vault in some divine version of the Olympics. Or is it possible that the Thracian die cutters thought giving Athena a pointed spear might make her too dangerous?

37

2:1

37.

-. Stater (Gold, 8.53 g 12), Alexandria Troas, struck 297/6-282/1 BC. Diademed head of Alexander III to right, ram’s horn over his ear. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ Athena seated left on throne, resting her left elbow on her shield and holding Nike in her outstretched right hand; inner left, monogram of ΠΥ; outer left, cornucopiae. Müller 99. Thompson 144. Well struck in high relief with a fine head of Alexander. Good extremely fine. 14,000 This is an exceptionally fine lifetime issue of Lysimachos, with a bold and strong portrait of Alexander.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

38

38.

-. Tetradrachm (Silver, 17.17 g 12), Lampsakos, struck 297/6-282/1. Diademed head of Alexander the Great to right with horn of Ammon over his ear. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ Athena seated to left on throne, leaning her left elbow on her shield and holding Nike, crowning the king's name, in her right; behind, transverse spear with point below left; to left, monogram of ΔΞ; in exergue, crescent to left. Thompson 49. A lovely piece with an elegant portrait of Alexander. Good extremely fine. 5000

2:1

From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection.

39

39.

-. Tetradrachm (Silver, 17.08 g 1), Sardes, struck 297/6-287 BC. Diademed head of Alexander the Great to right, with horn of Ammon over his ear. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ Athena seated left on throne, holding Nike,who crowns the king's name, in her right hand and resting her left arm on the shield at her side; behind her right shoulder transverse spear pointed downwards; at inner and outer left, monogram. Thompson 89. An attractive coin with a highly emotional head of Alexander. Nicely toned, Extremely fine. 3000

2:1

40

40.

-. Tetradrachm (Silver, 17.24 g 9), Amphipolis, struck 288/7-282/1 BC. Diademed head of Alexander III to right, ram’s horn over his ear. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ Athena seated left on throne, resting her left elbow on her shield and holding Nike in her outstretched right hand; to left, kerykeion with handle to right. Thompson 195. An attractive coin struck on a broad flan. Good extremely fine. 3000

2:1

31


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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

41

41.

2:1

Lysimachos. 305-281 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 17.24 g 5), Amphipolis, struck 288/7-282/1 BC. Diademed head of Alexander the Great to right with horn of Ammon over his ear. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ Athena seated to left on throne, leaning her left elbow on her shield and holding Nike, crowning the king’s name, in her right; behind, transverse spear with point below left; on the inner left and the outer right, monogram. Müller 543 var. Thompson 201. Lightly toned, well struck and with a portrait in high relief. Good extremely fine. 4000 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection, from the Millennia Collection, Goldberg 46, 26 May 2008, 24 and ex Tkalec 19 February 2001, 74.

42

42.

2:1

-. Tetradrachn (Silver, 16.97 g 12), Pergamon, struck 287/6/282/1 BC. Diademed head of Alexander the Great to right with horn of Ammon over his ear; below neck, Κ. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ Athena seated to left on throne, leaning her left elbow on her shield and holding Nike, crowning the king's name, in her right; behind, transverse spear with point below left; outer left, herm; inner left, cult image; in exergue, monogram of ΩΞ. Arnold-Biucchi, Pergamene, 40 var. Thompson 220 var. An unpublished variant with herm and cult image (the cult image is normally paired with a crescent). Lightly toned and of excellent style, about extremely fine. 3000 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection, ex Classical Numismatic Group 75, 23 May 2007, 113 and Triton VII, 13 January 2004, 174.

43

2:1

43.

-. Stater (Gold, 8.47 g 11), Uncertain mint, struck circa 290s- 280s BC or, perhaps, as an early posthumous issue. Head of the deified Alexander III to right, wearing taenia and with horn of Ammon over his ear. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ Athena seated to left on throne, shield by her side, holding Nike in her right hand and resting her left in her lap, spear behind her to left; in exergue, ΜΕ ΔΙ; to left, eagle's head to left. Müller -. Thompson -. A superb example, apparently unpublished with these monograms. Lustrous and particularly nice, virtually as struck. 7500


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

44

44.

-. Tetradrachm (Silver, 16.93 g 12), Ainos, struck circa 280 BC. Diademed head of Alexander III to right, ram’s horn over his ear. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ Athena seated left on throne, resting her left elbow on her shield and holding Nike in her outstretched right hand; to left, herm; in exergue, two monograms. W. Fischer-Bossert, “Die Lysimacheier des Skostokos,” RBN 151 (2005), p. 73, C 6a and pl. VIII, C 6 (this coin). Attractively toned and with a pleasing portrait. Extremely fine. 3500

2:1

Ex Auctiones 22, 16 June 1992, 178 and from the Collignon collection, Feuardent, 17 December 1919, 175.

45

45.

-. Tetradrachm (Silver, 17.00 g 10), Ainos, struck circa 281-260s BC. Diademed head of Alexander the Great to right with horn of Ammon over his ear. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ Athena seated to left on throne, leaning her left elbow on her shield and holding Nike, crowning the king's name, in her right; behind, transverse spear with point below left; outer left, filleted thyrsos; inner left, cult statue on throne. Meydancikkale 2690 var. Müller 122. With an extremely bold and strong portrait of Lysimachos, based on the style used on those minted in Pergamon. Good extremely fine. 3000

2:1

From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection, ex Triton X, 9 January 2007, 121.

46

46.

-. Stater (Gold, 8.53 g), uncertain mint, struck circa 280s-250s BC. Diademed head of Alexander III to right, ram’s horn over his ear. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ Athena seated left on throne, resting her left elbow on her shield and holding Nike in her outstretched right hand; below throne, two crossed arrows over grape cluster. Müller -. Thompson- . A lovely coin of excellent style. Extremely fine. 5000 The coinage of Lysimachos proved to be very popular, not only during his lifetime but afterwards as well: both gold and silver issues continued to be produced until the 1st century BC. This lovely stater, with a symbol on the throne that is apparently unknown (or at least unpublished), could well have been struck during Lysimachos’ lifetime but the size of the head and general appearance suggest it is an early posthumous issue.

2:1

33


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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

47

47.

2:1

Lysimachos. 305-281 BC. Stater (Gold, 8.48 g 11), Byzantion, struck circa 260-245 BC. Diademed head of Alexander to right, with horn of Ammon over his ear. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΛΥΣΙΜΑΧΟΥ Athena seated left on throne, holding Nike in her right hand, transverse spear in her left and resting her left elbow on shield by her side; to left, uncertain monogram. Marinescu Issue 22, 53 (O26/R50). A very attractive example, well struck and with an impressively large head of Alexander. Minor marks, good extremely fine. 5000

ISLANDS OFF THRACE

48

48.

2:1

Thasos. Circa 411-340 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 15.05 g 11), struck circa 410-390 BC. Head of Dionysos to left, wearing ivy wreath. Rev. ΘΑΣΙΟΝ Herakles kneeling to right, wearing lion skin over his head and body, drawing bow; to right, amphora; all in linear square within a shallow incuse square. Le Rider, Thasiennes 23 var. Pixodarus 3 (dies A2/P3) = West I, 13A = Jameson 2023 = Gulbenkian 465. Very rare. Of remarkably fine style with a particularly noble head of Dionysos. Lightly toned , about extremely fine. 25,000 Ex Nomos FPL I, Winter/Spring 2008, 15 and Gorny & Mosch 125, 13 October 2003, 79. The head of Dionysos on this coin shows a serenity and power that is particularly noble and majestic, and is quite comparable to the best heads of Zeus that appear on the coinage of Olympia. In fact, if it were not for the ivy wreath he wears, this could be of Zeus himself. There is no hint of the wilder nature of Dionysos here; nor is there a suggestion that his followers include elemental creatures such as satyrs, maenads or silens, or that he himself could drink too deeply, as he appears to have done on some issues from the nearby city of Mende. The style of the portrait appears to be a Classical reworking of a more Archaic original - the way the hair is close to the head, almost like a cap, argues for an earlier prototype, perhaps a cult statue that was slightly modernized in its reproduction on the coin.

THRACO-MACEDONIAN TRIBES

49

49.

2:1

The Orreskioi. Circa 500-480 BC. Stater (Silver, 9.88 g). Traces of inscription at the edge of the flan Centaur galloping to right, carrying off nymph whose right hand is raised in protest. Rev. Quadripartite incuse square. Asyut 78 (same dies). Kraay/Hirmer 375 var. SNG ANS 980. Rare. A particularly sharply struck and attractive example. Nicely toned, nearly extremely fine. 15,000


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

THRACO-MACEDONIAN REGION

50

50.

Siris. Circa 520 BC. Stater (Silver, 8.94 g). On the left, nude, ithyphallic satyr walking left, holding his tail with his right hand and gesturing with his left toward a nymph, wearing long robes and walking to left, her left hand raised in greeting and holding a wreath in her right; between them, large pellet. Rev. Incuse square diagonally divided. BMC 8. BMFA 598. HPM p. 79, 3 = pl. XIX, 23. SNG ANS 947. Nicely toned and unusually well centered, a very attractive coin. Extremely fine. 10,000

3:1

In some ways this coin is very amusing! The Macedonian tribal groups who used their locally mined silver to produce coins for export were very fond of wine and were, thus, worshippers of Dionysos and his followers. For them the nymphs and satyrs were ever-present spirits in their daily lives. Here we see the beginning of what looks like negotiation: the satyr, somewhat nonchalantly twisting his long horse tail (do note his hooves as well), seems to be bargaining over the nymph’s favors. She raises her hand in shock at his presumption - of course she is going to end up with him in the end, but he better raise his offer!!

51

51.

Uncertain mint. Circa 480 BC. Drachm (Silver, 4.32 g). Rider, wearing Persian bonnet and holding bow, on horse galloping to right. Rev. Incuse square, diagonally divided. Seemingly unpublished, but cf. Tkalec AG, 28 October 1984, 63 for a very similar obverse, probably by the same engraver. Of the greatest rarity, apparently unique. Toned as found and with slightly crystalized surfaces. Good very fine. 6000 This is an extraordinary coin that is only paralleled by the equally rare piece that is cited above. That shows the same horseman, undoubtedly a Scythian since he wears his characteristic hat and carries a bow, but with a running boar on the reverse. That is clearly a scene of two parts with a hunter and his prey. The present piece just shows the beginning of the scene: perhaps the desire to illustrate the whole ‘story’ impelled the mint authority to authorize the replacement of the usual incuse square with an actual type? In any event, the source of these coins seems to be Macedonia, which makes the use of a ‘Persian’ or eastern horseman, understandable. The Attic standard weight, however, implies that the coin was issued after the Persian defeat in the war with Athens.

4:1

35


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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

MACEDON

52

52.

2:1

Akanthos. Circa 425 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 16.65 g 9). Bull, with head lowered, collapsing to left, attacked by lion leaping on his back to right; in exergue, fish swimming to left. Rev. ΑΚΑΝΘΙΟΝ around quadripartite square with raised fields; all within incuse square. Cf. Desneux 97/102 var. (obverse) and 103 (reverse die R92). Very rare, apparently the second example of this die pair known. A coin of remarkably realistic classical style, beautifully preserved. Lightly toned and extremely attractive, good extremely fine. 15,000

53

53.

2:1

Chalkidian League. Circa 432-348 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 14.52 g 11), struck in Olynthos under the magistrate Ariston , circa 350 BC. Laureate head of Apollo to right, his hair flowing down the back of his neck. Rev. ΧΑΛΚΙΔΕΩΝ Kithara with five strings; below, ΕΠΙ ΑΡΙΣΤΩΝΟΣ. BMFA 582. Robinson & Clement Group V, 131 (A81/P 111). SNG ANS 496-497. SNG Lockett 1314. With a head of Apollo of very fine and noble style. Traces of double striking in the hair, otherwise, good extremely fine. 5000 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection, ex Classical Numismatic Group 70, 21 September 2005, 72.

54

54.

Sermyle. Circa 490 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 16.52 g). CΕRΜVΛΙΑΟ Ν Bare-headed warrior riding horse galloping to right, wearing cuirass and hurling spear from his upraised right hand; behind, large pellet. Rev. Shallow quadripartite incuse square. AMNG III, p. 107, 2 and pl. XXI, 4 = Traité I, 1667 and pl. LIII, 2 (same obverse die). Raymond pl. II, 12. A remarkably fine example, sharply struck and very attractive. Minor traces of corrosion, otherwise, an exceptional piece, extremely fine. 75,000 2:1

Ex Triton VIII, 11 January 2005, 126.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

KINGS OF MACEDON

55

2:1

55.

Philip II. 359-336 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 14.36 g 11), Pella, struck circa 359-355/4 BC. Laureate head of Zeus to right. Rev. ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ Philip riding left, wearing armor, kausia and cloak billowing out behind him, and raising right arm in salute; below horse, vertical thunderbolt, Ζ over Μ and wreath. Le Rider 69 var. (same obverse die). A clear, well struck and very attractive coin, with a superb head of Zeus. Extremely fine. 5000 The early Zeus heads on the coinage of Philip II are clearly related to those found on the slightly earlier Arkadian League staters struck in Megalopolis (as Kraay/Hirmer 512 and BCD 1512). The horseman on the reverse is clearly meant to be Philip II himself.

56

56.

-. Stater (Gold, 8.64 g 11), Pella, struck circa 340-328 BC. Laureate head of Apollo to right. Rev. ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ Charioteer driving biga to right; below, kantharos. Le Rider 133 ff. . A coin of particularly lovely style, beautifully centered. Some slight rubbing on the high points, but still lustrous around the devices, nearly extremely fine. 3000 2:1

57

57.

-. Stater (Gold, 8.64 g 2), Amphipolis, struck circa 323-315 BC. Laureate head of Apollo to right. Rev. ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ Charioteer, holding reins in his left hand and goad in his right, in biga galloping to right; below, trident to right. Le Rider 184. SNG ANS 266. A superb example struck in high relief. Virtually as struck. 7500 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection.

2:1

37


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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

58

58. 2:1

Alexander III ‘the Great’. 336-323 BC. Stater (Gold, 8.58 g 4), “Amphipolis”, Macedonian mint, struck circa 330-320 BC. Helmeted head of Athena to left, with serpent coiled on the helmet bowl. Rev. ΑΛΕΞΑΝ ΔΡΟΥ Nike standing left, holding wreath in her right hand and stylis in her left; to left, trident head to left. Price 175. A lustrous and very attractive coin, very well struck. Slightly traces of double-striking on the obverse, otherwise, a nearly perfect piece, virtually as struck. 4500

59

2:1

59.

-. Stater (Gold, 8.62 g 11), uncertain Greek mint, struck circa 310-275 BC. Helmeted head of Athena to right, wearing necklace, aegis and with a snake on the bowl of her helmet. Rev. ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ Nike standing to left, holding wreath in her right hand and stylis in her left; to left, ant; below her right wing, eight-pointed star. Müller 179. Price 831. A superb, lustrous piece struck in high relief. Virtually as struck. 4500 Ants very rarely appear on Greek coins; its combination with a star as symbols on this coin imply a connection, perhaps to a local legend or myth.

60

60.

2:1

-. Tetradrachm (Silver, 16.98 g 12), Odessos, struck circa 280-200 BC. Head of Herakles in lion skin headdress to right. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ Zeus seated left on high-backed throne, holding eagle in his right hand and long scepter in his left; to left, ΚΟΙ; below throne, monogram. Price 1162 and 1171 var. An attractive coin with a dramatic head of Herakles. Obverse almost imperceptibly doouble-struck, otherwise, good extremely fine. 1000


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

61

61.

-. Tetradrachm (Silver, 16.92 g 12), Messembria, struck circa 250-175 BC. Head of Herakles in lion skin headdress to right. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ Zeus seated left on high-backed throne, holding eagle in his right hand and long scepter in his left; to left, Corinthian helmet to right above monogram of ΖΩ . Price -. With a rather remarkably florid head of Herakles, of pure northern Hellenistic style. Tiny bang over the eye, otherwise, good extremely fine. 1000

2:1

62

62.

-. Drachm (Silver, 3.85 g 1), Temnos, struck circa 188-170 BC. Head of Herakles in lion skin headdress to right. Rev. ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ Zeus seated left on backless throne, hold eagle in his right hand and scepter in his left; to left, ΑΜ over vine-tendril with grapes above an oenochoe to right . Price 1684. Extremely rare. A splendid example, well struck on a broad flan, extremely fine. 3000 Temnos struck a well known series of broad-flan Alexander tetradrachms during the first quarter of the 2nd century BC, but drachms are actually extremely rare. Apparently there are only three known examples, all from the same issue (one was acquired by the British Museum in 1914).

2:1

KINGDOM OF PAEONIA

63

63.

Patraos. Circa 335-315 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 12.77 g 5). Laureate head of Apollo to right. Rev. ΠΑ-ΤΡΑΟΥ (retrograde) Paeonian horseman, wearing crested helmet and full armor, galloping right and spearing fallen Macedonian soldier; below horse’s tail, conical helmet; below horse’s hooves, harpa. Paeonian Hoard 221 (same dies). A particularly fine and unusually well-centered example. Extremely fine. 1800

This coin differs from the vast majority of the known tetradrachms of Patraos by having an unusually detailed reverse representation. The cavalryman seems to be seated on a cloth that is above a form of chain mail armor protecting the sides and front of his horse: as such this is one of the few numismatic representations of ancient horse armor.

3:1

39


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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

THESSALY

64 2:1

64.

Larissa. Circa 356-342 BC. Drachm (Silver, 6.19 g 1). Head of the nymph Larissa facing, turned slightly to left, wearing ampyx, triple-pendant earring and necklace. Rev. ΛΑΡΙΣ - ΑΙΩΝ Horse grazing to left. Herrmann Group VIII, Series A, pl. V, 4 var. Lorber, Hoard, Phase L-III. Very rare legend variety. A lovely coin of especially beautiful style. Extremely fine. 1000

65

2:1

65.

Phalanna. Circa 340 BC. Drachm (Silver, 5.80 g 2). Youthful male head to right, with short, curly hair. Rev. ΦΑΛΑΝ-ΝΑΙΩΝ Bridled horse prancing to right. De Hirsch 1158. De Luynes 1858. Traité IV, 583 and pl. CCXCIII, 6. Very rare. An astonishing coin, sharp, nicely centered and of splendid style. Reverse very slightly double-struck and with an insignificant flan fault, otherwise, good extremely fine. 14,000 Precisely who this young man is on the obverse is subject to debate: the lack of a wreath makes it more likely to be Ares than Apollo. The drachm coinage of Phalanna is actually very rare, in this condition extremely so; the coins are probably all from a single issue, or perhaps two, and it is likely that they were all struck at roughly the same time. The similarity of the male head on the obverse to the heads of Apollo on the gold staters of Philip II is almost certainly not a coincidence - the Phalanna head is surely copied from them.

66 2:1

66.

