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Be sure to visit NewStudents.DailyIllini.com for all the tips and advice you’ll need to make freshman year great.

New Student Guide

Inside Where you’ll go

At UI, education happens in landmark lecture halls. Don’t be intimidated.

Page 3A

What to bring

Packing is a tough task, but bringing too much to college can be a bigger problem.

Page 4A

What’s been happening UI’s administration has seen some scandal. Find out the past history.

Page 5A


2A

NEW STUDENT GUIDE

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION ONE: ACADEMICS PAGE 3 - Cliche as it may sound, the virtues of attending class are lost on some. Learn how to avoid into that trap. PAGE 4 - There’s no shame in seeking some easy A’s. Learn what classes can help you boost your GPA. PAGE 5 - The University’s administration is excited you’re here and have written welcome letters. PAGE 6 - Your password is your livelihood when surfing the Internet. Make sure you’re always protected. - Academics are important, but staying involved on campus is too. - Being an international is a whole other experience entirely. Find out how to prepare accordingly.

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Editor in chief Samantha Kiesel 217 • 337-8365 editor@DailyIllini.com Managing editor Ryan Weber 217 • 337-8343 mereporting@ DailyIllini.com Web producer Karen Chen 217 • 337-8343 meonline@DailyIllini. com New Student Guide copy chief Jeff Kirshman New Student Guide copy editors Eliot Sill, Steven Vazquea, New Student Guide designers Samanhta Kiesel, Nathaniel Lash, Nora Ibrahim

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NEW STUDENT GUIDE

The Daily Illini  |  www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

3A

Opportunity for help in every class by Sari Lesk Assistant News Editor

It’s Tuesday morning, and you are on your way to CLCV 115: Mythology of Greece and Rome. You are heading over to Foellinger Auditorium, where you will satisfy your General Education requirement for Western/Comparative Culture(s). Foellinger Auditorium is the circular building at the south end of the Main Quad. Originally dedicated in November 1907, it is now topped with the Quad Cam and a pineapple that serves as the international symbol of “welcome.” The Auditorium’s seating capacity of more than 1,000 allows it to serve not only as a lecture hall, but also a venue for concerts and lectures. Yes, this lecture hall can hold more than 1,000 students at a time. Before you try to fathom how you could ever learn in a class that size, pause and take a deep breath because that is not the size of the class, and there are tools to succeed in the University’s largest classes. According to the Office of Admission’s Self-Guided Quad Tour, “Only six percent of 100-level classes have 100 students or more and 66 percent have 30 students or less.” Sophomore in LAS Shan-

non Parker, an Illinois Student Admissions Representative (I-STAR), said she addresses class size on the tours she leads. She said the University’s largest classes are roughly 800 people. “Those classes are always subdivided into mandatory smaller discussion sections that are taught by teaching assistants that are getting their masters, Ph.D., or doctorate directly under the professor of that large class.” Parker said students do not need to worry about the competence of teaching assistants in educating students. “They know exactly what they’re talking about and they are monitored by the professor,” Parker said. “They’re also closer in age to you, which is really cool, I think, because they’re students as well, so they know what you’re going through.” Although discussion sections are led by teaching assistants, Parker said professors know what is happening in this aspect of their classes. She said she’s even had professors stop into her discussion sections to check in and see what’s going on. Parker said discussion sections offer the opportunity to ask questions and review class material in a smaller setting

than the large lecture hall. “You kind of get the best of both worlds,” she said. “You get that large lecture size with that really impressive – sometimes even worldrenown – professor, and then you get that smaller close knit-atmosphere.” In addition to discussion sections, professors offer students the opportunity to students to ask questions of them outside of class about course material. Professors hold office hours, which is a time that the professor will regularly be available to meet with students. For students who have a time conflict with office hours, many are more than willing to work with students and schedule an appointment at another time. Beyond getting help with the class, this is also an opportunity to establish a relationship with someone who can offer you wisdom and guidance beyond the classroom. Parker said the benefits of large lectures have made them appealing classes to her. “I came from a small school and I was really scared about the big classes,” she said. “They ended up being my favorite because there are more opportunities to meet more students in there and usually those larger classes are really popular.”

Michael Stein The Daily Illini

Students use their laptops during class in Foellinger Auditorium on March 31, 2010.

With freedom comes responsibility: Switching your major is not pitfalls to avoid if you want to succeed the end of the world, but hannah meisel Managing editor for Online

Aug. 27 is coming faster than you think. Sooner than you know, you’ll be making the trip to Chambana, unloading your belongings in a 12-by-12 cinder block room, meeting your new friends, and come Monday, sitting in your first college class. College is a time of freedom like you’ve never experienced. Want to stay up all night watching a whole season of “How I Met Your Mother”? Go for it. Eat a whole box of pizza while you’re at it? One World it is! Nurse a hangover from last night’s ragin’ frat party instead of going to microeconomics lecture? Your choice, bro. But that’s where it gets tricky. I know you’ve heard it all before: Go to class, study, don’t procrastinate on your papers and projects. I’ve rolled my eyes at this advice plenty of times, but the reason it keeps repeating itself is because it works. And I’m living proof of the other side of the story. It’s a Tuesday night in mid-September, and you’re thinking about getting to your reading for poli sci ... but only after you’ve finished watching that movie on Lifetime. Someone knocks on your door — it’s your new friend Sam from down the hall. Sam and a few of her high school friends want to go to The Piano Man at the Canopy Club in Urbana — one of the few establishments 18 year olds can enter. Suddenly, you don’t care if Susan Sarandon gets her children back from her abusive ex-husband-turned-kidnapper. You switch off the TV, get dressed in your hottest outfit appropriate for a weeknight and walk to Goodwin Avenue, vowing that you’ll only accept one Long Island from Max the senior, who, for whatever reason, prefers the company of freshmen girls. Suddenly, it’s 7:39 on Wednesday morning and you wake up in a top bunk wondering how you got there. You stare at the clock, silently bargaining with the gods of 8 a.m. Spanish that if you skip just this once, you’ll never do it again. Quizzes are only worth 10 points each, right? Take a few ibuprofen tablets and sleep it off, sweetie. But guess what? You will skip Spanish again. And again. By skipping just once, you made it easier to skip again. And not just Spanish, but every other morning class. And eventually, you’ll be skipping English to take a post-lunch nap. I know you’re saying to yourself, “I’ll never do that, I can skip class just once or twice.” But it’s a slippery slope, and it takes Bear Grylls-esque strength to scale back up that mountain. Here’s another example: You get home from class, work or practice (or a combination of the three) on a cold and rainy fall day, and all you want to do is veg out on your bed, couch or floor (or a combination of the three). All of a sudden, it’s 2 a.m. and you’ve spent the last seven hours on Reddit. And while you’re now very well-versed in all of the newest memes on the Internet and interesting tales circulating the web, odds are this will do you no good on tomorrow’s statistics midterm.

And if you’ve been skipping stats for that midmorning nap habit you’ve developed, the odds are definitely not in your favor. And finally, even if you don’t think you’ll develop a chronic class-skipping habit or Internet addiction, I guarantee that you, your friends, your friends’ friends and their friends will all fall victim to procrastination at least a few times. And while minor procrastination isn’t a huge deal, the little acts of procrastination will add up, lull you into a false sense of security and when it’s Dec. 8 and your 10-page paper on comparing political systems in South America that you haven’t started is due in six hours, yeah, that’s when it’ll hit you. Yes, all of these things have happened to me (well, not the Lifetime movie part — maybe). But, you know, even that sentence doesn’t take responsibility for my actions. I let these things happen. I’ve skipped more classes than I can count. I’ve started off the semester filling out my day planner and then let it fall to the wayside. I’ve procrastinated to the point of having two hours to type out a paper I had two months to prepare for — and had done none of the research I’d kept meaning to. And it has not ended well. Though I’m in a major where my future career probably will not depend on my college GPA, I am in the minority. Business and engineering majors who apply for similar internships or jobs are weeded out by GPAs. Those seeking to go to graduate school, medical school or law school (a large chunk of LAS or ACES or AHS majors) need a high GPA to be competitive with students from undergrad programs all over. I’m not saying you have to study your brains out every night and never have any fun. But honestly, going out six of seven nights of the week isn’t fun. It’s repetitive and draining, and you’ll go broke by November. Balance is key. And for me, even though I know that most likely no one will ever see my GPA when I apply for jobs, I’ve realized that it still means something to me. It means that sometimes I didn’t have the willpower to get up and stick my nose in a textbook. It means my work ethic probably isn’t as strong as my roommates’. It means I don’t always know how to use my time wisely and set my priorities in order. And if I don’t get on the right track to changing my habits, they could be my downfall the rest of my life, as I procrastinate on task after task, story after story. It’ll catch up to me. College is a time for freedom, yes, but also a time for responsibility. As my mother has always said to me, “There’s freedom in responsibility.” I never really understood that until I hit bottom. In college you have more free time than you’ve ever had, and more than you ever will have again. If you can’t form good time management habits in these four years, no matter the grades, no matter the job qualifications, you’ll be illequipped for the working world. So learn from my mistakes. Get yourself a free iBook on Quad Day to start planning your study time. Have lots of fun going out, but not when you have a test the next day. Besides, 8 a.m. Spanish isn’t that bad after all, especially when you get to class and can learn from la profesora.

Hannah is a senior in Media.

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find out what you like first By Jack Preis Daytime Assignment Editor

Hey, you made it to college! Not only that, you also made it into a pretty nice place. Bravo! Congrats, grad! You did it! To a bright future! And whatever else those annoying grad cards said. But let’s take a minute and look at what that really means for your future. To me, the weirdest thing about going to a university is that, before you’ve even left home to experience (semi-)independent life, you’ve already committed to a specific college and major. You’re expected to know exactly which degree to pursue, and roughly where that’s going to take you postgraduation. That is, unless you’ve done yourself the favor of starting in the Division of General Studies to delay your major declaration. I guess the first point I want to make is that, despite all the wonderful experiences you’ve gained from high school, more likely than not, you don’t really know yourself yet. I don’t mean to crane my neck from this high horse, either, as I’m still not sure what I want to “do” exactly, and I don’t know if I ever will be. What’s worse, the classes you take freshman year may not even be directive. It can be hard to see how 100-level classes and assorted Gen-Eds point you in a tangible, career-oriented direction. Freshman year is, excuse the phrase, ‘like a box of chocolates’ in that way. If your classes are keeping you busy but not giving you any answers, you just need to spend more time with yourself. Go to Quad Day and see what clubs sound interesting, or just take up a new hobby and see how good you can get at it. Coming out of high school, it’s easy to say what you love, but it’s a whole other project to determine what you’d be happy doing on a constant basis for a number of years of your life. College really is the time to explore yourself in whatever creative way you choose. As editor of my high school’s paper, journalism was certainly my thing, but when I started college I thought I had this world figured out. By enrolling in the College of Business, I would put myself on a secure path toward financial success and relative job satisfaction, which is all I felt I needed. But after finding my classes uninteresting and constantly wondering when I’d be able to use my real talents last December, I yearned for a more stimulating outlet.

Yearning led to critical thinking. Did I really have it figured out? What is a safe career path going to do for me if it doesn’t interest or challenge me to develop my person, or even make me happy? I decided that I didn’t want to spend my life working up a ladder, but rather, I’d develop a more broad skill set that could make me both marketable and generally happy. I decided that, for now, that skill would be writing. Hope I’m doing all right so far. So that was when I decided to switch into the journalism program in the College of Media. Not only would I be able to explore my writing skills here, but I would also be graduating with a degree that qualified me in a much more broad way. As a journalism grad, I can simply be a “writer.” Depending on how I choose to market that skill, I have a number of careers available to me — I can be an author, publisher, editor, lawyer, marketing or advertising specialist, or, dare I say, an actual journalist. As of right now, I’m excited by the thought of working many different jobs throughout my life without getting too comfortable in any one. I know I won’t like doing the same thing over and over no matter what it is. You and I are different people, though, so throughout this process, be sure to really try and figure out what you want out of life, even if you don’t know exactly what one dream “job” would be. At first I thought transferring my major would be some big hassle, but I found it’s actually a fairly easy process for most colleges. I basically just had to write 500 words about why I wanted that major, and then prove that I could complete the degree in a reasonable amount of time. You’ll also want to have a strong GPA to make transferring easier, so don’t slack on those Gen-Eds. Finally, some of the University’s colleges will also want to see involvement or experience in relevant activities so it doesn’t seem like you’re switching on a whim. So, before you apply to switch, it’s good to get involved with one of the 1,000 or more Registered Student Organizations (RSOs) or find your own way to show that interest. If you’re looking for some inspiration, I’ll leave you with a quote by author Khalil Gibran that continues to help me along my ever-winding path: “The lust for comfort murders the passions of the soul.”

Despite all the wonderful experiences you’ve gained from high school, more likely than not, you don’t really know yourself yet.


4a

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

NEW STUDENT GUIDE

The Daily Illini  |  www.DailyIllini.com

Easy classes to fulfill Gen-Eds By Maggie Huynh

Daytime Assignment Editor

In high school, state education laws probably mandated you to take a bunch of classes that you didn’t care for. Here at college, you actually get to choose what classes you want to take and for the most part, ones that interest you. However, you will still have to fill some General Education, or Gen-Ed, requirements that all University students have to complete in order to graduate. Most of these classes won’t have anything to do with your specific major, but they are meant to give you a good overview of what is offered on campus. The good thing is that there are a good chunk of classes that will make taking GenEds a breeze and even boost your GPA. Here are just a few of the classes that will make your freshman year course load a lot lighter:

STAT 100: Statistics Daily Illini Illini File Photo

Eli Hyman, looks through posters at the Poster Sale at the Illini Union on Jan. 17, 2011. Poster sales are a great way to decorate your dorm room.

Decorating your dorm is key Jeff kirshman Sports editor

Y

our dorm serves as a first impression for the rest of your floormates, which is why packing the right amount of needs and nonessentials is so crucial. Fair or not, your dorm is a reflection of you. So what do you want your dorm room to say? One option is to have a bookshelf displaying Hemingway, Faulkner and Camus to show how much of an intellectual you are. Perhaps you want everyone to know how much you support Illini athletics and the Chief. Or maybe the goal is to turn your dorm into a Bro Pad that guarantees you and some rando dimepiece two tickets to Pound Town. The options are endless, though you should avoid the latter, for you will be the worst person in the world. When I packed for my freshman year at the Florida Avenue Residence Hall (FAR), I took one more lap around my room at home to see if there was anything worth bringing that I might ever need. This was stupid. Many of the items I took with me never served a purpose, including an inflatable Superman punching bag that I thought would be “fun” but spent the majority of its time deflated in the back of my closet after the first week was up. Especially if keeping your room tidy is a challenge, bringing less things with you allows for less of them to end up on the floor. Ask yourself before you load another item into the minivan if it’s really worth bringing. Think Andy from Toy Story. Packing extra laundry baskets will allow for you to organize which clothes are dirty and which have been used sparingly and are still wearable. This tactic comes in handy particularly if you exercise regularly and don’t want to put the clothes you used for a few hours during the day back with your completely clean

clothes when suiting up into athletic apparel. If you plan on going home somewhat regularly, you can use those trips back to the casa to switch out clothes depending on the season. There’s no need to have a bulky winter coat to take up space in your closet in September. What type of refrigerator should you get? What about a microwave? These are important matters. For the record, microwaves are key for nuking popcorn or pizza rolls (or both!) and refrigerators are paramount for storing said pizza rolls and other items like peanut butter, jelly and, ahem, beer. You want to bring both appliances, especially since the refrigerator can also serve as your TV stand. Speaking of which, some of you may be contemplating not bringing a TV due to the idea that, “I’ll be studying all the time and never have time to watch.” This is a terrible idea. Even if you are involved on campus, there is plenty of time for wasting. Let’s say you take a very respectable 15 hours of class a semester; this means you will average three hours of classes per day (this math is correct). Did I mention weekends? You’re going to study, rush a fraternity/sorority, play underwater hockey and engage in a bunch of higher-learning activities at all times? Really? If you have free time, you need TV to help fill it. And if you’re busy, you need to be able to unwind for an hour at the end of the day to watch SportsCenter or The Daily Show or some mindless sitcom to turn your brain off to. Trust me, it feels amazing to come home after a long day and just plop on the couch (or in your case, bed or futon), and watch an episode of Scrubs you’ve already seen seven times. Posters, which can be found reasonably priced on Amazon, are a great way to transform what is otherwise a closet-sized prison cell into an actual home. At the same time, you don’t want to your decor to match everyone else’s. Wow, you like John Lennon? So does everyone else. The Beatles weren’t some indie band with a small cult following. Choose

your posters with a more selective eye. Yes, John Belushi wearing his “College” sweatshirt is a classic, but try not to begin your college career as cliche as possible. Other posters that fall into this category feature Bob Dylan, Muhammad Ali, Fight Club, Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Bob Marley. I’m not saying these are completely off limits, but no one wants to resemble the College Freshman meme. Especially for guys, video games are a great way to make friends without coming off as someone desperately looking for a new Facebook request. Just extend an invitation to play, and, assuming you’re not a huge weirdo and you have a general sense of how to behave socially, you’ll be acquaintances in no time and on the right track toward friendship. All the better if you have old-school consoles such as Nintendo 64 or the always-charming GameCube. Finding someone who shared my affinity for the ludicrously unrealistic NFL Street instantaneously brought out copious amounts of manlove. Here’s lookin’ at you, Randy Lefkowitz. Attaching whiteboards to the front of your door is also a nice touch, though they are by no means a necessity: Curse words and male genitalia will be scribed more than practical information, but they’re fun nonetheless. It’s smart to coordinate bringing all of these items with your roommate(s). Doing so not only keeps costs down and frees room in your vehicle when packing, but it will allow for you to get to know them better and initiate bonding. Think about it: Why did you hangout where you did during high school? It probably depended on who had the coolest stuff. Sure, you might be a great person, but if the kid at the end of the hall has a sick stereo system, people are probably going to want to clock a lot of hours there. Not saying you should buy a bunch of state-of-the art equipment, but things like this do come into play when everyone is trying to make friends.

You’ll hear it from just about everyone on campus — STAT 100 with Ellen Fireman may be just about the easiest class you can take. It fills the Quantitative Reasoning I credit and most students end up with A’s in the class. There are four tests over the semester and homework every week, but for the most part they are generally pretty easy. Fireman also offers a lot of extra credit, so it’s hard to do poorly in this class. Just make sure to show up because she takes attendance via iClicker (a device you will have to buy that allows professors to take attendance and give quizzes to large lectures).

ATMS 100: Introduction to Meteorology This class will take care of your Quantitative Reasoning II requirement. It will also go towards three of the six Natural Sciences & Technology hours you have to take. Jeffrey Frame, the professor, puts up incomplete lecture slides online, and you just have to fill in the blanks during class. He also takes attendance through iClicker quizzes, so showing up is an easy way to score some points. There are a couple of tests, but as long as you review the slides, you won’t have anything to worry about. There’s also a lab section for this class, which usually comprises of really easy group work.

GEOL 118: Natural Disasters Take this course with Steve Altaner for an easy class that will also count towards your Natural Sciences & Technology requirement. Like other large lectures, homework is assigned online, but there is very little of it. The tests are easy as long as you study the notes he gives you in class. Altaner also assigns a short writing assignment that is based off your own experience with natural disasters, and your fellow students in the class grade it. Needless to say, it’s a pretty easy class.

JOUR 200: Introduction to Journalism Even if you don’t like to write, everyone has to fulfill the Advanced Composition Gen-Ed, and this class is an easy way to do it. Jennifer Follis will give you a rundown of professional journalism in this class, along with a couple easy assignments and quizzes. There’s a midterm and final too, but she’ll provide you with study guides that give you everything you need to know to pass.

RLST 108: Religion & Society in West I This class may not be as popular as other Gen-Eds, but Bruce Rosenstock likes to make it easy for his students. He gives out a low amount of homework, and there are only two tests. The tests might be the best part — less than 20 multiple choice questions, partial credit for wrong answers and he gives you the questions beforehand. Just show up, and you will be well on your way to an A in the class.