Perrhaiboi. Circa 450-430 BC. Hemidrachm (Silver, 3.21 g 5), Oloosson. The Hero Thessalos, nude but for a cloak, standing right, restraining the forepart of a raging bull by grasping his horns. Rev. ΠΕ Forepart of a bridled horse galloping to right, reins trailing; all within incuse square. SNG Fitzwilliam 2429. Weber 2887 (same dies). Very rare. A pleasing coin, nicely toned. Extremely fine. 3250 Ex Leu 77, 11 May 2000, 192.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

67

67.

- Circa 430 BC. Drachm (Silver, 6.44 g 6), Oloossson. The Hero Thessalos, wearing long cloak and petasos, hanging behind him from a cord around his neck, struggling to left with a bull, which is attempting to escape; the Hero is grasping the bull around its neck and holds a short club in his right hand. Rev. ΠΕ Bridled horse galloping to right, with its reins trailing behind; all within incuse square. McClean 4660 (same dies). Traité II, IV, 571 var. (obverse to right and reverse to left). Extremely rare, perhaps the best known example. Lightly toned and most attractive, good extremely fine. 22,500

2:1

The coinage of the Perrhaiboi, whose capital and mint was Oloosson, is primarily one of small silver and bronze - hemidrachms are rare and drachms are extremely rare. At least two types of drachms were produced, an earlier one, as the one illustrated in Traité and in CNG 57 (2001) as lot 294, which has the Hero striding to the right while restraining the bull, and this one, which is clearly stylistically later. Here we see Thessalos shown realistically digging in his heels in his attempt to stop the raging bull, We know, of course, that he was successful!

KINGS OF EPEIROS

68

68.

Alexander I, ‘the Molossian’. 350-330. Stater (Silver, 10.92 g 2), Corcyran standard, Tarentum, possibly by the famous Tarentine Kal... engraver, struck circa 334-330 BC. Bearded head of Zeus Dodonaios to right, wearing oak wreath. Rev. ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟ[Υ] / ΤΟΥ ΝΕΟΠΤΟΛΕ [ΜΟΥ] Thunderbolt shown vertically; to left, eagle with closed wings standing left. Kunstfreund 196 (this coin). Traité IV, 331 and pl. CCLXXXIII, 4 (same obverse die). Vlasto 1868. Extremely rare. Of superb late classical style, beautifully struck. Nicely toned, Extremely fine. 40,000 Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 9, 16 April 1996, 32, Monnaies et Médailles 75, 4 December 1989, 235 and from the collection of C. Gillet, Bank Leu/Münzen und Medaillen, 28 May 1974, 196. Alexander the Molossian was not only the King of Epeiros but also, through his sister Olympias, the brother-in-law of Philip II of Macedon and the uncle of Alexander III. At the same time his nephew was beginning his epic march to the East, he was called in by the Greek city of Tarentum to save it from the pressure of the aggressive Lucanians and Bruttians. He arrived with an army in 334 and was initially successful; he was, however, killed in a minor engagement in 330. This coin was issued in Tarentum to pay his Epeirote troops since it was on the non-Italic weight standard they preferred. The artistry is absolutely superb: the head of Zeus is immediately reminiscent of the contemporary issues of Olympia and of Philip II.

2:1

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

PHOKIS

69

2:1

69.

Delphi. Amphictionic issues. Circa 336-334 BC. Stater (Silver, 12.10 g 10). Veiled head of Demeter to left, wearing wreath of grain leaves. Rev. ΑΜΦΙ-ΚΤΙΟ-ΝΩΝ Apollo seated left on omphalos, resting his chin on his right hand with his right elbow propped on a large lyre at his side, and, in his left hand, holding a laurel branch; to left, small tripod. Gulbenkian 487 (same dies). Kinns, Amphictionic, dies O3/R6. Svoronos, Delphi, 32. Very rare. Lightly toned and a very pleasing coin, very fine. 40,000 An earthquake in 373/2 severely damaged the Temple of Apollo at Delphi: reconstruction went forward slowly and was even stopped during the Phokian occupation of 355-346. However, in 338/6 the Amphiktions decided to use the temple treasures to create a new coinage to finance the work - and to publish all their accounts in inscriptions, which still survive. They issued staters, drachms and hemidrachms, which are among the most elegant of all the later 4th century coinages of Greece. On the obverse of this stater we see the head of the Demeter from the temple at Anthela (near Thermopylai - also in the charge of the Amphiktionic League, while the reverse shows us a pensive and rather patient looking Apollo: probably waiting for the repair of his sanctuary to be finished.

3:1

BOEOTIA

70

70.

Federal Coinage. Circa 395-387 BC. Stater (Silver, 12.45 g). Boeotian shield. Rev. ΒΟ-ΙΩ Amphora with fluted body and prominent handles; above, bow with string above. BCD Boiotia 8. BMC 48. Traité II, 3, 369 = pl. CCIV, 31. Beautifully centered and in high relief, an unusually nice coin though with a slightly double-struck reverse. Extremely fine. 1200 2:1 This is an amazingly fine example, far better than any in the BCD collection. The centering of the obverse is exceptional and gives the shield, the emblem par excellence of the Boeotians, a remarkably sculptural quality.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

71

71.

-. Circa 287 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 17.13 g 12), Thebes. Laureate head of Zeus to right. Rev. ΒΟΙΩΤΩΝ Poseidon, seated left on throne with a lion's leg on the front and a Boeotian shield on the side, holding dolphin in his right hand and transverse trident in his left. BCD Boiotia 81 (same reverse die). De Luynes 1980 (same obverse die). Gulbenkian 920=Jameson 2065=Weber 3305 (same reverse die). Extremely rare. Minor area of striking flatness on the beard, nearly extremely fine. 40,000

2:1

Ex Triton XI, 8 January 2008, 147. The identification of the head on the obverse of this coin has long been the object of debate, though some of the arguments seem rather odd. In the magisterial BCD Boiotia (Triton IX, 10 January 2006, lot 81) its learned author identifies the head as that of Poseidon wearing a laurel wreath and says he has done so following the arguments of Jenkins in the Gulbenkian catalogue. Unfortunately, Jenkins actually provides no arguments there at all, and is himself merely following Jameson and HN (though there the identification, p. 353, appears as “Poseidon ?”; earlier, in 1884, the same author, in BMC Boeotia, p. 38, 63, identified the head on the coin as that of Zeus). In Garrett, the source of the BCD specimen, the head was also identified as being that of Zeus. The specimens that appeared as Triton VIII, 298 and M&M De 31, 36 were both well made forgeries from the same die pair; for what it’s worth, both cataloguers identified the personage on the obverse as Zeus. Even more interestingly, as BCD points out, the head on the obverse of this coin is clearly not the same as the head of the seated god on the reverse: the latter is definitely Poseidon since he carries a dolphin and a trident, but he seems not to be wearing a wreath (or if he is, it has much longer leaves than the one that appears on the obverse). And why should Poseidon be wearing a laurel wreath at all? In honor of his brother Zeus, who always wore one? It is infinitely more likely that the god on the obverse is Zeus, as nearly everyone thought it was in the past.

2:1

72

72.

Tanagra. Early-mid 4th century BC. Stater (Silver, 12.33 g). Boeotian shield. Rev. ΤΑ Forepart of leaping horse to right, with garland of laurel leaves around his neck. BCD Boiotia 265. BMC 29. Traité II, 3, coll. 299300, 344. An unusually attractive and well preserved example, much finer than the BCD piece. Bright and lustrous. Flan slightly oddly shaped, otherwise, one of the finest known examples, extremely fine. 2000

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

73

73.

Thebes. Circa 440-425 BC. Stater (Silver, 12.23 g). Boeotian shield. Rev. ΘΕ Head of Herakles facing, bearded and wearing lion skin headdress; all within incuse square. BCD Boiotia 422 (same dies). SNG Copenhagen 281. Traité III 234 and pl. CC, 3. Very rare. A superb piece, very well centered, perhaps the finest known. Lightly toned and, extremely fine. 95,000

3:1

This is unquestionably one of the most startling heads of Herakles ever to appear on a coin: the full frontal view is unusual but the staring, eerie expression makes it clear that we are facing a god and not a mortal.

74

74.

-. Circa 405-395 BC. Stater (Silver, 12.05 g). Boeotian shield. Rev. Θ Ε Bearded head of Dionysos, three-quarters facing and turned slightly to the right, wearing ivy wreath. BCD Boiotia 458 (same dies). J.Hirsch XXV (Philipsen), 29 November 1909, 898 (same dies). Extremely rare. The finest example of this type known; bearing an outstanding head of Dionysos struck in high relief. A few minor marks, good extremely fine. 150,000

3:1

The mint of Thebes produced a number of unusually fine representations on the reverses of its staters, but this one must be the most startlingly impressive of them all. Following the same local artistic traditions we have seen with the previous stater bearing the facing head of Herakles, we only have the head of the god on the reverse, peering mask-like out of the the field of the coin, lacking a neck to make him into a more human figure. He is also clearly a figure of great power and emotion; his eyes are fully open and stare out at us, and his lips are parted so that we can see the teeth within his mouth. The brilliant engraver who created this astonishing head has let us imagine the flush moving over the god’s cheeks, as he gets redder and redder with all the sacred wine he has drunk. This is unquestionably one of the finest facing heads in all Greek numismatic art.

75

75.

Thespiai. Early-mid 4th century BC. Stater (Silver, 12.21 g). Boeotian shield. Rev. ΘΕΣΠ ΙΚΟΝ Head of Aphrodite Melainis to right; below neck, crescent downwards; to right, crescent to left . BCD Boiotia 605 (same dies). BMC 9. BMFA Suppl. 94. Rare. A sharp and unusually fine example. Extremely fine. 32,500

3:1

In his discussion of a coin of this type the BCD cataloguer has opted to date it in the earlier part of the 4th century; he does, however, point out that it could well have been produced in the second half of the 5th century! Aphrodite Melainis (”the black one”) was a goddess who was worshipped at only a few places, with her most famous sanctuaries being those at Corinth, and at Thespiai where she was associated with the moon.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

ATTICA

76

76.

Athens. Circa 467-465 BC. Drachm (Silver, 4.30 g 10). Head of Athena to right, wearing crested Attic helmet adorned with three olive leaves over the visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl. Rev. ΑΘΕ Owl standing to right, head facing; behind, olive spray. SNG Munich 42-43. Starr Group II C, 89. Svoronos Pls. 8, 38 and 9, 30. Rare, especially in this condition. Nicely toned and struck in high relief. Extremely fine. 17,500

3:1

The early drachms from the Starr groups, c. 479-454, are surely the most beautiful drachms ever produced by the Athenian mint. The heads of Athena can be little masterpieces - like this one, which is close to the heads on the famous dekadrachms - and the owls are particularly lively looking. One problem is that they circulated for quite a long time and now tend to be usually found no better than very fine in condition. As such, this lovely piece, in extremely fine and in high relief, is nothing short of exceptional.

77

77.

-. Circa 455-449 BC. Obol (Silver, 0.70 g 10). Helmeted head of Athena to right, with three olive leaves over the visor and tendril on the bowl. Rev. ΑΘΕ Owl standing to right, with head facing and triple-pointed tail feathers; to left, long curved olive leaf and fruit. Jameson 1192. Starr Group V. Cf. Svoronos pl. 8, 33. Rare and attractively toned. Good very fine. 1000 The Athenian obols of the second quarter of the 5th century are actually surprisingly rare and hard to find: far greater numbers were produced before the Persian invasion and then later in the century. The Athenians were obsessed by silver coins and were very much against the introduction of base metal replacements. They insisted on issuing silver fractions that were so tiny as to be almost unusable (such as the well-nigh ridiculous hemitartemorion, or 1/8 obol, which weighed c. 0.08 g!). The use of plated coins during the emergency situation at the end of the Peloponnesian War (Aristophanes called them “Red-Heads” because the silver surface soon wore through) also left a bad memory, and true Athenian bronzes only began to be produced in the 330s.

3:1

78

78.

-. Circa 455-449 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 17.11 g 9). Head Athena right, wearing Attic helmet addorned with three olive leaves, sprig with palmette and round earring. Rev. ΑΘΕ Owl standing right, head facing, with triplepronged tail feathers; behind, olive sprig and crescent; all within incuse square. Starr Group V.B, series 4. Very minor flan crack, otherwise an attractive, compact coin with a splendid owl. Extremely fine. 4000 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection, ex Classical Numismatic Group 76, 12 September 2007, 464. This piece falls at the beginning of the mass issues of tetradrachms struck after the removal of the treasury of the Delian League to Athens in 455, and retains the fine style of those earlier pieces.

2:1

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

ISLANDS OFF ATTICA

79

2:1

79.

Aegina. Circa 550-530/25 BC. Stater (Silver, 12.30 g). Sea turtle, with no collar and an almost smooth carapace. Rev. “Union Jack” pattern reverse with eight segments, some partially filled up. Holloway, Early, class A, 4. H.Cahn, Griechische Münzen archaischer Zeit (Basel, 1947) 11 (same dies). Extremely rare, one of the earliest issues of Aegina. Well centered and struck, and with even wear, good very fine. 5000 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection, ex Classical Numismatic Group 76, 12 September 2007, 504.

This is actually one of the earliest issues of Aegina, just after those struck with irregular incuse reverses; it has a remarkable monumentality. The turtle on this coin does not just relate to Aegina’s position as an island, or to the possibility that the turtle was sacred to Aegina’s ancient goddess Aphaia (she may have Minoan origins), but is actually a pun. The Aeginetans called their pre-monetary planoconvex silver ingots ‘turtles’ because of their shape: thus, when they began to strike coins what better type could they have chosen to advertise the high quality of their silver!

80 3:1

80.

-. Circa 456/45-431 BC. Stater (Silver, 12.27 g 7). Land tortoise with segmented shell. Rev. Incuse square with a skew pattern. ACGC 127. Milbank pl. 2, 12. SNG Copenhagen 516. Lightly toned and unusually well centered. Extremely fine. 5000 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection, ex Classical Numismatic Group 73, 13 September 2006, 273.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

PHLIASIA

81

81.

Phlious. Late 6th-early 5th century BC. Half-Stater (Silver, 7.18 g). Triskeles of human legs to right with pellet at the center; between two of the legs, Φ. Rev. Incuse square divided into six irregular triangles. BCD Peloponnesos 77 (same dies). Seltman, Athens, 314 (P259/A207, same dies). Traité II, I, 1181 = Weber 3874. Extremely rare. Boldly struck. Attractive dark patina. Some minor deposits, otherwise, extremely fine. 17,500

3:1

Ex Triton VIII, 11 January 2005, 331. The early half-staters of Phlious are extremely rare, only about half a dozen of them are known. It is struck on the Milesian standard and is related to other early coins from both Kleonai and Pheneos, though precisely why these cities should have used an Asiatic weight standard is rather uncertain to be sure. The reason for the triskeles as an obverse type might refer to a local mountain called Trikaranon - ‘the threeheaded one’ - but it equally well might have nothing to do with that at all, especially since the fractions only had a single leg on their obverses! Of the five other known examples of this type (some with the triskeles to left), four are in museums (Berlin, Brussels, The Hague and London).

SIKYONIA

3:1

82

82.

Sikyon. Circa 370-360/50 BC. Stater (Silver, 12.34 g 6). Chimaera moving to left on ground line, right paw raised; below Chimaera, Σ Ε; in exergue, monogram of ΔΑ. Rev. Dove flying left with ΣΙΒΥΡ above wing; all within olive wreath tied at the right. BCD Peloponnesos 221.1 (same dies). Traité III 778, pl. CCXX, 20 (same dies). A rare variety. Bright and attractive. Reverse struck slightly off center, good extremely fine. 4500 This is possibly the finest known example of the type. The name Sibyrtios (for the full spelling, see BCD 212) is an extremely uncommon one: the most famous individual we know of who bore it was a Cretan officer in Alexander’s army. He was made satrap of Arachosia and Gedrosia (now Pakistan) from c. 323 until at least 303. Another Sibyrtios is cited by Aristophanes as being the father of Cleisthenes, an unsavory character in the Acharnians of 425 BC. Neither of these can be the magistrate who signed this coin.

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

83

83.

2:1

Sikyon. Circa 370-360/50 BC. Stater (Silver, 12.19 g 2). Chimaera moving to left on ground line, right paw raised; below Chimaera and partially over the ground line, nude archer kneeling left and firing arrow from his bow; on either side of Chimaera’s neck, Σ Ε. Rev. Dove flying right with open wings; above tail, ΠΑ; all within olive wreath with ties to left. BCD Peloponnesos 221.2 (same dies). BMC 64. Very rare, especially in such outstanding condition. Extremely fine. 12,500

84

84.

-. Circa 360s-340s/330s BC. Obol (Silver, 0.60 g 1). Dove alighting right, holding fillet in its beak; on wing, Ι. Rev. ΣΙ Dove flying to right. BCD 245. A superb, bright and beautifully preserved example with little actual wear, very rare in this condition. Virtually as struck. 975

The obols of Sikyon were struck in very large numbers, understandably so because they were very popular and circulated throughout the Peloponnesos, as well as in many places in Central Greece where the Aeginetic standard was also used. Thus, the vast majority of known Sikyonian obols are in worn condition, with pieces like this being truly exceptional. This is one of the finest obols of Sikyon known, better than any in the BCD collection.

85 3:1

85.

-. Circa 340s/330s BC. Triobol (Silver, 2.52 g 5). ΣΙ Chimaera prowling to right on ground line. Rev. Dove flying to right. BCD 237 (this coin). BMC - . Traité -. Extremely rare. Beautifully toned, a superb coin, perhaps the finest in existence, good extremely fine. 2750

From the BCD Collection, LHS 96, 8 May 2006, 237 and ex Bank Leu 53, 21 October 1991, 92.

2:1

Sikyon was one of the most prolific mints of mainland Greece, producing enormous numbers of Aeginetan weight staters, drachms, triobols, fractions and bronzes. Yet, many of the individual issues involved turn out to be very rare. This piece comes from one of those groups: it is missing from almost every major collection and normally is only found in very poor condition. Perhaps its naturalistic looking Chimaera, who is clearly prowling rather than prancing the way he does on most of Sikyon’s main stream issues, was not deemed appropriate or was thought to be somehow ‘old fashioned’ - Chimaeras like this do appear on some of Sikyon’s earlier issues. In any case, this rather short-lived issue was soon replaced by vast numbers of more standard pieces with ‘rampant’ Chimaeras.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

86

86.

-. Circa 335-330 BC. Stater (Silver, 12.16 g 3). ΣΕ Chimaera walking left, right paw raised; above to right, wreath. Rev. Dove, with open wings, flying left within wreath; below dove's head, Ν. BCD Peloponnesos 218. BMC 57. Lightly toned. Extremely fine. 2500

The Sikyonian staters that bear a wreath on their obverses and the letters Ν, Ι or Α on their reverses were part of a large issue produced to finance Alexander's appeal for mercenary troops from the Peloponnesos in 334 BC. 3:1

MESSENIA

87

2:1

87.

Korone. Circa 100-50 BC. Hemidrachm (Silver, 2.56 g 12). Helmeted head of Athena to right. Rev. ΚΟΡ Bunch of grapes with Ε below (= year 5); all within ivy wreath. BCD Peloponnesos 784 (this coin). Grandjean pl. XXVI, 4 (same obverse die). Rare. Beautifully toned and attractive, extremely fine. 3000 From the BCD Collection, LHS 96, 8 May 2006, 784.

88

2:1

88.

Messene. Late 2nd century BC. Hemidrachm (Silver, 2.48 g 3). Diademed head of Zeus to left. Rev. ΜΕ-Σ Tripod; all within laurel wreath. BCD Peloponnesos 729 (this coin). BMC 15. Grandjean 120. Rare. An exceptionally fine example. Well-struck and of lovely style, extremely fine. 1250 From the BCD Collection, LHS 96, 8 May 2006, 729.

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

LAKONIA

89

89.

3:1

Lakedaimon (Sparta). Under the Achaean League. Circa 175-168. Hemidrachm (Silver, 2.42 g 8). Laureate head of Zeus to right. Rev. Achaean League monogram with ΛΑ above, ΜΕ below and the pilei of the Dioscouri to left and right; all within laurel wreath. Agrinion 468a (same obverse die). BCD Peloponnesos 849 (this coin). Clerk 324. Very rare. Nicely toned and unusually well preserved for this rare issue, extremely fine. 1750 From the BCD Collection, LHS 96, 8 May 2006, 849. Since Lakedaimon was a very unwilling member of the Achaean League it is not surprising that her 2nd century issues are extremely rare. This is one of the finest known examples.

ARGOLIS

90

90. 3:1

Argos. Circa 490s/480s-470s BC. Triobol (Silver, 3.08 g 12). Forepart of wolf at bay to left. Rev. Alpha, with bar sloping to the right and with two pellets, within a shallow incuse square with two deeper incuse squares in the upper part . BMC 8. BCD Peloponnesos 1008 (this coin). Traité I, 1204, pl. XXXVII, 21 (= de Luynes 2291, same dies). Very rare and attractively toned. Extremely fine. 2500 From the BCD Collection, LHS 96, 8 May 2006, 1008 and ex Kovacs FPL 17, December 1982, 21.

The early triobols of Argos were struck in relatively large numbers but were in use until the 3rd century BC; thus, they usually appear in miserable condition. Really good ones, like this example, are truly very rare, indeed. In over a generation of assiduous collecting BCD was able to view hundreds of triobols from this period, the majority of which were in no better than Fine condition (most were worse): extremely fine examples like this one virtually never appeared. This is one of the best pieces he possessed.

91

3:1

91.

-. Circa 420/10 BC. Diobol (Silver, 2.13 g 6). Corinthian helmet to right. Rev. Corinthian helmet facing with Α to right; all within incuse square. BCD Peloponnesos 1036 (this coin). BMC 29 = Traité III, 613 pl. CCXV, 9. SNG Copenhagen 20 var. Very rare and beautifully toned. Extremely fine. 4000 From the BCD Collection, LHS 96, 8 May 2006, 1036, ex Münzen und Medaillen 85, 11 April 1997, 95 and M&M FPL 139, October 1954, 16. This very rare coin seems to commemorate a short-live alliance between Argos and Corinth.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

92

92.

-. Circa 370-350 BC. Stater (Silver, 11.99 g 5). Head of Hera to right, her hair flowing down the back of her neck, wearing stephane ornamented with palmettes, earring and necklace of pearls. Rev. ΑRΓΕΙΩΝ Two dolphins swimming in a circle to left; between them, Corinthian helmet right between Ε-Μ. BCD Peloponnesos 1066 (this coin). BMC -. A. Löbbecke, Griechische Münzen aus meiner Sammlung IV(ZfN 17, 1890), p. 6 and pl. I, 8 = Traité III, 617 (same dies). Extremely rare, the second example known. Some striking flatness but beautifully toned and struck on a broad flan, extremely fine. 65,000

2:1

From the BCD Collection, Leu Numismatics 96, 8 May 2007, 1066, and ex Bank Leu 7, 9 May 1973, 184 and Monnaies et Médailles X, 22 June 1951, 282. Argos only produced a very small number of staters, all of which fall within a rather limited period of time, probably circa 370-350 when both Spartan and Theban domination of the Peloponnesos had fallen away. The Argive issues seem to fall into three groups: a small series at the beginning with head left (as BCD 1058), a main series with compact heads of Hera (as BCD 1061-1065), and a later outlying group (as the present piece), which has a large, elegant and ‘pretty’ head of the goddess, which differs in concept from those on the two preceding groups. Reminiscences of this head can be found on later staters from Crete, thus making it likely that some coins of this type found their way to that island in the purses of returning mercenaries.

93

93.

Hermione. Circa 360-320/10 BC. Triobol (Silver, 2.85 g 7). Head of Demeter Chthonia to left wearing grain wreath, pendant earring and pearl necklace. Rev. Monogram of ΕΡ within wreath of grain. BCD Peloponnesos 1287 (this coin). BMC 1. Grandjean, Monnayage I, 1A (D1/R2, but cited by Grandjean as being R7, this coin). Very rare. Very attractively toned, probably the finest existing triobol of Hermione. Good extremely fine. 7500 From the BCD Collection, LHS 96, 8 May 2006, 1287 and ex Sotheby, 22 April 1970, 173. This was the best Hermione hemidrachm BCD owned - that means it is about the best one will ever find!

3:1

ARKADIA

94

94.

Arkadian League. Circa 460-450 BC. Hemidrachm (Silver, 2.98 g 3), Kleitor. Zeus Lykaios seated facing on low throne, his head to left, holding long scepter in his left hand and with eagle flying off his right. Rev. ΑΚΑΔΙΚΟ (sic! and partially retrograde) Head of Kallisto to right, with profile eye, wearing a thin necklace and with her hair bound up at the back with a taenia. BCD Peloponnesos (Kleitor) -. Williams, Confederate, 151. A very rare variant with a splendid facing portrait of Zeus on the obverse. Attractive dark patina, nearly extremely fine. 3000

2:1

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

95

95.

3:1

Mantineia. Circa 490-470 BC. Triobol (Silver, 5). Bear, the transformed nymph Kallisto, walking to left with open jaws. Rev. ΜΑ Three acorns arranged in a triangle; letter of the legend below and to right; oak leaf on the left; all within a triangular incuse. BCD Peloponnesos 1449. BMC 2 and 4 (bear left), 3 (same reverse die). Extremely rare and unusually well preserved, but with slightly porous surfaces. Nearly extremely fine. 25,000

The first coins of Mantinea celebrate the myth of Kallisto, the nymph who was seduced by Zeus and became the the mother of Arkas, the eponymos hero of the Arkadians. She and her son were changed into bears by Zeus in order to protect them from Hera’s anger; later they became the constellations Ursa Major and Minor. Kallisto only appears as a bear on the early coinage of Mantinea; she is portrayed as a beautiful young woman on the later coinage of the Arkadians, as on the following coin and on lot 93 above. This piece is one of the finest known examples of the type.

96

96.

3:1

Arkadian League. Circa 460-450 BC. Hemidrachm (Silver, 2.93 g 10), Mantinea. Zeus Lykaios, seated left on low throne, holding long scepter in his let hand and with eagle flying left from his right. Rev. ARKA Head of the nymph Kallisto to left, wearing a simple necklace and with her hair bound with a taenia; all with incuse square. BCD Peloponnesos (Mantinea) 1458 (this coin). Williams, Confederate III, 2, 240. Nicely toned and with a superb early Classical head of Kallisto. About extremely fine. 4500 From the BCD Collection, LHS 96, 8 May 2006, 1458 and from that of the Johns Hopkins University and J. W. Garrett, Bank Leu/Numismatic Fine Arts, 16 October 1984, 227.

97

97.

Arkadian League. Megalopolis. Summer 363-Spring 362. Stater (Silver, 12.19 g 1). Laureate head of Zeus Lykaios to left. Rev. Youthful Pan, nude and with his head facing, seated to left on a rock that is covered by his mantle, holding lagobolon in his right hand and resting his left elbow on the rock; to left, Arkadian League monogram; at the foot of the rock, syrinx and, in small letters, ΟΛVΜ. BCD Peloponnesos 1511(same dies). Guerin 11 (dies 1/c). Traité III, 866, pl. CCXXIV, 2 (same dies). Very rare. With the usual die break on the obverse, otherwise, nearly extremely fine. 60,000 Ex Triton VIII, 11 January 2005, 329.

3:1

The staters of Megalopolis struck in the name of the Arkadian League are all very rare, indeed. About 33 examples are known (most in museums), struck from three obverse dies, of which this is the first in the series. The quality of the engraving is remarkable: it is certain that the artist who produced the dies for this coin also worked for Olympia and for Philip II. As noted in the BCD catalogue, the suggestion that the reverse die of the present coin was unknown to Guerin (in the Triton catalogue) is an error: Guerin’s plates were simply not clear enough to enable a firm identification to be made at that time.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

98

98.

Pheneos. Circa first or early 2nd quarter of the 4th century. Obol (Silver, 0.91 g 12). Head of youthful Hermes to left, with his petasos hanging behind from a cord around his neck. Rev. ΦΕΝΙ Upright kerykeion; to right, acorn and oak leaf. Not in BCD and apparently unknown and unpublished. Somewhat carelessly struck with some obverse flatness and a minor flan crack, otherwise, extremely fine. 12,000

3:1

BCD was famous for saying that he was sure that as soon as he auctioned his collection, one of those great rarities would appear for which he had long searched in vain. In this case the situation is even worse: this coin is utterly unknown and marks a completely new issue of the 4th century!! But when was it struck? It clearly must be connected to the extremely rare triobols and obols that bear the same head of Hermes on their obverses (triobols: BMC 1 and BCD 1600; obols: BMC 2 - not in BCD), which have been dated in the BCD catalogue to the late 5th or very early 4th centuries. The heads on the triobol and this obol are, in fact, so close that we can assume the same die cutter was responsible for both: perhaps they should be dated down into the 4th century, even if that would leave Pheneos with little or no coinage in the late 5th. The reverse type certainly harks back to the rare 5th century fractions of Pheneos that also bore kerykeia as their reverse types (BCD 15981599), but the prominent oak leaf and acorn symbol seems completely unexpected. In fact, this coin looks experimental in every way and it may well be that it was decided to replace the kerykeion type on the reverse with the more familiar ram almost immediately after this coin was struck. In any case this is a most extraordinary novum.

99

99.

-. Circa 370-340 BC. Obol (Silver, 0.88 g 6). Bust of youthful Hermes to right, his cloak tied around his neck and with his petasos hanging behind, suspended by a cord. Rev. ΦΕ Ram standing to right; above, kerykeion to right. BCD 1608. BMC 5. Traité II, 3, 891. Weber 4317. Rare. A beautiful piece, sharp and minted from fresh dies. Virtually as struck. 5750

3:1

For all intents and purposes this is a perfect coin - the moneyers at Pheneos seem to have taken inordinate pride in their work since badly struck pieces are very uncommon. It is more than likely that some of the obols were actually initially distributed to the citizenry as donatives, which would then be used commercially as the recipient wished. This type of usage has parallels to some of the late 5th century litrai struck in Sicily, which are often of such outstanding beauty that they must have been produced deliberately as prestige issues on the order of a wealthy magistrate (such as the famous litron from Akragas: AMB 263, SNG Lloyd 829).

100

100.

Stymphalos. Circa 350 BC. Obol (Silver, 0.90 g 9). Head of Herakles in lionskin headdress to right. Rev. ΣΤΥΜΦΑΛΙΟΝ (retrograde) Head of water bird to right. BCD 1703 (but from different dies). SNG Copenhagen 286. Very rare. A lovely coin, beautifully struck on a small, gem-like flan. One of the finest known obols of Stymphalos. FDC. 6250 The obols of Stymphalos can be connected with the foundation of the new city and all date to a short span of time between the very late 360s until the early 340s. They were produced during the building period to ensure sufficient small change to pay all the building workers (curiously enough, the fractional bronzes one would have expected to be struck alongside them were not - Stymphalian bronze coinage is incredibly rare - and one can assume the civic authorities preferred to use suitable imported issues, perhaps Sikyonian).

3:1

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

101

101.

3:1

Tegea. Circa 350-330 BC. Hemidrachm (Silver, 2.82 g 12). Helmeted head of Athena Alea to right. Rev. ΤΕΓΕΑΤΑΝ The warrior Kepheos, nude but for helmet, striding right, holding dagger in his right hand and shield, ornamented with a griffin on the inside, with his left; on the ground below his feet, spear. BCD Peloponnesos 1730 (this coin). SNG Lockett 2531 = Pozzi 1960 = Traité 990 pl. CCXXVII, 28 (same dies). Very rare. Lightly toned, Very fine. 4500 From the BCD Collection, LHS 96, 8 May 2006, 1730. This is actually quite an incredibly rare coin: very few examples from this die pair are known, perhaps only three.

THE CYCLADES

102

102.

Kythnos. Circa 530/20-500 BC. Tetrobol (Silver, 4.06 g). Head of a boar to right. Rev. Rough incuse square with irregular sides. Sheedy 1. Traité II, I, 983, pl. XXVIII, 7. Toned, well struck and very attractive. Extremely fine. 4500 This is one of the earliest coins of Kythnos and has a rather stylized but attractive head of a boar. Those struck in second quarter of the 5th century have a more realistic looking boar, though one that is perhaps less appealing.

3:1

103

103.

Paros. Circa 520/15-500 BC. Drachm (Silver, 6.08 g). Goat kneeling to right. Rev. Incuse square. Dewing 1962. Sheedy 33a (this coin). SNG Lockett 2619. A perfectly centered and beautifully toned example. Extremely fine. 12,500 From the collections of Oskar Kokoschka, LHS 95, 25 October 2005, 631 and W. Niggeler, I, Bank Leu/Münzen und Medaillen, 3 December 1965, 341.

3:1

The Parian ‘goats’ are among the most endearing of all of the Cycladic coinages. This one is particularly nice.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

104

104.

-. Circa 500-497/5 BC. Drachm (Silver, 6.06 g). Goat moving to right. Rev. Roughly quadripartite incuse square. Sheedy 73a (this coin). A remarkably beautiful coin with a magnificently sculptural goat. One of the loveliest examples of the entire series. Finely toned and extremely attractive. Virtually as struck. 17,500

3:1

Ex Bank Leu 13. 23 April 1975, 175. This must be one of the most impressive of all surviving Parian drachms. The beautifully rounded and high relief representation of the goat is reminiscent of those that appear on Achaemenid gems and, even, on Minoan and Mycenaean ones.

105

105.

Tenos. Circa 200-188 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 13.11 g 12), Rhodian standard weight. Laureate head of Apollo Karneios to right with ram’s horn over his ear. Rev. ΤΗΝΙΩΝ Poseidon seated left on high-backed throne, holding dolphin in his right hand and trident in his left; to left in field, bunch of grapes. É&A-G 102. Extremely rare and important, one of only five tetradrachms of Tenos known. Nicely toned, Extremely fine. 37,500

Ex Münzen und Medaillen 95, 4 October 2004, 41, from the collection of S. Boutin Monnaies et Médailles 76, 19 September 1991, 801, ex Ars Classica XVI, 3 July 1933, 1315 and from the Carystus Hoard of 1930 (IGCH 210). This is one of the rarest of all Cycladic coins, known only from a very few specimens. The head on the obverse closely resembles that of Alexander on the coins of Lysimachos but the laurel wreath proves that it is of Apollo.

2:1

55


56

nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

PAPHLAGONIA

106

106. 3:1

Kromna. 4th century BC. Tetrobol (Silver, 3.58 g 10), Persic standard, circa 340 BC. Laureate head of Zeus to left, his hair partially rolled at the back of his head but with some locks falling down below the neck truncation on both sides of his head. Rev. ΚΡΩΜΝΑ Head of the Citygoddess or, perhaps, Hera to left, wearing turreted stephane adorned with palmette and scrolls, triple-pendant earring, necklace and drapery along the neck line; before, uncertain monogram; behind, star; above, crescent with points downward. Cf. Monnaies et Médailles 54 (26 October 1978), 253 (same monogram and star but no crescent). Cf. SNG BM Black Sea 1323 var. (monogram) and 1332 (= BMC 6, with crescent but no star). A lovely coin of splendid style, very well struck. Nicely toned. Reverse slightly off center, otherwise, extremely fine. 2250

Ex Numismatica Genevensis 4, 11 December 2006, 88, Triton IX, 10 January 2006, 893, and Numismatik Lanz 102, 28 May 2001, 254, and from the collection of the Johns Hopkins University and J. H. Garrett, Bank Leu/Numismatic Fine Arts, 16 October 1984, 248. The coinage of the minor Paphlagonian city of Kromna dates to around the middle of the 4th century BC and consists solely of silver coins that are often termed drachms (but are more likely to be Persic tetrobols) and a single series of bronzes. Very similar coins were produced by the nearby city of Sesamos (silver tetrobols and diobols,and bronzes, - they bear a very similar head of Zeus and a female head that is probably Demeter) as well as by the more important city of Herakleia Pontica across the border in Bithynia (staters, drachms, tetrobols, diobols and obols - they bear a head of Herakles coupled with a female head that is very similar to the one on the issues of Kromna - variously identified as either Hera or the city-goddess). Since the issues of Herakleia can be dated to the time of the tyrant Satyros (c. 352345 BC) it seems likely that those of Kromna and Sesamos should be around that period as well (both of these cities were incorporated into the new city of Amastris in c. 300 BC). While some of the coins from Kromna are rather banal in style, some, like this one, are astonishingly good: the heads can be compared to those on the contemporary coinage of Olympia.

BITHYNIA 3:1

107

107.

Kios. Circa 340-330. Stater (Gold, 8.59 g 11), signed by the magistrate Agasikles. Laureate head of Apollo to right. Rev. ΑΓΑΣΙΚΛΗΣ Prow of war galley to left, ornamented with a star; above, club to right; to left, traces of eagle (?, mostly off the flan) standing to left. Rec. Gén. p. 311. Extremely rare, one of perhaps ten known staters of Kios, almost all of which are in museums. Traces of double-striking on the reverse and a few insignificant marks, otherwise, lustrous, sharp and, virtually as struck. 37,500


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010 Not surprisingly, the head of Apollo on this coin seems to hark back to those on the coinage of Olynthos and on the gold staters of Philip II: we have to assume that the rare issues of Kios had to have been influenced by those of Philip’s. In any case, they have to have been produced prior to c. 324/3 (Mørkholm) or c. 323-320 (Westermark) when the great Saida Hoard (IGCH 1508) was buried, since that hoard contained virtually all of the known gold staters of Kios, including other examples struck by Agasikles. Whether the gold staters were struck to pay mercenaries by the Persians or whether the city was already in Alexander’s hands when they were minted is uncertain: the city had been under direct Persian rule in the early 4th century but was officially independent by mid-century. Nevertheless, it seems more likely that the coins were struck prior to Alexander’s invasion, especially since they were accompanied by large numbers of silver hemidrachms that would also have been ideal for mercenary pay. The gold staters are extremely rare, with only around 10 being known, apparently struck by five magistrates: Agasikles, Agnonides, Hierokles, Poseidonios and Proxenos. This is certainly one of the finest examples in existence.