NEW STUDENT GUIDE

The Daily Illini  |  www.DailyIllini.com

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

5A

NOTES FROM THE UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION

University President Robert Easter Nearly 40 years ago, I was in the same shoes as all of you. I was new to the University, a farm kid from southwest Texas looking forward with a mixture of excitement and fear to all of the lifechanging possibilities that I could only imagine were in front of me. I had just begun my doctoral studies in Urbana-Champaign. My hopes and dreams were big, and like countless other University students, the lessons I learned and the people I met took my career to heights I could never have imagined. Our story is as familiar to this great campus as the Alma Mater. Our alumni are a

who’s who in fields ranging from business and technology to agriculture and the arts. Their achievements are literally engraved into our everyday lives, including PayPal, YouTube and the National Football League. This fall, each of you will embark on a path that will add the next chapter to our rich story of excellence. This is an extraordinary place. The UrbanaChampaign campus is a world leader in education and research, and one of three distinctive and distinguished campuses that comprise the University of Illinois. Our best-in-class graduates, our worldclass faculty and staff and our leading-edge research make the University an incubator that drives progress for Illinois and the nation. The University’s greatness is also rooted in the deep loyalty of an alumni base that is more than 640,000 strong and the largest in the nation, our 22,000 faculty and staff, and our countless friends and supporters. Together, they recently helped us top one of the most ambitious capital campaigns ever tackled by any U.S. university, raising more than $2.4 billion to advance the academic and research programs that have made the University the envy of our peers around the world. For all of you, the coming weeks and months will be a time of discovery, introducing you to those prestigious programs, our historic campus and new friends who will last a lifetime. As all of you begin your new journey, so will I. This fall marks my first as president, and I’m honored and humbled to lead the University where I have spent my entire career. So from one newcomer to another, welcome. And thank you for entrusting your future to the University of Illinois. I promise you won’t be disappointed. Bob Easter, President, University of Illinois

Chancellor Phyllis Wise Dear Cherished Students: Welcome to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Welcome to a campus where we value every student, where we nurture idealism and intellect and where our goal is to make your experience at Illinois one of the best in your life. I am so delighted that you have entrusted your education with us. We will not let you down. I hope during these first few busy weeks, as you orient yourself to your classes and

to the campus, that you will appreciate the amazing resources this University offers. I believe we have the finest, more dedicated professors in the nation, and that we offer the most up-to-date laboratories and lecture halls. In addition, you have the chance to attend lectures, concerts, recitals and readings on a daily basis. I hope you will take advantage of these one-of-a-kind opportunities to enhance your educational experience. As I complete my first year as Chancellor I have been struck by the architecture of both the South and North Quads. Buildings such as the stately Foellinger Auditorium, the newly remodeled Lincoln Hall, the Beckman Institute and that busy nexus of student activity, the Illini Union, all add the beauty of this historic campus. The intellect and inspiration of generations past and present are embodied in the brick and mortar of all of our buildings, new and historic. Even if you don’t have a class in one of these buildings I urge you to experience them. You will be impressed, and over time you will learn the incredible history of this 144-year-old venerable institution of learning. A great way to begin your time here at the University of Illinois is to attend Quad Day on Sunday, Aug. 26. Student organizations will be on the Quad and you will have a chance to interact with them and decide which opportunities in the campus community are a good fit for you. And, on Friday, Aug. 24 at 11:30 a.m., I will address all of you during our New Student Convocation in the Assembly Hall, followed by lunch at Memorial Stadium. See you there! Phyllis M. Wise, Vice President and Chancellor, University of Illinois

A brief history of scandal at Illinois NATHANIEL LASH Managing Editor for Reporting

I

t’s hard to feel as though your future Alma Mater gets good press nowadays. The top levels of administration have been cleaned at least a couple of times in the few short years following Gov. Pat Quinn’s demand that the entire board of trustees tender its resignation in the aftermath of the 2009 Clout Scandal. Starting with B. Joseph White, we’ve seen four faces in the president’s office, with Bob Easter now taking the reins after three years of relative instability. The University of Illinois is in no way unique in having such a high turnover in administrators. So far, we’ve dodged the child sex abuse scandal that recently displaced Penn State’s Graham Spanier, or more recently, Florida A&M’s marching band hazing rituals that left one of its drum majors beaten to death. So our issues, while having the same pattern of resignations and turnover seen elsewhere, aren’t on the same scale of death and rape. Nevertheless, things started looking bad in May 2009, when the Chicago Tribune began printing its “Clout Goes to College” series. The articles revealed years of pressure from University administrators and Illinois politicians to accept well-connected applicants, who may have otherwise been underqualified to attend the University. This shocked an entire nation and led to the resignation of most of the University’s trustees, as well as former President B. Joseph White and former Chancellor Richard Herman. The Tribune and the University continue to grap-

ple, both in state and federal court, over the outcome of student records that may give a clearer picture of who was pulling the strings in the now-passed scandal. After White’s resignation, Stanley Ikenberry, former president, took over his old job in the interim. When Chancellor Herman finally folded, both his and Provost Linda Katehi’s empty posts were taken over. The new board of trustees chose Michael Hogan, a historian and president at the University of Connecticut, to take over permanently. Hogan inherited a position fraught with declining state funds (and rising administrative salaries), and everyone knew the school had some tough years ahead. Few if any at that time, however, expected him to resign before his second year on the job. And for his first year, despite tensions with the University’s faculty senate, it seemed as though he’d make it. But the last academic year started with a bang. In early September, a two-month investigation into falsified class profiles in the College of Law was initiated after an anonymous whistleblower tipped off the University’s ethics office. The culprit, assistant dean of admissions and financial aid Paul Pless, was promptly fired for his manipulation of grade point averages and LSAT scores that largely make up the college’s ranking in the annual U.S. News and World Report. Pless is now a broker for a real estate firm in Bloomington. Meanwhile, the University’s College of Law has dropped 12 highly coveted spots in April’s U.S. News rankings. But that, apparently, didn’t call into question President Michael Hogan’s ability to lead and manage the University, nor that of law school dean Bruce Smith. Nay, it was the centralization of the campuses that began to eat away at Hogan’s short-lived tenure. By April 2011, a leading campus administrator,

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Sally Jackson, had resigned over centralization of authority over information technology between the Urbana, Springfield and Chicago campuses. So it’s not hard to imagine that when his sights turned to enrollment management — the same field that had sparked the 2009 scandal — conversations got heated. These proposals would create more concerted efforts in admissions across the three campuses, as well as some specific proposals, like getting Illinois on the Common Application. Response from faculty was largely negative, saying it would infringe on each campuses unique identity. Such as it was in December 2011, when the University Senates Conference, an advisory board made up of members of the faculty senates from each campus, met to make a recommendation on Hogan’s proposals. Springfield’s representatives, who felt enrollment management could benefit their campus, were in support of the proposal, while Chicago and Urbana representatives sought a unified stance against it. During this time, all members received an email saying that unified stance was to be in vain, signed anonymously as “Senator.” When senates conference member Roy Campbell, a security specialist at the University’s Department of Computer Science, opened the email, he forwarded back to members metadata with the last name of Hogan’s fiercely loyal chief of staff, Lisa Troyer, apparently embedded when the email body was cut-and-pasted from a Microsoft Word document. Troyer resigned the following month, less than two weeks before an external report all but conclusively proved she was the author, though she continued to deny sending the emails. There was uproar, and many blamed Hogan for his apparent failure of “ethical leadership.” StuAffairsNSE2010v2:NewStuEd2010

7/7/10

Things started to get stickier when emails obtained under the Illinois Freedom of Information Act showed Hogan was pressuring the newly hired Chancellor Phyllis Wise to publicly endorse his enrollment management plan, and even more so when Troyer received a faculty appointment in the Department of Psychology, as per her tenure that was granted when she was hired as Hogan’s chief of staff. Letters condemning Hogan and his policies began circulating between chaired faculty, and eventually, more than 100 of the highest ranked faculty began calling for Hogan’s ouster in late February, and again on the ides of March. This came a week after an emergency meeting with the board of trustees, after which he sent a mass email to the University promising to “restore integrity and trust.” But that promise never solidified. Over Spring Break, Hogan decided it was time to call it quits, and the trustees hired Bob Easter, the former interim Chancellor, who had been at that time trying to enjoy retirement. In a display of the greatest optimism, he’s been signed on for the next two years, the same tenure as his ill-fated predecessor. So that’s where we are. Last year was quite a whirlwind, and we’re excited to see what the University of Illinois community can dish out for us this year. Disabled student scholarship funds being funneled into copious amounts of leather-bound books, rich mahogany and pre-Prohibition scotch whiskey to appease corrupt Chicago politicians? The discovery that a shadow multinational corporation is pulling all the strings in a bid for world domination? As a journalist, rampant speculation isn’t my business, but you can’t rule anything out. Only time will tell.

Nathaniel is a junior in Media. 1:13 PM

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Tuesday, July 24, 2012

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Preparation vital for international students Many helpful resources available to ease transition to UI, American lifestyle BY CARINA LEE STAFF WRITER

In August, students from all around the world such as China, South Korea and India will officially be the class of 2016. Compared to domestic students, preparation for college before coming to the U.S is greater and needs to be done earlier. Students who are coming straight from their home country will need to make a pre-arrival checklist, which includes receiving an I-20, having a Visa interview for an F-1 Visa and submitting immunization records. Nicole Vernon, assistant director of the Office of International Students and Scholar Services (ISSS) said it is vital for international students to communicate from time to time with the ISSS. “We email all international students throughout the summer,” Vernon said. “They need to be kind of looking out for important updates and check our website for pre-arrival information and what to expect before they check in.”

Vernon added that students are welcome to visit the office with any questions. “Students don’t know that we can answer questions not relating to immigration status,” she said. “It’s important to look at everything you get: It might be information that you would go back and take a look at it again.” First-time international students might not know where to go, but Vernon advises students to explore more and check out the events going on the first few days. Illinois was ranked second in the most recent rankings of the U.S.’s research institutions in number of international students, according to the University’s website. At a university with over 7,000 international students out of over 41,000 students, these students could possibly feel at home but also may find it hard to get used to the American culture. Xin Chen, senior in Engineering, said getting out the comfort zone helps to adjust to a new culture.

“It’s more like in China because I met a lot of Chinese students there. ... It feels more like home,” Chen said. “Make more friends, not only (home-country) friends, but also American friends. Ask for help from professors when you have problems (in class).” Kevin Yau, an international graduate student in LAS, said international students need to have long-term goals to succeed at studying abroad. “Some of the freshmen don’t know what they are doing, and they don’t understand why they are here,” Yau said. “I would advise them to try to find their goal and then study hard to achieve it.” Yau said the earlier international students understand their goals, the more competitive they will be when entering the job market out of school. “If they know what they want as soon as they can, study hard and achieve it during their freshman and sophomore year. That could be a better thing.” he said. “They can grab more chances than other people do.”

Studying in college more than just a night of cramming Advice to help get off on right foot BY HANNAH PROKOP STAFF WRITER

Typical study habits for many college students seem to include all-nighters at the library, last minute cramming sessions and endless cups of coffee. If last minute memorizing, a few hours of sleep and relying on a caffeine buzz worked for you in high school, it may work for you in college, too, but you will probably be better off trying out some different study habits. Unlike high school, there aren’t as many, if any, homework assignments to “cushion” your grade in college. The majority of the time, a few tests and papers will determine your grade — so each one counts. Following a few good study habits may help your grades and help you to have the best freshman year possible.

Don’t wait till the last minute To make sure you stay on top of your studying, start early. You’re less likely to be panicked if you begin studying a week or two in advance, rather than the night before your test. Studying the night before is also a bad idea because midterms and fi nals, especially, cover a lot of information — more than you will be able to memorize and retain for the next day. Breaking up and studying your material in smaller sections will make it less intimidating and easier to remember.

Find your perfect study spot For some, it’s under a tree on the Quad, for others, it’s in an isolated cubicle in the Undergraduate Library (UGL). Test out different places around campus to fi nd your perfect study spot.

Some of the more popular campus libraries — Granger, Main Library, the UGL, ACES — are sure to be packed with students studying, especially around fi nals time. Don’t forget about other places on campus such as lounges in your dorm, the quiet rooms in the Ikenberry Commons and cafes and coffee shops around campus.

Use all available resources Everyone misses a day of class, doesn’t understand a difficult lecture or can’t read their own handwriting from time to time. Use other students in your class as a resource for any questions you have or to fi ll in gaps in your notes. Creating study groups will allow you to get answers to any questions you may have and give you a chance to make friends in your classes. Also, don’t be afraid to go to a professor’s office hours to ask questions or just to clarify material covered in class. It may seem intimidating, but all professors have office hours for a reason — use them.

Remember to relax The best way to become even more stressed and overwhelmed while studying for a test is to push yourself too far. Studying 24 hours a day, seven days a week will only tire you out, make you less focused and cause you to miss out on other opportunities. Everyone needs study breaks. If you’ve been sitting down or staring at a screen for hours, get up and move around. Walk around campus, visit your next-door neighbor or grab something to eat to relieve yourself from studying for an hour or so.

DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

People study in the Granger Engineering Library in Urbana on Thursday afternoon, May 7, 2009. Studying is important, but the moments that will make your freshman year memorable are the times you tried new things on campus, joined

an organization and met new friends, so be sure to balance your time so you can fully enjoy your freshman year.

Creating a password needs both time and creativity MARTY MALONE Contributing writer

I

f you took my advice from the Campus Navigator 2012 edition and set yourself up a brand new Google Account, first off I say, “Congrats!” It wasn’t too painful, right? You just typed in your desired name, a few other bits of information like your birthday and gender and then chose a password very carefully ... and voila! You were transformed into a functioning member of 21st-century society. Take a step back, though, back to choosing your password. In a rush to set up your account, did you try to make your password “password”? How about “12345”? If you did, you noticed a dialog box popped up and said: “You might as well give us your social security number as well. Oh yeah, and your credit card. If you’ve ever had a different last name, mind if you share that with us too?”

OK, so that wasn’t their exact phrasing, but it is true that Google will not allow easy passwords like that to get by. First off, “password” is a common word, which the company won’t allow. And the same goes for passwords for your University accounts. I won’t begin to discuss the ridiculousness of having to create two different passwords for your NetID and Enterprise accounts, but I do applaud the University for also putting in password safeguards for students. Eight to 12 characters and three different character classes (upper case, lower case and numeric), among other rules, help students create unique passwords to protect all of their important, private information. If you’re keeping track, in this article alone there are now three different accounts to remember passwords for: Google and your two University accounts. What about your Amazon account? And Netfl ix? And iTunes? And those other billion websites that require passwords? You could take the easy way out and use the same password for each, but lately that just doesn’t seem like a viable option anymore. Both LinkedIn and Last.fm had hackers supposedly steal password information from a large percentage of users. If you

have the same password for your LinkedIn and Google Accounts, well there goes all your private information. How the h-e-double-hockeysticks is one supposed to remember all of his or her different, unique passwords? You could take a step back in time and revert to the good, old pen and paper method. Just make sure (1) not to lose it and (2) not to lose it! There are also websites like KeePass and LastPass that let you store all of your different passwords on the web, behind the security of another mega password. Finally, how do you go about making a great password? If “password” and “qwerty” aren’t unique enough, try some of your favorite words — backwards. (It won’t work if your favorite word is racecar, sadly.) Also, trade out “o’s” for zeros, “L’s” for “1’s” and “A’s” for “4’s”. Tr4dE 0ff L0weRcaSe anD C4piTAL LeTterS. Also I may be the only person on earth who hums a little jingle in my head each time I type my password (full disclosure I use the same password for a lot of sites with different little variations) in because in my head it has good, natural rhythm. Whatever. Have fun with it, and just don’t forget it.

Marty is a senior in Media.


The Daily Illini  |  www.DailyIllini.com

NEW STUDENT GUIDE

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

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8A

NEW STUDENT GUIDE

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

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A publication of The Daily Illini

New Student Guide

Inside How to make friends

With 40,000 undergraduate students, you don’t want to be a total social outcast.

Page 2B

Where you want to be

It may not be the Las Vegas Strip, but Green Street is Champaign’s nightlife hot spot.

Page 3B

Who’s been here before

What do Playboy, YouTube and the Jacksonville Jaguars have in common? Ties to the Orange and Blue, of course.

Page 6B


2B

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

NEW STUDENT GUIDE

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

TABLE OF CONTENTS Friendships can start

SECTION TWO: CAMPUS LIFE in a variety of ways PAGE 3 - Green Street: the central hub of UI nightlife -Not a drinker? No worries, we’ve got you covered.

during time at Illinois events around campus like Illinites at the Illini Union or go to Insomniac Perhaps one of the most terrifying Cookies late at night with some of the parts of going off to college is the people she had met in her dorm. thought of going alone, leaving friends Another way that several students behind. In the fi rst weeks on campus, meet their closest friends is by joining meeting new people and starting new clubs and organizations, called Regfriendships will generally be the top istered Student Organizations (RSO). priority of new students. Some will That’s what David McDowell, senior say it is scary being alone, but others in LAS, tried to do on Quad Day. “In the fi rst couple of weeks, I hung are optimistic about the prospect of out with people on my floor, joined a starting a new chapter. The vast majority of new students lot clubs at Quad Day, and probably will make their fi rst friendships right went to five of the 10 clubs that I had inside of their dorms, fi rst by building signed up for,” McDowell said. a relationship with their roommates While in the clubs, he began to and then venturrea lize that ing down the hall he didn’t have to see whom else much in comis around. mon with othStarting to fi nd ers in them, fr iends dow n but that doesn’t the hall is exactmean that othly what Sudeepti ers won’t have Tumuluru, junior more success. in Business, says He admits that to do. When she he wished he started school at wou ld h ave the University, stayed more SUDEEPTI TUMULURU, she only knew one active in his junior in business person on campus. clubs, alluding To meet more peoto the possibilple, she started close to home. ity that he would have made better “I made friends in my dorm fi rst friends if he had participated more. because you will see those people the At the very least he doesn’t regret most,” Tumuluru said. any of the time he spent in his clubs. She also recommended that stuMcDowell ended up meeting his dents keep their doors open because best friends when he joined his frait’s a sign that someone is in the room ternity, which is also another option and ready to meet someone new. for students who are looking for a way “Play some music, and someone will to meet more people. pop their head in,” she said. Commonly, students will make Valentino Elliott, senior in LAS and friends with people they sit next to resident advisor at Lundgren Hall in in class or those with whom they do the Six-Pack, also met several of his a project. To maintain those relationfriends through his dorm. He met ships, students must make an effort to them at the programs that his resi- keep in touch, McDowell said. dent advisors had created. Elliott also “I’ve drifted away from a lot of looked beyond his dorm and started the friends that I have met in classes to go to activities around campus and because if you don’t have the class apartment parties. several times per week, then you don’t Tumuluru, on the other hand, wasn’t see them, and you drift apart,” he said. as comfortable with going to parties At the very least, even if students when she arrived in Champaign her feel they are alone, they share that fi rst semester, nor did she like going same feeling with a majority of others. Being proactive at making friends to many of the fraternities. “I was very sheltered in high school, is essential, Tumuluru said. so putting myself near that much “You have to have the motivation alcohol was not something I was going to make friends,” she said. “Start off to do,” Tumuluru said. slow, you will fi nd some of your very Instead, she would go to other best friends here.” BY RYAN WEBER OPINIONS EDITOR

PAGE 4- Find out how to avoid the freshman 15. PAGE 5 - Discover the ways you can navigate campus. -Learn the goings-on of Welcome Week. PAGE 6 - Survival 101: where to find free food on campus

“You have to have the motivation to make friends. Start off slow, you will find some of your very best friends here.”

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Tuesday, July 24, 2012

3B

The street that has a little bit of everything

Suggestions to experience a prime location on campus

piercing. But hey, if you’re daring, then why not opt for a tattoo to symbolize your fi rst year of college? Cross the street ... DIAGONALLY. Green Street is the only place I’ve ever been to that allows pedestrians to cross in this unconventional way. It’s freeing, I tell you, freeing. Try a new type of food. You could go for Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Greek — the options are endless. I highly recommend Cravings. Meander through the aisles at Walgreens. I’ve killed so much time in there, leafi ng through magazines or checking out the latest “As Seen On TV” item or searching for new gum fl avors. When there’s no Target within walking distance, Walgreens is surely the next best thing. Journey to Baskin Robbins. It’s not a well-known fact, but there actually is a BR on the corner of Green and Neil. Just one mile down the block, this place is Green Street’s best-kept secret. Noth i ng c ou ld possibly be better than 31 fl avors of deliciousness. Have a spontaneous dance party on the corner of 6th and Green. Gameday Spirit is right there, and they almost always have music blasting outside. Random dancing is the perfect way to relieve stress, trust me. People watch at Starbucks. If you sit at the little bar by the window, you’ve got the perfect view of the street. Frappy Hour has never been so interesting.

MELANIE STONE Opinions columnist

G

reen Street is where the magic happens. Okay, okay, so maybe not magic in the literal sense. (Or whatever sense you were thinking of.) But Green Street is defi nitely a hot spot on campus. There’s food, there’s fun, and there are friends — all you could ever want or need is located there. In order to squeeze all of its goodness into one column, I’ve taken the liberty of composing a list for all you incoming freshies: O rd er I r i sh Nachos at Murphy’s Pub. These aren’t your ordinary nachos. Instead of chips, these babies are loaded onto waffle fries. That’s right, waffle fries. The fi rst time my friends and I ordered these, I ate three-fourths of the plate, or approximately 10,000 calories. Get a piercing or a tattoo. The second week of school, one of my friends dragged us to a tattoo parlor. Don’t worry, all she wanted was a little cartilage

No matter who you are, there’s something for everyone on University of Illinois students’ favorite street.

DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

Located at the north end of campus, Green Street is the heart of Campustown. It is home to a myriad of restaurants take-out places and, of course, bars. (Note: This is especially entertaining on Unofficial St. Patrick’s Day.) Scour the sale racks at Urban Outfitters. Or give yourself an impromptu manicure with the nail polish testers. Or, buy something. Celebrate the end of the week with

some deep dish pizza from Papa Del’s. It’s one of the few sit-down restaurants on Green Street; sometimes, you just want to be served. And the pizza isn’t just good — it’s life-changing. Well, Class of 2016, there you have it. Ten things to do on Green Street.

Come hungry, come bored, come craving pizza. No matter who you are, there’s something for everyone on University of Illinois students’ favorite street.

Melanie is a sophomore in Media.

Alcohol’s not needed for a good time at U of I Eight ideas for new students looking to have fun without consuming alcohol MELANIE STONE Opinions columnist

Y

ep, the rumors are true — University of Illinois students love to get their drink on. In fact, the 2012 Princeton Review ranked our school at No. 11 on the official list of top party schools. For most people, a typical weekend involves shots, “jungle juice” and lots and lots of cheap beer. Most freshmen spend their evenings at frat parties, while others choose to go to the bars on campus. Believe it or not, there are some exceptions to that group. Myself included. Not only was I eighteen for my entire freshman year, but I also stopped drinking second semester. That meant no bars and no alcohol for me. First, allow me to discuss the bar scene. You have to be 19 years old to get in and 21 to drink. This low entry age makes the bars very popular. Places like KAM’S and Joe’s are almost always packed on Friday and Saturday nights. On weeknights, most bars offer specials. Tuesday night is Wine Night at the Clybourne, for

example. Then there’s Country Nite at KAM’S , occasionally complete with a mechanical bull. Needless to say, U of I students hold their bars close to their orange and blue hearts. If you’re not 19, then have no fear. Frat parties or house parties are actually a ton of fun. The music is loud, people are talking or dancing and the Keystone is free (if you’re into that). For those that don’t drink, it’s not always easy to fi nd something to do on a Friday night. But this past semester, I’ve managed to have a blast without a drop of liquor. Here are a few ideas, tested and approved by yours truly: 1. Find friends with cars. Off-campus adventures are the best, even if it’s just a late night drive to Jarling’s Custard Cup or Danville. 2. Pass out water to drunk people. It sounds dumb, but kids coming out of the bars are quite entertaining, trust me, and they’ll certainly appreciate the free water after a night of drinking. 3. Organize a scavenger hunt. My sorority planned one during

Champaign is a small town, and it might not be what you’re used to. There are plenty of things to do; all you have to do is think outside of the box.

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the spring — we planked, we laughed, we did strange things on Green Street. It was hilarious. 4. Play hide-and-go-seek in the Library’s Main Stacks. It’s like a cornmaze of books in there. You could read them, too, if you’re feeling especially intellectual. 5. Take a bus to the movie theater. There’s nothing like a midnight premier to rile you up. 6. Walk around the Quad with a cardboard cutout. Yes, my friends and I did this. Two words: Edward. Cullen. 7. Go to parties and be the craziest one there. Just because you don’t drink doesn’t mean you can’t tear up the dance floor. To be perfectly honest, non-drinkers and students under 18 will need to be a little bit creative. Champaign is a small town, and it might not be what you’re used to. There are plenty of things to do; all you have to do is think outside of the box. Or, when in doubt, hang out with an Edward Cullen cutout.

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Looking for a Job in Student Media? Whether you worked for your school paper or yearbook or just enjoy good music…come see if you have a home at Illini Media. We are looking for staff from writers to personalities, business majors to broadcast majors.

Help the University identify water pollution on campus

INFO NIGHTS Wednesday, August 29 @ 7PM Tuesday, September 4 @ 7PM

What to look for:

Illini Media Building 512 E. Green St, Ch.

-Discolored water, foaming or unusual odor in the Boneyard Creek -Hoses draining to a storm sewer inlet -Leaking contaniers of unknown or hazardous substances -Anything being poured into the street or a storm sewer drain

Who to call: -Contact Enviromental Compliance at 217.265.9828

Daily Illini Independent student newspaper

Buzz Weekly entertainment magazine

Illio Yearbook

Technograph Quarterly engineering magazine

WPGU-FM Commercial radio station

the217.com Entertainment website

Permissible discharges include: Water-line flushing, Landscape irrigation, Lawn watering, Water used for fire-fighting


4B

NEW STUDENT GUIDE

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

A University with plenty of options for exercising

Campus Recreation provides students a variety of ways to stay in shape and compete BY LAURA SHAY STAFF WRITER

For many new students, the school year starts off with a serving of french fries here, a cone of soft-serve there. After a few weeks, however, some might get into the habit of having pizza for dinner every night at the Ikenberry Commons or visiting the Busey Beanery for some late night Oreo cheesecake. Soon enough, many new students begin to notice a little extra padding — and not in their wallets. Somewhere between ordering Insomnia Cookies for delivery to their dorm and hitting up Espresso Royale for a large Polar Cap with whipped cream before class, a large group of students who are new to campus are at risk to gain the infamous “freshman 15.” Living on campus and eating in the dining halls does not have to be a condemnation to an extralarge graduation robe. Many students who live in University Housing are still able to get fit, while being tempted with golden brown tater tots and crumbly raspberry bars, by participating in physical activities. Government guidelines from the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services recommend between one hour and 15 minutes and two and a half hours of aerobic activity a week, depending on the intensity of the aerobic activity. However, it is also recommended that adults perform muscle-strengthening exercises at least two days a week. Those wishing to get back into shape, or who simply miss their gym memberships from back home, can visit either Campus Recreation Center East (CRCE) or the Activities and Recreation Center (ARC). Membership to both facilities is included for all

full-time students who have been assessed the student service fee. Both Campus Recreation facilities contain cardiovascular equipment, weights, indoor running tracks, aquatic areas and gymnasiums. The facilities have “everything (a student) could want” to get into shape, said Erik Riha, assistant director of marketing for Campus Recreation. Students looking to get their heart rates up can choose between treadmills, ellipticals and various other cardio machines. Many machines at both CRCE and ARC have integrated television screens so that users can catch up on their favorite reality shows while exercising and iPod hook-ups can be found on many machines, as well. For those who prefer to pump iron, there are weight machines for isolating muscle groups, anywhere from quadriceps to deltoids. Free weights are also available in both Campus Recreation facilities, ranging from DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO 2.5 pounds to 120 pounds. For those who are unfamil- Originally opened in 1971, the newly renovated Activities and Recreation Center (ARC) re-opened Aug. 21, 2008. iar with the equipment at ARC or CRCE, Riha recommends a free equipment orientation, or semester-long unlimited use, allowing students Working out on campus does not mean being conwhich can provide students with the knowledge to to take a class once, or as many times as they like. fined to a gym, either. Many students get their exerTeam sports may spark memories of physical cise running outside or walking around campus. properly use the machines or equipment. Personal trainers are also available to customize education classes past, but CRCE and ARC offer Playing outside does not need to be associated workouts and are a good option for those who have both club sports and intramurals for students who with childhood, as sunny days on the quad are not worked out previously, Riha said. enjoy friendly competition without having the time often filled with groups of students tossing around If a machine or weight-based workout is not commitment or required skill level of the Univer- a frisbee or kicking a soccer ball from one student appealing, there are still numerous other ways to sity’s NCAA teams. to another. Club sports offered include women’s basketball, Despite the risks of gaining weight as a new stuexercise both in and out of the gym. Both CRCE and ARC offer group fitness classes, men’s and women’s hockey and even a triathlon dent, there are many ways to work on getting back which include Zumba, cycling and yoga. During the club. into shape, or to maintain a fit body. regular semester, over 70 group fitness classes a Campus Recreation intramurals feature tradiWith hard work and determination, those tootional sports such as basketball and soccer, but tight skinny jeans could be feeling loose before week are offered. Group fitness passes are available for single use also include a Wii Sports tournament. Halloween.

Those wishing to get back into shape, or who simply miss their gym memberships from back home, can visit either Campus Recreation Center East (CRCE) or the Activities and Recreation Center (ARC).

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The School of Social Work plays a vital role in transforming the lives of vulnerable families through innovation and intervention. We are committed to groundbreaking research that impacts practice. Our greatest measure of success is the transformative student experience we offer through our highly ranked programs. Our undergraduate and graduate students receive an unparalleled level of classroom instruction coupled with intensive internship opportunities that take them into the community and provide real-world experiences. This perfect balance of classroom and field work continues to produce the very best graduates in the nation. Questions? a. | 1010 W. Nevada St., Urbana, IL p. | (217) 333.2261 w. | socialwork.illinois.edu e. | socialwork@illinois.edu | facebook.com/socialwork.illinois


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Tuesday, July 24, 2012

5B

How to maneuver UI’s sprawling campus and C-U area ALISON MARCOTTE Assistant features editor

Y

our college years are a unique time when your social and academic life both exist within the same mile radius. Yet, while everything is seemingly within arm’s length, transportation is still an important daily factor to consider. For instance, consider the following scenarios: Embarking on a trip to your friend’s dorm? Biking or walking are sound options since the dorms are relatively close to each other. Journeying to an 8 a.m. class? You might want to take the bus instead of walking at that godforsaken hour. Returning from a movie in Savoy at 12 a.m.? The buses won’t be running anymore that far away from campus, so you’ll have to take a taxi. When deciding how to travel, consider the following.

Champaign-Urbana MTD Bus Cost to use: Free for all University students, faculty and staff What to bring: You’ll need your i-card to board the bus when you are anywhere off campus, such as the mall or downtown. Where it is accessible: Throughout the University campus, and in the communities of Champaign, Urbana and Savoy. When it is available: Except for major holidays, MTD buses are available every day of the year. There are different bus schedules for six time periods: weekday daytime, weekday night, Saturday daytime, Saturday night, Sunday daytime and Sunday night. Types: Different numbered buses, such as the 22 Illini or the 13 Silver, have unique routes throughout campus. Information about the routes can be found at CUMTD.com. How to know when they are arriving: MTD uses STOPwatch, which tells you when the bus will arrive based on the bus’s GPS location. You can find this information on the computer, on your phone via

text or web or at the bus stops, which have HD monitors displaying arrival times. How to use it: When the bus arrives, check the sign above the front window to make sure it’s the right bus. For example, if you want to get to the Florida Avenue Residence Halls (FAR) or Pennsylvania Avenue Residence Halls (PAR), you could take the Teal. The sign would say “12 E TEAL; FAR/PAR.” The FAR and PAR dorms, which are across the street from each other, are the last stop of the bus route. If you have a bike, you can load it on the bike rack in front of the bus. When you want to get off the bus, pull the yellow bell cord to request the next stop. To exit through the rear doors, you need to push on the door for it to open. If you’re going to unload your bike, tell the operator you will be doing so. Why to use it: The MTD bus system is the biggest source of motorized transportation on campus. According to the Champaign-Urbana MTD website, there are nearly 100 buses and 15 vans, and they provide over 10 million rides per year. The buses are convenient for getting to class, going to a friend’s dorm or other locations. MTD also provides SafeRides for when you need a safe way at night to get to your destination on or near campus and there is no other option. Key information to know: MTD website: CUMTD.com MTD number to put in TO field when texting the bus stop code: 35890 SafeRides phone number (which can be found on one’s i-card): 217-265-7433

Bike Cost to use: Free! (not including the cost of the bike, helmet and lock) What to bring: Helmet; a sturdy bike lock, such as a U-lock Where you can use it: There are designated bike routes on the streets and sidewalks of the University campus and in Champaign-Urbana. When you can use it: You could ride your bike all year long, but fewer people bike in the winter because of the icy conditions and cold weather. Many students put their bikes in storage to prevent their them from getting weather-damaged. Be cautious when biking at night because of

DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

Bicyclists and pedestrians all fight for space on the sidewalks lining Wright Street in Champaign near campus. safety reasons. How to use it: Get on bike and pedal! OK, joking aside, there are bike racks around campus where you can lock your bike. Why to use it: In addition to being healthy and ecofriendly, biking is a fast, convenient way to get to destinations around campus, such as class.

Taxi Cost to use: Prices vary depending on distance traveling and which taxi service you are using What to bring: Cash or debit/credit card, and they can be pricey. Where it is accessible: Near the Cham-

paign-Urbana area When it is available: At all times Types: There are many taxi services available in the Champaign-Urbana area. How to access them: Call the phone number that corresponds with your preferred taxi service. Why to use them: Taxis are helpful with getting to places far away from campus, such as the Illini Terminal, if you’re going home for the weekend. They are also helpful with getting back to campus at late hours when the buses stop running.

Walking Cost to do: Free! (except for those styl-

ish shoes you’ll be fashioning) What to bring: A cell phone for safety or in case you are lost Where to do it: All throughout campus Why to do it: Similar to biking, walking is healthy and ecofriendly. Also, walking around campus will help you get more familiar with the campus. When to do it: All year. However, it may be smarter to take the bus during the winter months. It is also advised to go with a friend if walking somewhere at nighttime. Key information to know : SafeWalks Escort Service phone number: 217-333-1216.

Alison is a sophomore in Media.

Welcome Week events offer new UI students several free activities, experiences Thursday, Aug. 23 Event: Illini Union Welcome Back Outdoor Concert and Comedy Show When: 9 p.m. concert and 9:30 p.m. comedy show Where: Anniversary Plaza (in front of the Union on the Quad side) for the concert and Courtyard Cafe (inside the Union) for the comedy show Description: The Illini Union is hosting the Boston trio The Dean’s List on the Quad. After, students can venture inside to the Courtyard Cafe see Lee Camp from Comedy Central’s “Fresh Debate.”

Where: The Assembly Hall Description: Sponsored by the Chancellor’s Office, 6A Friday, March 2, 2012 several deans and professors will welcome students to the University. Following the convocation, students can enjoy a free lunch at Memorial Stadium.

Where: Illini Union I-rooms Description: New students can volunteer for several different community service projects. There are only 240 available spots available. Sign up at www.odos.illinois.edu/newstudent

Event: Taste of Nevada When: 4 – 6 p.m. The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.c Where: Cultural Centers on Nevada Street Description: The cultural houses and centers of Nevada Street provide students with food, games and music while simultaneously introducing the diversity the University has to offer.

An Unofficial history: Photos of the last 9 years

Event: Illini Union LateNighter When: 8 p.m. – 2 a.m. Where: Illini Union Description: Several activities and performances will be available to students. The LateNighter is to feature a hypnotist, live music, games and food.

Friday, Aug. 24

Saturday, Aug. 25

Event: New Student Convocation When: 11:30 a.m.

Event: Illini Union Service First When: 8 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Sunday, Aug 26

Event: Quad Day When: 12 – 4 p.m. Where: Main Quad Description: Several hundred registered student organizations (RSO) will have booths set up that will line all of the sidewalks of the Quad for students to visit. Generally, RSOs will give out free T-shirts, mugs, pens and other items to students.

Event: Illini Union Board Quad Day Cinema featuring “Hunger Games” When: 9 – 11:30 p.m. Where: Main Quad Description: Students can see the newly released film while sitting with the new friends they have met since they arrived at school. Source: Office of the Dean of Students

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Cl 2006 Illinois Alum Mike Nora is as for jaywalking by the police “Some people say on Unofficial St. Patrick’s Day in 2006 A ticketed s St. in Champaign. “Because ugonI wasFourth fourS feet in the street, I got a Iyengar yoga is the ta jaywalking ticket--ridiculous,” said uswho dressed Nora, t ruptinsa costume for easiest [yoga style]. the occasion. 2 State Police officer An Illinois 7 Some people say it is the hard- 2008 guides a patron of C.O. Danel’s outside

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story apartment located on Armory St. in Champaign during the University of Illinois’ Unofficial St. Patrick’s Day on Friday, March 6, 2009. The students involved in the furniture tossing had to give their information to Police, but did not receive any other citations. 2011 Students compete in a danceoff on the front lawn of a house on the corner of Chalmers and Oak in Champaign on Unofficial St. Patrick’s Day on Friday, Mar. 4, 2011.

2004

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6B

NEW STUDENT GUIDE

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

The Daily Illini  |  www.DailyIllini.com

Famous alumni: expect the unexpected Hugh Hefner:

If you don’t know Hef, you’ve probably lived your life under a rock. Hefner is the multimillionaire celeb who started Playboy Enterprises. He graduated from the University with a B.A. in psychology and a double minor in creative writing and art in 1949. Hefner was also a cartoonist for the Daily Illini during his time here. Sounds like the recipe for success.

taylor goldenstein News editor

T

he University of Illinois was the launching pad for many of the world’s best and brightest. It’s not a complete listing, but here is a compilation of the most notable alumni that attended this University – some that you know, some that you don’t even know you know.

Taylor is a junior in Media.

Dick Butkus: I bet you’re feeling a little like Simba right now. They’re all mine? Yes, Simba, they’re all yours. Dick Butkus included. Butkus is a former football player for the Chicago Bears and one of the most famous linebackers in NFL history. The football superstar got his start at the University in 1962 before he was later drafted with the third overall pick in 1965 by the Chicago Bears.

Nick Offerman: Ron Swanson — I mean, Nick Offerman — is the actor known for his breakout role in hit NBC sitcom “Parks and Recreation.” Offerman’s acting career began with his bachelor of fine arts from the University. After that, he went on to co-found a theater company and also work at a variety of others. These theater companies led him to meeting Amy Poehler, who at the time was also buzzing around on the Chicago improv front. The rest is history.

Roger Ebert: Ebert, also a Daily Illini alum who once was a DI editor-in-chief, is one of America’s most popular and respected film critics. He was the first film critic to win a Pulitzer for criticism. Despite his struggles with thyroid cancer stripping him of his voice, Ebert continues writing movie reviews and more. Ebertfest, an annual film festival in Champaign, has taken place in his honor for 14 years.

Edward Adelbert Doisy: Vitamin K mean nothing to you? Think back to days of hiding brussel sprouts under napkins and passing off your broccoli or asparagus to your dog. Edward Doisy is one of two scientists who won a Nobel Prize for discovering the vitamin and its chemical structure. Receiving his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University was the first stop on his educational journey toward that discovery before he received his Ph.D. from Harvard.

Steve Chen: If you’ve ever watched a video of a cat eating with chopsticks or the Evolution of Dance, a man in a red shirt with the most awkward dance moves of the century, or any of the other millions of videos on a little website called YouTube, then you know the work of Steve Chen. Chen is one of the three co-founders of the site and studied computer science at the University.

Shel Silverstein:

Shahid Khan:

This deceased poet, musician and cartoonist was expelled from the University after one year due to poor grades. He attended the Chicago School of Fine Arts and Roosevelt University, but was drafted into the army before he could graduate. Though he died of a heart attack in 1999, his poetry books remain a staple of children’s libraries everywhere.

Khan is a billionaire who owns Flex-n-Gate Corp., an automobile parts manufacturing company, and is also the owner of the Jacksonville Jaguars. He graduated from the University in 1971. This year, he made his way onto Forbes’ World’s Billionaires list.

Using resources, being aware can help result in free food Putting in extra effort to save cash helps offset expensive cost of college tuition By Karen Chen Staff Writer

College tuition is quite expensive itself. Starting college also means the responsibility of feeding yourself. Your mom will not make lunch for you. There’s no fixed lunch hour like high school where you sit down with all other students. Food is expensive. Eating out every day will soon drain your wallet. Though we are always told that there’s no free lunch, free food actually exists.

Attend meetings and orientations At the beginning of the semester, registered student organizations (RSO) are recruiting by holding a lot of meetings and orientations. If you are looking for food, go to the ones with free pizzas, chips, snacks and drinks. Some of the organizations offer free food to attract newcomers. Attending these occasions, you also make new friends and

expand your connections throughout campus. In this case, you may get more free food in the future. Despite that, creating your network is very important.

Take the samples Unfortunately, not that many restaurants give out free samples. But if you see them, don’t feel bad for taking them because they want you to take them. It’s part of their promotional plan. When samples are gone, the restaurant owners will be happy. Jimmy John’s, from time to time, gives out some free samples. Take them. It makes their jobs easier, too. Mia Za’s Cafe has been known to give out some trial pieces. Samples are often given out in the Market Place mall food court in Champaign. There’s usually at least one there. With one hand holding the box and their other hand holding the toothpick with a piece of chicken or beef, saying to you to “try this.” This may just energize your shopping day.

Coupons There are not that many absolute free coupons. But some cou-

pons are good deals, such as “buy a large pizza, get an appetizer free” or “buy an entrée, get dessert free.” Regardless, it still saves you some money. On Quad Day, different coupon books are handed out. You may not use it until you need it. There is no harm of keeping one around the house. One scenario may be that your roommate one day needs a coupon book, and he’s become so thankful and decided to buy you a meal. Who knows what will happen? Simply web search food coupons, you will have a variety of choices. Some are also the freebies you receive at registration. They are usually cereals, coffee or even a bag of gummy bears. They are free.

Go out on dates You will meet a lot of new people. Well, this may be more likely to apply to girls. I blame this on social norms. If a person asks you out, don’t hesitate to say yes. But you can’t always expect this person to pay for your meal. You could get lucky, though. And don’t forget to bring your wallet. College could be cheaper if you start saving money. Saving money on food will be a good start.

UNIVERSITY BAPTIST CHURCH on campus at 4th & Daniel Sunday Worship at 11am

a church for students, where students lead and serve

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NEW STUDENT GUIDE

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HEY, DAD! W E LC O M E to the club You’re already a member of the Dads Association at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. We’re the nation’s first and oldest college parent organization. The Dads Association raises money for scholarships and worthy campus causes. We also keep you informed on-line with www.illinidads.com. There are no dues.

Mark your calendar for Dads Weekend, Nov. 9-11. It’s 3 days of fun with your student, including a Fighting Illini football game. For more about Dads Weekend, the Dads Association or getting involved, check out www.illinidads.com.


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NEW STUDENT GUIDE

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

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A publication of The Daily Illini

New Student Guide

Inside What’s beyond

While there’s plenty to do on campus, here’s some off-campus spots to hit up.

Page 3C

Where you can save

College costs a ton, but you can save a lot of dough by being thrifty.

Page 5C

What to do in the city

Should you stray into the downtown areas of Champaign or Urbana, here are some things you can do.

Page 5C


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Tuesday, July 24, 2012

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TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION THREE: COMMUNITY PAGE 3 - Looking for love? Be classy and try these great date restaurants PAGE 5 - What exactly can you do in C-U? -Campustown is not your entire universe. Discover downtown Champaign. PAGE 6 - C-U area attractions to keep you busy

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Tuesday, July 24, 2012

3C

Off campus hot spots to occupy free time

East-central Illinois has plenty of spots to unwind; here’s where to find them Location: 515 Old Timber Road, Monticello Distance from campus: 28 miles Dates open: Daily, except Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day

Nora ibrahim Opinions columnist

Kickapoo State Park

C

ollege life will keep you plenty busy with academic work, new faces and must-go places around campus, but Champaign-Urbana is also teeming with other attractions if you have an afternoon to kill. The following places offer a little kick from your routine on the University’s campus area.

Curtis Orchard in Champaign Description: This farm-turned-apple-orchard is a popular item on the bucket list for University students. Go apple picking in the fall, or pick your own pumpkins in September or October to celebrate the autumn season in Illinois. Location: 3902 South Duncan Road, Champaign Distance from campus: 6.5 miles Dates open: July 20 to Dec. 20

Allerton Park Daily Illini file photo

Chris Phillips, left, junior in Business and Melissa Reiman, junior, in Social Work, and visits the Country Store at Curtis Orchard on Sept. 28, 2010.

Description: The park offers 14 miles of trails to bike, walk, jog or what have you. Its garden scenery lends itself really well to a picnic lunch or a spot for your next date.

Description: The state park was strip-mined for coal, made largely a wasteland until it was transformed into usable land for hiking and camping. Now, you can rent a canoe, go boating, jog or hike the almost 35 miles of trails. Location: 10906 Kickapoo Park Road, Oakwood Distance from campus: 29 miles Dates open: Daily

The Art Theater in Champaign Description: The independent movie theater is located at the heart of downtown Champaign, showing an eclectic mix of movies. Often, an audience member is called up to give a two-minute spiel about the movie right before its showing, so if you want a different movie-going experience, the Art is that place. Location: 126 W. Church St., Champaign Distance from campus: 1.5 miles Dates open: Year-round, but check its schedule online to check out what’s playing when at thecuart. com/schedule.cfm.

Nora is a senior in LAS.

Romance in C-U: date spots on and off campus A few friendly suggestions of locations for a romantic night out on the town Destihl

Tolu Taiwo Opinions columnist

I

t happens: you step on campus, you meet a nice girl or boy, you fall for them, and soon you’re one half of an amazing dating unit. Besides movie nights and awfully awkward couple nicknames, one popular “couple activity” is eating out at a fairly nice restaurant. Luckily, the C-U area has multiple date-worthy spots.

Radio Maria Radio Maria has been the top contender for the Best of CU’s “Best Date Spot” for a long time standing. And for good reason — the location at 119 N. Walnut St. in Champaign frequently has the perfect candles for “mood lighting,” as well as a romantically artistic décor. Also, Radio Maria is home to some of the best tapas in the Champaign-Urbana area. From grilled shrimp tapas to vegetarian paella, you can grab your date and eat inside, tucked away in a cozy corner booth, sharing the small plates of Spanish cuisine. As a bonus, the restaurant also hosts a Salsa Night from 10:30 p.m. till 2 a.m. on Saturdays, so if you and your significant other are feeling adventurous and want to dance, you have that option.

Located on 301 N. Neil Street in downtown Champaign, Destihl is the city’s top gastrobrewpub restaurant. The atmosphere, from the classic stone walls to the sophisticated layout, makes up a perfect, albeit pricey, date ambience. I don’t really know how to exactly describe Destihl’s cuisine (after all, “gastrobrewpub” covers everything from beer-battered asparagus to Dijon chicken to double pale ale), but all I can say is all of their dishes are wonderful. I’ve only eaten there twice, and I still constantly have dreams about their appetizers list. Also, if you’re of age, their wine and beers are excellent, especially because they brew their own beer.

Sushi Rock A constant pain for University students is the trek of eating somewhere off campus, and while the first two places are great date spots, they have the disadvantage of being 10 minutes away from the heart of campus — by bus. For somewhere a little closer, try Sushi Rock, a sushi house right on 621 E. Green Street. The restaurant is a cozy, nice-sized space with the perfect dim lighting and close seating. The sushi is nicely priced, and there are a ton of options to choose from, especially the variety plates that cost around $10-15. Plus, going on a sushi-themed date is awesome for easy food-swapping action.

Tolu is a senior in Media.

Daily Illini file photo

Radio Maria has been the top contender for the Best of CU’s “Best Date Spot” for a long time. This Spanish cafe is known for their tapas and romantic atmosphere.

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NEW STUDENT GUIDE

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NEW STUDENT GUIDE

The Daily Illini  |  www.DailyIllini.com Tuesday, July 24, 2012

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C-U offers wealth of Looking beyond entertainment options campustown: C-U’s downtown areas By Candice Norwood

Assistant Features Editor

To outsiders, the Champaign-Urbana area might seem like a stereotypical small town. A town full of pickup trucks, flannel shirts and where the most exciting activities for “youngsters” include Wal-Mart, cow tipping or the local Dairy Queen. Despite the occasional cow sighting or the University’s obsession with the Morrow Plots, Champaign-Urbana offers a wealth of venues and events for music and theater. Whether it’s going to a blues night at Cowboy Monkey in downtown Champaign or seeing a play at the Krannert Center for Performing Arts, there are many opportunities for cultural stimulation both on and off campus.

by Thomas Thoren Staff Writer

While many incoming students will want to spend much of their time exploring and getting to know campus and everything it has to offer, they should also know that there is just as much to explore outside of the University’s boundaries in Champaign and Urbana’s downtown districts. Do not let their apparent distance from campus scare you; downtown Champaign is a mere 10-minute walk from Green Street and Urbana’s downtown can easily be reached by simply hopping on board the Champaign-Urbana MTD’s Green Line. Every student needs an escape from time to time, so take a trip to one of the downtowns and see what else this town has to offer.