LESBOS, ISLAND OFF AEOLIS

108

108.

Mytilene. Circa 454-428/7 BC. Hekte (Electrum, 2.55 g 7), struck circa 430 BC. Head of a nymph, possibly Europa, three-quarter facing and turned slightly to the right, wearing a taenia that is bound up at the back of her head. Rev. Two profile boar's heads confronting each other. Cf. BMC 51 (= Bodenstedt 45/α with A on the reverse but the same obverse). BMFA 1692 = Bodenstedt 45/β (same dies). Very rare. With a particularly beautiful facing head of very individual character. nicely centered and well struck. Minor scratches on the reverse, otherwise, about extremely fine. 7500

3:1

This is one of those rare issues from Mytilene that simply must have a story behind it. In fact, the obverse, with its head of a nymph, was used for two consecutive issues: the first, Bodenstedt 44, is paired with a reverse showing the head of a bull and the second, as this, Bodenstedt 45, with these two opposing boars’ heads (this type harks back to Mytilene’s early billon coinage, as BMC 10 ff.). The nymph’s portrait is remarkably good: she has a real character and must be taken from life. Perhaps she was a young woman who lived in Mytilene at the time this coin was made and the engraver, besotted by her charms, immortalized her by placing her portrait on these coins.

IONIA

109

109.

Phokaia. Circa 521-478 BC. Hekte (Electrum, 2.52 g), struck circa 490s BC. Facing head of Silenos with wide, open eyes, broad beard and long mustache. Rev. Quadripartite incuse square. Bodenstedt 43, -/θ. ; SNG Copenhagen. A spectacular, toned example of late Archaic miniature art, carefully struck and beautifully centered. Extremely fine. 12,500

Given its small size this coin can only be termed a masterpiece. Virtually no other coin bearing a facing head produced during the Archaic period rivals the virtuosity of its engraving - Silenos’ head on this coin has a presence that more than belies its small size. Coins of this type have been long known, but this is surely one of the finest examples extant.

3:1

57


58

nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

110

110.

3:1

Phokaia. Circa 521-478 BC. Hekte (Electrum, 2.59 g), Circa 480-450. Forepart of rooster to left; above, seal swimming to left. Rev. Irregular incuse square. Bodenstedt 40. Extremely rare, one of three examples known. Sharply struck in high relief, an exceptional example, extremely fine. 5000 The rooster that appears on this coin symbolizes the sunrise - as on the well-known contemporary issues of Himera in Sicily.

ISLANDS OFF IONIA

111

111. 2:1

Samos. Circa 453/2-440/39 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 13.01 g 6), year Ε = 5 = 449/448 BC. Lion’s scalp facing. Rev. ΣΑ Forepart of an ox to right; behind, olive branch; below, Ε. Barron 75 (A35/P75). BMC 93. SNG Copenhagen 1681. Traité II, 3, 1799 and pl. CL, 20. An attractive and very rare dated issue. Lightly toned, Good very fine. 12,500

Ex Hauck & Aufhäuser 19, 21 March 2006, 150 and Giessener Münzhandlung 69, 18 November 1994, 361.

IONIA OR LYDIA

112

112.

Uncertain mint. Early 5th century BC. Drachm (Silver, 4.37 g). Wolf, eating bunch of grapes held by his right paw, standing to left on base composed of a horizontal row of pearls between two linear borders. Rev. Quadripartite incuse square. Apparently unpublished and probably unique. A fresh and attractive coin. Nearly extremely fine. 7500

3:1

While naturalistic, this depiction is surely taken from some local myth, such as the famous tale of the fox and the grapes by Aesop. The fact that Aesop actually came from the area of Asia Minor where this coin was presumably struck (Aesop is closely connected with both Samos and Lydia), and that he lived from the late 7th through the mid 6th century (possibly circa 620-564), makes it very likely that there is a connection between this coin and the cultural milieu that gave rise to Aesop’s fables.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, z端rich 18 may 2010

KINGS OF LYDIA

113

113.

Kroisos. Circa 560-546 BC. Stater (Gold, 8.09 g), light standard, Sardes, circa 550-546 and later. Foreparts of lion, on the left, and bull, on the right, facing each other. Rev. Two incuse squares of unequal size. BMFA 2073. Dewing 2431. SNG von Aulock 2875. SNG Berry 1138. An exceptional piece, lustrous and unusually sharp. Virtually as struck. 8000

3:1

This superb coin was probably struck after the conquest of Lydia by Kyros the Persian: the lion and bull protomes on this coin are larger and more prominent than those ascribed to the reign of Kroisos himself. The reason why the issues of Kroisos continued to be struck under Persian rule is simply their popularity: they were trusted by users over a wide area and were only replaced by the familiar darics, bearing a figure of the Persian king, about a generation later, in c. 520. Originally enormous numbers of the lion/bull staters must have been struck, but the vast majority of them were all surely melted down and reminted as Darics in antiquity; thus they are now rather rare, especially when they are in nearly perfect condition, as this one. 3:1

114

114.

-. Hemihekte or 1/12 Stater (Silver, 0.85 g), Sardes, struck circa 550-546. Confronted foreparts of a lion, on the left, and a bull, on the right. Rev. Incuse square. BMC 20. Rosen 668. SNG von Aulock 8213. Very rare. Nicely toned and well centered. Nearly extremely fine. 1250

115 3:1

115.

Time of Cyrus to Darios I. Circa 545-520 BC. Siglos (Silver, 5.28 g), Sardes. Confronted foreparts of a lion, on the left, and a bull, on the right. Rev. Two incuse squares of unequal size. Dewing 2428. SNG Copenhagen 456. SNG Kayhan 1024. A splendid piece, bright and very well preserved. Extremely fine. 1500

116

116.

-. 1/6 Stater or Hekte (Silver, 1.66 g), Sardes. Confronted foreparts of lion, on the left, and bull, on the right. Rev. Two unequally sized incuse squares. Rosen 667 SNG Kayhan 1019. An exceptionally fine example, beautifully preserved. Rare so nice. Beautifully toned, good extremely fine. 4500

3:1

59


60

nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

CARIA

117

2:1

117.

Uncertain mint. Circa 520 BC. Stater (Silver, 11.95 g). Forepart of horse to left. Rev. Two incuse squares: the larger ornamented with palmettes and flowers, the smaller with a diagonal cross. ACGC 86. BMC (Troas) 5-8 (Kyme). Jameson 2235 = Weber 5475 (this coin). Traité I, 1, 537 = pl. XIII, 24. Very rare. Attractively toned as found, extremely fine. 27,500

Ex Bank Leu 45, 26 May 1988, 223, Hess-Leu 15, 7 April 1960, 205, and from the collections of R. Jameson, Sir H. Weber and General W. Yorke Moore, Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge, 1 March 1889, 172.

118

118.

. Circa 500 BC. Stater (Silver, 11.84 g). ΟVΛ Forepart of lion to left, head turned back to right. Rev. Irregular quadripartite incuse square. ACGC 99. SNG von Aulock 2077 (Miletos). Traité II, I, 737 and pl. XIX, 13. Very rare. Nicely toned, About extremely fine. 7500 Ex Hess-Leu 31, 6 December 1966, 457.

3:1

119

119.

3:1

Knidos. Circa 411-405/4 BC. Drachm (Silver, 6.26 g 3). Forepart of lion to right, with open jaws and outstretched right paw. Rev. ΚΝΙ Head of Aphrodite to right, her hair bound in a sakkos, wearing plain necklace and with a beaded neck truncation; all within incuse square. Cahn 117 var. (reverse R 79, obverse V58). A lovely fresh coin. Nearly extremely fine. 3750


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

SATRAPS OF CARIA

120

2:1

120.

Maussolos. Circa 377/6-353/2 BC. Tetradrachm (15.32 g 12). Laureate head of Apollo facing, turned slightly to right and wearing a cloak fastened with a gem below his chin. Rev. ΜΑΥΣΣΩΛΛ[Ο] Zeus Labraundos standing right, holding labrys (double-axe) in his right hand and long scepter in his left; below, between his legs and the scepter, Α. BMC 3 (same dies). Traité II 94. Rare. Lightly toned - a particularly appealing coin with a lovely and serene head of Apollo and an unusually expressive head of Zeus on the reverse. Slightly flat struck on the reverse, otherwise, good extremely fine. 10,000 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection, ex Nomos FPL 1, Winter/Spring 2008, 55. This coin has an astonishingly appealing head of Apollo: he is nothing like those found on contemporary issues of Rhodes, though he shares the emotionalism so characteristic of the art of the period. What is perhaps even more impressive is the skill with which the engraver handled the relatively tiny head of Zeus on the reverse - in itself it is a miniature of real power.

ISLANDS OFF CARIA

121

121.

Rhodos. Rhodes. Circa 229-205 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 13.61 g 11), struck under the magistrate Ameinias. Radiate head of Helios facing, turned slightly to the right. Rev. ΡΟΔΙΟΝ Rose with bud to right; to left, prow of galley to right; to left and right of stem, ΑΜΕΙΝΙ-ΑΣ. Ashton 212. SNG Copenhagen 759. SNG Keckman 542. SNG con Aulock 2799. Lightly toned and very well struck. Extremely fine. 14,000 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection, ex Nomos FPL 1, Winter-Spring 2008, 57 and Münzen und Medaillen FPL 518 (February 1989), 11.

2:1

61


62

nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

CARIA OR LYCIA

122

122.

3:1

Uncertain mint. Circa 530 BC . Half-stater (Silver, 5.79 g), Aeginetic. Beardless, almost certainly male, head to left, with long hair falling down behind and an ear with a large lobe (not an earring). Rev. Two irregularly divided incuse squares, one considerably larger than the other. Cf. BMC Caria, Cnidus 1 = Traité II, 1, 698 and pl. XVIII, 9 = Cahn, Knidos 75 and pl. 19, 1 = K. A. Sheedy, The Dolphins, the Crab, the Sphinx and ‘Aphrodite’, Studies Price, p. 323, 8 and pl. 69, 4 = E. Isik, Frühe Silberprägung in Städten Westkleinasiens (Saarbrücken, 2003), 75 and pl. 9, 4 (the unique stater of the same type, 9.92 g). A coin of great interest and numismatic importance, apparently unique. Lightly toned, good very fine. 12,500 Ex Gorny & Mosch 159, 8 October 2007, 187. This is one of the most extraordinary coins to appear in many years. It was first published in the Gorny & Mosch catalogue of 2007 along with a most erudite note (albeit unsigned) attributing it to the late 7th or early 6th century BC; thus firmly placing it within the realms of the so-called Daedalic art of the 7th century. This dating has, however, been challenged by K.Konuk, in his as yet unpublished chapter in the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Greek and Roman Coins, where he emphatically denies the existence of any silver coinage prior to the reign of Kroisos: he has, in fact, returned to the traditional view of Herodotus, who was writing in the mid 5th century, that Kroisos was the first to strike coins in pure gold and pure silver. Prior to that time, only electrum was used for coins which, therefore, remained a more-or-less a local phenomenon. Following the conquest of Lydia by Kyros the Persian in 546, if not before, the use of silver coins spread dramatically fast: within a decade or two silver was being struck by Greek cities all over the Aegean, in Magna Graeca and in Sicily. In addition, the widespread issuance of small silver fractions, paralleling the previous issues of electrum and gold small denominations, meant that coinage was being used by all elements of society for relatively small transactions as well as major payments. Returning to the present type, Sheedy already pointed out that the weight standard of the closely related and equally unique BM stater was related to Lycian issues, which suggested to him a date in the later 6th century for the coin: he simply must be right - the apparently early style undoubtedly reflects local taste rather than a chronological period.

DYNASTS OF LYCIA 3:1

123

123.

Kherei. Circa 440/30-410 BC. Stater (Silver, 8.67 g 3), Pinara. Helmeted head of Athena to right, bowl decorated with three olive leaves and palmette; behind neck, kher i. Rev. kher i Head of Kherei wearing Persian headdress made from a soft fabric. Falghera -. Mørkholm & Zahle II-. Cf. NAC 25, 25 June 2003, 194 (same dies). Very rare, only about half a dozen coins of this type are known. Nicely toned, Nearly extremely fine. 4000 Ex Numismatica Ars Classica 27, 12 May 2004, 199.

This coin is usually described as having been struck in an uncertain mint, but the obverse die was also used for signed issues from Pinara and it seems likely that it was minted there.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

124

124.

-. Stater (Silver, 8.51 g 6), Telmessos. Head of Athena to right, wearing crested Attic helmet adorned with tendril and four olive leaves; behind neck, symbol. Rev. kherei telebehe Head of bearded Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress; all within incuse square. Mørkholm & Zahle II 52. SNG Copenhagen Supp. 451 var. = SNG von Aulock 4198 (different obverse symbol). A splendid coin with a very fine head of Herakles. Obverse struck from a slightly worn die as usual, otherwise, good extremely fine. 7500

2:1

From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection, ex Nomos, FPL 1, Winter-Spring 2008, 64. The head of Athena, which appears on many Lycian issues of this period, was undoubtedly based on the similar heads of the goddess found on the contemporary coins of Athens. After all, the famous ‘Dekadrachm Hoard’ was found in Lycia, and we can be sure that Athenian coins must have been in common use there. The head of Herakles on the reverse is particularly attractive and has a style that is a blend of late archaic and early classical elements - note especially the difference in treatment between his beard and the hair over his forehead.

2:1 125

125.

-. Stater (Silver, 8.63 g 12), Telmessos. Helmeted head of Athena to right; behind, symbol. Rev. kherei telebehe Head of bearded Herakles wearing lion skin headdress to right. As last, from the same pair of dies. Mørkholm & Zahle II 52. Attractively toned and sharply struck. Extremely fine. 5500

PISIDIA

126

126.

Selge. Circa 370 BC. Stater (Silver, 10.87 g 1). Two nude wrestlers grappling with each other; between them, ΕΥ; in exergue, palmette. Rev. ΣΤΛΕΓΕΥΣ Slinger standing right; between his legs, astragalus; to right, triskeles. ACGC 1007. SNG Copenhagen 236. SNG von Aulock 5256 (same dies). Beautifully toned and exceptionally nice. Some minor flatness on the reverse, otherwise, good extremely fine. 3750 Acquired from Stack’s in 1998. This is unquestionably one of the finest of all the wrestler coins of Selge, it’s only rival being the famous piece from the von Aulock collection that sold for a record price in 2002.

2:1

63


64

nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

CILICIA

127

127.

2:1

Tarsos. Balakros. Satrap of Cilicia, 333-323 BC. Stater (Silver, 10.99 g 10). Baaltars seated left on backless throne, holding lotos-tipped scepter in his right hand; to left, grain ear and bunch of grapes; below throne, Τ; to right, Β above ivy leaf. Rev. Draped bust of Athena facing, turned slightly to left, wearing triple-crested helmet and pearl necklace. SNG France 367368. SNG von Aulock 5964. Toned. Extremely fine. 1250 Ex Classical Numismatic Group 43, 24 September 1997, 671.

CYPRUS

128

2:1

128.

Salamis. Evagoras I. Circa 411-374 BC. Stater (Silver, 10.93 g 1). E u fa go ro, (in Cypriot syllabic script). Head of bearded Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headress. Rev. Ba si le fo se eu (in combined Cypriot and Greek letters). He-goat with long horns and beard seated right on dotted ground line; above, grain of barley; to right, letter. BMC 55 var, Masson & Amandry, 36, Ba . A superb example, nicely toned, unusually well struck and centered, and of excellent style. Good extremely fine. 25,000 Ex Hess-Divo 307, 7 June 2007, 1296 and Monnaies et Médailles, FPL 518 (1989), 18. A spectacular piece: Cypriot coins are well known for their poor minting technique and they tend to be off struck, lightly struck, or on short flans, and usually they are in poor condition as well. This piece is an amazing exception. It is not only very well preserved but also is in good silver with virtually no traces of corrosion. The head of Herakles is a very noble one, and all the fur of the lion is clearly indicated. The powerful goat on the reverse has been shown with great accuracy as well resting and at peace.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

SELEUKID KINGS OF SYRIA

129

129.

Seleukos I Nikator. 312-281 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 17.23 g 1), Susa, circa 304-298/7. Bust of Alexander the Great as Dionysos to right, wearing Attic helmet adorned with a leopard skin and a bull’s horn and ear (a second bull’s horn can be seen coming out from the far side of his head) and with lowered ear guards, and with a leopard’s skin over his shoulders and knotted around his neck. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ Nike standing right, placing wreath on top of a trophy of arms to her right; below left, ΒΕ; between Nike and trophy, Boeotian shield; to right, monogram of ΠΡΥ. Kritt, ESMS Tr. 1-3 var. (obverse die A1, reverse -). SC 173.1. Rare. Struck from the first and most elaborate obverse die in the series. Lightly toned. A few minor marks and areas of flatness, otherwise, extremely fine. 20,000

3:1

The Trophy series began in Susa c. 304 and lasted for about seven years, using up 67 obverse dies and at least 93 reverses: it commemorated the victories of Seleukos I in India. What is especially interesting about this coin is that the remarkably fine condition of its obverse makes it clear that this was the prototype die for the entire series. The elaborate helmet that Alexander wears is covered by a leopard skin, which, unlike that on all the other dies of this series, is almost totally covered in spots made in the shape of almonds. Perhaps doing this took too much effort on the part of the die cutter, or the official in charge found it not to his taste, because, beginning with the second obverse die in the series this tapestry of spots was replaced by much more regular lines of larger spots, which look a little like cowrie shells and were surely easier to engrave.

130

130.

Antiochos III ‘the Great’. 223-187 BC. Drachm (Silver, 4.23 g 1), Antioch, circa 204-197. Diademed head of Antiochos III to right. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ Apollo seated left on omphalos, holding arrow in his right hand and resting his right on his bow; to left, monogram. SC 1047.1 = WSM 1090a. A superb piece, of exceptional quality and with a fine portrait. Lightly toned, good extremely fine. 4500

2:1

Ex Tkalec19 February 2001, 160.

131

131.

Seleukos IV Philopator. 187-175 BC. Drachm (Silver, 4.22 g 12), Soloi. Diademed head of Seleukos IV to right. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ Apollo seated left on omphalos, holding arrow in his right hand and resting his left on bow at his side; to left, Α above owl; to right, ΣΑ. CSE 526 (this coin). A. Houghton, The Royal Seleucid Mint of Soloi, NC 1989, 52 (this coin). SC 1305 (this coin cited). Very rare. Nicely toned and most attractive. Extremely fine. 4000 Ex Leu 81, ‘An Outstanding Collection’, 16 May 2001, 333 and Bank Leu 50, 25 April 1990, 199 and from the collection of Arthur Houghton.

2:1

65


66

nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

132

132.