Student performances

Champaign Downtown Champaign is only footsteps away from the Illinois Terminal, the transportation hub where several MTD buses make a stop along their routes. Champaign can also easily be reached by going north from Green Street along Neil Street. When midterms roll around and you are desperately looking for coffee, Champaign has you covered. While it does not offer an Espresso Royale, it does offer unique coffee shops to fuel you late into the night, such as Aroma Cafe, Cafe Kopi, and Pekara Bakery and Bistro. If you would rather stay up late into the night for more exciting reasons, Champaign also offers plenty of bars and nightlife. There are low-key, sit-down bars such as Quality or Blind Pig, which brews its own beer on-site and offers a robust list of others. If you are looking for a different kind of nighttime vibe, Soma Ultralounge or Boltini Lounge could be for you. Of course any night in Champaign should begin with a good meal from one of its many restaurants. The majority of Champaign-Urbana’s more upscale restaurants are located in downtown Champaign, with faithful standbys Bacaro, Escobar’s, Farren’s Pub and Eatery, Kofusion, Seven Saints and Radio Maria, which also offers salsa dancing and a nice brunch to take the parents to. There is also the recently overhauled Carmon’s Bistro and the newer additions Destihl and Big Grove Tavern. There are also many music venues such as Mike ‘N’ Molly’s, Cowboy Monkey, Memphis on Main and The Highdive, your best bet in Champaign for seeing your favorite local band opening for your favorite touring band.

Urbana Don’t be fooled into thinking Champaign has all the fun, though. There is a reason it is the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, after all. Urbana’s downtown area may be small, but it packs a lot of fun. The heart of Urbana’s downtown is on a stretch of Main Street, a continuation of Springfield Avenue in Champaign, with more to offer along Race Street and Broadway Avenue. Urbana offers what is often cited as the best barbecue in town with Black Dog Smoke and Ale House as well as one of the best breakfasts, and milkshakes, at Courier Cafe. Other dinner spots include Siam Terrace and Crane Alley, which serves dinner late into the night and doubles as a late-night

Photo by Annie Goold

Photo by Annie Goold

haunt complete with a large beer and spirits menu. For night owls looking for live music, The Iron Post is just around the corner. Urbana’s public library is also nearby, which is a good place to study in a quiet environment while being just far enough off campus to feel like you are getting away from it all. Across the street from the library is Urbana’s Lincoln Square mall. It has many arts and art supply stores as well as the always-expanding Common Ground Food Co-Op, which offers fresh local vegetables, organic foods and a multitude of grains, spices and other hard-to-find ingredients. In the southeast corner of the mall’s parking lot on Saturday mornings during the summer and fall months is the Market at the Square, Urbana’s farmers market. This includes many crafts, vegetables, meats and cheeses vendors, as well as live music from several acts young and old. Market visitors can eat their breakfast while they shop for a week’s worth at the same time.

Professionals may get paid to perform, but there are a large number of equally talented students on campus. Various student groups, including registered student organizations (RSO) and those studying performing arts, host concerts, plays and other events wellattended by the Illini community. The University’s dance, music and theater departments, for example, are well known throughout the country and offer concentrations in areas such as design and production and music education. Throughout the year, the departments showcase students in recitals and professional caliber productions. The School of Music’s Opera program puts on its largest productions every year in the Tryon Festival Theatre inside of the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts. With a spacious stage and seating for close to 1,000 audience members, the Festival Theatre is the second-largest space that the Center boasts and sees a number of ballets, musicals and ensembles each year. For those interested in choral music, The Other Guys is one of several student groups that host performances. Founded in 1968, The Other Guys is an octet a cappella group formed from the University’s Varsity Men’s Glee Club. Decked out in blue cardigans with a University’s signature orange “I,” the group harmonizes to classic and modern tunes while infusing comical expressions, choreography and stories into every aspect. “We’re the only a cappella group on campus that doesn’t use vocal percussion ... we also try to incorporate a lot of comedy into our shows,” said Rodrigo Anzures, junior in LAS and business manager for The Other Guys. “We literally lock ourselves in a room for an hour or two until we think of funny enough jokes and dancing.” With close to 20 hours of rehearsal each week and 100 performances per year, The Other Guys offer enjoyable and high quality shows. Among the other a cappella groups on campus are The Xtension Chords and The Girls Next Door.

Campustown Attending a great concert in ChampaignUrbana can be as easy as walking to the Quad. Several venues right on campus host great music and entertainment including big name acts like Drake or Jason Aldean, as well as local performers. While the Assembly Hall and Canopy Club

may be two of the most popular campus venues, Foellinger Auditorium should not be overlooked as a place to go because it can hold more than just an economics lecture. The dome-shaped auditorium is the venue primarily used by Star Course, a student-operated, live concert organization that brings various acts to campus. The organization puts on a minimum of three big shows each year that range from indie rock groups to superstar hip-hop artists. Recent past acts include Janelle Monae, Jeff Tweedy and Lupe Fiasco. Former senior manager for Star Course, Nick Bethune, said Foellinger’s great acoustics, “old school feel” and intimate setup make it a great venue with shows you can’t miss. Another entertainment center right in the heart of campus is the Illini Union. Directly opposite Foellinger across the Quad, the Union is home to study rooms, a food court and many halls for organizations to meet. The Union also houses the Illini Union Board, a group of students dedicated to providing the campus with events including comedy shows, guest lecturers and musicals. One of the most popular series of events for the IUB is Illinites. Illinites take place once a month and have themes such as “I Spy” and March Madness. Through the years, Illinites have featured flame-throwers, tarot card readers and laser tag. These offer a great alternative for those who are too young for the bars or want to stay clear of alcohol-prone environments.

Off campus Those seeking to branch out into the downtown Urbana and Champaign areas will find bars, art galleries and old theatres with diverse types of entertainment. The C-U Folk and Roots Festival is a yearly event that showcases local and outside folk artists at various venues across the area. Brenda Koenig, Chair of the C-U Folk and Roots said she and her team decided to put the festival together in order to attract more “traditional” musicians to the area and to promote the musicality and culture of the folk and roots genre. “We didn’t want it to be just another music festival, we wanted it to be a way to showcase our local organizations and artists,” she said. “You might come and hear a band and then go to one of our free workshops or lessons. We really wanted it to be a hands on type of festival.” Coming up on its fifth year, the festival has a number of events from jam sessions around campfires to “story telling” at the Urbana Free Library. Theater lovers can relax at one of the shows performed by the Champaign-Urbana Theatre Company. The group was founded in 1991 to preserve Champaign’s historic Virginia Theatre. Though performances originally took place there, the group moved on to the Parkland College Theater. According to the company’s managing director, Michael Galloway, auditions for the shows’ actors and directors are open to the public. This year’s season will feature “awardwinners” and popular shows that have won awards throughout the years. This series includes “The Producers,” “Legally Blonde,” and “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee.” The company offers individual student tickets at a reduced rate of $12 or season tickets for $35.

Thrift stores offer unique, vintage choices not found at other local businesses Downtown stores offer old-school clothes for fashion, theme parties By Kyle Milnamow Staff Writer

At the University, clothing stores don’t just range from big name stores like J.C. Penney and Macy’s at the mall. Instead, there are cheaper options for incoming students looking for a vintage look. Located in downtown Champaign are two “vintage” thrift stores, Dandelion Vintage & Used Clothing and Carrie’s Antiques & Jewelry, that offer clothes for everyday occasions to theater companies or customers. Carrie’s has been in the Champaign

area for 27 years. Originally, it started in Mattoon, Ill., south of Champaign. Much of the business began with trading before Carrie Homann, owner of Carrie’s, said it opened its own shop in Champaign. How they get business is a little unique. Though many businesses in the area will reach out to incoming freshmen to get attention, Homann said it is the opposite for them. “Most people seek us out, people that are interested in vintage clothing,” Homann said. “Either you like us or you don’t. And most people that are into it will seek out the businesses that deal in it.” Getting customers has been changing for Carrie’s. Though they deal with more Chicago customers now, dealing in trade shows up north, the number of students has

changed. “We don’t get a lot of students as we used to years and years ago,” Homann said. “But we do a lot of theater. In all the areas around. “ Though downtown can be a distance away from campus, graduate students often enjoy the downtown and will seek out such places. Also, a short bus ride can get you to these thrift stores. Those aren’t the only ones in the areas. Right off Prospect Avenue is a Goodwill store that offers more than just vintage clothing, but also anything from books to furniture. “Though I usually go outside of downtown to get my clothes, I enjoy the thrift stores in downtown,” said Kait Johnson, senior in FAA. “Whether it’s just for a new look or a theme party I am going to, thrift stores can get it done.”

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NEW STUDENT GUIDE

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Eat well without breaking the bank JORDAN SWARD Features editor

H

ow to do laundry. Useless knowledge acquired in Gen-Ed classes. The balance between your social life and your school life. These are all things you will hopefully learn during your first year at the University. But perhaps the most important thing you’ll learn is how to be cheap. To speed up the process, learn to spend little more than $3 on eating out, but still be satisfied.

CHONG JIANG THE DAILY ILLINI

Chef Jacob Sartin of Silvercreek Restaurant in Urbana, enjoys a lunch at the Maize Mexican Grill in Champaign.

Doodles: $1-$5 A delicious spin on the college staple. Doodles offers souped-up ramen noodles, which includes your choice of meat and a variety of vegetables. Even the plain Top Ramen tastes much better than the brick you buy at Walmart.

Second Story Pizza: $2.25 Second Story is the infamous late-night pizza slice spot. And for under $3, at least you won’t feel guilty about your wallet. Firehaus: $3 Tuesdays at Firehaus: You can get a three-dollar cheeseburger and chips with the purchase of any beverage. Kofusion: $1-$10 Cheap sushi might be every college student’s dream. Every Sunday and Monday night, Kofusion, located in downtown Champaign, offers a special sushi menu for a dollar per piece. Pick and choose, or splurge on the sampler: 10 pieces for $10. Maize Mexican Grill: $3 I’m reluctant to share this one because, although its crowded tables and small location may intimidate you, it’s one of Champaign’s hidden treasures. Maize is authentic Mexican food in the form of

gorditas, tostadas and tacos all under $3.

Papa Del’s Pizza: $1.50-$3 I’ll let you in on this secret: Papa Del’s sells pizza by the slice, Monday – Saturday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. for less than $3. Bonus: they are half-price from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. until they sell out. Espresso Royale: $1.90 Help get over hump day with half-price lattes at Espresso Royale. A medium vanilla latte will only put you back a few dollars. The Beef Stand: $2.75 The Beef Stand serves up Chicago-style hot dogs with all the satisfying toppings – but no ketchup, of course. El Charro Mexican Grocery Store: $1 Wednesday is the day to be hungry – El Charro near First and Green Street serves $1 tacos.

Lesser-known campus offers historic, beautiful locations After being on campus for a while, new students will be able to navigate their way around. However, it might take longer to hear about places that are completely unique to the University. Here is a list of five places for Illini to the know:

in a large, grassy area known as the arboretum. The Japan House offers classes and students can participate in tea ceremonies by appointment. In the yard next to the house stands a garden with benches to sit on and a few small manmade ponds. Hang out in the evening and listen to bullfrogs!

1. The Japanese House and Gardens, University Arboretum. The Japan House is a small white building with brown paneling just south of the Pennsylvania and Florida Avenue Residence Halls (2000 South Lincoln Avenue, Urbana). It sits with-

2. Allerton Park and Retreat Center. When Robert Henry Allerton, son and heir of First National Bank of Chicago’s founder Samuel Allerton, passed away in 1946, he left his 1,500-acre estate, “The Farms,” to the University. Located in Monticello, Ill., the estate

BY CLAIRE EVERETT STAFF WRITER

University Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod A Congregat ion of St udents in the Hear t of Campus Life

is a manageable car ride away. Allerton Park contains an Englishstyle mansion, hiking trails and an incredible collection of outdoor sculptures — a legacy of Allerton’s passion for collecting art.

3. The Sousa Archives, Center for American Music. The University of Illinois Bands had a true friend and supporter in John Phillips Sousa (1854-1932) who donated the largest archive of original Sousa music to the University Bands. Unique to Illinois, Sousa wrote the “U of I March” in 1929. His collection is now located in the University’s main

library. Aside from music, the collection contains personal papers, photographs, one of Sousa’s batons, and his music stand and podium.

4. Altgeld Tower, The University Chime. Installed in 1920 , the University Chime was a gift from the classes of 1914-21 and the U.S. School of Military Aeronautics. In the tower, there is a small room that houses the carillon, which are chromatically tuned bells played from a keyboard constructed of large wooden “pump handle” levers. Tours are given of the tower Monday

through Friday from 12:30 to 1 p.m. during the school year.

5. Mumford House, South Quad. 1403 W. Lorado Taft Dr. Built in 1870, Mumford House is the oldest structure on campus. Its design is based on a model farmhouse and was meant to serve as a structure for the University’s experimental farm. The experimental farm covered the majority of the South Quad, and now, the Mumford House and the Morrow Plots are the farm’s only remnants. The farmhouse is named after former Dean of Agriculture, Herbert W. Mumford, and is currently on the National Register of Historic Places.

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NEW STUDENT GUIDE

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

WELCOME UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS STUDENTS! MARKET PLACE SHOPPING CENTER INVITES YOU TO BECOME MEMBERS OF THE CLUB.

Members of The Club have access to exclusive retailer and restaurant offers and get advance notice of all local mall events. Scan the QR Code to join and receive an exciting welcome offer! VISIT GCAPNOW.COM 217.351.2437 | info@gcapnow.com

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Tuesday, July 24, 2012

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TABLE OF CONTENTS FROM ATHLETIC DIRECTOR MIKE THOMAS SECTION FOUR: ATHLETICS PAGE 4 - Learn the history of Chief Illiniwek and why it’s no longer here PAGE 5 - No D-1 talent? Take part in intramurals.

JOSHUA BECKMAN THE DAILY ILLINI

Dear Fighting Illini Students, On behalf of the entire Division of Intercollegiate Athletics, I would like to welcome you back to campus for the beginning of another great school year. I am very excited to see what 201213 holds after the success we experienced in my fi rst season at Illinois, especially with the way we fi nished strong with an NCAA championship in men’s gymnastics, a men’s golf individual NCAA champion and three NCAA titles on the track. And who can forget the volleyball team’s incredible run to the NCAA championship match, the soccer team’s Big Ten Tournament championship, the fourth straight Big Ten titles for the men’s gymnastics and men’s golf teams or the men’s tennis team’s Big Ten Tournament title and run to the Sweet 16 of the NCAA tournament? One thing I noticed early in my fi rst few Illini home events was the incredible student support our teams receive. Whether it’s fi lling up the north end zone stands at Memorial Stadium, packing the floor seating at the Assembly Hall, stuffi ng Huff Hall or taking in a baseball game at Illinois Field, Illinois students truly are diehard Fighting Illini fans. I thank you for that devotion, and I want to encourage you to continue cheering on our teams. You provide a great homefield and home-court advantage for our teams, and we greatly appreciate it. We would not have been able to achieve the great things that we have in recent years without you. As a new year begins, I hope to see more and more of you at our events and around campus. A vibrant and engaged student body is key to a university’s success both in the classroom and on the playing field, and that is exactly what we have at Illinois. With the energy and enthusiasm that Tim Beckman and his staff have instilled in the football program and the focused intensity that John Groce has brought to the men’s basketball team, I hope you will once again fi ll Memorial Stadium and the Assembly Hall. But don’t forget about head coach Matt Bollant’s women’s basketball team; he went 148-19 at Green Bay and lost only five conference games in five years. I have the utmost confidence that he will bring that success to our program soon. And if you haven’t been to a volleyball or soccer match, a wrestling dual meet, a track meet or a softball game, why not? The high caliber of those teams — along with all of our squads — is something to be experienced during your time on campus.

I enjoyed meeting a number of fans at our home events last year and am looking forward to it again in 2012-13. Thank you for your support, and I’ll see you at the game! Regards, MIKE THOMAS, Director of Athletics

READY TO BE AN ILLINI FAN? Men’s Cross-Country Head coach: Gavin Kennedy Home course: Arboretum Note: The Illini did see some improvement with a new coach, sending two runners to the NCAA Championships. But the need to excel in conference meets to make headlines.

»

Men’s Tennis

More online: To read about all 19 sports, visit Newstudents. DailyIllini.com

Head coach: Brad Dancer Plays at: Atkins Tennis Center 2011-12 record: 19-8, 8-3 Big Ten, Big Ten Champions Note: Led by seniors Roy Kalmanovich and Dennis Nevolo, the Illini overtook the Buckeyes for the Big Ten Championship. With an impressive recruiting class, the Orange and Blue should compete in the next few years.

» » » » » »

Men’s Gymnastics Head coach: Justin Spring Plays at: Huff Hall 2011-12 record: National champions, fourth straight Big Ten championship Note: A magical journey ended with the program’s first national championship in 23 years, picking up a Big Ten title and several individual championships. Sophomore C.J. Maestas will lead the Illini into next season.

Women’s Golf

Men’s Track and Field

» »Soccer» » »

Head coach: Renee Slone Note: The team finished fifth at the Big Ten in addition to receiving an at-large bid to the regionals. With a strong senior class leaving, the younger players will need to step up to fill the open slots.

Women’s Tennis Head coach: Michelle Dasso Plays at: Atkins Tennis Center 2011-12 record: 18-7, 10-3 Big Ten Note: Illinois recorded some key wins against top competition early in the season. However, it met its match at the Big Ten Championships against Michigan. With the team’s singles wins leader, Melissa Kopinski, back next year, the team has the chance to take the conference by storm.

Women’s Cross-country Head coach: Jeremy Rasmussen Home course: UI Arboretum Note: A last-place finish at the Big Ten Championships says it all. But on the bright side, the Illini will return their entire roster from last season in addition to a recruiting class that coach Jeremy Rasmussen is excited about.

Women’s Basketball

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Head coach: Janet Rayfield Plays at: Illinois Track and Soccer Stadium 2011-12 record: 17-5-2, 8-2-1 Big Ten, Big Ten champions Note: The 2011-12 season was the best for the Illini in program history, winning 17 games for the first time and a Big Ten Championship. Rising star and junior Vanessa DiBernardo will be the player to watch, as she will be looked upon to carry this team to the next level.

Volleyball Head coach: Kevin Hambly Plays at: Huff Hall 2011-12 record: 32-5, 16-4 Big Ten, national runnerup Note: Huff Hall was buzzing this year as the Colleen Ward-led Illini climbed to the No. 1 ranking midseason. However, they came up short in the title match against UCLA. Liz McMahon, along with several new recruits, makes this team one to watch come fall.

Men’s Golf Head coach: Mike Small 2011-12 record: Fourth straight Big Ten championship Note: The program has produced individual national champions two of the past three years, with junior Thomas Pieters winning in 2012. The future looks bright for the program.

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Women’s Gymnastics Head coach: Kim Landrus Plays at: Huff Hall Note: NCAA qualifier Alina Weinstein and senior Kelsey Joannides led the way for the Illini this year, but it was not enough to reach nationals as a team. The Illini will look to qualify for NCAAs with a returning Weinstein hoping to bring her team to nationals.

Softball

Head coach: Matt Bollant Plays at: The Assembly Hall 2011-12 record: 11-19, 5-11 Big Ten Note: Head coach Jolette Law was fired after another losing season for the program, opening the door for Matt Bollant, who posted a 148-19 record at Wisconsin–Green Bay. He has said he will stress fundamentals next year to a group looking to rebound from a subpar campaign.

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Head coach: Mike Turk Home course: Illinois Track and Soccer Stadium Note: Senior Andrew Riley was the team’s most valuable player, winning the 100 meters and 110-meter hurdles at the NCAA Championship meet. With Riley graduated, the team must rely heavily upon its younger athletes to compete for the Big Ten crown.

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Men’s Basketball Head coach: John Groce Plays at: The Assembly Hall 2011-12 record: 17-15, 6-12 Big Ten Note: After winning 10 straight to start the season, it looked like the Illini could make some national noise. But it only went downhill from there, leading to the firing of Bruce Weber. Groce will not be judged this year but in the following years as his recruiting skills will be vital to the health of the program.

Head coach: Terri Sullivan Plays at: Eichelberger Field 2011-12 record: 27-26, 10-14 Big Ten Note: A roller-coaster season ended with Northwestern sweeping the Illini at the end of the season. Next year this team can only go as far as its lineup takes it. And it needs to begin with success in early tournaments in February and March.

Baseball Head coach: Dan Hartleb Plays at: Illinois Field 2011-12 record: 28-25, 11-13 Big Ten Note: The Illini were edged out of the Big Ten Tournament after an up-and-down season. The next season mainly depends on trying to find consistency in the offense. If they can do that, they’ll be in Big Ten contention.

Football Head coach: Tim Beckman Plays at: Memorial Stadium 2011-12 record: 7-6, 2-6 Big Ten Note: The Illini are coming off a historic season, one that saw the team losing six consecutive games after winning the first six. All eyes will be on new coach Tim Beckman and his energetic personality. Compiled by Darshan Patel.


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Tuesday, July 24, 2012

The Daily Illini | www.DailyIllini.com

Illini Pride: Great way to experience University athletics BY SAMANTHA KIESEL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Road trips, meeting players and having some of the best seats are just a few perks of being a part of the registered student organization (RSO), Illini Pride. Illini Pride is the biggest RSO on campus, averaging around 3,000 members. These members represent the student section for all athletic events. The most popular groups include Block I for football and Orange Krush for men’s basketball. President and senior in engineering, Daniel Borup said it is unlike any RSO on campus. “There is no other experience like it,” Borup said. “As an incoming freshman it’s a great way to be a part of the Illini Pride. There’s nothing else like it at Illinois.” Other than Block I and Orange Krush, Illini Pride consists of groups like the Spike Squad (volleyball), Grounds Crew (baseball), Flip Crew (gymnastics), Blue Crew (women’s basketball), Hot Shots (soccer) and six others. Borup said Illini Pride is very excited about Block I this year because of the new head football coach, Tim Beckman. Kasandra Dalessandro, senior in ACES and vice president of Block I, said she met with Beckman at the end of the spring semester to plan events for the upcoming fall. “He seems really into combining the students and the community with the team and to really be an Illini family,” Dalessandro said. Some of those events include a kick-off party the fi rst Thursday after school starts, where members will learn game day procedure but also get a chance to ask Beckman and players questions about the season. Dalessandro said one of

their goals this year is to build a relationship between players and students. One of the biggest events for both Block I and Orange Krush is the road-trip game. This year, Block I will go to the Ohio State game on Nov. 3. To go on the road trip, members have to record road trip points and the people with the most points are able to go. Attending other sporting events, like soccer or volleyball, earns people points. Orange Krush also has a road trip, but the game they attend is not released until January or February. When Orange Krush members go, they wear the other teams colors until revealing the orange and blue right before tip off. “I didn’t know what to expect on my first road trip, but there is such a sense of pride when you finally take off the opposing teams colors and have the Illini colors underneath,” said Vice President of Orange Krush McKennon Biers, junior in Business. “And just showing the fans and the other school that you care enough to make the trip is just great.” Orange Krush serves two purposes. It is the student section for the men’s basketball team that has access to floor seats, but it is also the Orange Krush Foundation. The foundation made $180,000 last season, which was given to 163 local and national charities, McKennon said. To be a member of Orange Krush, you must raise money that goes toward the foundation. One of the most up-and-coming student sections is the Spike Squad for the volleyball team that just went to the national championship game this past season. “For the smaller sports, I think people should really get involved in Spike Squad,” Dalessandro said. “I mean it’s so much fun. It’s such high energy. You’re right there, and you’re really able to connect with the volleyball players. I actually became friends with a

DAILY ILLINI FILE PHOTO

Illinois’ almost-full North-Endzone student section contributed to the game attendance of 53,243 at Memorial Stadium on Oct. 1, 2011. Block I is one of the many different student pep squads that make up Illini Pride. lot of the volleyball players.” But the main reason Borup, Dalessandro and McKennon said to join is because Illini Pride is a great place, especially as a freshman, to meet friends. It

is also an opportunity for freshmen to meet people they can attend games with. Registration for Illini Pride can be found on its website at illinipride.com.

The story behind mascot Chief Illiniwek: from beginning to controversial ending BY STEVEN VAZQUEZ STAFF WRITER

Although the tradition of the Chief came to an end in 2007 , there is no question that it left a mark that will last forever at the University. As a matter of fact, our athletic teams still remain the Fighting Illini, as the University continues its search for a new mascot. Here is a brief history of Chief Illiniwek and how the tradition eventually was extinguished.

The Beginning The idea of having a Native American war dance during the halftime of a football game was thought of in 1926 by assistant director of bands Ray Dvorak, according to the Chief Illiniwek Dialogue Report on the University website. Illiniwek comes from the loose confederation of Algonquin tribes, which once lived in this very region of the state. The French ended up changing to ending from “wek” to “ois” for the naming of the state. The meaning of Illiniwek is “they are men.” It is believed that former football head coach Robert Zuppke called the University’s symbol Chief Illiniwek, and so the name stuck. Lester Leutwiler was a student at the time when all of this was coming together and he had an interest in Indian tradition, so he was the

first to dance as the Chief during the halftime of the Illinois at Pennsylvania football game in 1926. The next Chief, Webber Borchers, wanted to appear in an authentic American Indian-made ensemble, so he initiated a campaign to replace the outfit with something authentic. His efforts came during the depression, so he was only able to raise $15. Fortunately, a Champaign merchant reached out to fund the rest and Borchers ventured to Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota, where three Sioux women made the suit. The first authentically made Chief outfit debuted on Nov. 8, 1930, at Yankees Stadium, where Illinois faced Army for the seventh game of the football season. The Chief Illiniwek costume changed a total of five times after that, and it was always authentically created.

The Controversy According to the Chief Illiniwek Dialogue Report, the first signs of disapproval for the Chief as a mascot were brought to the University’s attention in 1975 . A few members from the citizens for the American Indian Movement voiced their protests in the 1975 Illio. They had a few reasons for this dissatisfaction, stating that the Chief tradition was “a mockery of Indian customs” and that it was disrespectful to Indians because “the idea of symbols from

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several different tribes angers Indians.” In 1989, a student by the name of Charlene Teters, who was a member of the Spokane Tribe, began to protest the presence of the Chief at athletic events. She was later joined by national groups of American Indian activists, which sparked a larger effort to banish other logos depicting Indian tradition from not only collegiate sports, but professional sports as well. In October of 1990, the board of trustees agreed to hear arguments from a few protesters. The board voted 6-1 in favor of keeping the Chief, stating that he was “the spirit of the Fighting Illini.”

The End On Feb. 16, 2007, the University announced that it would be ending the Chief tradition and any other related Native American imagery associated with it. The announcement came as a result of sanctions imposed on the University resulting from an NCAA policy announced in August 2005 against the use of Native American imagery the NCAA deemed “hostile or abusive.” The sanctions banned the University from hosting postseason competitions. On Feb. 21, 2007, in the final game of the men’s basketball regular season, in front of a sold-out crowd at the Assembly Hall, the 80-year tradition came to an end and Chief Illiniwek danced for the final time at a University sporting event.

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ILLINI TO WATCH Get to know the Illini athletes to keep an eye on in 2012-13 MAX TANE Assistant sports editor

F

or once I get to put on my Mel Kiper, Jr. or Todd McShay hat and grade players. I promise I will try hold back using the term “physical prowess.” If only all the Illini athletes convened for a massive combine and did all the drills for us all to see. Oh well, I guess you can’t have everything. Expect big seasons for these Illini:

Football, senior

Whitney Mercilus garnered all the attention last season, leading the nation in sacks. Akeem Spence attracted a regular double-team at defensive tackle. This was the perfect scenario for Buchanan to get comfortable as the bandit last season in Vic Koenning’s defense, which landed him a Second-team All-Big Ten selection. While a new system is being put in place, Buchanan’s position will remain unchanged aside from the title. He will still be able to use his length and quickness to his advantage, as he did in the spring game back in April. Look for him to anchor the defensive line along with Spence and Glenn Foster and attract some first-round NFL Draft attention.

Liz McMahon

Football, junior

Volleyball, sophomore

Brown had against Northwestern, this Memphis, Tenn., native made huge strides in his sophomore campaign. He led the Big Ten in tackles-for-loss (14.5) and second in tackles per conference game (11.9). He has an incredible motor and sense for the ball. Life may have been easier for him last season, coming in behind the pass rush of Mercilus and Buchanan, but his high football IQ should have him poised for a season where he could be considering foregoing his senior year.

Spending your freshman year under the wing of two All-Americans is a pretty canny luxury, if you ask me. Now, McMahon has a chance to lead the Illini’s front line as they chase a consecutive trip to the Final Four. McMahon quickly asserted herself into the Illini’s rotation and played a huge part in their tournament run to San Antonio. Expect a ton of happy dances from her and “Bernies” (McMahon’s kill celebration) from the bench this year.

Illini Women’s Basketball This should not be just one athlete. This should be an entire team breaking out. Matt Bollant was the best hire in the “Year of Mike Thomas,” and for good reasons. Bollant had Wisconsin-Green Bay with backto-back 30-win seasons and as high as a No. 5 seed in the NCAA tournament. He had transformed them into the Butler of the women’s Horizon League. His ability to teach fundamentals should really turn the culture of this team around. Karisma Penn has All-American potential. Combined with Kersten Magrum, and the Illini may just be sporting one of the best frontcourts in the Big Ten. Adrienne GodBold is someone you can rely on for anything. And I mean, anything. Ivory Crawford and Alexis Smith showed promise for the future backcourt, and Detroit native Amber Moore gets buckets like Rip Hamilton did in his prime for the Pistons. If it all comes together for this squad, they could win around 20 games and be flirting with the NCAA tournament.

Bruno Abdelnour Tennis, senior

The departures of Dennis Nevolo and Roy Kalmanovich are big for the Illini. But head coach Brad Dancer did lock up the No. 6 recruiting class in the nation, and this is now Bruno Abdelnour’s team. Abdelnour’s clutch performance over Auburn sent Illinois to the Sweet 16 last season. His 14-8 record in singles in the Big Ten helped the Illini to their first Big Ten Tournament title since 2005. The title of Academic AllBig Ten performer speaks for itself in the case of Abdelnour. He is one of the smarter players on the court in the Big Ten, as well as in the classroom. Study hard, kids.

Campus sports offer non-D-I opportunities BY MELISSA MCCABE

Your last (insert sport) banquet has come and gone. You’ve bid a bittersweet farewell to your teammates and coaches and you’re ready to head off to college to continue playing (insert sport). Except the University of Illinois, your new home for the next four years, is a Division I school, which means that if you weren’t lucky enough to be blessed by the gods of athleticism, or at the very least extraordinary DNA, chances are you won’t be seeing much action on the (insert athletic facility). However, just because you might not be your high school’s volleyball star or the next big thing in football doesn’t mean you have to hang up your baseball mitt or banish your cleats to the attic just yet. There are plenty of ways for former high school athletes or people who just want to get some exercise to play sports at a D-I school. There are over 1,000 Registered Student Organizations (RSOs) on campus, and a number of them are dedicated to a wide variety of sports. In addition to staying in shape, joining a club sport is also a great way to meet people outside of your dorm and classes. Danielle Saubert, senior in ACES and member of the crew, or rowing, team said her teammates are her favorite part of rowing because of their camaraderie and how they have become a family. Worried about balancing practice, classes and a social life? No problem. Madeline Urban, junior in LAS and member of the water polo team, was juggling 18 credit hours, practice and a few other extracurricular activities one semester. She wasn’t sure she could continue playing, but her team was really understanding about her missing practice so that she could fi nish her homework. “They explained that its a club sport and it’s much more relaxed than any varsity sport,” Urban said. “So I kept playing and just really had to make good use of my time to do homework and go into office hours.” Saubert, however, says that crew actually helped her in that regard. “I think that rowing, given that practices are held ... in the morning, has actually improved my time management,” Saubert said, “It has made getting enough sleep essential and fitness a priority in my daily life.” Don’t want to commit to that much time? Grab a bunch of friends and form an intramural team. Intramural sports are organized by Campus Recreation. There are 15 different sports offered throughout the year, ranging from basketball to badminton. They generally only require a few hours of your time a week, so it’s easy to fit in with a busy class or work schedule. Finally, there’s always the good old-fashioned pickup game. Bored on a Saturday afternoon? Knock on your neighbors’ doors and see if anyone is up to toss the disk and play some Ultimate. You and your friends spend class periods discussing soccer? Pick a time and invite the rest of the class for a late-night game on the South Quad. Like everything else in college, playing sports and getting exercise is what you make it.

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Tuesday, July 24, 2012


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Tuesday, July 24, 2012

NEW STUDENT GUIDE

The Daily Illini  |  www.DailyIllini.com


THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSIT Y OF PENNSYLVANIA

INSIDE

AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012

online at theDP.com

WELCOME BACK ISSUE

hunger games BACK PAGE

FINDING A CURE

MADE IN AMERICA

Why homesickness should not be treated lightly

Phila. music festival to feature artists such as Jay-Z and Pearl Jam

PAGE A4 Opinion

PAGE A7 news

Students see convention scene A communication class is taking its students to the Republican and Democratic tion national conventions Elec

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BY MELANIE BAVARIA Staff Writer Even with Hurricane Isaac now headed away from Florida, Penn students attending the Republican National Convention are still in a whirlwind. Eight students from “Conventions, Debates and Campaigns,” a communication class co-taught by professors David

Eisenhower, Marjorie Margolies and David Thornburgh,, are in Tampa Bay, Fla., this week to experience and report the RNC. Demand for the class, which covers the election season beginning with the conventions and ending in November, was

U. advocates race-based admissions

the highest since the class began in 2004. The professors decided to open up the course to more students but made them choose between the two conventions due to a limited number of available passes. Eight students chose to attend the RNC while 12 will attend the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C., next week. “The student body is more left-leaning, meaning the Democratic party is the party more students identify with,” said College senior Johnny Schaefer,

who will attend the DNC. The idea for the course started in 2000 under the direction of Kathleen Hall Jamieson, director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center. Jamieson, with the help of Eisenhower and Margolies, enlisted Annenberg undergraduates and graduate students for research assistance at the conventions. In 2004, Jamieson left the project and Eisenhower and Margolies turned it into an academic class, and in 2008, partSEE RNC PAGE A9

FRESH FACES

Ellen Frierson/Photo Manager

Participants of PennCorp and PENNacle pre-orientation programs play icebreaker games for new freshmen to meet and bond.

A green pathway to the Palestra

Penn co-signed a SCOTUS brief in support of affirmative action BY ALEX ZIMMERMANN Staff Writer Penn affirmed its commitment to race-based affirmative action earlier this month, as the school co-signed an amicus curiae brief in support of the University of Texas’ affirmative action policy. UT’s policy is under scrutiny in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, an upcoming Supreme Court case involving Abigail Fisher, a white student who was denied admission to the university. Fisher is arguing that the school’s policy of using race as a consideration in admissions decisions violates the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment to the Constitution. Oral arguments in front of the court are scheduled for Oct. 10. Penn joined the seven other Ivy League institutions, along with other highly selective schools like Duke and Stanford universities, in submitting the brief arguing that race-based affirmative action is crucial to ensuring a diverse student body, and that diversity is a compelling interest in students’ educational experiences. “Penn does not often, but does from time to time, join with our peers to file amicus briefs in the U.S. Supreme Court on issues of major significance to Penn and the higher education community,” Penn Senior Vice President and SEE SCOTUS PAGE A10

Shoemaker Green, the newest PennConnects project, opened to the public Aug. 20

project began Sept. 2011. Among other features, the open lawn consists of several tree-lined walkways and sitting BY ADITI SRINIVAS areas. A war memorial paying Staff Writer homage to fallen soldiers also A touch of green was added to area of open green space located stands at the foreground of Shoethe Quaker Red and Blue this in front of the Palestra, opened maker Green. summer. Aug. 20 to the Penn community. SEE SHOEMAKER PAGE A8 Shoemaker Green, a 2.75-acre Construction on the $8.5 million Jing Ran/Sports Photo Editor

Shoemaker Green, which sits in front of the Palestra, was named in honor of 1960 Wharton alumnus Alvin Shoemaker, who became an emeritus trustee in October 2008. The Green will have its official ribbon-cutting ceremony Sept. 20.

Some Pa. colleges to provide students with valid voter ID

Profiling Penn’s Class of 2016

2,465 students will enter the freshman class this fall

students 341 international represented 69 countries

12.6% 62.6%

of all applicants were accepted of accepted students chose to attend Penn

13.9%

1,234 Men, 1,231Women

50

of the class are international states represented

Valid identification at polls, such as the PennCard, must carry an expiration date BY SARAH SMITH Staff Writer Many Pennsylvania colleges are taking on the burden of ensuring their students can vote in the upcoming presidential

Welcome Back Penn Students!

election. The voter identification law, which passed in March and was upheld August 15 by the Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court, requires photo IDs from accredited Pennsylvania colleges and universities to have an expiration date to be valid at the polls. The PennCard is valid because it has an expiration date. According to a study done in April by the Pennsylvania Pub-

lic Interest Research Group, 91 accredited colleges surveyed at the time did not have acceptable IDs. These schools enroll over half a million — or around 84 percent — of students in Pennsylvania, according to the study. Penn, along with Drexel, Villanova and Temple universities currently meet the ID requireSEE VOTER ID PAGE A2

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Sign up for our Fall VIP LIST! Leasing Begins November 1st Editorial (215) 898-6585 • Business (215) 898-6581

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n e ws

Page A2 AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 — ­ WELCOME BACK ISSUE

Distances from university zip codes to nearest PennDOT locations

The Daily Pennsylvanian

51 schools

27 schools

0-5 miles from PennDOT

6-10 miles from PennDOT

8

schools

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11-15 miles 16-20 miles 21+ miles from PennDOT from PennDOT from PennDOT Graphic by Leslie Krivo-Kaufman

It’s new. Price a factor Online EXCLUSIVES /thebuzz

30 SECONDS WITH BRANDON COPELAND Get an inside look at this y e a r ’s t e a m w i t h t h i s 30-second interview of the senior captain.

GALLERY: FOOTBALL MEDIA DAY Check out behind-the-scenes photos of players and coaches at the annual Media Day activities.

/news GALLERY: SIGHTS OF SUMMER Weren’t in Philly this summer? We’ve got you covered with a quick photo recap of summer happenings.

GALLERY: READS THE DP CAMPAIGN Get to know your students groups and learn why they read the DP, Street, Under the Button and the Buzz.

in colleges’ decisions VOTER ID from page A1

ments. Colleges with invalid IDs, such as Bryn Mawr College and Penn State University, are taking steps to ensure their IDs will be valid by November. Most are affixing stickers with an expiration date, an acceptable form of providing an expiration date under the law. P ress Secretar y of the Pennsylvania Department of State Ron Ruman said the government had been “fairly f lexible” in expiration date stickers. The stickers, he added, could give a specific date or read “fall semester 2012” as an expiration date. Most institutions producing the stickers have said the cost is negligible. According to Doreen Tobin, vice president for student affairs at East Stroudsburg University, ESU is producing the stickers “in house,”

costing a cent per sticker. As of fall 2011, 7,353 students were enrolled in ESU. Josh Stern, associate vice president for student affairs and dean of students at Arcadia University and a 1999 Graduate School of Education alumnus, wrote in an email that it would cost under $100 to have the stickers printed. Arcadia enrolls around 6,000 graduate and undergraduate students. Haver ford College pro duced its stickers via Microsoft Word, according to its OneCard administrator John Castrege. The college paid $34.99 for 8,000 stickers, which w ill ser ve its 1,198 students. ESU also dealt with the decision of when to allow its stickers to expire. They chose to print December 2012 on the stickers for upperclassmen. New f reshmen will be issued IDs with nine semesters until the expiration date. “We couldn’t arbitrarily give everyone nine semesters,” Tobin said. Upperclassmen who want an ID with an expiration date will need to pay $10 for it, less than the regular replacement fee of $25.

Br y n M aw r wh ich has 1,300 undergraduates and 400 graduate students, is issuing new IDs for all students. “We called Voter Services, and there were no guidelines [for the stickers],” said Ellie Esmond, co-director of the Civic Engagement Office at Bryn Mawr. Esmond said she was unable to find consistent rules for what information had to be printed on expiration stickers. “I’m concerned that it’s very open to interpretation on c a mpuses,” she sa id . “There’s going to be a lot of confusion at the polls.” However, some Pennsylvania colleges are not moving to make their student IDs valid at the polls. “Price was one of the issues,” PennPIRG Program Associate Angela Lee said. “A lot of [the schools] were saying they weren’t aware of the law and weren’t doing anything.” PennPIRG has been raising awareness about the law on college campuses and helping them comply with the law. They have been printing reminder cards and registering new youth voters, according to Lead Organizer

f or Pen n P I R G St udent s Vanessa Wright. “We have a western county with the lowest turnout across the board,” she said. “It’s rea lly i mpor t a nt to make it as easy as possible to register to vote.” Students whose schools are not providing valid ID will have to rely on other forms, such as a Pennsylvania d r ivers’ license or a U.S. passpor t . Without those, they will have to get a photo ID card for voting purposes at the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Those w ishing to do so must present two proofs of residency, such as an utility bill or a piece of mail addressed to a dormitory. W hile some colleges have PennDOT centers in their zipcode, other students looking to vote will have to travel farther. Lee descr ibed Elizabethtow n College, which enrolls appr ox i mat ely 2 , 30 0 u ndergraduates, as being reluctant to buy stickers due to cost. Elizabethtown is approximately 14 miles away from the nearest PennDOT that issues photo ID cards. Distances range from less

tion

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t ha n a m i le t o about 2 6 miles. To get a photo ID card f rom PennDOT, students with an out of state drivers’ license must surrender their license to get the card. “If you get a secure Pennsylvania photo ID, you’re declaring residency here,” Pen n D O T sp okesp er son Jan McK night said. “ You can only declare residency in one place.” Lee found this measure “restrictive.” “I don’t think many [students] would want to relinquish their license to get a Pennsylvania voter ID,” she said. The voter ID ruling from the Commonwealth Court w i l l b e app e a le d i n t he Pennsylvania Supreme Cour t in September. The oral arguments are expected to conclude on Sept. 13.

underthebutton.com

EVENTS

theDP.com/events

NSO LATE NIGHT: FREE IKEA SHUTTLES

gov. rendell on elections 2012

bhangra with penn dhamaka

social justice social and movie

NSO student activities fair

Buy all your dorm needs. Stops at 37th and Spruce, 40th and Locust, and 34th and Walnut streets. 10:30 p.m. thursday

Hear former governor Ed Rendell discuss the elections. Register on Penn InTouch. claudia cohen hall g17 3:30 p.m. friday

Join Penn’s all-male dance troupe for a quick lesson in this South Asian dance style. platt house 175 11 p.m. friday

Meet and vote on a film to watch with MEChA, Penn for Palestine and PennBDS. Claudia Cohen Hall g17 11 p.m. friday

Check out which activities you’d like to be part of for the next school year. along locust walk 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. monday

Browse more upcoming events and submit your own at theDP.com/events.

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N e ws

The Daily Pennsylvanian

HamCo continues repairs to fire damage UCH says fire’s aftermath and repairs will not be disruptive to move-in this week

On Campus Recruiting (OCR) for Graduating Students

Starts Early This Year!

Employer Information Sessions (EIS)

BY CAROLINE MEUSER Staff Writer Last week’s fire at Hamilton Court will not be disruptive to students moving in this week, according to University City Housing. Roof ing material on the top floor of building C of the 39th and Chestnut streets apartment complex caught fire early morning on August 21. According to Philadelphia Fire Department Executive Chief Richard Davison, the cause of the fire is still under investigation. Universit y Cit y Housing P roper t y M a nager Em i ly Brown said UCH is following the proper procedures to move tenants back in as soon as possible. “The cleaning and restoration crew is working on repairs,” Brown said. “We are doing our best to work around them.” Col lege sen ior Joe -A n n Moser, who was in the buildi ng when t he f i re bega n , described the ceiling above the fourth floor stairwell as “completely destroyed.” UCH did not comment on the extent of the da mage or the potential cost for re-

O C R

WELCOME BACK ISSUE ­— AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 Page A3

begin Wednesday, September 5th Full EIS Schedule On

Penn Calendar - Category “Career/Prof”

OR PennLink “Events”

Courtesy of Luke Poethig

The ceiling of the top floor in Hamilton Court’s building C was damaged due to a fire on August 21. The building is still undergoing repairs. pairs. Repairs began the day of the fire and remain underway. They are expected to be complete by the end of this week, according to Brown. Until all repairs are complete and inspected by city officials, tenants on the top two floors will not be permitted to move back into the apartments. Moser commented on the benefits of the hasty response of the Philadelphia Fire Department. “Hopefully, the fire won’t have too big of an impact on move-in this week,” she said.

“It was pretty quickly contained and thankfully it was during that time of summer when not a lot of people were around.” According to Brown, vacant rooms in other Hamilton Court buildings have been made available for the affected tenants. However, Moser said staying in other vacant rooms seemed too much of a hassle. “I’m not sure where other people in the building are staying in the meantime, but I’ve just been sleeping on friends’ couches,” she added.

theDP.com/news

New to OCR? Live Orientation Sessions on Tuesday, Sept. 4th @ 1:30pm, JMHH 240 Friday, Sept. 7th @ 12pm, JMHH 240 Online OCR Orientations & More Info: www.vpul.upenn.edu/careerservices/recruiting

www.vpul.upenn.edu/careerservices

So where is CURF?

You may have noticed that the ARCH Building looks like this:

220 South 40th Street, on the 2nd floor. Look for Ben and Jerry’s and The Last Word Bookshop--the entrance is right in between their doors.