3:1

Demetrios II Nikator. First reign, 146-138 BC. Drachm (Silver, 4.06 g 1), Seleucia in Pieria. Diademed head of Demetrios II to right. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ ΝΙΚΑΤΟΡΟΣ Anchor upwards; on crossbar at lower left, lily. SNG Spaer 1634 (same dies). SC 1927.1. Very rare. Lightly toned and extremely attractive. Good extremely fine. 2250 Ex Classical Numismatic Group 58, 19 September 2001, 703. The lily symbol on the reverse might suggest an attribution of this coin to Jerusalem (!), since that was the city’s symbol par excellence on issues of Antiochos VII and others that were minted there. Unfortunately, this coin is linked to others that do not bear this symbol (as SC 1925-1926 and 1927A) so this attribution must be discarded.

133

133. 3:1

Tryphon. Circa 142-138 BC. Drachm (Silver, 4.26 g 12), Antioch. Diademed head of Tryphon with flowing hair to right. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΤΡΥΦΩΝΟΣ ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑΤΟΡΟΣ Ornate Macedonian helmet to left, with spike on top and with a wild goat's horn over the visor; to left, monogram. SC 1033g. A splendid example in high relief struck on good metal, very rare thus. Lightly toned and with much original luster, good extremely fine. 3500

134

134.

3:1

Demetrios II Nikator. Second reign, 129-126/5 BC. Drachm (Silver, 4.13 g 12), Tarsos. Diademed and bearded head of Demetrios II to right. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ ΘΕΟΥ ΝΙΚΑΤΟΡΟΣ Zeus seated left on throne, holding Nike in his right hand and long sceptre in his left; to left, two monograms. SC 2158. SNG Spaer 2204. Nicely toned and with a wonderful portrait. Two old scrapes on the reverse, otherwise, nearly extremely fine. 1000


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

135

135.

Antiochos VIII Epiphanes (Grypos). 121/0-97/6 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 16.54 g 12), Seleucia ad Calycadnum, 112-96. Diademed head of Antiochos VIII to right; fillet border. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ Athena standing left holding Nike in her right hand and resting her left on a shield; behind, spear; in outer left, flower; inner left, ΕΡ ΑΡ. SC 1279.4 (this coin illustrated). Beautifully toned, very well struck, and with one of the finest of all the portraits of Antiochos VIII. Good extremely fine. 2000

2:1

Ex Freeman & Sear, MBS 10, 11 February 2004, 233. Antiochos VIII had an extensive coinage, including issues struck when he was still under the regency of his terrible mother, Cleopatra Thea. His portraits are seldom particularly good, many devolving into caricature, but this piece bears a head of quite exceptional character: it shows a refined elegance that is simply outstanding in every way. It is certainly the finest depiction of this late Seleukid king in existence.

THE ACHAEMENIDS OF PERSIA

136

136.

Time of Darios I. Circa 520-505 BC. Siglos (Silver, 5.35 g). Half-length figure of the Persian king to right, wearing radiate headdress and holding bow in his left hand and two arrows in his right. Rev. Oblong irregular incuse. Carradice Type I (pl. XI, 10). BMC Arabia pl. XXVII, 25. Rare. Nicely toned and well-struck on a full flan. Good very fine. 1500

3:1

From the Bellaria Collection, Triton VII, 13 January 2004, 363 and ex Numismatica Ars Classica A, 27 February 1999, 533.

137

137.

Time of Darios I to Xerxes I. Circa 505-480 BC. Siglos (Silver, 5.30 g). Persian king, wearing radiate tiara, in running/kneeling stance to right, shooting bow. Rev. Oblong incuse. Carradice Type II (pl. XI, 12). BMC Arabia pl. XXVII, 23. A very attractive example of the type, nicely toned, unusually well struck, perfectly centered and very well preserved. Good very fine. 1200 From the Bellaria Collection, Triton VII, 13 January 2004, 365.

3:1

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

138

138.

3:1

Time of Xerxes II to Artaxerxes II. Circa 420-375 BC. Siglos (Silver, 5.43 g). Persian king, wearing radiate tiara, in running/kneeling stance to right, holding bow in his left hand, spear in his right and with a quiver over his shoulder. Rev. Oblong incuse. Carradice Type IIIb C (pl. XIV, 36). BMC Arabia pl. XXV, 15. An exceptionally fine, toned example of this type, very well struck and clear. Nearly extremely fine. 1500 From the Bellaria Collection, Triton VII, 13 January 2004, 368 and ex SBV (Basel) 33, 20 September 1993, 426.

THE KINGDOM OF PARTHIA

139

139.

3:1

Arsakes II. 211-185 BC. Drachm (Silver, 4.21 g 12), Rhagae?, circa 209. Head of Arsakes II to left, wearing bashlik. Rev. ΑΡΣΑΚΟΥ Arsakes I seated right on low throne, holding bow in his right hand; to right, eagle. Sellwood 6.1. Shore 4. Attractive, well struck and nicely toned. Some uncleaned encrustations on obverse and reverse, otherwise, extremely fine. 1250 From the Bellaria Collection, Triton VII, 12 January 2004.

140

140.

Mithradates II. 121-91 BC. Drachm (Silver, 4.21 g 12), Ecbatana, circa 119-109. Diademed bust of Mithradates II to left, wearing torque and elaborate robes. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ΜΕΓΑΛΟΥ / ΑΡΣΑΚΟΥ / ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ Arsakes I seated right on low throne, holding bow. Sellwood 26.1. Shore 77. A wonderful piece, perfectly preserved and beautifully toned. Good extremely fine. 1000 3:1

From the Bellaria Collection, Triton VII, 12 January 2004, 422 and ex Sternberg 27, 7 November 1994, 23. The Parthians consciously harked back to earlier portrait styles, both of the Persian Great Kings and of the Assyrian and Babylonian rulers of Mesopotamia. This is a classic example of the kind of archaistic portrait they liked: it could have stepped right off one of the great relief panels found in Persian and Babylonian palaces!


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

141

141.

Phraates III. Circa 70/69-58/7 BC. Drachm (Silver, 4.13 g 12), Rhagae, circa 63/2-62/1. Diademed facing bust, with trim beard, elaborate robes and a necklace with a central medallion. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ΜΕΓΑΛΟΥ // ΑΡΣΑΚΟΥ // ΘΕΟΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ / ΕΥΕΡΓΕΤΟΥ // ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ / ΚΑΙ / ΦΙΛΕΛΛΗΝΟΣ Arsakes I seated right on throne, holding bow; below bow, monogram of Rhagae. Sellwood (Darius?) 35.7. Shore 165. A spectacular example of a rare coin, with a wonderfully evocative portrait. One of the very finest coins of this type in existence. Beautifully toned and struck on full, large flan, virtually as struck. 6000

3:1

This coin type has had a variety of attributions but its assignment to Phraates III now seems to be fairly certain. This is one of the most attractive of all Parthian coins and bears a facing portrait of remarkably good workmanship.

THE KINGDOM OF PERSIS 3:1

142

142.

Bagadat (Bayadad). Early-mid 3rd century BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 16.47 g 2). Diademed and bearded head of Bagadat to right, with luxuriant mustache; wearing kyrbasia or satrapal hat, and pendant earring. Rev. Aramaic legend in two lines. Bagadat seated left on high-backed throne, wearing kyrbasia and long robes and holding cup in his left hand and long scepter in his right; to left, standard. Alram 511. BMC, Arabia, p. 195, 1. De Morgan p. 397, 1. Very rare. Good very fine. 15,000 Ex Spink, 19 March 2009, 357, from the Pishvai Collection, ex Peus 388, 1 November 2006, 223, from the Bellaria Collection, Triton VII, 13 January 2004, 536 and from the Moreira Collection, Superior 138, 31 May 1998, 1622. The early coinage of Persis, which began towards the beginning of the 3rd century BC, is remarkable for its adamant reliance on iconography derived solely from its own Persian tradition, rather than accepting the forms of Greek art that then dominated the ancient world. While the die cutter for this coin must have been familiar with Greek work, the portraits of Bagadat are clearly of a Persian ruler perhaps only the relatively short beard is a concession to more ‘modern’ tastes. The way he appears stiffly seated on the reverse, holding a most un-Greek cup and such an unusual scepter, harks back more to Persepolis than to anywhere else. The standard that appears on the left is surely what was to become the Sasanian national battle standard: a huge flag that came to be embroidered with precious stones, gold and silver: it was captured and destroyed by the Arabs at the Battle of al-Qadisiyyah in 636.

2:1

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

BAKTRIA

143

143.

Euthydemos II. Circa 185-180 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 17.03 g 12). Diademed and draped bust of Euthydemos II to right. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΕΥΘΥΔΗΜΟΥ Youthful Herakles, nude but for lionskin over his left arm, standing facing, wearing an ivy wreath and holding a club in his left hand and a second ivy wreath in his right. Bopearachchi 1 D. Mitchiner 113b. SNG ANS 217-218. A lovely coin struck in good silver. Lightly toned, Nearly extremely fine. 4500 Ex Spink 100, 112 October 1993, 45.

2:1

144

144.

Antimachos I. Circa 180-165 BC. Tetradrachm (Silver, 16.97 g 11), Pushkalavati. Diademed and draped bust of Antimachos to right, wearing flat topped kausia. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΘΕΟΥ ΑΝΤΙΜΑΧΟΥ Poseidon, nude to the waist, standing facing, holding long trident in his right hand and filleted palm branch in his left. Bopearachchi Série 1A, 1-2. Mitchiner 124b. SNG ANS 274. Very rare in this condition. A superb piece, on a broad flan and with a wonderful portrait in high relief. Lightly toned, virtually as struck. 10,000 Ex Goldberg, Millennia Collection, 26 May 2008, 64.

2:1

The coinage of Baktria, present-day Afghanistan, is one of the most romantic and fascinating vestiges of Hellenism. The Greeks basically arrived there with Alexander’s conquering armies (though some Greeks had already been transported there as a place of exile by the Persian kings); after his conquest many remained. It became a province of the Seleucid kings of Syria but its satrap was able to establish it as an independent kingdom in the mid 3rd century BC. The coinage of Baktria and of its successor states further east in the Indus Valley is remarkable for the gallery of outstanding portraits they bear, primarily of rulers whose names and features are known solely from their coins. This coin is no exception: we know virtually nothing about Antimachos save for his portraits, which are remarkable for their beauty and individuality. The soft hat he wears, the Macedonian traveling or hunting cap, the kausia, proved to be one of the longest lasting items of Greek heritage in the East: its direct descendent, the pakol, is worn by Afghans to this day. While the coinage of Greek Baktria is not as rare as it once was, coins in truly superb condition are very difficult to find. This is certainly one of the finest examples of its type in existence.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

THE INDO-GREEK KINGDOMS

145

145.

Antialkidas. Circa 115-95 BC. Drachm (Silver, 2.44 g 12). ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ ΑΝΤΙΑΛΚΙΔΟΥ Diademed and draped bust of Antialkidas to right, wearing kausia. Rev. Maharajasa jayadharasa Amtialikidasa Zeus seated on throne to left, half facing, holding Nike in his right hand and scepter in his left; to left, forepart of elephant to right. Bop. 13 B, 42. SNG ANS 1094. Beautifully toned and well struck. Good extremely fine. 1000

2:1

One of the many remarkable facets of the Indo-Greek coinage is its bilingual nature: the inscription on the obverse is in Greek while that of the reverse is in the local Kharosti script. This type of usage is found nowhere else in the Greek world.

146

146.

Menander II. Circa 90-80 BC. Drachm (Silver, 2.41 g 12). ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔΙΚΑΙΟΥ ΜΕΝΑΝΔΟΥ Helmeted, diademed and draped bust of Menander II to right. Rev. Maharajasa dhramikasa Menamdrasa Nike walking right, holding wreath and palm branch; to left, monogram. Bopearachchi 2B. Mitchiner 229b (Menander I). SNG ANS 1270/1269. Extremely rare. Nicely toned and struck. Nearly extremely fine. 2750 Ex Triton X, 9 January 2007, 461.

JUDAEA

2:1

147

147.

Bar Kochba Revolt. 132-135 CE. Large Bronze (Bronze, 35mm, 43.56 g 12), year 1 = 132/133. Inscription in three lines reading Shim’on Prince of Israel within palm wreath with large oval jewel at the top. Rev. Year One of the Redemption of Israel Amphora with fluted body, high foot and curved handles. AJC II 3b. Hendin 677. Mildenberg 1 (O1/R1). TJC 220b. . Very rare. Partially flat struck, otherwise, very fine. 10,000 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection. What is interesting about this coin is how off struck it is: while Bar Kochba’s minters were primarily interested in getting coins out into circulation, and were working very rapidly, they usually did not produce such partially struck pieces. In addition this coin seems to have seen a great deal of actual circulation wear and that, in itself, is most strange since the war only lasted about four years. It seems more than likely that this large coin later served as a talisman for its owner, being carried for many years before its ultimate loss. Such use is attested by the appearance of a number of other Bar Kochba coins that have been holed for suspension in antiquity and then lost. It seems quite certain that after the revolt was crushed the coins were outlawed by the Roman authorities so that their continued possession, even as talismans, would have been dangerous for their ancient owners. The owner of this piece must have been a great patriot to have held it long enough to give it the amount of wear it has.

2:1

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

148

148.

2:1

Bar Kochba Revolt. 132-135 CE. Large Bronze (Bronze, 30mm, 11.10 g 12), year 2 = 133/4. Inscription in two lines reading Shim’on within an olive wreath closed by an oval gem at the top. Rev. Year 2 of the Freedom of Israel Amphora with fluted body, high foot and curved handles. AJC 39. Hendin 705. Mildenberg 19. TJC 356. A fascinating piece with considerable remains of an unidentifiable undertype. Roughly struck and with traces of corrosion, otherwise, about extremely fine. 7500 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection. Overstruck on an uncertain imperial issue from a Greek city in the East, very possibly a Hadrian from Gaza.

THE PTOLEMAIC KINGS OF EGYPT

149 2:1

149.

Ptolemy II Philadelphos, with Arsinoe II, Ptolemy I, and Berenike I. 285-246 BC. Octodrachm (Gold, 27.48 g 12), circa 265-246 BC. ΑΔΕΛΦΩΝ Jugate busts to right of Ptolemy II, diademed and draped, and Arsinoe II, diademed and veiled; behind, Gallic shield. Rev. ΘΕΩΝ Jugate busts to right of Ptolemy I, diademed and draped, and Berenike I, diademed and veiled. SNG Copenhagen 132. Svoronos 603 and pl. XIV, 16. Attractive and well struck. Extremely fine. 20,000

150

150.

Ptolemy II Philadelphos. 285-246 BC. (Bronze, 17.74 g 12), Alexandria, circa 250 BC. Laureate head of Zeus to right. Rev. ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ Eagle with spread wings standing left on thunderbolt; to left, shield. SNG Copenhagen 114 ff. Svoronos 610. With a lovely brown patina, an exceptionally fine coin for this series. Good extremely fine. 4000 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection, ex Nomos FPL 2, Winter-Spring 2009, 88.

2:1

The bronze coinage of the Ptolemies was extensive and very well-used. Silver and gold issues were reserved for major expenses, especially for the military and for imports, while bronzes were used domestically. Thus, very large numbers of bronzes were issued in a wide variety of denominations, but the vast majority preserved today are very worn. Really splendid pieces, like this one, are very rarely encountered, especially ones so stylistically excellent.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

151

151.

Berenike II, wife of Ptolemy III. Circa 244/3-221 BC. Octodrachm (Gold, 27.80 g 12), Alexandria. Veiled and draped bust of Berenike II to right. Rev. ΒΕΡΕΝΙΚΗΣ ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΗΣ Cornucopiae bound with fillet. BMFA 2348. SNG Copenhagen 169. Svoronos 1113. Very rare. A superb piece of wonderful style. Virtually as struck. 52,000

3:1

Berenike II was the daughter of Magas of Cyrene and Apama and was born c. 267. Soon after her father’s death she married the Macedonian prince Demetrios the Fair but, after finding him in bed with her mother (!) she had him killed and then married Ptolemy III of Egypt. When Ptolemy III was on campaign in Syria she cut off her hair and dedicated it to Aphrodite to ensure his safe return. The hair mysteriously disappeared and was then thought to have been carried up to the heavens where it became known as the constellation Coma Berenices. She was murdered by her mercuric son Ptolemy IV in 221, shortly after the death of Ptolemy III.

152

152.

Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII. 180-116. Okotodrachm (Gold, ), circa 134 (?). Head of Arsinoé II (?) to right, wearing diadem and stephane, and with a lotos-tipped scepter behind her head; in field to left, Κ. Rev. ΑΡΣΙΝΟΗΣ ΦΙΛΑΔΕΛΦΟΥ Double cornucopiae bound with fillet; border of dots. Du Chastel 298 (there dated to 134 BC). SNG Copenhagen 322. Svoronos 1498. Superb, lustrous and most attractive. Virtually as struck. 27,500 The head on the obverse of this coin, and the legend on the reverse, imply that what we have is merely a re-issue of the famous coinage of Arsinoe II, begun during her lifetime by Ptolemy II. Given the fact that the Ptolemies retained the head of Ptolemy I for virtually all the silver coins issued by the dynasty this seems reasonable. However, the prominent Κ on the obverse has lead to the belief that the portrait is actually that of either Cleopatra II or her daughter Cleopatra III; the first was the wife of both Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII, the second was the wife of Ptolemy VIII. It seems unlikely that we can ever be certain.

2:1

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

COINS OF THE ROMANS THE ROMAN REPUBLIC

153

153.

3:1

C. Memmius C.f. 56 BC. Denarius (Silver, 3.80 g 11). C.MEMMI.C.F Head of Ceres to right, wearing wreath of grain ears and earring. Rev. C.MEMMIVS / IMPERATOR Trophy of arms with, at its base, captive kneeling to right, his hands tied behind his back. Babelon (Memmia) 10. Crawford 427/1. Sydenham 920. An attractive, well-centered coin struck on a broad flan. Some areas flatly struck, otherwise, extremely fine. 1000

The reverse relates to the money’s uncle, C. Memmius L.f., who was the commander of the Roman forces who were victorious in Bithynia in the early 50s BC, He was given the title imperator for them in BC 57 and this coin was struck shortly thereafter to commemorate that event.

154

154.

3:1

Julius Caesar. Denarius (Silver, 3.90 g 2), Sicily, perhaps minted in Lilybaion under the proconsul A. Allienus, 47 BC. C.CAESAR IMP.COS.ITER Diademed and draped bust of Venus to right. Rev. A.ALLIENVS PR.COS Trinacrus standing left, with right foot on prow, holding triskeles in his right hand and cloak in his left. Babelon (Alliena) 1 and (Julia) 14. Crawford 457/1. CRI 54. Sydenham 1022. Rare. Good very fine. 1000

In late 47 BC Caesar was on Sicily, preparing for his assault on the Pompeian forces in north Africa. During this period a small issue of denarii was produced in his name by Aulus Allienus, then the proconsul of Sicily. The reverse shows a figure of Trinacrus, supposedly a son of Neptune, who may have been invented to account for the name Trinacria, commonly used for Sicily. The coins of Allienus must have seen considerable circulation: almost all surviving specimens are considerably worn.