Still confused? Walk up Locust Walk away from Van Pelt Library until you reach 40th Street, and turn right. Or visit us at

Follow project updates at http://www.vpul.upenn.edu/arch/

http://www.upenn.edu/curf/


Page A4 AUGUST 29-September 3, 2012 — WELCOME BACK ISSUE

The Daily Pennsylvanian

Opinion VOL. CXXVIII, NO. 63 The Independent Student Newspaper of the University of Pennsylvania

128th Year of Publication DANA TOM, Executive Editor SARAH GADSDEN, Managing Editor ANJALI TSUI, Opinion Editor RACHEL EASTERBROOK, Online Managing Editor SETH ZWEIFLER, Campus News Editor JULIE XIE, City News Editor JENNIFER SUN, General Assignments Editor MEGAN SOISSON, Senior Sports Editor ALYSSA KRESS, Sports Editor MIKE WISNIEWSKI, Sports Editor GABRIELA COYA, Copy Editor WILL MARBLE, Copy Editor

MATT WILLIAMS, News Design Editor CHRISTINE CHEN, Sports Design Editor JUSTIN COHEN, News Photo Editor JING RAN, Sports Photo Editor ELLEN FRIERSON, Photo Manager RAFE KETTLER, Lead Online Developer LESLIE KRIVO-KAUFMAN, Online Graphics Editor DAN NESSENSON, Video Producer TAN CHAN, Video Producer

EMILY KUO, Business Manager KELSEY BRONGO, Marketing Manager STEPHANIE CHAN, Ad Design Manager

MELISSA HONG, Finance Manager LYN CHE, Advertising Manager CELINE SEKER, Credit Manager

Opinion Unsigned editorials appearing on this page represent the opinion of The Daily Pennsylvanian. All other columns, letters and artwork represent the opinions of their authors and are not necessarily representative of the newspaper’s position.

LETTERS & GUEST COLUMNS Share your thoughts by submitting letters to the editor and guest columns to letters@theDP.com. Letters to the editor must be fewer than 200 words and include the author’s name, phone number and description of University affiliation. Guest columns must be fewer than 700 words. All submissions are subject to editing for style, clarity and space concerns.

Contact 4015 Walnut St. Philadelphia, PA 19104 Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

News/Editorial: (215) 898-6585 Advertising: (215) 898-6581 Fax: (215) 898-2050

Corrections and Clarifications If you have a comment or question about the fairness or accuracy of a story, email Managing Editor Sarah Gadsden at gadsden@ theDP.com.

‘‘

ALICE YU is a College senior from Branchburg, N.J. Her email address is aliceyu@sas.upenn.edu

What’s more patriotic than you and a couple thousand of your fellow patriots jamming out to a lineup of national superstars in the middle of the city where America was born?” Nursing sophomore Nick Giordano on the Budweiser Made in America Festival that coincides with New Student Orientation (Page A7).

An illness with no prescription GUEST COLUMN BY DIVYA RAMESH | Finding the cure for homesick freshmen

T

he trips to the pediatrician’s office this summer had worn my patience thin. When Student Health Services confirmed that all my immunization records had successfully traveled through the system, I was overjoyed. By that point, I had memorized the dates of my hepatitis A vaccines and could rattle off the name of every booster I had ever received over the course of my 18year existence. I thought I was done. Now that I have moved in and Convocation is around the corner, I realize that the vaccines on my chart have failed to prevent one thing: homesickness. While I can bring Tylenol to campus to ameliorate that occasional headache, there’s no pill to cure this freshman illness. The thing with homesickness is that it is not a bacterial infection. I cannot go to the doctor’s office, diagnose my condition as “collegefreshman homesickness” and leave with an antibiotic course guaranteed to cure me in a week’s time. I cannot diligently take my vitamins and hope not to be affected. Homesickness is worse than strep throat in that way — there are no physical symptoms or surefire treatments. It might be the only illness that’s necessary to self-diagnose and self-medicate. Some might argue that alongside issues like campus security, discussing new-student homesickness is trivial. Yet, according to Gregory Longo, a professor at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, untreated homesick-

ness can cause students to become depressed, abuse drugs and alcohol and even drop out of college. As one of the few psychologists to have studied the condition, Chris Thurbur considers homesickness natural but recommends that it be accepted and dealt with.

‘‘

The thing with homesickness is that it’s not a bacterial infection. I cannot go to the doctor’s office, diagnose my condition as ‘college freshman homesickness’ and leave with an antibiotic course guaranteed to cure me in a week’s time.”

But, how exactly do homesick students cope? Students generally fall into two categories: those that believe in the adage, “absence makes the heart grow fonder,” and those that maintain the mentality, “out of sight — out of mind.” For those in the latter category, or those able to move into the latter category, homesickness, in theory, is nonexistent. Home is out of sight and therefore, out of mind.

QuoTED

For those who join me in the former category, however, homesickness is tough. After 18 years of being with my parents, I know that not having them around to remind me to eat breakfast in the morning or rest up when I am sick is only going to make me think of them more. Their absence, more than their presence, is going to remind me of home. To my fellow homesick students, one way to selfmedicate is to turn the adage on its head. If absence makes the heart grow fonder, then, presence should make the heart grow distant. Make friends. Use social networks. Crowd schedules with school work and find lunch buddies to fill the odd hours between classes. Family can feel closer with a phone call — as AT&T used to metaphorically encourage, “reach out and touch someone.” In a generation that is skilled with Skype and texting, we’re always connected. Family and friends are just a click away. Face-to-face communication is only intercepted by a screen. Technology shrinks distance, and in the process, shrinks homesickness into oblivion. It’s comforting to know that homesickness is common: almost everyone from Homer’s Odysseus to L. Frank Baum’s Dorothy has experienced it. In “Doubt: A Parable,” by John Patrick Shanley, Father Flynn says, “When you are lost, you are not alone.” By the same token, to all my fellow freshmen, when you are homesick, you are not alone. That knowledge is the pill that we need to feel better. DIVYA RAMESH is a College freshman from Princeton Junction, N.J. She will be crowding her schedule this semester by writing a biweekly column for the DP. Her email address is divyaramesh20@ gmail.com.

Saying sorry to my subletters GUEST COLUMN BY ADAM SILVER | No price would have been fair to pay for my apartment

D

ear Subletters, I am sinc e r el y sor r y. You and I both know what I did — I misled you, I gave you false hope and I broke your tr ust. I sublet my Hamilton Court apartment to you. The unit is so filth-ridden, disgusting and rodent-ified that moving into my fraternity house will be a sanitary upgrade. When we first met, I laid the charm on thick. I gave you a tour of the apartment, strategically avoiding the bathroom with cockroaches, and you bought it. I could see your eyes widen as you imagined living there — it would be perfect for your summer needs. As I showed you around, you were impressed. I explained, “It’s not quite the Radian, but it’s really been a great apartment. I just think HamCo gets a bad rap. And, I mean, it has exposed brick. Who doesn’t love exposed brick?” I don’t. HamCo has r uined exposed brick for me. To s ay t h at H a m i lt on Court is a pleasant living experience is like saying a quick bite to eat at Gigi and Big R’s food truck is a pleasant dining experience — it’s just untrue. HamCo is essentially an overpriced slum that caters to Penn students. For those of you who have never entered HamCo, the “court” is less like a courtyard and more like the love child of a city dump and a parking lot. It is miserable. Subletters, I know I told you that pets were not allowed in HamCo, but that is simply because it already comes w ith pets. Most

door ways in the building have about two inches of clearance from the ground so that pests, bugs and rodents can come and go at their leisure — thank God for that! The court has some g reat w i ld l i fe. L ast fa l l, I witnessed two rats fight over the contents of an old pizza box.

‘‘

Subletters, I know I told you that pets were not allowed in HamCo, but that is simply because it already comes with pets. Most doorways in the building have two inches of clearance from the ground so that pests, bugs and rodents can come and go at their leisure — thank God for that!”

I know that I cheerfully said, “The cable comes with over 60 channels — including Animal Planet!” I really should have explained that

ADAM SILVER the best way to get your nature fix is by watching the cour t ya rd secur it y ca mera. I assured you that rent includes utilities, even inter net . Well, that is only theoretically tr ue. Internet is included in the sense that you have access to a Wi-Fi username and password. Ha milton Cour t , however, doesn’t bother to make the internet actually work in your room. Sorr y about it. Subletters, I know what you are thinking: “Oh Adam, don’t feel bad. You gave us the best deal ever — over $ 2 0 0 b elow t he mont h ly rent. How could we be mad at you?” While that is true, I still screwed you over — no price would have been a fair one. So again, I apologize. Sorr y for being deceitful and sorry that you trusted me. Hopef ully, next time you look for affordable summer housing, you will go somewhere that is plush in air conditioning and internet wh i le r ema i n i ng f r ee of bugs and cranky hipsters. Can we still be friends? — Adam ADAM SILVER is a College junior and masters of public administration candidate at the Fels Institute of Government. He is from Scottsdale, Ariz., and will be writing a weekly column for the DP this semester. His email address is adamsilver0601@gmail.com.


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Autistic man denied HUP heart transplant Nearly 300,000 people have signed a petition protesting the decision BY SHELLI GIMELSTEIN Senior Staff Writer A fter an autistic patient was denied a heart transplant at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, his mot her has st a r ted a petition to reverse the decision and place her son on the transplant list. Paul Corby, Karen Corby’s 23-year-old son, was diagnosed in 2008 with left ventr icular noncompaction, a congenital disorder that impairs the left part of his heart which pumps blood through his body. In 2011, Paul was referred to Penn Medicine, but was denied a heart transplant due to “psychiatric issues, autism, the complexity of the process, multiple procedures and the unk now n and unpredictable effect of steroids on behavior,” according to a June 2011 letter from his cardiologist at the time. When Paul was not recommended for a transplant, his mother said she was “stunned — I couldn’t believe that we were in this position, that my son was this sick and no one was going to help him.” In addition to the support she has received on her online petition — which, as of press time, had nearly 300,000 signatures — Corby said a number of autism organizations, including Autism Connection of Pennsylvania and the Philadelphia chapter of the Autism Society of America, have offered their help.

According to a statement from HUP spokesperson Susan Phillips, the Penn Health System evaluates transplant candidates based on “the current health status and posttransplant prognosis of the recipient, the impact of other existing health problems on the success of the surgery itself and over the longer term, as well as the potential interaction between a patient’s existing drug therapies and the drugs that would be necessary to stop transplant rejection.” The tra nspla nt tea m at Pen n is “at a rea l d isadvantage in this case,” said psychiatry professor David Mandell, who is the associate director of the Center for Autism Research at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. “They are not allowed to share their reasoning with the public, only with the family, due to patient confidentiality laws.” Psychiatr y professor Anthony Rostain, who specializes in adult developmental disorders, said that autism should not have been listed as a factor in the transplant denial. He believes, however, that the decision was based on psychiatric issues in the patient’s record “above and beyond autism.” “If he was being denied because of his developmental disorder, that’s a civil rights issue and clearly would be of concern for everyone,” he said. “But apparently there was more to this case than we were informed about.” Rostain added that HUP has done two transplants for patients with autism in the past.

25

“Ultimately, any decision to carry out a transplant is based in part on the medical issues and also on the ability of the patient’s support network to manage the complexity involved in recovering from the procedure,” he said. According to Mandell, Penn’s transplant policy does not exclude individuals with developmental disabilities. However, he feels it should be made explicit “that they do not make decisions about a candidate’s appropriateness for transplant or any other surg ical procedure based solely on the presence of a developmental disability.” Around 40 percent of people requesting heart transplants are turned down, according to Rostain. Since she began circulating the petition, other hospitals have begun reaching out to Corby, offering to look at her son’s medical records. Her son’s case also gained additional publicity in an Aug. 14 Philadelphia Inquirer article. “I can say with 99 percent certainty that we probably won’t be going to [HUP] even if they reversed the decision,” Corby said. “I can’t imagine him getting fair treatment there with all the media coverage.” Mandell added that while Corby’s petition may cause the transplant team to reevaluate this particular case, “[his] hope is that it will have a more systemic response — that we would think much more broadly about policies that affect the care of individuals with developmental disabilities.”

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Venture capital firm relocates near campus Highrise living Flexible leases Pet friendly Spacious apartments 24 hour desk service & security Efficiency, 1, 2, & 3 BR apartments available

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First Round Venture Capital to foster entrepreneurial spirit in West Phila., Penn BY ANGELYN IRVIN Staff Writer First Round Venture Capital is giving Philly a dose of brotherly love. The f ir m, which has offices in San Francisco and Ne w Yor k , i s mo v i ng it s he ad q u a r t e r s f r o m We st Conshohocken, Pa. to Philadelphia. Founded in 2004 by 1993 Wharton alumnus Josh Kopelman and former Penn professor Howard Morgan, First Round is the third-busiest venture capital firm in the nation, according to The Philadelphia Inquirer. The firm will relocate to 4040 Locust Street, what was formerly a bowling alley, in mid-September. The University City location is expected to attract tech-minded students from Penn as well as West Philadelphia at large. “We’ve begun to see some sig ns of entrepreneurship com i ng f rom t he cit y a nd also f rom the Universit y,” said Kopelman, who serves as the managing director. “ I t h i n k Un i v e r s it y C it y has so ma ny t a lented entrepreneurs and technolo gists that we’re hoping we can be sort of a resource to help other entrepreneurs get more companies started,” he added. T he f i r m specia l i zes i n aiding companies in the seed stage, the earliest point in a company or concept. According to Kopelman, work ing

with entrepreneurs at this stage of development is more emotionally, and financially, rewarding. “They have pretty fantastic resources,” said College sophomore Matt Gibstein, a member of Students for Technolog y and Entrepreneurship at Penn, who has closely followed First Round. “They’re very good at finding small companies that have re a l ly h ig h pot ent ia l a nd growing them.” W it h s e v e r a l st a r t - up s launched by students in the past year, it’s ev ident that there’s no shortage of business acumen and tech savvy at Penn. “There’s this impending sense of entrepreneurship at school, and [First Round’s relocation is] definitely going to encourage people to follow that path,” Gibstein said. College senior Har r ison Lieberfarb, who is also familiar w ith F irst R ound’s work, anticipates a significant amount of interaction between students and the firm due to the company’s close proximity to campus. “I think University City is an amazing location for it,” Lieberfarb said. “They’re going to be more amazed than they expected by the extent that Penn students are going to want to engage them in our community.” According to Kopelman, the nature of entrepreneurship has changed since his time at Penn. With the accessibility of resources, anyone is capable of founding a company. “When I was a student at

Wharton, there was no commercial internet. But over the last 20 years, if there’s one t rend t hat’s been re peated, it’s the removal of barriers and gatekeepers,” Kopelman said. He added that students’ access to affordable tools, such as app development software and the internet, has leveled the playing field. Kopelman hopes that the company’s move to Philadelphia encourages other firms to do the same. “The region is really robust in ter ms of students with technical talent and I think geography matters far less than it has before,” Kopelman said. Lieberfarb added that relocating to Philadelphia will be a signal to other companies that there is a market to be explored here. “If First R ou nd c a n work i n West Philly and be this successful, I think it’s a real model for other companies.” F i r st R ou nd w i l l a l low other companies to occupy their new office space. There is room available for portfolio companies as well as student business owners. They will also hold “office hours” once a month to prov ide opportunities for the city’s entrepreneurs to connect with the company. W h i le hesit a nt to ma ke predictions about how the company would fare, Gibstein is confident in First Round’s potential. “I don’t want to make predictions about Philly’s viability, but … if any one’s going to make it happen, it’d be First Round.”

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Students prep for Made in America Many plan to go to the festival, despite it occurring during New Student Orientation BY KATE GHEEN Staff Writer Just in time for New Student Orientation, the Budweiser Made in America Festival is coming to Philadelphia’s Benjamin Franklin Parkway on Sept. 1 and 2. The city’s largest music festival in years will feature High End about 30 different performers. Jay-Z, who spearheaded the event, will headline the Saturday night concert, and will be accompanied by performers throughout the weekend like Pearl Jam, Skrillex, Miike Snow and Drake, among others. Although Made in America overlaps with NSO — a notorious weekend for both on-campus parties and student- organized dow ntow n events — the Penn community figures to be well-represented at the concert. Some students believe going to the concert will enhance the NSO experience, not take away from previously planned oncampus events. “The timing is perfect — right during NSO,” College sophomore Leland Chamlin said. “I’m excited about seeing all my friends. I really could care less about the majority of the music.” Other students attending, however, are going to see the extensive lineup of performers and enjoy the concert atmosphere. College senior Greg Bonnem, who is going to Made in

America, said he is most ex- of performers, three separate cited to see lesser-known per- stages will host the musical formers like Janelle Monáe, acts. The main stage will be loAfrojack and The Knock. cated in front of the iconic steps “Since it’s outside and on the of the Philadelphia Museum of Benjamin Franklin Parkway, it Art. According to the Associshould be sweet,” he said. ated Press, Made in America There will also be no short- is the first concert hosted on age of incoming freshmen at the Parkway to require paid the festival, as many Class of admission. 2016 students are planning to The AP also reported in an venture off campus on their Aug. 24 article that 100,000 first NSO nights. concertgoers are expected to “People always bring posi- be at Made in America this tive vibes to festivals, and weekend. Made in America seems like “What’s more patriotic than the perfect way to start off you and a couple thousand of Salon Services foryour a Modest Price NSO weekend,” Wharton and fellow patriots jamming College freshman Jorge Bar- out to a lineup of national suriga said. perstars in the middle of the “This is going to be my first city where America was born?” concert ever and it will give me Nursing sophomore Nick Giora great chance to explore the dano said. city that I’ll be living in for next four years,” Wharton freshman Chad Payne said. “It’s the perfect complement to the NSO week.” Tickets for the festival have been on sale since the end of May, with general admission passes now ranging from $150$175. Some have cited the high cost of tickets as reasons why they will not attend. “I can’t afford to pay $175 in the beginning of the semester for this,” Wharton sophomore Amanda Triglia said. For those not attending Made in America, there is still an opportunity to see the performances. Producers Ron Howard and Brian Grazer are planning to make a film documenting the two-day festival. “The fact that a movie will be made about the festival makes it seem like organizers will try to create an experience unlike that of any other festival,” Barriga said. Because of the large number

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Sustainability central for Shoemaker SHOEMAKER from page A1 “We realized we have historic towering buildings, like the Palestra and Franklin Field, and instead of having a front lawn, we had six tennis courts,” Vice President for Facilities and Real Estate Ser vices Anne Papageorge said. “It was not the most appealing of entrances.” According to a October 2011 Daily Pennsylvanian article, Penn initially intended Shoemaker Green to be called the Palestra Green. It was renamed in honor of 1960 Wharton alumnus Alvin Shoemaker when he became an emeritus trustee in October 2008. A lvin Shoemaker will be present at an official ribboncutt i ng ceremony for t he Green Sept. 20. Papageorge added t hat

Shoema ker Green shou ld also create more open space on campus, since the future construction of a new college house on Hill Field will take away some of that space. “We wanted to ensure students had enough space for passive recreation opportunities,” she said. The construction is a “key element” of the University’s PennConnects plan, according to Papageorge. PennConnects, which began in 2005, is an initiative that aims to create more open, sustainable space across campus. The construction process for Shoema ker Green i nvolved covering the existing Lott Tennis Courts in front of the Palestra with soil, and establishing an electr ical system and rainwater collection mechanism, said Marc Cooper, project manager for Shoemaker Green. Cooper said one of Shoemaker Green’s most unique features is a rain garden that can capture water runoff during a storm. The rain garden is an “integral” feature of the

area’s project design, according to Cooper. Sho em a ker Gr e en a l so comes equipped with other environmentally sustainable features, including a specially engineered mix of soil and native plants. Together, these elements make the Green one of the pilot sites for a new national initiative — the Sustainable Sites Initiative, University Architect David Hollenberg said. The initiative aims to create a set of criteria to evaluate the sustainability of open spaces, Hollenberg explained. Students on campus have so far responded favorably to the opening of Shoemaker Green. Wharton freshman Jimmy Gammill, who plays on Penn’s football team, said the area would be useful for tailgating before games. “This is nice to look at when I walk to the locker rooms and to practice,” Gammill said. “I remember looking at the area when I came to visit Penn’s campus, and this looks great.”

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Class set up in Bloomberg newsroom RNC from page A1 nered with the Fels Institute of Government. Eisenhower is the director of the Institute for Public Service at the Annenberg School of Communication and Margolies is a Fels professor. More recently, the team was joined by Thornburgh, the director of Fels. For the fourth time, Penn students have gotten the opportunity to attend the conventions, but this year they have another assignment. The Philadelphia Daily News is relying on the students for convention coverage. A lthough the opening of the main convention hall in Tampa was delayed a day due to the weather, Eisenhower, grandson of former President Dwight Eisenhower, described the scene on Monday as “definitely underway” but “a quiet day in terms of news generation.” Throughout the conventions, the students will be running from breakfasts with state delegations to panels of party leaders. They have set up ca mp inside the Bloomberg newsroom, which was made possible by Albert Hunt, Annenberg professor and executive editor at Bloomberg’s Washington Bureau. He is responsible

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Students in the “Conventions, Debates and Campaigns” class are attending speeches in the Tampa Bay Times Forum at the Republican National Convention. for the “complete access to the Bloomberg news station,” Eisenhower said. “[Hunt] has really helped us here.” “The professors know everyone so everyone stops to talk to us,” said College senior Coby Lerner, one of the students in Tampa. Lerner chose the RNC because “it’s a more interesting campaign because it’s not an incumbent running.” He added that it is a very exciting class. “We are in a unique position — we are here as students, we are here as reporters, and to a certain extent we are here as guests.” “We are doing so much,” said Margolies, who is a delegate to the DNC. “Ever y year we’ve gotten into in-

The Tenant Comes First!

credible things, almost [every event].” “[Eisenhower] handles the Republican side and I handle the Democratic side,” she said, laughing. “It is amazing. If you talk to the students who did it years ago they say it was a life-altering experience.”

WELCOME BACK ISSUE ­— AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 Page A9

College senior Angela McDougall, who is currently in Tampa, said the opportunity allows her “a better understanding of the role of conventions in our political system and its impact on elections.” Students say the buzz topic at the convention seems to be the intersection of funding and politics. Delegates at the convention are focusing mainly on the role super PACs play in modern politics and debate over whether money should be tied to political speech. T he st udent s have met many politicians, delegates and reporters, including former New Jersey Governor Tom Kean. Kean told them that if money is tied to speech, certain people will be excluded from the democratic process. “That was not an official event. We would never have gotten that if we had not just been there talking to him,” Lerner said. Interactions like this define the class. “The main thing is to be there. Go.” Eisenhower said. “Here we are, and we’ll be back to report on what we’ve found.”

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One of our bloggers takes offense to Rep. Todd Akin’s statements and the GOP response BY SARAH GUTMAN Congressman Todd A kin (R-Miss.), when asked about his stance on abortion in cases of rape, made the following wildly offensive and medically inaccurate statement on Aug. 19: “If it’s a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down. But let’s assume that maybe that didn’t work or something. I think there should be some punishment, but the punishment ought to be on the rapist, and not attacking the child.� Well, at least he think s some punishment is appropriate in rape cases. First of all, “legitimate� r ap e? T h at is not a n ac ceptable term to be used in any dialogue. Rape is rape. Whether force is used does not make a rape “legitimate� or not. To question or belittle certain rapes is to victimize the survivor all over again. Tony Award winning playwright, activist and survivor of rape, E ve Ensler ( best known for authoring “The Vagina Monologues�) wrote an incredibly eloquent response in The Huffington Post, calling Akin’s comments “a window into the psyche of the GOP� and asking the Representative to put himself in the position of a woman who has already endured something no one ever should only to be forced to carry to term a child that will be a daily reminder of the worst moments of her life.