155

155. 3:1

Lollius Palicanus. 45 BC. Denarius (Silver, 4.17 g 1), Lollius Palicanus, Rome. LIBERTATIS Diademed head of Libertas to right, wearing earring and pearl necklace. Rev. PALIKANVS Subsellium (Tribune’s chair) on rostra ornamented with three prows. Babelon (Lollia) 2. Crawford 473/1. CRI 86. Sydenham 960. Some areas of weakness but well centered. About extremely fine. 1000


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, z端rich 18 may 2010

156

156.

Sextus Pompey. Denarius (Silver, 3.75 g 3), mint moving with Sextus Pompey, probably at Massalia, under the fleet commander Q. Nasidius, 4443 BC. NEPTVNI Bare head of Cn. Pompeius Magnus to right; below, dolphin swimming downwards; before, trident upwards. Rev. Q.NASIDIVS Galley sailing right; in the prow to right, commander standing right with his right hand raised in salute; in the stern, helmsman holding rudder; above left, star. Babelon (Nasidia) 1, (Pompeia (28). Crawford 483/2. CRI 235. Sydenham 1350. Rare. An attractive piece, very well centered and struck. About extremely fine. 3000

3:1

157

157.

C. Cassius Longinus and L. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther. 43-42 BC. Denarius (Silver, 3.90 g 6), mint moving with the army of Brutus and Cassius. C.CASSI.IMP LEIBERTAS Diademed head of Libertas to right, wearing earring and necklace of pearls. Rev. LENTVLVS / SPINT Jug and lituus. Crawford 500/3. CRI 221. Sydenham 1307. Well struck and nicely centered with a very bold head of Libertas. Lightly toned and with some dark deposits, extremely fine. 2000

3:1

158

158.

Brutus. Denarius (Silver, 3.83 g 12), struck by Pedanius Costa in a mint moving with Brutus and Cassius in either western Asia Minor or Northern Greece, late summer-autumn 42 BC. LEG COSTA Laureate head of Apollo to right; border of ray-like dots. Rev. BRVTVS IMP Trophy including a helmet, shield, cuirass and two spears. Babelon (Iunia) 42 and (Pedania) 1. Crawford 506/2. CRI 209. Sydenham 1296. A bright and attractive piece. Extremely fine. 2000

Nothing is known about Pedanius Costa, who was the legate of Brutus who signed this coin. What is interesting iconographically about the head of Apollo on the obverse is the way the standard border of dots has been changed to tear-drop shaped rays, thus emphasizing his connection with the sun.

3:1

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

159

159. 2:1

Brutus. Denarius (Silver, 3.97 g 12), military mint, probably at Smyrna, early 42 BC. BRVTVS Axe, simpulum and knife. Rev. LENTVLVS / SPINT Jug and lituus. Crawford 500/7. CRI 198. Sydenham 1310. A lovely piece, beautifully toned and nicely centered. Good extremely fine. 4000 The implements on the obverse refer to the priestly college to which Brutus belonged, while the jug and lituus on the reverse relate to P. Cornelius Lentulus Spinther’s position as an augur, a function to which he was elected in BC 57. The astonishing sharpness and superb condition of this coin show that it must have been buried only a short while after it was struck, probably only about six months before the battle of Philippi in October 42. It also almost certainly indicates that it belonged to a supporter of Brutus who was killed during the battle: in any case, the coins struck by the Tyrannicides would have surely been proscribed themselves and would otherwise have been melted down.

160 2:1

160.

C. Numonius Vaala. 41 BC. Denarius (Silver, 3.80 g 2), Rome. C.NVMONIVS VAALA Bare head of Numonius Vaala to right. Rev. VAALA Soldier, holding spear and shield, rushing left to attack a fortified stockade defended by two soldiers each bearing a sword and shield. Babelon (Numonia) 2. Crawford 514/2. CRI 322. Sydenham 1087. Very rare and with an excellent portrait. Good very fine. 2000 The moneyer who issued this coin is unknown - as is his ancestor, whose portrait and exploit is portrayed on it. What presumably happened is that a Numonius was the first soldier to break through the walls of an enemy fortification, thus receiving the corona vallaris, a crown for being first over an enemy wall. This honor was then taken as the family’s cognomen in the form of Vaala. The portrait itself was presumably taken from a death mask or funeral bust still in the family’s possession.

2:1 161

161.

Mark Antony and Octavian. Denarius (Silver, 3.91 g 12), mint moving with Antony, under the moneyer M. Barbatius, 41 BC. M.ANT. IMP.AVG.III.VIR. R.P.C.M.BARBAT. Bare head of M. Antony to right Rev. CAESAR.IMP.PONT.III.VIR.R.P.C. Bare head of Octavian to right. Babelon (Antonia) 51, (Barbatia) 2. Crawford 517/2. CRI 243. Sydenham 1181. A lovely piece, bright, attractive, very well-centered and struck on a broad flan. Good extremely fine. 3000


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

162

162.

Divus Julius Caesar. Denarius (Silver, 4.09 g 5), struck under the magistrate Q. Voconius Vitulus, circa 40 BC. Laureate head of Julius Caesar to right. Rev. C. VOCONIVS / S C /VITVLVS.Q. / DESIGN Calf standing left. Babelon (Julia) 121, (Voconia) 1. Crawford 526/4. CRI 331. Sydenham 1133. A lovely coin with an outstanding portrait of Caesar. Lightly toned and most attractive, extremely fine. 20,000 The posthumous portraits of Julius Caesar vary greatly in their quality, even within a single issue. This is a dramatically emotional head and was certainly engraved by a master portraitist. Another example struck from the same obverse die appeared as UBS 78, 2008, lot 1186 (while not as good as the present piece it sold for ten times its pre-sale estimate!).

3:1

163

163.

Mark Antony and Cleopatra. Denarius (Silver, 3.45 g 12), mint moving with Antony, 32 BC. CLEOPATRA[E REGINAE REGVM]FILIORVM REGVM Diademed and draped bust of Cleopatra to right Rev. ANTONI ARMENIA DEVICTA Head of M. Antony to right; behind, Armenian tiara. Babelon (Antonia) 95. Crawford 543/2. CRI 345. Sydenham 1210. Rare. Minor marks and traces of corrosion, otherwise, very fine. 5000

2:1

The joint coinage of Antony and Cleopatra has been sought after since at least the Renaissance, since its historical and dramatic resonance has caught the imagination of generations of scholars and collectors. The portraits, while not flattering, must be true ones and they allow us to see one of history’s most famous and ill starred couples, shown as they wished to be portrayed.

THE ROMAN EMPIRE

164

164.

Octavian. Circa 29-27. Denarius (Silver, 3.83 g 1), Brundisium or Rome, circa 29-27. CAESAR COS VI Bare head of Octavian to right; behind, lituus; before, banker’s mark. Rev. AEGVPTO / CAPTA Crocodile at bay to right, mouth open; below in field, uncertain graffiti. BMC 650 (Rome). BN 905. Cohen 2. CRI 430. RIC 275a. Rare. Minor graffiti in reverse field, otherwise, nicely centered and, good very fine. 3000

3:1

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zĂźrich 18 may 2010

165

2:1

165.

Augustus. 27 BC-AD 14. Denarius (Silver, 3.60 g 12), Uncertain mint in the northern Peloponnnesos, circa 21 BC. AVGVSTVS Bare head of Augustus to right. Rev. IOVI - OLVM The hexastyle temple of Zeus at Olympia, seen from the front, with a round shield in the pediment and palmettes on the roof. Bauten 159. BMC 665. BN 939. Cohen 182. RIC 472. Rare. An attractive, bright example. Obverse struck very slightly offcenter, otherwise, good extremely fine. 2800

This coin was struck at the beginning of Augustus’ trip to the East (22-19 BC), while he was traveling across the Peloponnesos after having arrived at Patrai. Where it was struck is uncertain: it could conceivably have been produced at Elis or even Patrai. In any event, the engravers were surely Greek, since the Latin lettering is somewhat awkwardly done.

166 2:1

166.

-. Denarius (Silver, 3.87 g 1), Samos, circa 21-20 BC. CAESAR Bare head of Augustus to right. Rev. AVGVSTVS Bull standing right. BMC 663. BN 941. Cohen 28. RIC 475. A bright, bold and attractive coin. Very minor flan crack, otherwise, extremely fine. 3000

167

167. 3:1

-. Denarius (Silver, 3.91 g 7), Colonia Patricia, circa 19 BC. CAESAR AVGVSTVS Bare head of Augustus to right. Rev. OB / CIVIS / SERVATOS within oak wreath with jewel at the top and with the ties extending upwards. BMC 378. Cohen 208. RIC 77a. A lovely piece, bright, and unusually nice. Good extremely fine. 2750


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

168

168.

-. Denarius (Silver, 3.66 g 2), Rome, L. Aquillius Florus, circa 19 BC. L.AQVILLIVS.FLORVS. III.VIR Draped bust of Virtus to right, wearing helmet with a long crest and a feather on the side. Rev. AVGVSTVS CAESAR Augustus, driving biga of elephants to left, holding laurel branch over the backs of the elephants. BMC 36. BMCRR 4545. Cohen 354. RIC 301. Rare. Struck on a slightly oblong flan but attractive and fresh. Extremely fine. 4500

2:1

The obverse of this coin is taken from the issues of the moneyer’s ancestor, Mn.Aquillius who struck coins in BC 71 (Crawford 401). The reverse type, also used by the moneyer’s two colleagues M. Durmius and P. Petronius Turpilianus, probably refers to the triumph over the Armenians (for the Armenian campaign see below, lot 170).

169

169.

-. Denarius (Silver, 3.57 g 7), Rome, under the moneyer L. Aquillius Florus, 19/8 BC. CAESAR AVGVSTVS Bare head of Augustus to right. Rev. L AQVILLIVS.FLORVS.III.VIR Open flower with six petals seen from above. BMC 46 = BMCRR 4553. BN 183. Cohen 364. RIC 309. An attractive piece. Bright and lustrous. Some very minor traces of corrosion, otherwise, extremely fine. 2000

3:1

170

170.

-. Denarius (Silver, 3.77 g 1), Pergamon, circa 19-18 BC. AVGVSTVS Bare head of Augustus to right. Rev. ARMENIA CAPTA Armenia tiara and bowcase with quiver. BMC 677. BN 995. Cohen 11. RIC 516. Very rare. Somewhat brightly cleaned and with some minor traces of corrosion remaining, otherwise, nearly extremely fine. 3000 This coin celebrates one of the major triumphs of Augustus, his placing of a Roman candidate on the throne of Armenia. This occurred when the Armenians requested the Romans to replace their present king, Artaxias, with his Romanized brother Tigranes, who had been living as an exile in Rome for ten years. This was done by an army led by Tiberius: his success was so complete, and so swift, that the Parthian king Phraates IV decided to return all the Roman standards captured from Crassus at the battle of Carrhae in 53 BC (for another denarius commemorating the Armenian triumphs, see above, lot 168).

3:1

79


80

nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

171

171. 2:1

Tiberius. AD 14-37. Aureus (Gold, 7.79 g 10), Lugdunum, circa 14-17. TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS Laureate head of Tiberius to right. Rev. PONTIF MAXIM Livia, wearing robes and holding a branch in her right hand and a long scepter in her left, seated to right on a simple, undecorated throne above a double line. BMC 30. Calicó 305e. Cohen 15. RIC 25. An attractive, bold example, with an expressive portrait and fine toning. Good extremely fine. 7500 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection.

The gold coinage of Tiberius must have been enormous. It was struck in the great branch mint of Lyon and was, as a class, one of the most used gold coinages in Roman history. These pieces are found all over the Empire and beyond - they were very popular in India where they were imported as payment for the spices and luxuries the Romans craved. Nevertheless, the fact that these coins were so popular means that they were also extensively used and many lasted in circulation until at least the 2nd century AD. Thus, a lovely piece like this, so well centered on the obverse and in such fine condition, is not at all common.

172

172.

Caligula. 37-41. Denarius (Silver, 3.64 g 6), Rome, 40. C.CAESAR.AVG. PON.M.TR.POT.III.COS.III Laureate head of Caligula to right Rev. S.P.Q.R. / P.P /OBC.S. within oak wrreath. BMC -. Cohen 21. RIC 28. Very rare. A lovely example, sharp and particularly attractive, Good extremely fine. 15,000

3:1

The coinage of Caligula has always been popular, probably because of the emperor’s notoriety, so well known from ancient sources. His reign began well, since his predecessor Tiberius had become very unpopular during his later years. However, seven months after his accession to the throne Caligula fell seriously ill and while he recovered, his personality seems to have changed. He became every more extreme, cruel and bizarre. A variety of medical explanations have been adduced for this, the most likely being a form of lead poisoning. Like many of the Julio-Claudians he was quite handsome, but his later portraits do, at least with the benefit of hindsight, seem to show signs of his reputed insanity.

173

173.

3:1

Nero. 54-68 AD. Denarius (Silver, 3.57 g 6), Rome, 64-65. NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS Laureate head of Nero to right. Rev. IVPPITER CVSTOS Jupiter seated to left on throne, holding thunderbolt in his right hand and long scepter in his left. BMC 74. Cohen 119. RIC 53. An attractive piece, well struck on a broad flan. Extremely fine. 2500


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

174

174.

-. Sestertius (Orichalcum, 25.32 g 7), Lugdunum, 65. NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P Laureate head of Nero to right with globe at the point of the bust. Rev. PACE P R TERRA MARIQ PARTA IANVM CLVSIT S C Temple of Janus with ornate roof decoration, latticed window on the left and with a garland hung across the closed double doors to the right. BNC 319. BN 73. Cohen 146. RIC 438. WCN 419. A fine and clear example with a smooth brown patina, a good portrait and a detailed view of the temple of Janus. Extremely fine. 5000

2:1

From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection.

175

175.

Galba. AD 68-69. Denarius (Silver, 3.35 g 5), Rome, circa July 68 January 69. IMP SER GALBA AVG Bare head of Galba to right. Rev. SPQR / OB / C S within oak wreath. BMC 34 (there incorrectly termed laureate). Cohen -. RIC 167. Rare. Perfectly centered and with a powerful portrait. Good extremely fine. 4000 The silver coinage of Galba is notorious for its relatively poor preservation; most examples known are in the ‘very fine’ range. This piece is unusually nice.

3:1

176

176.

Otho. AD 69. Denarius (Silver, 3.53 g 6), Rome, circa 15 January - 9 March 69. IMP M OTHO CAESAR AVG TR P Bare head of Otho to right. Rev. PAX ORBIS TERRARVM Pax standing to left holding branch in her right hand and caduceus in her left. BMC 3. Cohen 3. RIC 4. Bright, well centered and well struck, an unusually nice piece. Good extremely fine. 6000 Otho’s portraits are famous for the elaborately waved hair he wears: it was, of course, a wig as the ancient sources tell us! He was prematurely bald and very vain about it.

3:1

81


82

nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zĂźrich 18 may 2010

177

177.

Vitellius. AD 69. Denarius (Silver, 3.47 g 6), Rome, April-December 69. A VITELLIVS GERM IMP AVG TR P Laureate head of Vitellius to right. Rev. CONCORDIA P R Concordia seated left, holding patera and cornucopiae. BMC 20. BN 52. Cohen 18. RIC 90. An excellent, lustrous piece with a fine portrait. Extremely fine. 3250

3:1

178 2:1

178.

Vespasian. AD 69-79. Denarius (Silver, 3.49 g 12), struck in a mint in Asia Minor, probably Ephesos, 76. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG Laureate head of Vespasian to right; below wreath ties, small O. Rev. Domitian Caesar, in military dress, riding prancing horse to left, raising right hand in salute and holding scepter in his left. BMC -. Cohen -. RIC 1480. Extremely rare. For an obverse die by the same die cutter, see RIC 1479. Virtually as struck. 3000 This piece is part of a very rare issue, which is certainly from Asia Minor and probably from Ephesos (see RIC II, 2nd edition, pp. 43-44). The coins of this group are characterized by rather strong portraits and unusual types (the reverse of this coin was almost certainly intended solely for issues in the name of Domitian as Caesar). The boldness of Vespasian’s portrait on this coin is remarkable.

2:1

179

179.

Titus. AD 79-81. Denarius (Silver, 3.54 g 6), Rome, after 1 July 79. IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M Laureate head of Titus to right. Rev. TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P Venus standing right, half draped, nude to the hips and leaning on a column to her right, holding a helmet in her left hand and a long transverse scepter in her right. BMC 9-10. Cohen 268. RIC 34. An unusually nice example, lustrous and well-struck. Good extremely fine. 2250


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zĂźrich 18 may 2010

180

180.

Julia Titi. Augusta, AD 79-90/1. Denarius (Silver, 3.35 g 6), 80-81. IVLIA AVGVSTA TITI AVGVSTI F. Diademed and draped bust of Julia Titi to right, her hair in a plait down the back of her neck. Rev. VENVS AVGVST Venus standing right, half draped, nude to the hips and leaning on a column to her right, holding a helmet in her left hand and a long transverse scepter in her right. BMC 141. Cohen 14. RIC 388. Sharply struck and particularly attractive. Good extremely fine. 4500

2:1

181

181.

Domitian. AD 81-96. Dupondius (Orichalcum, 12.73 g 6), struck to commemorate the Secular Games, Rome, 14 September-31 December 88. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII CENS PERP P Radiate bust of Domitian to right. Rev. COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC Domitian, togate, standing left before a temple facade, sacrificing from a patera over a burning altar to left; to left, flute player and harpist standing right; at their feet, personification of the Tiber lying right, holding cornucopiae. BMC 432. Cohen 91. RIC 621. Rare. Attractive green patina with brown highlights. Nearly extremely fine. 5000 Ex Gorny & Mosch 151, 9 October 2006, 422.

The Secular Games, Ludi Saeculares, were religious ceremonies that took place in Rome every 100 or 110 years; they had a mythological origin but were actually held in 249 and 140 BC, after which they fell into abeyance until Augustus revived them in 17 BC. They involved sacrifices to a number of different gods and goddesses, after which there were theatrical performances and some athletic events. Domitian’s celebrations were commemorated on an extensive series of coins in all metals, with those in orichalcum and copper being the most elaborate. In the present example we see Domitian sacrificing in the presence of the Tiber, with two attendants adding a musical accompanyment.

2:1

182

182.

Domitia. Augusta, AD 82-96. Denarius (Silver, 3.57 g 6), Rome, 82-83. DOMITIA AVGVSTA IMP DOMIT Draped bust of Domitia to right, wearing pearl necklace and with her hair piled up over her forehead and in a long braid falling down the back of her neck. Rev. CONCORDIA AVGVST Peacock walking right. BMC 61. BN 65-68. RIC 151. Rare. A superb piece, beautifully preserved and well struck. Good extremely fine. 10,000

Domitia Longina, the youngest daughter of the great Roman general Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo, was born c. 50-55, and was a remote descendant of Augustus through her mother. Her father was forced to commit suicide in connection with a plot against Nero in 67. The family survived and in 71 she met Domitian and fell in love with him: they married after she divorced her first husband. In 73 they had a son who died in childhood at some point before 81. Domitian and Domitia separated in 83, but they reconciled shortly thereafter and remained together until his assassination in 96. After the murder she went into honorable retirement and lived on well into reign of Hadrian, dying c. 130.

2:1

83


84

nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

183

2:1

183.

Nerva. AD 96-98. Denarius (Silver, 3.37 g 7), Rome, 97. IMP NERVA CAES AVG P M TR POT Laureate head of Nerva to right. Rev. COS III PATER PATRIAE Simpulum, sprinkler, ewer and lituus. BMC 33. Cohen 48. RIC 24. A brilliant, sharply struck and very attractive example. Good extremely fine. 1500

184

184.

2:1

Trajan. AD 98-117. Sestertius (Orichalcum, 25.83 g 6), Rome, 105. IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS V P P Laureate head of Trajan to right, with slight drapery on his far shoulder. Rev. S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI S C Trajan, in armor, on horse galloping to right, hurling spear at fallen Dacian crawling to right. BMC 839. Cohen 508. Hill 216. RIC 543. A lovely clear example with a splendid portrait. Lovely brownish gold Tiber patina. Minor flan crack, otherwise, extremely fine. 5000 This is a beautiful example of one of Trajan’s issues commemorating his victories in the Dacian wars.

185 2:1

185.

-. Denarius (Silver, 3.38 g 6), Rome, 107. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DACP M TR P COS V P P Laureate bust of Trajan to right, with aegis on his far shoulder. Rev. S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI Genius of the Roman People standing left, holding cornucopiae in his left hand and sacrificing over a burning altar from a patera held in his right. BMC 209. Cohen 394. Hill 347. RIC 183. A remarkably fine piece, perfectly struck in high relief. Good extremely fine. 750


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

186

186.

-. Denarius (Silver, 3.34 g 6), Rome, 114. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P Laureate and draped bust of Trajan to right. Rev. S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI View of the Column of Trajan: showing his statue on top, the two eagles at its base, and the entrance below. Bauten 50. BMC 452. BN 746. Cohen 558. Hill 618. RIC 292. Sharp and attractive with lustrous surfaces. Extremely fine. 1250

2:1

Trajan’s column is one of the best known and most recognizable of all the monuments of Rome. Built to commemorate Trajan’s Dacian Wars, it was finished in 113 and commemorated by coins struck in 113/114. The sculptural frieze, illustrating the campaigns of 101-102 and 105-106, contain nearly 2500 figures (the emperor himself appears 59 times among his troops). The column was originally set between the Greek and Latin Libraries and the Basilica Ulpia at the northern end of Trajan’s Forum - viewers could have seen the reliefs from the balconies of those buildings. The statue of Trajan that was originally on top of the column disappeared at some point during medieval times: in 1587 Pope Sixtus V topped the column with a bronze statue of St. Peter. The model was made by the sculptors Leonardo Sormani (fl. c. 1551-c. 1590)and Tommaso della Porta (c. 1550-1606) and the final mold that was cast in bronze was by Bastiano Torrigiani (d. 1596).

187 2:1

187.

Hadrian. AD 117-138. Denarius (Silver, 3.51 g 6), Rome, 122. IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG Laureate bust of Hadrian to right, with drapery on his far shoulder. Rev. P M TR P COS III Galley moving to left. BMC 246. Cohen 1174. Hill 215. RIC 113. A superb piece, perfectly centered and unusually fine. Virtually as struck. 1500

188

188.

-. Denarius (Silver, 3.54 g 6), Rome, 125. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS Laureate bust of Hadrian to right with slight drapery on far shoulder. Rev. COS III Libertas standing left, holding pileus in her right hand and scepter in her left. BMC 402. Cohen 374. Hill 270. RIC 175. A superb and lustrous piece with a wonderful portrait. Virtually as struck. 1000

2:1

85


86

nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

189

189.

3:1

Aelius. Caesar, AD 136-138. Denarius (Silver, 3.29 g 6), Rome, 137. L AELIVS CAESAR Bare head of Aelius to right. Rev. TR POT COS II / CONCORD Concordia seated left, holding patera in her right hand and resting her left elbow on cornucopiae set on the ground. BMC 981 (Hadrian). Cohen 1. Hill 837. RIC 436 (Hadrian). A splendid piece, of wonderful style. Minor die scratch on the obverse, otherwise, good extremely fine. 2000

190

2:1

190.

Antoninus Pius, with Marcus Aurelius as Caesar. AD 138-161. Denarius (Silver, 3.53 g 6140), Rome, 140. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III Laureate head of Antoninus Pius to right. Rev. AVRELIVS CAESAR AVG PII F COS Bare head of Marcus Aurelius Caesar to right. BMC 156. Cohen 15. RIC 417a. A superb and lustrous piece, with a remarkably elegant portrait of the young Marcus. Good extremely fine. 750

191

191.

Antoninus Pius. AD 138-161. Sestertius (Orichalcum, 28.54 g 12), Rome, 145. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P Laureate head of Antoninus Pius to right. Rev. COS III S C / LIBERALITAS / [AVG IIII ] Antoninus Pius seated on platform to left with, to left, Liberalitas standing left with abacus and cornucopiae and, to right, officer standing left; below left, togate citizen standing right with upraised hands. BMC 1688. Cohen 498. Hill 655. RIC 774. Strack 984. An attractive coin with a particularly detailed and wellpreserved reverse. Greenish brown patina, extremely fine. 9500 2:1

The reverse shows a donative scene, with the emperor giving alms to the citizens. These events had both a ritual and theatrical character - the figure of Liberalitas who stands next to the emperor is not a statue but an actual woman, dressed in the robes of the ‘goddess’.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, z端rich 18 may 2010

192

192.

Diva Faustina Senior. Wife of Antoninus Pius, Empress 138-140. Denarius (Silver, 3.24 g 6), Rome, struck to commemorate her death in AD 140, circa 147. DIVA FAVSTINA Veiled and draped bust of Diva Faustina to right, her hair in a bun bound with pearls at the top of her head. Rev. AETERNITAS Fortuna, veiled, standing facing, head left, holding globe and rudder. BMC 366. Cohen 7. RIC 348. A beautifully centered coin with a splendid, large portrait in high relief. Virtually as struck. 400

3:1

193

193.

Commodus. AD 177-192. Denarius (Silver, 2.88 g 6), Rome, very late 191192. L AEL AVREL COMM AVG P FEL Head of Commodus to right, wearing the lion skin headdress of Hercules. Rev. HERCVLI ROMANO AVG Bow, club and quiver loaded with arrows. BMC 343. Cohen 195. RIC 253. An astonishingly well-preserved and sharply struck coin, rare thus. Struck on a slightly tight flan, otherwise, good extremely fine. 1200 As is well known, Commodus, the son of the philosopher emperor Marcus Aurelius, became increasingly deranged as his reign moved on, and this coin is palpable evidence for the form of madness that led to his assassination soon after it was issued. By the late 180s he had identified himself with Hercules and sought to emulate him by killing both animals and humans in the arena. His passion for gladiatorial combats was so great that contemporaries suggested his actual father was a gladiator who Faustina II had taken as a lover. The fact that he advertised his beliefs on the coinage must have been one of the reasons why the conspiracy against him was formed. The silver coinage of Commodus is notorious for its generally poor condition: many were lightly struck and seldom anywhere near as attractive of those of his immediate predecessors. This piece is exceptional and particularly well struck.

3:1

194

194.

Crispina. Augusta, AD 178-182. Denarius (Silver, 3.39 g 12), Rome, 180182. CRISPINA AVGVSTA Draped bust of Crispina to right, her hair bound up at the back. Rev. VENVS Venus standing left, holding an apple in her right hand and gathering up her upper garment on to her left shoulder with her left. BMC 44 (Commodus). Cohen 35. RIC 286a (Commodus). Lustrous, beautifully centered and well-struck. Good extremely fine. 450 Crispina was the wife of Commodus and came from a consular family. Her father, Gaius Bruttius Praesens, was a distinguished senator and a friend of Marcus Aurelius and they undoubtedly decided that Crispina would be an excellent match for Commodus. Unfortunately, he apparently disliked her and after the conspiracy of Lucilla in 181/2, she was exiled and probably executed (coins in her honor cease to be issued in 182).

3:1

87


88

nomos . . . . . . auction 2, z端rich 18 may 2010

195

2:1

195.

Septimius Severus. AD 193-211. Denarius (Silver, 2.85 g 12), Laodicea, 197. L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP VIIII Laureate head of Septimius Severus to right. Rev. PROFECTIO AVG Septimius Severus, holding transverse spear and riding horse walking to right. BMC 466. Cohen 580. RIC 494. A superb piece, bright and most attractive. Good extremely fine. 750

196

196. 2:1

-. Denarius (Silver, 3.12 g 7), Rome, 201. SEVERVS AVG PART MAX Laureate head of Septimius Severus to right. Rev. ANTONINVS AVGVSTVS Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Caracalla to right. BMC 187. Cohen -. Hill 471. RIC 157. Rare. Attractive and well-struck. Very minor flan crack, otherwise, good extremely fine. 2250

197

197.

2:1

-. Sestertius (Orichalcum, 29.98 g 12), Rome, 211. L SEPT SEVERVS PIVS AVG Laureate head of Septimius Severus to right. Rev. VICT BRIT P M TR P XIX COS III P P / S C Two Victories standing left and right, fixing a shield on a palm tree with two seated captives at its base. Banti 165. BMC 216A (but with an incorrect obverse legend). Cohen 723. Hill 1166. RIC 808 var . Attractive dark green patina. Reverse double struck, otherwise, about extremely fine. 5000 From the Patrick H. C. Tan Collection, ex LHS 102, 29 April 2008, 408.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, z端rich 18 may 2010

198

2:1

198.

Julia Domna. Augusta, AD 193-217. Denarius (Silver, 2.89 g 7), Rome, 216. IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG Draped bust of Julia Domna to right. Rev. VENVS GENETRIX Venus seated left, extending right hand and holding scepter in her left. BMC 23B. Cohen 212. Hill 1536. RIC 388c. A superb and lustrous coin with an excellent portrait. Virtually as struck. 300

199

199.

Caracalla. AD 198-217. Denarius (Silver, 3.47 g 6), Rome, 206. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG Laureate head of Caracalla to right. Rev. LAETITIA - TEMPORVM Circus scene: in the middle, a galley under sail to left; below, wild animals (including a stork, lions, bulls and a bear); above, four racing quadrigas. BMC 508. Cohen 118. Hill 793. RIC 157. Very rare, clear and very attractive. Extremely fine. 2500

3:1

This coin commemorates the seven days of spectacles held in the Circus Maximus to celebrate the victory over the Parthians. A ship was built in the arena and from it each day hundreds of animals would be released as part of the show.

200

200.

-. Denarius (Silver, 3.16 g 12), Rome, 214. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM Laureate and bearded head of Caracalla to right. Rev. LIBERAL AVG VIIII Liberalitas standing left, holding abacus in her right hand and cornucopiae in her left. BMC 70. Cohen 139. Hill 1427. RIC 302. Superb and lustrous. Virtually as struck. 300

2:1

89


90

nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

201

201.

3:1

Geta. Caesar, AD 198-209. Denarius (Silver, 3.25 g 6), Rome, 206. P SEPTIMIVS GETA CAES Bare-headed and draped bust of Geta to right. Rev. ROMAE AETERNAE Roma seated facing in the center intercolumniation of a hexastyle temple with a statue at the base of each column; in the pediment, Jupiter standing between two reclining figures. BMC p. 247, * = Cohen 176 = Hill 788 = RIC 54 (all citing the specimen in Paris). RCV 7199 (also presumably referring to the Paris piece, but this is not clear). Extremely rare and of great importance. A clear and remarkably well preserved example. Extremely fine. 5000 The reverse of this coin shows the Temple of Roma and is remarkable for the great detail the die cutter has managed to show on such a small flan. It is also one of he rarest of all Severan denarii, of which only the specimen in Paris seems to have been known previously (all references to the type in literature go back to that piece). The same reverse also appears on an apparently unique aureus of Caracalla (BMC p. 210, ‡ = Calicó 2810 = Hill 780 = RIC 143A, all referring to a piece that appeared in the NCirc of 1925).

202

202.

3:1

Diadumenian. Caesar, AD 217-218. Denarius (Silver, 3.26 g 6), Rome, late July 217 - end February 218. M OPEL ANT DIADVMENIAN CAES Bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust of Diadumenian to right, seen from the front. Rev. PRINC IVVENTVTIS Diadumenian standing left, in military dress, his head to right, holding standard in his right hand and scepter in his left; behind him to right, two standards. BMC 87. Cohen 3. RIC 102. Lustrous and with a lovely portrait. Virtually as struck. 1200

203

203.

Philippopolis, Thrace. Elagabalus. 218-222. 2 Assaria (Bronze, 24mm, 8.70 g 1). ΑΥΤ Κ Μ ΑΥΡ ΑΝΤΩΝΕΙΝΟC Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Elagabalus to right. Rev. ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΠΟΛΕΙΤΩΝ ΝΕΩ - ΚΟΡΩΝ Prize crown inscribed ΠΥΘΙΑ. BMC -. Varbanov 1532. Weber 2776. Rare. Well struck and clear with a dark green patina. Nearly extremely fine. 850

3:1

The Pythian Games were refounded by Caracalla in Thrace, and they were especially celebrated at Philippopolis, which produced a commemorative coinage bearing numerous types related to the event. This piece shows one of the elaborate crowns given to the victor - as well as two laurel branches. Most conveniently, the crown is carefully named so that we can have not doubt to which festival it relates.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, z眉rich 18 may 2010

204

204.

Julia Soaemias. Augusta, AD 218-222. Denarius (Silver, 3.26 g 6), Rome. IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVGVSTA Draped bust of Julia Soaemias to right. Rev. IVNO REGINA Juno, veiled, standing right, holding long scepter in her left hand and palladium on her extended right. BMC 40. Cohen 3. RIC 237. A beautifully preserved coin with an outstanding portrait. Minor die clashing on the reverse, otherwise, good extremely fine. 500

3:1

205

205.

Julia Paula. Augusta, AD 219-220. Denarius (Silver, 3.63 g 11), Antioch. IVLIA PAVLA AVG Draped bust of Julia Paula to right. Rev. CONCORDIA Julia, veiled, standing left, on the right, facing Elagabalus, togate, standing right, on the left, clasping their right hands together. BMC 319. Cohen 12. RIC 214. A superb piece with a remarkably fine portrait in high relief. Virtually as struck. 600

3:1

206 2:1

206.

Severus Alexander. AD 222-235. Aureus (Gold, 6.28 g 6), Rome, 223. IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG Laureate draped and cuirassed bust of Severus Alexander to right. Rev. P M TR P II COS P P Mars standing left, helmeted and wearing armor, holding olive branch in his right hand and reversed spear in his left . BMC 91. Calic贸 3089. Cohen 230. RIC 21. Rare. With a fine portrait of the youthful emperor. Toned and attractive, good extremely fine. 9500

91


92

nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

207

207.

Gordian III. AD 238-244. Antoninianus (Silver, 4.82 g 12), Rome, end July 238 - July 239. IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gordian III to right. Rev. VIRTVS AVG Virtus standing left, resting right hand on shield and holding spear with his left. Cohen 381. RIC 6. A remarkably fine piece, with a superb, youthful portrait struck in high relief. Good extremely fine. 200 3:1

Antoniniani of Gordian III are easy to find in good condition, but very rarely are they so well struck. The portrait on the obverse is a small masterpiece of die engraving.

208

208.

2:1

Pergamon, Mysia. Gordian III. 238-244. Medallion of 8 Assaria (Bronze, 45mm, 44.17 g 6), an alliance issue with Nikomedia in Bithynia, struck during the magistracy of Julius Logismos, strategos of Pergamon. ΑΥΤ Κ Μ ΑΝΤ ΓΟΡΔΙΑΝΟC Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gordian III to right, seen partially from behind. Rev. ΕΠΙ C ΙΟVΛ ΛΟΓΙC/ΜΟV ΠΕΡΓΑΜΗ/ΝΩΝ ΚΑΙ ΝΕΙΚΟΜΗ/ΔΕΩΝ ΟΜΟΝ/ΟΙΑ Asklepios, on the left, holding kerkykeion in his left hand, and Demeter, on the right, holding long torch in her left hand, poppies in her right and resting her right foot on a prow. Franke-Nollé 1633-1636. Kampmann 103. RPC 174. Very rare, one of six known specimens, all from the same pair of dies. Rough olive green patina. Minor ancient scratch on obverse, otherwise, nearly extremely fine. 5000 Alliance coins were a special feature of political life in Roman Asia Minor: cities honored each other as part of their intense rivalry over status. Lesser cities attempted to have alliances with more important ones as a way of boosting their own position. In this case Nikomedia, an important but second rank city, must have sought an alliance with the much more prestigious city of Pergamon. These alliances were basically only honorific, (though they could affect the tax status of the citizens of the cities involved, since the cities themselves were all firmly under Roman rule.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, z端rich 18 may 2010

209

209.

Antioch, Pisidia. Gordian III. 238-244. Sestertius (Orichalcum, 32mm, 25.18 g 6). IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gordian III to right. Rev. CAES ANTIOCH COL / S R Two Victories standing on left and right, mounting shield inscribed S R on trophy with two seated captives at its base. Krzyzanovska VIII/31. SNG Paris 1236-1237 var. . Well struck and sharp. Attractive brownish-green and red patina. Uncleaned and with some remaining deposits, otherwise, extremely fine. 2200

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210

2:1

210.

Philip I. AD 244-249. Antoninianus (Silver, 4.13 g 6), Rome, 244-247. IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Philip I to right. Rev. PAX AETERN Pax running to left, holding branch and transverse scepter. Cohen 102. RIC 41. Bright, attractive, well centered and in high relief. Virtually as struck. 200

211

211.

-. Antoninianus (Silver, 4.76 g 6), Antioch, 248. IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind. Rev. AEQVITAS AVG Aequitas standing left, holding scales and cornucopiae. Cohen 8 var. RIC 82. Sharp, attractive and well struck. Good extremely fine. 300

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, z端rich 18 may 2010

212

212.

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Otacilia Severa. Augusta, AD 244-249. Antoninianus (Silver, 4.28 g 6), Rome, 248. OTACIL SEVERA AVG Diademed and draped bust of Otacilia Severa on crescent to right. Rev. SAECVLARES AVGG / IIII Hippopotamus walking to right. Cohen 63. RIC 116b. A fine piece with a particularly amusing looking hippopotamus. Good extremely fine. 400 This coin was struck in honor of the Secular Games, held to commemorate the 1000th anniversary of the founding of Rome. During these games a wide variety of exotic animals were brought to Rome to be displayed and, usually, killed in the arena. Modern bull fighting is but a pale imitation of the extensive destruction of animals that took place during Roman festivals. Not only were beasts killed in imitation of hunts, but others were used for the public execution of criminals who were thrown to them: presumably those unfortunates who were not immediately felled by the wild beasts were dispatched by their keepers.