“I am asking you and the GOP to get out of my body, out of my vagina, my womb, to get out of all of our bodies. These are not your decisions to make. These are not your words to define,� Ensler concludes. I couldn’t say it better myself. It is not for predominantly male politicians to make a woman’s healthcare decisions for her. It is for the individual woman to decide whether to exercise her constitutionally protected right to choose. Anything less is a violation of women’s and human rights. Second, while I may not have read all the doctor-y things that Akin has, but I have been a woman for my entire life, giving me a good 21 years of experience with the workings of the female body that the representative from Missouri will never have. Either way, I’m pretty sure no legitimate doctor has ever said that a woman’s body can tell that unwanted sperm is being put in her and can just flush it out or keep it from fertilizing an egg. In fact, a 1996 study in the American Journal of Obstetr ics a nd Gy necolog y concluded that “rape -related pregnancy occurs with significant frequency.� Also, on Aug. 20’s Andrea Mitchell Reports, Dr. Nancy Snyderman noted that the rate of pregnancies resulting from rape (the 1996 study reported it as five percent) is the same rate of pregnancies resulting from unprotected sex in general. So Congressman Akin really has no idea what he’s talking about. Third, this representative is somehow on the House’s

ToDD AKIN

U.S. Representative to Missouri’s second congressional district Science Committee? Really? Finally, the Romney campaign was quick to denounce Representative Akin’s comment s , say i ng “G over nor Romney and Congressman Ryan disagree with Mr. Akin’s st at ement � a nd t h at “[a] Romney-Ryan administration would not oppose abortion in instances of rape.� I find that a little funny seeing as Akin and Ryan were in fact co-sponsors of the Protect Life Act (otherwise known as the “Let Women Die� act), that would allow hospitals to refuse to give women abortions even in emergency situations and sought to redefine rape as “forcible rape,� or as Representative Akin likes to call it, “legitimate� rape. Minus the absurdly unfounded medical claims, Ryan has echoed Akin’s sentiments on women’s reproductive health and, in his own words, is “as pro-life as a person gets.� If Romney wins the election, with his lack of conviction, Ryan’s views would be influential. This would be a huge step backward for the country and especially women. The GOP has made itself increasingly hostile towards women’s rights, particularly women’s health care and reproductive rights. Although Akin may have “misspoken,� this Freudian slip expressed views that are becoming dangerously common within the Republican Party.

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SCOTUS may strike down UT policy SCOTUS from page A1 General Counsel Wendy White said in an email. “I believe our brief does an excellent job of explaining the importance of diversity to Penn and higher education.� Many Supreme Court experts believe the justices will strike down UT’s policy as unconstitutional, shifting away from previous judicial precedent that schools may take race into account in admissions decisions. By preventing schools from enrolling a diverse student body, some believe that the Court’s strike down would be detrimental to students. “As someone who has been teaching in highly selective universities for over 30 years, we provide a much better education than we did in the era before affirmative action,� said political science professor Rogers Smith, who specializes in constitutional law. “To say it’s unconstitutional, it will send a signal that efforts to promote greater racial and ethnic inclusion in many forms of life are in constitutional jeopardy.� A shift in the court’s stance on affirmative action could also come as a shock to Penn, which may be forced to substantially alter its policy of valuing diversity in admitted classes. Penn currently uses race as a factor in a holistic review process of applicants. Dean of Admissions Eric Furda stressed that this commitment to diversity matters to students, and not just in terms of percentages. “We’re not just tr ying to keep a scorecard so Penn can say we’re more diverse,� Furda said. “This isn’t just to say we have ‘X’ percent of ‘Y,’ it’s how that matches up with the academic offerings here, how this plays out on Locust Walk

every day ‌ that’s where we realize the value of diversity.â€? The brief co-signed by Penn makes a similar claim, arguing that schools should not only be permitted to achieve diversity through “mechanistic policies.â€? Should the cour t r ule against UT, it may simply hold that the university’s affirmative action policy is inconsistent with standards created by a 2003 case on race-based affirmative action, Grutter v. Bollinger. Given the change in Supreme Court justices since t h at t i me , however, L aw School professor and constitutional law expert Kermit Roosevelt believes the court is likely hearing the case to reexamine Grutter and the constitutionality of affirmative action as a whole. “The idea that the purpose of the Equal Protection Clause is to prevent society from making progress toward racial equality is absurd,â€? Roosevelt said. “I do not think that any sensible understanding of the equal protection clause would prohibit race-based affirmative action.â€? Opponents of UT’s practice, though, argue that race is an unnecessar y factor for the university, since its policy to admit all students in the top 10 percent of their high school class already creates substantial diversity. Some argue that focusing on race distracts schools from more important measures of diversity. Richard Kahlenberg, a senior fellow at The Centur y Foundation and author of “The Remedy: Class, Race, and Affirmative Action,â€? believes that if schools are prohibited from explicitly taking race into account, they will be encouraged to recruit and admit more lower-income students as a way of indirectly promoting racial diversity. “I’ve been a long-time advocate of universities considering economic status in admissions, giving a break to low-income and working-class students of all races,â€? he said. Although Penn, unlike UT,

is a private school, it receives some federal funding, as do most other private universities. Roosevelt said that should the court strike down UT’s policy, another round of litigation would ensue, raising the question of whether the Fisher decision would govern private schools’ admissions practices. At the end of the day, White believes any decision would have broad impacts on schools across the country.

WELCOME BACK ISSUE ­— AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 Page A11

“The courts have long incorporated the constitutional standards barring racial discrimination into Title VI of the Civil Rights Act — which prohibits race discrimination in programs that receive federal funding. So while not directly applicable, it will effectively govern all admissions practices,� White said. “Whatever the Supreme Court decides in the UT case will effectively apply to public and private institutions alike.�

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WELCOME BACK ISSUE ­— AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 Page B1

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The 23rd annual P hiladelphia PrideDay Parade hit Philade Gay and Lesbian P lphia on June 10, du ride Month. Events ring International included live music the gayborhood to P , food, drinks and a enn's Landing. parade that ran from

MAY 24

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Lil' Pop Shop, a gourmet popsicle shop, opened at 44th and Spruce streets this summer. The shop currently offers 12 non-traditional flavors, including Vietnamese coffee, lime mint, mango sriracha and chocolate with salted caramel brownie.

JULY 4

pling of local food for Taste of Philadelphia - a sam ding Lan nn's Pe to ked trek e alik nce Day Parade. hians gies Forever and the Independe ebration, students and Philadelp Hoa cel a! and eric es Am rip me St lco ars We St wa ed Wa lud As part of the Day. Other festivities inc Lawn for Mural Project Paint trucks - and to Independence

Photos by Maegan Cadet, Melanie Lei, Christina Prudencio, and Jing Ran | Design by Matt Williams


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Page B2 AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 ­— WELCOME BACK ISSUE

The Daily Pennsylvanian

Huntsman returns to Penn Board of Trustees

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The former presidential candidate previously served from 1996 to 2000

16 - Interstate_Light_abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz`1234567890-=[]\;’,./ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ~!@#$%^&*()_+{}|:”<>?_åçéƒ ©˙î˚¬µñøœ®ß†ü¥à¡™£¢§¶•ªº–“‘«…æ÷|ÅıÇÎ´Ï˝ÓˆÔÒ˜،‰Íˇ¨„˛Á¸`⁄‹›fifl‡°·‚—±”’»ÚƯ˘¿|áéíóúâêîôûàèìòùäëïöüÿãñõÁÉÍÓÚÀÈÌÒÙÄËÏ ÖÜŸÑÃÕÂÊÎÔÛ ÅıÇÎ´Ï˝ÓˆÔÒ˜،‰Íˇ„˛Á¸`⁄¤‹›fifl‡°·‚—±”’»ÚƯ˘¿ ‘”�”‘’”

We’re all for mini-marts, mini-golf and mini-bagels

BY SHELLI GIMELSTEIN Summer News Editor June 21 — Former Republican presidential candidate and 1987 College graduate Jon Huntsman Jr. is returning to Penn’s Board of Trustees. On Ju ne 14 a nd 15, t he Board of Trustees voted to re-elect Huntsman as a University Trustee after his 11year departure. University Secretary Leslie Kruhly said Huntsman agreed to commit to attending the tr ustees’ biannual meetings, stating

JON HUNTSMAN Jr. Former gov of Utah and presidential candidate

Penn to have someone of his stature and intellect on our board.” Huntsma n remained involved at Penn after leaving the Board of Trustees, enrolling two of his daughters at the University and ser ving on the advisory board of the Huntsman Program in Inter national Stud ies and Business. Huntsman also delivered the 2010 Commencement address and has spoken at various Penn schools and centers.

Like getting a great haircut?

fridges.

but not

mini-

“he would love to rejoin the Board” and “Penn was like family.” Huntsman ser ved on the boa r d f r om 19 9 6 t o 2 0 0 0, when he stepped down after being named Deputy United States Trade R epresentative, Kruhly said. Huntsman went on to serve as governor of Utah and U.S. ambassador to China before launching his presidential campaign, which he suspended in January. Penn President Amy Gutmann was pleased at Huntsman’s return to the board, emphasizing his career in public service. “Jon Huntsman Jr. is a proud Penn alumnus who has been admirably engaged at the highest level of public affairs,” she said. “It is an enormous advantage for

Photo by Ryan Abel

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N e ws

The Daily Pennsylvanian

WELCOME BACK ISSUE ­— AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 Page B3

U. to offer tax offsets for LGBT employees Those covering domestic partners’ health care will qualify for extra pay BY SHELLI GIMELSTEIN Summer Sports Editor May 24 — Penn has become one of the first universities to compensate employees in same-sex domestic partnerships who must pay taxes on healthcare benefits. The University announced in the May 22 edition of The Almanac that it will provide up to $125 a month or $1,500 per year to employees who pay taxes to the Internal Revenue Service for health benefits their partners receive. The policy took

effect July 1, 2012. Federal and Pennsylvania state tax codes currently do not recognize domestic partners as dependents for tax purposes, according to Terri Ryan, manager of strategic communications for the Division of Human Resources. “By providing some extra compensation to the employees in that category, employers are acknowledging the inequity and doing something to

try to make domestic partner benefits truly more equitable,“ LGBT Center Director Bob Schoenberg said. For Schoenberg, the new policy of “grossing up” to compensate for the tax “demonstrates that Penn is among the most progressive and inclusive employers.” Penn began to offer domestic partner benefits in 1994, becoming one of the first employers in the Philadelphia area to do so. Tax offsets are already offered by several universities, including Syracuse, Yale and Columbia universities and Bowdoin and Barnard col-

leges. Additionally, companies such as Facebook and Apple implemented the practice of “grossing up” in 2011, while Microsoft and Yahoo started this year, according to The New York Times. Beg inning July 1, 2012 , employees may add domestic partners in the event of a “qualifying life event” or during the annual open enrollment period. Approximately 125 Penn employees covered their domestic partners as of May 24, Ryan wrote in an email. Rising College junior Hugh

Hamilton, chair of the Lambda Alliance — the umbrella organization for LGBT groups on campus — said that the tax offset policy was “jumpstarted” by Penn’s Action Plan for Faculty Diversity and Excellence. Released by the University in June 2011, the Diversity Action Plan is aimed at recruiting a more diverse faculty and staff. Last February, the Action Plan drew some criticism from some LGBT community members who felt that it did not sufficiently emphasize LGBT faculty representation.

The new tax offset policy “is a great step both in terms of basic fairness to our LGBT faculty and staff, but also in terms of competitiveness with peer institutions,” Hamilton said. “It sends the message to prospective faculty and staff that Penn is a place where they’ll be valued.” Chemistry professor Eric Schelter agreed, adding that “the initiative sends a clear, supportive message to the faculty that will help to attract and retain scholars with same-sex partners in every discipline.”

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n e ws

The Daily Pennsylvanian

Penn jumps to 17th in Forbes ranking The magazine previously ranked Penn at 36th and 52th overall BY SHELLI GIMELSTEIN Summer News Editor Aug. 2 — Penn’s national ranking is on the rise. According to the Forbes magazine ranking of America’s Top Colleges released on August 1, Penn was ranked 17th overall among universities in the United States. Princeton University took the top spot, followed by Williams College, Stanford University, the University of Chicago and Harvard and Yale universities. For the past two years, Penn’s ranking has shifted dramatically, dropping from 36th place in 2010 to 52nd place in the 2011 ranking. Forbes and the Center for College Productivity and Affordability used a slightly dif ferent methodolog y for the college rankings than in previous years, according to Forbes Executive News Editor Michael Noer. He explained that this year, they slightly increased the weighting given to colleges that produce prominent and highly paid alumni, as well as graduates who win nationally competitive awards such as the Fulbright and Rhodes scholarships. “ W h i le t he c h a nges i n weighting were small — no more than a couple of percentage points — they had the effect of rewarding schools who are more academically selective, like Penn,” Noer wrote in an email. “We slightly discounted four-year gradu-

ation rates. We have never measured schools by selectivity, but we felt this rewarded more academically rigorous programs by a little bit without compromising the core of our philosophy.” The ranking is meant to evaluate the outcomes of graduating each college, taking into account “low debt, good paying jobs, getting your degree in four years, high reported satisfaction with teaching,” Noer said. “But we did feel that [post-graduate] academic performance was slightly undervalued, so we adjusted it a little bit. It helped all the Ivies, not just Penn.” Top Colleges Educational Consultant Steven Goodman, a 1989 Graduate School of Education alumnus, believes the 17th place ranking is “big for Penn.” While other rankings, like that of U.S. News and World Report, tend to focus more on reputation, the Forbes survey looks at academic quality and careers — making this a significant jump for Penn, according to Goodman. “Reputation drives numbers, but admissions is not only about quantity, it’s about quality as well,” Goodman said, adding that Penn may see an increase in its applicant pool’s quality as a result. Forbes also named Penn 16th among private colleges and 9th among research universities in the nation. Additionally, Forbes ranked Penn the 6th most entrepreneurial college, citing the business achievements of 1997 College and Wharton graduate Elon Musk, who co-founded PayPal and Tesla Motors.

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N e ws

The Daily Pennsylvanian

WELCOME BACK ISSUE ­— AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 Page B5

Liquor store to open at 43rd and Chestnut streets The store will be closest to campus after another at 41st and Market closed in January BY AVI GRUNFELD Staff Writer June 14 — The Penn community will once again have a liquor store within a few blocks of campus. The Philadelphia Zoning Board of Adjustment overturned a decision regarding a proposed liquor store that has been stirring some controversy in the Spruce Hill community. The Zoning Board approved the application of a state liquor store at 43rd and Chestnut streets on June 13 after rejecting the store at an April hearing. The new ruling comes after the entire Zoning Board heard arguments for and against the store during a special appeals hearing on June 6. The store will be the closest liquor to store to Penn’s campus after another store at 41st and Market streets permanently closed on Jan. 14 due to problems with the landlord and building site. The state is working on negotiating a lease agreement with

the owners of the space, Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board spokesperson Stacey Witalec said. The store will replace adult video store Risqué Video. The Zoning Board does not release explanations for its decisions. However, Spruce Hill Community Association zoning committee Chair Barry Grossbach attributed the reversal to the SHCA’s different approach for the June hearing. In April, the SHCA did not make an effort to have people in support of the store sign a petition or attend the hearing. The association was trying to avoid a “brawl and division in the neighborhood” similar to the one in 2007 that erupted when the Zoning Board rejected a liquor store at 43rd and Walnut streets across the street from the Masjid al-Jamia mosque, Grossbach said. “We decided it was necessary once again as we had done in 2007 to show the board that there

was considerable support in the neighborhood for the store,” Grossbach said, referring to his approach at the June 6 hearing. Witalec said the state is deciding whether or not the store will be a premium store, meaning it would carry an expanded selection of wine. DeRitis and Grossbach are both expecting a premium store that will be an

upgrade over the liquor store at 49th Street and Baltimore Avenue and the closed 41st and Market streets store. The store faced strong opposition from the Muslim community. A petition against the store garnered 305 signatures, many of them local Muslims who oppose the store because of its close proximity to the mosque.

While the Zoning Board officially approved the store, SHCA will remain involved in the details surrounding its opening. Grossbach and others on the association will make sure the proviso he and owners of the plaza signed calling for additional security from the University City Police is properly enforced. “We’re happy that this is be-

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hind us now and we will certainly do whatever we can to heal whatever rift there may be in the neighborhood,” Grossbach said. He added, “We believe that people of different views, beliefs, customs and traditions can exist side by side in respect of one another without imposing their views on one another.”


Page B6 AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 ­— WELCOME BACK ISSUE

The Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies (GSWS) Program at Penn offers students exciting opportunities to explore the roles of gender and sexuality in culture. Our vast array of courses gives students opportunities to focus on women and feminist theory, gender and sexuality, gender and race, and gender and health. Students can also develop a more international and transnational perspective on contemporary global issues including the possibilities and problems associated with economic and cultural globalization, migration, diaspora, and religious fundamentalism. Visit our new website at www.sas.upenn.edu/gsws to see our course offerings and to learn about upcoming events, the major and minor in GSWS, GSWS Core Faculty, and GSWS Staff and Research Scholars.

n e ws

The Daily Pennsylvanian

Oakland Athletics draft 2012 graduate Vince Voiro Star pitcher Voiro was drafted in the 15th round, sent to play in minor league BY ANNA STRONG Summer Sports Editor July 12 — By many young baseball players’ standards, recent graduate Vince Voiro is living the dream. The star pitcher, who went 5-3 in his senior season with a 2.45 earned run average, was drafted in the 15th round by the Oakland Athletics. He was then sent to play for the Arizona League Athletics, a minor-league affiliate of the A’s. “I found out I got picked, a nd t hen I was out t here w ithin about a week ,” the

all h the t, n ... a w e e t o r a d ls g le l l za t t z e i i P sm re a l e r su you’ a ot llet t n u b e’s r wa r e h d t in you re. n A ar mo ll r o d rde o to

Patrick Hulce/DP Senior Photographer

All-Big 5 honoree Vince Voiro was drafted in the 15th round, the 469th pick overall, by the Oakland Athletics after a standout senior season. Cherry Hill, N.J., native said. “And then three or four days after that, I was practicing w ith the team. There’s no orientation or anything like that, they just kind of throw you right in.” It did not take long, however, for Voiro to settle into the routine. “ I d e f i n it el y h ad some catching up to do, since the Ivy League season ended so early. But once I was in the swing of things, I started to feel good,” Voiro said. Voiro made his debut on June 24 against the AZL Indians and pitched a no-run, nohit inning of relief. He came on in relief again against the Indians on June 26, striking out three and hold ing op ponents runless and hitless in one inning of work. Voiro did not let up a hit until his third outing against the AZL Brewers. “It’s a building-up process. It’s partly about getting as many guys throwing in the game as possible, but they’re also managing you — if you’re not ready to be throwing a lot of innings, they don’t want you to do it,” Voiro said. His f irst start came

against the AZL Mariners on July 9. Voiro gave up three hits and one earned run, but struck out two over three innings. H i s i mpr e ssi ve p er f or m a nce c a n b e at t r ibut e d mostly to his lifelong hard work at the game, but also to his career as a Quaker. “I definitely felt prepared coming in. College baseball is a g r ind because it’s all year long, and so is playing here. [I was ready for] having practice and games almost every day.” Ideally, Voiro’s next step would be to move up to the Athletics’ Shor t Season A t e a m , t he Ver mont L a ke Monsters, based in Burlington. “The major it y of people move up to Ver mont f rom here, so that’s what I’m hoping for,” Voiro said. T he nex t st ep up f r om Vermont is the Iowa-based Burlington Bees, the Athletics’ full-season A team, then t he Adva nced A Stock ton Ports (Stockton, Calif.), the A A M id la nd R ock Hou nd s (Midland, Texas) and finally the A A A Sacramento River Cats.

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N e ws

The Daily Pennsylvanian

WELCOME BACK ISSUE ­— AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 Page B7

Occupy hosts national gathering in Phila. Hundreds came from across the country for workshops, speakers and marches BY LALITA CLOZEL Staff Writer July 5 — The Occupy Wall Street movement returned in full force to Philadelphia the week of July 4 for its first national gather ing, which included five days of workshops, speakers and marches. The event drew hundreds of Occupy members from all over the country, as well as 107 endorsements from other Occupy groups, according to Occupy National Gathering organizer Steve Cottrell. The summer convention was intended to “strengthen [Occupy’s] ability to work together,” organizer Tammy Shapiro said. It was also a reaction to a not her g r oup’s n at ion a l convention. The 99% Declaration, a g roup inspired by Occupy Wall Street, also held a national meeting in Philadelphia Monday, July 2 through Wednesday, July 4. In what they called a “Continental Congress 2.0,” about 90 delegates from across the United States convened to draft a list of grievances to send to politicians and members of the Supreme Court. Organizers of the Occupy National Gathering had trouble finding places to settle in for the week. On June 30, the protesters were in front of Independence Mall, part of the Independence National Historical Park on 6th and Market streets. But that evening, an Occupier was arrested after setting up a tent at 5th and Walnut streets. The next day, the group moved to Franklin Square in order to avoid more disruptions. Some attendees were disappointed by the new location. Chas Schaeffer, a member of Occupy Pittsburgh, felt the Franklin Square location was

planned its convention without asking for Occupy Philadelphia’s support. This was “a little disturbing to people from Occupy Philly,” Cottrell said, adding that 99D was less prom i nent compa red portrayed in the media as an to Independence Mall. “We Occupy group. Occupy Philamissed a big opportunity last delphia then decided to have night,” he said. “We missed it because we were doing civil disobedience.” On the evening of July 1, a solidarity march for the person arrested resulted in 26 arrests on charges of disorderly conduct and obstruction of highways. The people arrested were all released the next day. One of the goals of the convention was to “to see what we agree on,” Shapiro said. Other Occupiers said this was an opportunity to network and meet other Occupiers in person. But ma ny were ex pecting a larger gathering. Shapiro was hoping to see 1,500 people throughout the week. Roughly 500 people came. Those who did make the trip to Philadelphia were often organizers of their Occupy movement at home. “This isn’t necessarily a gathering for all Occupiers,” explained Foo Conner, who helped plan the initial Occupy Wall Street movement on the internet. A lthough ever yone was invited, he said, the gathering was “more for organizers and hardcore radicals.” To g r e at appl ause , one prominent speaker, journalist Chris Hedges, described the Occupy movement as “the dress rehearsal for the end of the corporate state.” Rolling Stone reporter Matt Taibbi called for putting corporate criminals in jail and deplored the high cost of education, which is “pegged to the availability of student credit.” While 99D addressed similar issues in its convention, there was tension between the two groups. Initially, 99D

its own national gathering. But the two groups bridged their differences when Zevin Cr uz, a delegate who had been a member of Occupy New York and Occupy Ithaca, led a delegation to approach Occupy a nd “get their input.”

L a r r y Swetma n, a n Occupy Philadelphia organizer who had previously criticized 99D for a lack of transparenc y, said he appreciated the gesture. He said the two groups are no longer in disagreement. “We don’t have to fight,” he added.

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Brendan Van Gorder, a rising College sophomore who attended the gathering, is hopeful for the future of activism. Though the convention “didn’t draw as many people as it should have,” he said, “the spirit of Occupy I am confident will live on.”