213

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213.

Philip II. AD 247-249. Antoninianus (Silver, 4.61 g 1), Antioch, 247-249. IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Philip II to left. Rev. FELI / CITAS / IMPP in three lines within laurel wreath. Cohen 11. RIC 242. Rare. With a fine portrait of the young prince and an unusually interesting reverse. Beautifully centered and well struck, good extremely fine. 750

214

214.

3:1

Trajan Decius. AD 249-251. Antoninianus (Silver, 3.84 g 6), Rome, 250251. IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Trajan Decius to right. Rev. PANNONIAE The Two Pannoniae standing left, both raising their right hands, the one on the left with a standard next to her and the one on the right holding a vexillum. RIC 23 var. Attractive and well struck. Good extremely fine. 300


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, z端rich 18 may 2010

215

215.

Trebonianus Gallus. AD 251-253. Antoninianus (Silver, 3.65 g 6), Rome, 251-253. IMP CAE C VIB TREB GALLVS AVG Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Trebonianus Gallus to right. Rev. ANNONA AVGG Annona standing right, holding rudder and corn ears. Cohen 17. RIC 31. Sharp, lustrous and with a splendid portrait. Good extremely fine. 300

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216

216.

Aemilian. AD 253. Antoninianus (Silver, 3.57 g 6), Rome, August September 253. IMP AEMILIANVS PIVS FEL AVG Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Aemilian to right. Rev. MARTI PACIF Mars striding left, bearing branch in his right hand and spear and shield in his left. Cohen 22. RIC 5b. Rare. Some slight flatness of strike, otherwise, extremely fine. 650

3:1

217

217.

Diva Mariniana. The wife of Valerian, who died before he came to the throne in 253. Antoninianus (Silver, 2.66 g 12), Viminacium, 253-254. DIVAE MARINIANAE Veiled and draped bust of Mariniana on crescent to right. Rev. CONSECRATIO Apotheosis of Mariniana: Mariniana, draped, raising right hand and holding scepter, flying upwards on peacock to right. Cohen 16. MIR 36, 850b. RIC 6. A remarkably well-struck example with a particularly delicate portrait. Good extremely fine. 600

3:1

95


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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

218

218.

Constantine I. AD 307/310-337. Aureus (Gold, 5.43 g 6), Siscia, summer 311-313. CONSTANTINVS AVG Laureate head of Constantine I to right. Rev. IOVI CONSERVATORI / SIS Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt in his right hand and long scepter in his left; at his feet to left, eagle standing on globe to left, his head turned back bearing a wreath in his beak for Jupiter. Calicó 5168. Depeyrot 13/1. RIC 214. Very rare. A lovely coin, perfectly preserved and lightly toned. Virtually as struck. 12,000 3:1

219

219.

-. Medallion in the weight of 6 siliquae (Silver, 19.08 g 6), Constantiniople, struck as a donative for the dedication of Constantine’s new city of Constantinople, circa 11 May 330. Head of Constantine to right, wearing rosette diadem Rev. D N CONSTANTINVS / MAX TRIVMF AVG /M CONSZ Constantinopolis seated facing on throne, turned slightly to the right, wearing turreted crown, holding cornucopiae and with her left hand and flower with her right, and with her right foot on the prow of a galley. Alföldi pl. 18, 225. Cohen 136. Gnecchi p. 58, 11-13 var. (differing officinae). RIC p. 578, 5 3 var. Toynbee pl. 37, 9. Extremely rare, a remarkable piece of the greatest historical importance. Toned and pleasing, good very fine. 50,000 From the Biaggi collection, ex Bank Leu 22, 8 May 1979 383. This piece formed part of a whole group of coins and medallic issues that were produced to commemorate the festivities surrounding the official dedication of Constantinople in 330. The silver issues of this type bear either the figures of Roma or Constantinopolis on their reverses, thus proclaiming the equality of the two cities.

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

COINS OF THE EASTERN EMPIRE AND THE BYZANTINES

220

220.

Arcadius. AD 383-408. Solidus (Gold, 4.52 g 6), Constantinople, circa 403-408. D N ARCADIVS P F AVG Helmeted, diademed and cuirassed bust of Arcadius facing, holding spear over his right shoulder and with shield, ornamented with a horseman spearing a fallen foe, over his left. Rev. NOVA SPES REIPVBLICAE S / CONOB Victory seated right on cuirass, supporting on her left knee a shield, which she inscribes XX/XXX; in field to left, star. Depeyrot 34/2. RIC 29. Lustrous and very attractive. Virtually as struck. 1500

3:1

221

221.

Leo I. AD 457-474. Tremissis (Gold, 1.45 g 6), Milan, 2 August - 19 November 461. D N LEO PERPET AVG Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Leo to right. Rev. Cross within wreath; in exergue, COMOB. RIC 2515. Extremely rare. Crudely struck and with some remaining deposits. Good very fine. 4500

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By the mid 5th century the Roman coinage of the West was reduced to numerous issues of gold, often only produced for accession donatives or to buy off enemies, accompanied by very much rarer silver and bronze. In Italy, gold was minted in Aquileia, Milan and Rome, but the proportions issued by each mint varied greatly. While tremisses were quite common as a class, this issue of Leo I’s from Milan must have been produced in very limited numbers for a special event: today they are extremely rare.

222

222.

Zeno. Second reign, AD 476-491. Solidus (Gold, 4.53 g 6), Constantinople, fifth issue, circa 403-408. D N ZENO PERP AVG Helmeted, diademed and cuirassed bust of Zeno facing, holding spear over his right shoulder and with shield, ornamented with a horseman spearing a fallen foe, over his left. Rev. VICTORI-A AVGGG Γ / CONOB Victory standing left, holding long jeweled cross in her right hand; to right, star. Depeyrot 108/1. RIC 929. Sharp and lustrous. Virtually as struck. 1000

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97


98

nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zĂźrich 18 may 2010

223

223.

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Justinian I. 527-565. Solidus (Gold, 4.45 g 6), Rome, circa 537. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG Helmeted and cuirassed bust of Justinian facing, holding cross on globe in his right hand and with shield over his left shoulder. Rev. VICTORIA AVCCCA / ROMOB Angel standing facing, holding long cross on base in his right hand and cross on globe in his left; to right, star. DOC -. MIBE 28.1 = BMC Vandals pl. XVI, 4 (Berlin, same reverse die). SB 290. Extremely rare, and one of the finest specimens of this type known. Good very fine. 7500 From the Christov Family Collection, Goldberg 53, 24 May 2009, 2009 and ex Triton III, 30 November 1999, 1300. This was the earliest solidus struck by Justinian’s forces after they recaptured Rome from the Ostrogoths. The clear and explicit mintmark ROMOB was almost immediately changed to the more usual Byzantine gold mark, CONOB, shortly after this coin was struck.

224

224.

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Heraclius. 610-641. Solidus (Gold, 4.51 g 6), Constantinople, 636/7. Heraclonas, wearing cap with cross above, and Heraclius and Heraclius, both wearing crowns with crosses, standing facing, all holding globus crucigers in their right hands. Rev. VICTORIA AUGUH / CONOB Cross potent on base and three steps; to left, Heraclian monogram; to right, I. DOC 36. MIB 42. SB 761. Good extremely fine. 650

225

225.

3:1

Constans II. 641-668. Solidus (Gold, 4.47 g 6), Constantinople, 651-654. dN CONSTAN-TINUS P P AU Crowned and draped bust of Constans facing, with very long beard and holding globus cruciger in his right hand. Rev. VICTORIA AUGUA / CONOB Cross potent on base and three steps. DOC 19a. MIB 23. SB 956. Good extremely fine. 650


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

99

226

226.

Constantine IV Pogonatus. 668-685. Solidus (Gold, 4.35 g 6), Naples (ascribed by Ricotti Prina to Pentapolis), circa 681-685. P OCNS TA US P P A Helmeted, diademed and cuirassed bust of Constantine IV facing, turned slightly to right, holding spear in his right hand and with shield over his left shoulder. Rev. VICTORA AVGV Δ:T / CONOB Cross potent on base and three steps. DOC -. MIB III, cf. pl. 34, X2. Ricotti Prina 31 (same obverse die). SB 1230A. Very rare. Attractively toned. Extremely fine. 10,000

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From the Christov Family Collection, Goldberg 25 May 2009, 2173 and from the collection of M. Heckman, Triton VIII, 12 January 2005, 1390. The coinage of Byzantine Italy is a very complicated one. It was issued by the official mints in Rome, Ravenna and Syracuse, but also in subsidiary ones in Naples and, probably, elsewhere (Ricotti Prina ascribed issues to a variety of mints but his attributions are no long taken very seriously). There must, however, have been traveling mints as well, accompanying the Byzantine military forces.

227

227.

Justinian II. First reign, 685-695. Solidus (Gold, 4.43 g 6), Constantinople, 692-695. IhS CRISTDS REX REGNANTIuM Draped bust of Christ facing, with long hair and full beard, raising right hand in benediction and holding book of Gospels in his left; behind head, cross. Rev. D IuSTINIANuS SERu ChRISTI Δ / CONOP Justinian II, crowned, bearded and wearing loros, standing facing, holding cross potent on base and two steps in his right hand and akakia in his left. DOC 7d. MIB 8a. SB 1248. A wonderful piece, beautifully struck, very sharp and with a superb portrait of Christ. Reverse slightly off center, otherwise, virtually as struck. 15,000 This coin bears the first numismatic portrait of Christ, and it remains one of the finest ever made. It shows Christ Pantocrator and was copied from a representation found in the Imperial Palace that was itself based on the head of the Zeus of Phidias from Olympia. The decision to place Christ on the coinage was a momentous one: until this point the Moslem Arab conquerors of the Byzantine East and Africa had been content to use Byzantine solidi as their sole gold coinage. The appearance of a bust of Christ, however, was unacceptable to them and led to the introduction of a new, national coinage, first with a ‘standing Caliph’, based on the figure of Justinian II, in 693/4 and then the non-figural epigraphic dinars that began in 696/7 (A.H. 77).

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100

nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

228

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228.

Tiberius Petasius. 728 or 730/731. Solidus (Gold, 4.03 g 6), Blera (in Latium, near Rome) or, perhaps more likely, Naples. TIUERIUS MULTUS A Facing bust of Tiberius, wearing chlamys and a diadem with cross over a circlet, holding globus cruciger in his left hand and akakia in his right. Rev. VICTOR.IVTGTA Cross potent on base and two steps. F. Füeg, “Byzanz: Zu Prägungen aus dem 8. bis 11. Jahrhundert, Teil 1,” SM 196, 1999, 73, A (this piece cited). Unique and of the greatest historical importance. Minor marks and some minor striking flatness, otherwise, about extremely fine. 30,000 Ex Stack’s, 12 January 2009, 3179 and Vecchi 5, 5 March 1997, 1183. This unique coin illuminates one of the murkiest chapters of Italy’s Byzantine history. Tiberius Petasius (his epithet comes from the sun hat - petasos - he liked to wear) was a Byzantine army officer who, due to the decision by Leo III to ban icons in 727, decided to revolt in Italy. He lasted for a very short while before being captured and executed in Monterano by the Byzantine Eutychius, the last Exarch of Ravenna (728-752). His head was sent to Leo III as a present. The style of this coin is closest to that found on coins struck in Beneventum by the Lombard princes of that city; the possibility that this was struck in nearby Naples is not unlikely.

229 2:1

229.

Constantine IX Monomachus. 1042-1055. Histamenon (Gold, 4.43 g 6), Constantinople. +IhS XIS REX REGNANTIhM Christ, nimbate, seated facing on lyre-backed throne Rev. [C&§STA] §Th bASILEU Rm Bust of Constantine IX facing, wearing loros and crown with pendilia, holding scepter ending in leaved cross in his right hand and globus surmounted by a cross resting on a crescent in his left. DOC 1b. SB 1828A. Rare. Lustrous and attractive. Good extremely fine. 750


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

ISLAMIC COINAGE

230

230.

The Umayyad Caliphate. Pseudo-Byzantine types. Dinar (Gold, 4.26 g 6), uncertain mint in North Africa, circa 695-705/715. [NON] EST dS NISI IPSE SO[... Two imperial busts facing (based on those of Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine), both draped and wearing crowns with a triple ornament; the one on the left larger and bearded, that on the right beardless and smaller. Rev. dE d NO CIAS MA ET OMN AN Pillar, with cross bar on top, on base and two steps; to right, pellet. BMC (Arab-Byzantine) 143. Extremely rare. Minor nicks and scrapes, otherwise, nearly extremely fine. 6250 This very rare dinar (it was struck on a slightly lower standard than the Byzantine gold solidus) was produced based on Byzantine prototypes at some point towards the end of the 7th century. The curious fact is that the types are those used on coins minted at Carthage under Heraclius, which were last struck in 641, even though Carthage itself was only captured by the Arabs in 695. In the winter of 697/8 a Byzantine fleet was able to recapture the city, but the Byzantines were driven out later in 698 by a very much superior Arab force that retook the city. At that point our sources differ: most say that the city was destroyed during the final attack, but others suggest that the city was deliberately dismantled in 705 to prevent any further foreign occupations. In any case, after the city was destroyed it was replaced by the nearby town of Tunis, to which much of the old population of Carthage was transferred. The minters of this coin chose to produce a Byzantine-looking coin that would be familiar to local users, but not from a prototype that was so recent that it would imply Byzantine overlordship. The legends on both the obverse and reverse relate to the Islamic profession of the faith (the shahâda) but are not in fully canonical form; they are in Latin and can be expanded to: NON EST DeuS NISI IPSe SOLus CuI Socius Non est and DEus Dominus NOster CIAS MAgnus ETernus OMNiA Noscens.The most recent discussion of this coinage is in Michael Bates’ Roman and Early Muslim Coinage in North Africa, North Africa from Antiquity to Islam, edited by M.Horton and T. Wiedemann (Bristol, 1995) pp. 12-15 (a more expanded version is in preparation): he suggests that the North African ArabByzantine issues were produced in the period running from c. 695 to 715/718. They were replaced by completely Arabic issues, albeit using typically local thick flans in 718, and by broader, flatter coins in a style close to that used in Damascus and the other main mints of the caliphate in 719/720. He also suggests that the figural types were struck in Carthage while those with Latin inscriptions but no images were produced in the purely Islamic city of Kairouan, which had been founded in 670. This makes sense, especially since the inscriptions used on the coins seem to run in parallel and make it very likely that two mints were involved. If, however, the sources that state that Carthage was destroyed in 698 are correct, this makes the minting history of the figural types rather complicated. The possibilities are as follows:1. all the figural issues were produced in Carthage from 695 through the Fall of 697 and then ended;2. figural types began to be produced in Carthage in 695, stopped with the Byzantine occupation, and then resumed in 698, either in Carthage if a) the city was only destroyed in 705 as some sources suggest, or b) in Tunis, if Carthage was dismantled in 698 and its population, and mint, removed to that nearby city. This would be an intriguing possibility; and it might also be where the issues of Hasan ibn al-Nu’man that are dated to A.H. 80 (699/700), as BMC 164 ff., were produced (though they bear only a single bust and have inscriptions that are only in Arabic) or c) in Tripolis, where a whole series of bronzes were struck (c. 699-704) in the name of Musa ibn Nusair, who was the governor of Africa from 698 and was soon to be the conqueror of Visigothic Spain (these coins seem marginally different in style from those in the main series and probably should be seen as a parallel issue).

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nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

COINS OF THE RENAISSANCE PERIOD

ITALY

3:1 231

231.

Ferrara. Borso d’Este. 1450-1471. Ducato (Gold, 22mm, 3.54 g 3), undated, but struck 1450-1452. +BORSIVS.MARChIO.ESTENS Quartered arms of Este within a circular field. Rev. SVRESIT.XPS.SPES MEA Christ, nimbate, rising from the tomb, raising right hand in benediction and holding banner in his left. Bellesia 1/C. Biaggi 759. CNI X, p. 429, 3 var. Fr. 260. Of great rarity, one of only five known examples. Clear and most attractive, extremely fine. 75,000 Ex Hess-Divo 300, 27 October 2004, 1174, from A Private Collection, Leu 68, 22 October1996, 173, and from the collection of Conte Alessandro Magnaguti, VI, Santamaria, 28 January 1954, 85. Borso d’Este, the last Marquis and first Duke of Ferrara, was probably Ferrara’s most popular ruler. He was extremely bright and after succeeding to the marquisate of Ferrara he managed to be crowned duke of Modena and Reggio by the emperor Frederick III in 1452. He then spent a great deal of effort charming the Pope in order to be crowned duke of Ferrara as well. He finally managed this with Paul II and was crowned on Easter Day, 14 April 1471 in old St. Peter’s. Unfortunately the excitement lowered his resistance and he died from an attack of malaria on 19 August. This coin was his first gold issue, struck in the interval between his accession in 1450 and his coronation as duke of Modena and Reggio in 1452.


nomos . . . . . . auction 2, zürich 18 may 2010

THE KNIGHTS HOSPITALLERS OF RHODES

232

3:1

232.

Emery d’Amboise. 1503-1512. 2 Ducats (Gold, 6. 94 g 4). +.F. EMERICVS.DAMBOYSE.MAGNQ.MAG.R. Arms of Amboise quartered with those of the Order. Rev. +AGN:DEI:QVI.TOLIS:PECCA. MVD. MISE.NO: Nimbate Pascal lamb standing left, head turned back to right to view the banner of the Order behind him. Fr. 7. Schlumberger p. 261 (citing a piece bearing these legends then in the Montenuovo collection in Vienna). Extremely rare, one of only a very few known examples. Lightly toned. Very slightly wavy flan with sllight traces of mounting, otherwise, nearly extremely fine. 50,000 From the collection of Professor J. R. Stewart, Baldwin 48, 26 September 2006, 5084, acquired from Baldwin’s on 11 April 1960 and from the collection of Archduke Sigismund of Austria. Emery d’Amboise was born in 1434 in the chateau of Chaumont-sur-Loire, the third son of Pierre d’Amboise, chamberlain of Charles VII and Louis XII. He had a long career in the Order of St. John, rising to become treasurer and commander of the galleys under his predecessor as grand master, Pierre d’Aubusson. D’Amboise was elected grand master on 10 July 1503: on his departure for the island Louis XII gave him the sword that St. Louis (Louis IX, 1226-1270) had used on his crusades. As a grand master d’Amboise actively raided against Turkish forces as well as those of the Sultan of Egypt; but he was also fully aware of the coming Turkish threat to the island (they would finally take it in 1523) and spent a great deal of effort strengthening its defenses. His most common coins are the usual gold ducats struck on Rhodes; all his other issues are much rarer, even minor coins struck in base metal. However, his multiple ducats, as this, were the rarest of them all and must have been produced in very small numbers as prestige gifts for important patrons of the Order.

103


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nomos ……… catalogue april 2009

nomos ……… catalogue april 2009

7

auction 2

nomos 2

zürich, 18 may 2010

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03_cover_mey10.indd 6-7

nomos ag, numismatists zürich, switzerland 26.3.2010 18:02:16 Uhr


Nomos Auction 2