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Page B8 AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 ­— WELCOME BACK ISSUE

The Daily Pennsylvanian

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Aug. 1 — On July 23, Penn announced Joel Carstens as the University director of Financial Aid. Ca r st ens, who d i rect ed Princeton University’s underg raduate f ina ncia l a id renewal process, as well as the Office of Student Employment, will replace Bill Schilling, who retired on June 30 after serving for over 30 years. “The University of Pennsylvania’s unique place in American higher education, the quality of a Penn education at all levels, the Penn

Pan-Asian American Community House finds new leadership July 13 — Pan-Asian American Community House welcomed a new director after almost a year of searching. P e t e r Va n D o , f o r m e r program director for Community Center Programs at Cornell University’s Student Activities Office, began as PAACH director July 23. Do has had a wide range of accomplishments, from being published in several Viet-

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tor,” she wrote in an email. During his eight years at Princeton, Carstens made signif icant changes to the st udent employ ment pr o gram, making it a part of the financial aid operation, which included developing online tools for what previously was a “manual and difficult experience” for students and potential employers, according to Robin Moscato, director of financial aid at Princeton. “He just made the student employment system work so much better and be a much more pleasant experience for the students,” Moscato said.

namese journals to receiving honors including the Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship from the U.S. Department of Education. Since former PA ACH director June Chu’s departure in the fall of last year, the search committee had invited five candidates to campus before offering the position to Do. “He stood out because of his experience in students in their programs and in their initiatives,” Associate Vice Provost for Equity and Access Will Gipson said. Do had

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Penn reviews Universitywide sexual violence policy Specific guidelines for student, faculty and staff cases to be released this fall BY SHELLI GIMELSTEIN Summer News Editor July 19 — Penn has announced revisions to its university-wide sexual violence policy. The new policy, which appeared in the Almanac on July 17, provides new definitions related to sexual assault, such as what constitutes rape and consent to engage in sexual activity. Additionally, the policy has expanded the list of resources available for counseling and complaint resolution, and clarifies the rights of complainants and respondents prior to the investigation procedure. Vice President of Institutional Affairs Joann Mitchell explained the policy revisions were triggered by the “Dear Colleague” letter issued by the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights in April 2011. The letter’s guidelines — as well as the Clery Act, which requires universities to disclose information about crimes committed on or near their campuses — encouraged institutions like Penn to “be clearer about rights and expectations that people have” regarding sexual violence policy, Mitchell said. She added that while the newly released overarching policy governs the entire Penn community and its visitors, more specific guidance is be-

ing developed for students, faculty and staff. Expected to be announced in the fall, these policies will identify key aspects of complaint procedures‚ such as the burden of evidence for establishing a complaint and the standard of proof that will be used to determine case outcomes. In April, the Office of Student Conduct announced its revised student sexual misconduct policy, lowering the standard of proof from “clear and convincing evidence” to “preponderance of the evidence” — or just over 50 percent likelihood the accused student is responsible for the alleged incident. The Division of Public Safety, Human Resources and the Provost’s Office, along with other offices within the Division of the Vice Provost for University Life, contributed to developing the new policy. According to Vice President for Public Safety Maureen Rush, while the policy “doesn’t really change anything from a policing point of view,” it serves as “a funnel to the right resources” for victims of sexual violence who may not know where to get help or report the incident. Rush explained resource centers like Division of Public Safety and the LGBT Center can help victims understand their options in proceeding with a sexual assault or harassment complaint. Students can either go through the formal criminal justice process or pursue the complaint within University disciplinary proceedings. While sexual violence is also

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Page B10 AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 ­— WELCOME BACK ISSUE

n e ws

The Daily Pennsylvanian

Undocumented student arrested in DreamActivist protest Rising College sophomore Sheila Quintana was arrested with two others, later released BY DANIEL COOPER Contributing Writer June 29 — Rising College sophomore Sheila Quintana and two others were arrested on June 28, at around 1:40 p.m. due to a coordinated act of civil disobedience during a DreamActivist Pennsylvania protest. While protesting at the Montgomery County Correctional

Facility in Norristown, Pa., Quintana — a Daily Pennsylvanian contributing writer — came out as an undocumented immigrant along with Erika Guadalupe Nuñez, a student at Bryn Mawr College, and Jose Luna, a cook and server in Norristown, before the three were arrested.

They were charged with failure of disorderly persons to disperse upon official order — a misdemeanor of the second degree — and obstructing highways and other public passages, a misdemeanor of the third degree. On July 1, Quintana and Guadalupe Nuñez were released from jail. Luna, who had been released on Friday, led a DreamActivist PA vigil at Montgomery County Correctional Facility that evening in support of their release. The demonstration was a pro-

Weingarten Learning Resources Center

test against Montgomery County Correctional Facility’s decision to contract with Immigrations and Customs Enforcement in order to provide them with 60 beds, through which ICE could keep detained undocumented immigrants. Approximately 40 protesters arrived near the entrance of the correctional facility, congregating around the sidewalk as they held banners, chanted and shared their stories as undocumented immigrants. The protesters blocked Eagleville Road and marched in circles around Quintana, Guadalupe Nuñez and Luna as they chanted in support of the individuals. After about an hour of protest-

ing on the street, the police issued a warning to move out of the street or face arrest. After three warnings, Quintana, Guadalupe Nuñez and Luna remained on the road while the other demonstrators cleared onto the sidewalk. At this point, the police circled the three remaining individuals and arrested them. “The police came in and very professionally and calmly arrested the three individuals and the protest ended shortly after this,” said Frank Custer, communications director for the Montgomery County Office of Communications. Quintana and her peers refused to provide any biographical information to the police. The

three were provided with preliminary arraignments before Magisterial District Judge Cathleen Kelly Rebar of Collegeville for July 3 at 10:00 a.m. Bail was set at $3,000 in cash per person. “It’s a real risk that she’s taking. I am very proud of Sheila, it’s huge enough for me when someone comes out publicly. Doing it with civil disobedience is the ultimate coming out experience,” said rising Wharton junior Tania Chairez, who was arrested in March after blocking traffic in front of the ICE Philadelphia office. Chairez first came out as an undocumented immigrant in a Daily Pennsylvanian guest column called “Undocumented and unapologetic.”

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Friday, September 7, at 4:00 p.m., NY Times Magazine Editor Paul Tough and Penn Professor Angela Duckworth, “How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character.” In a discussion moderated by Dr. Duckworth, Tough introduces a new generation of scientists and educators working to change the understanding of how children develop character.

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A Look Ahead... Save The Date! Thursday, September 13, at 6:00 p.m., Political Analyst Jacqueline S. Salit, “Independents Rising: Outsider Movements, Third Parties and the Struggle for a Post-Partisan America.” A look at the little-known history of the independent political movement and its influence on the current political landscape.

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The Daily Pennsylvanian

Adrienne Lerner wins McKay Scholarship Lerner one of two athletes recognized for potential to contribute to sports comm. BY KENNY KASPER Staff Writer June 14 ­­— Even with her soccer career at Penn behind her, Adrienne Lerner has yet another reason to feel the thrill of victory. O n Ju n e 6 , t h e NC A A published a press release announcing Lerner as a recipient of the Jim McKay Scholarship –– an honor bestowed upon just one male and one female athlete each year. The postgraduate scholarship, which is awarded to two NCAA athletes for their “potential to contribute to the sports communications industr y,” according to the press release, grants the winners $10,000 toward graduate school. A classic a l stud ies major with a minor in political science, Lerner graduated magna cum laude in May and plans to use the scholarship funds to earn an MBA and pursue a career in spor ts broadcasting, where she can further the work of the scholarship’s namesake. “[Jim McKay] stood for a lot of things that I really respect in the industry,” Lerner said. “He kind of put sports on the map in terms of being something that tons of people would want to watch on television.” The voice of A BC’s Wide World of Sports for more than 40 years, host Jim McKay was best known for his use of the phrase “the thrill of victory, and the agony of defeat” in his introduction to the show. Coincidentally, the first broadcast of the show was for the 1961 Penn Relays. Later, McKay earned two Emmy Awards for his coverage of the Munich massacre during the 1972 Olympics. Lerner will have her own e x p e r ie nc e c o v e r i n g t he Oly mpic games this summer as a soccer researcher for NBC, providing updates and information to the on-air talent. It is a job that is the per fect marriage between Lerner’s passions for sports and broadcasting. “Having your job just be sitting and watching sports and helping other people to enjoy it is just kind of a dream come true for me,” Lerner said. A n avid sports fan since childhood and a soccer player since age four, Lerner has cultivated her love for athletics for nearly two decades. As a defender for the Red and Blue, she led the 2011 squad to a program best 14-2-1 re-

cord, a second-place finish in the Ivy League and the highest shutout percentage of any team in the nation. “[Lerner] was a leader by example,” coach Darren Ambrose said. “Not only did she talk the talk, but she walked the walk.” In recognition of her efforts, the Penn team captain received numerous accolades, including being named to the All-Ivy first team, 2011 ECAC A ll- Star second team and Penn’s All-Time team. Off the field, Lerner represented her fellow athletes as the president of Penn’s Student-Athlete Advisory Committee. Compared to her extensive ex per ience as an athlete, Lerner’s entry into the world of television is relatively recent. She had her first encounters with broadcasting as an intern with Meet the Press, while still exploring the prospect of a major in political science. Though she ultimately decided aga i nst pursui ng politics, she fell in love with broadcast television, a passion coaxed further during an internship with Half Yard Production’s development of the Histor y Channel’s How the States Got their Shapes. These experiences led to work with the Penn Sports Network in Lerner’s junior year, as well an internship with NBC Sports the following summer. By this point, Lerner knew that she belonged in sports broadcasting. “It was the best summer ever. I woke up, and I was so excited for work every day,” Lerner said. Ambrose and Assistant Director of Athletics and Academics Rosemarie Burnett first encouraged Lerner to consider applying for a postgraduate scholarship during winter break of 2011. Given her interest in sports broadc a st i n g , t he J i m Mc K ay Scholarship was a natural fit for Lerner. After becoming a finalist for the scholarship, Lerner participated in an interview w ith an NCA A committee over the phone on the Sunday of Spring Fling weekend. At the end of April, while r unning on a treadmill at Pottruck Health and Fitness Center, Lerner received a call from an NCAA liaison. After rushing outside to take the call, the representative was the first to congratulate her for becoming a Jim McKay scholar. “So I like freaked out at Pottruck,” Lerner said with a laugh. However, she was not allowed to tell anyone else about the award until the NCA A made its official announce-

ment, which came with the June 6 press release. In November, Lerner will travel to the NCAA headquarters in Indianapolis to officially accept the scholarship. Lerner credits the Penn ex per ience, includ ing the suppor t of her coaches, teammates, professors and peers, for having spurred her to achieve both in academics and athletics as well as to pursue this particular scholarship. “The way I matured and grew in my four years at Penn I think gave me the confidence to apply for something like this,” Lerner said. Though the scholarship is an individual award, Lerner aspires for it to impact the Penn soccer program and Penn community at large. “I hope that this encourages other people on the team and people looking at Penn to really consider the types of opportunities that you get from going to a school like this and play ing a spor t ,” Lerner said.

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            

     

            

      

Perfect for riding to class

Comfortable Riser Bars

Comfortable Saddle

Cool Retro Styling Rear Rack Compatible Single Speed

Chain Guard: Keeps pants out of the chain

Sizes Small - X-Large While supplies last


Page B12 AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 ­— WELCOME BACK ISSUE

The Daily Pennsylvanian

From high marks to high scores. This year stay on top of everything from study time to play time. Download study guides and play online games with a smartphone from AT&T.

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$

New 2-yr agreement with qualifying voice and data plans required.

SAMSUNG GALAXY S III ®

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Visit a Store

Mention FAN #94154 or visit att.com/wireless/UPENN to learn more about discounts on qualified charges.

Limited 4G LTE availability in select markets. LTE is a trademark of ETSI. Limited-time offer. Samsung Galaxy S III requires a new 2-yr wireless agreement with voice (min $39.99/mo.) and monthly data plans (min $20/mo.). Subject to Wireless Customer Agrmt. Credit approval req’d. Activ fee $36/line. Geographic, usage, and other terms, conditions, and restrictions apply and may result in svc termination. Coverage and svcs not avail everywhere. Taxes and other charges apply. Data (att.com/dataplans): If usage exceeds your monthly data allowance, you will automatically be charged overage for additional data provided. Early Termination Fee (att.com/equipmentETF): After 30 days, ETF up to $325. Restocking fee up to $35. Other Monthly Charges: Line may include a Regulatory Cost Recovery Charge (up to $1.25), a gross receipts surcharge, federal and state universal svc charges, and fees and charges for other gov’t assessments. These are not taxes or gov’t req’d charges. Monthly discount: Service discount applies only to the monthly service charge of qualified plans and not to any other charges. Available only to qualified students and employees of colleges/universities with a qualified business agreement. Other service discount qualification requirements may apply. Restrictions, other terms, and conditions apply. See store for details. Visit a store or att.com/wireless to learn more about wireless devices and services from AT&T. ©2012 Zynga Inc. All rights reserved. Zynga, Words With Friends, and their respective logos are trademarks of Zynga Inc. Screen images simulated. All other marks used herein are the property of their respective owners. ©2012 AT&T Intellectual Property.


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N e ws

WELCOME BACK ISSUE ­— AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 Page C1

IAL SPECEAD SPR

t s 4 3

Guide TO penn and philadelphia

DE

INSI

The years ahead: tradition by tradition Events involve desserts, supply curves, Styrofoam hats and toast

pus, here is a rundown of what to look forward to over the next four years: Convocation: September 4 In this ceremony, members of the incoming freshman class and transfer students Penn has accumulated a are officially welcomed to the number of traditions over its University. 272 years. Some are dignified, Convocation is one of the others are more whimsical, only three instances during but you can hardly consider your time at Penn when your yourself a true Quaker until entire class will come togethyou’ve booed the Princeton er as a group (Hey Day and Tigers on Franklin Field dur- Commencement are the other ing a football game or eaten two). fried Oreos during Spring The event features speeches Fling. For those new to cam- by Penn President Amy Gut-

mann and Provost Vincent Price, and performances by several a cappella groups and the Penn Band. The Line: Early October One of the great Penn basketball traditions, The Line is when students stake out overnight in the Palestra for season tickets to the men’s basketball games. Although season tickets can also be purchased without participating in The Line, students who spend the night in one of the nation’s most historic gymnasiums get SEE TRADITIONS PAGE C3

Navigating the local food scene Thai, Indian, burgers, vegan — get it all on campus or in Philadelphia

campus eating opportunities that flavor University City. Whether you’re looking for a quick bite between classes or planning a fun night out with friends, Philadelphia offers options for every budget. There comes a time in every Food carts freshman’s life when the idea Food carts offer some of the of another dining hall dinner cheapest and tastiest food on loses its luster. And when you hit campus, perfect for a quick meal that milestone, don’t despair — between classes. Penn favorites Philadelphia is home to a vibrant include Magic Carpet (across food scene which you can sample from the Lower Quad and on 34th right on Penn’s campus. and Walnut streets) for Middle You can get your fix at familiar Eastern vegetarian fare, Hemo’s chains such as McDonald’s and (across from the Upper Quad Chipotle, but you’ll soon discover SEE FOOD PAGE C6 the enticing range of unique off-


Page C2 AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 ­— WELCOME BACK ISSUE

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Traveling outside the “Penn bubble” Take public transportation to explore Philadelphia and beyond Once you’ve settled into your dorm and learned to nav igate you r way dow n Locust Walk , it’s time to venture out into the rest of Philadelphia, which offers restaurants, shopping and museums galore. On a student’s budget and schedule, public transportation is your best bet for getting around. It’s cheap, safe and easy to figure out. SEPTA, the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority, is the nation’s fifth-largest public transportation system. Bus and trolley rides cost $2 onboard, or you can buy SEPTA tokens in advance for $1.45 each. Packs are available in the basement of Houston Hall, Penn Bookstore, college houses and Fresh Grocer. Use the “Plan My Trip” link at septa.org to help find frequent destinations. Around University City The LUCY (Loop Through University City) bus runs through the area weekdays from 6:10 a.m. to 7 p.m. The route — which you can find at septa.org/schedules/bus/ pdf/LUC Y.pdf — includes 30th Street Station. Flash your PennCard for a free ride. Pen nCa r d holder s c a n also find a free ride on Penn Bus and Penn Shuttle, which run between 20th and 48th streets. To Center City, Chinatown and Old City Students can reach these popular shopping and eating destinations by taking the Market-Frankford El, which runs along Market Street. The stops near campus are

at 40th and 34th streets. You can also take the 21 SE P TA bus , wh ich r u ns eastbound to Center City on Chestnut Street and westbound to campus on Walnut Street, for $2 or a SEPTA token. For Chinatown, take the El to 8th or 12th streets. For Old City, take it to 5th and 2nd streets. And for South Street, take the 40 SEPTA bus toward Lombard or 2nd streets. There are stops all along Spruce Street, including one in front of the Quad. To South Philly Ride the El to City Hall and transfer to the Broad Street Line (the Orange Line) going south. Stadium Complex To go support Philadelphia sports teams, take the Broad St reet L i ne goi ng south to its last stop, AT&T Station. This brings you to Wells Fargo Center, Lincoln Financial Field and Citizens Bank Park. Philadelphia International Airport W hen it’s time to head home for break , take the airport train from the University City Station at South Street and Convention Avenue (by the Penn Museum) to Philadelphia International Airport. You can also catch the air por t train at 30th Street Station. New York City New York is close by road or rail. You can take the Amtrak train from 30th Street Station — the most expensive option — or take the Trenton Line from 30th Street Station to Trenton, N.J., where you transfer to a New York-bound New Jersey Transit train. A more inexpensive option is a bus ser vice, like Megabus or BoltBus, which departs from 30th Street Station, or buses departing from Chinatown.

WELCOME BACK ISSUE ­— AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 Page C3

Staying healthy on campus Pottruck, CAPS and Fox Fitness Center are just some resources to tap into Both the University and surrounding community offer a number of resources to help students stay healthy, so they can work — and play —hard. Physical health. Feeling a bit under the weather? Go to Student Health Services. Located at 3535 Market Street, SHS offers regular check-ups and resources if you are sick. Vaccinations are also available. You can schedule an appointment with a general practitioner over the phone, through the SHS website (www.vpul.upenn.edu/ shs/) or in person. During non-business hours students should call SHS’s oncall physician at 215-746-3535.

In case of an emergency, students should go to the Emergency Department at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, located on the first floor of the Silverstein Building on the corner of 34th and Spruce streets. Mental health. Penn offers limited free counseling to stuents through Counseling and Psychological Services, located at 36th and Walnut streets. CAPS gaurantees confidentiality and can refer students to therapists for long-term care. To schedule an appointment, call the CAPS office at 215-8987021. For emergencies, call 215-3495490 and ask for the CAPS clini-

cian on call. Another resource for students is the Reach-A-Peer help line. An anonymous, confidential service, the RAP line is staffed by trained stuent volunters on call between 9 p.m. and 1 a.m. for any concerns or problems you may have. The number is 215-573-2727. Alcohol policy. You may be on a college campus, but the legal drinking age is still 21. If you choose to drink illegally, the University guarantees medical amnesty to any student seeking medical help if they or a friend overdoses on alcohol or drugs. Any university-funded undergraduate student organization wishing to serve alcohol at an event must register in advance with the Vice Provost for Uni-

Spring Fling dates back to the 1970s TRADITIONS from page C1 premium seats in the lower level of the student section. Econ Scream: The night before the first Economics 001 midterm At midnight on the eve of the first Economics 001 midterm, students let off steam by gathering on the Quad’s Junior Balcony and screaming their stress away. Besides the hoards of loud freshmen, if you’re lucky, you’ll witness several more adventurous upperclassmen streaking through the Quad. Homecoming: October 27 Homecoming brings alumni back to the halls of their alma mater. Many will head over to Franklin Field to watch Penn face off against Brown ­— and of course, to throw toast onto the field at

Christina Wu/DP Senior Photographer

Students congratulate each other after parading down Locust Walk during the annual Hey Day celebration held toward the end of every academic year. the end of the third quarter after they finish a rousing rendition of “Drink a Highball.” Spring Fling: April Described by some as one of

the nation’s best college parties, this weekend gives students a chance to trade studying for eating fried Oreos and funnel cake.

versity Life. No kegs of any kind are allowed on University-managed properties. The full text of Penn’s alcohol policy can be viewed online at vpul.upenn.edu/alcohol. Working out. Most gym-inclined Penn students exercise at the Pottruck Health and Fitness Center, a multi-level facility located at 37th and Walnut streets. The facility offers a wide array of exercise and weight machines, basketball courts, a swimming pool, a climbing wall and even a virtual golf studio. The Fox Fitness Center at Franklin Field is another indoor workout option. The Center has two floors of weights and cardio equipment and hosts daily group circuit training workouts.

Besides organizing the carnival in the Quad, the Social Planning and Events Committee also hosts a large concert. Last year’s concert featured performances by DJ Tiësto and electro-pop group Passion Pit. Hey Day: Last week of classes On the last day of classes, juniors march through campus with styrofoam hats and canes to mark the official start of their senior year. Historically, seniors have thrown ketchup, flour and even rotten eggs at the juniors on Locust Walk, but three years ago, administrators and student leaders worked together to provide a cleaner and safer experience. Initiated four years ago, the annual Final Toast on College Green is an event during which seniors toast juniors as they pass by. Commencement: May 13 Seniors say farewell to Penn as they receive their diplomas and words of wisdom from a guest speaker at Franklin Field. Last year social activist Geoffrey Canada delivered the keynote address.


Page C4 AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 — ­ WELCOME BACK ISSUE

WELCOME BACK ISSUE ­— AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 Page C5

The Daily Pennsylvanian

Bienvenue, freshman! In your hands is everything you need to know about Penn, according to 34th Street Magazine. Street is Penn’s go–to source for all things arts and culture at Penn and in Philadelphia. Whether you’re a reader or a writer, a lover or a fighter – we hope this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship. Pick up Street's first issue on September 13. Then join us at 4015 Walnut that night for our first writer’s meeting.

REASONS EVERYBODY KNOWS YOU’RE A

ALL ALONG THE WESTERN FRONT

MAN.

You've made it into one of the best, most competitive schools in the country. Now, all you have to do is survive. But please, for everyone's sake, don't devolve into the primal form of Freshmanus Cluelessus. | BY PATRICK FORD–MATZ, KATIE GIARLA AND SANDRA RUBINCHIK

You sneeze in Fisher (how dare you?). It’s 8 p.m. and the lights are low. Beneath the meticulous molding and perfectly Ivy bookshelves of the dead, dead silent Fisher Fine Arts Library, there you are, poring over textbooks and notes in preparation for your first big exam tomorrow. But, what’s that? A tickle inside your nose, a pull at the back of your throat…a piece of dust from some ancient priceless manuscript! Tension builds and you know what’s coming. BOOM. Silence disrupted. Next time, you’ll just have to suffer. Hold. It. In.

You go to the Van Pelt basement wearing sweats and no make–up to study. Little did you know that the Van Pelt basement is where you go to see and be seen. Anyone who’s anyone will be there wearing their finest and whispering in hushed tones about the weekend’s hottest gossip. If you’re looking to check out people rather than books, then you’re in the right place, but if you’re hoping to produce anything more than a Facebook status update, we suggest you check out Fisher.

Craving: Mexican Ditch: Chipotle (39th and Walnut) Try: Guacamole Mex–Grill (46th and Woodland) Mexican food–lovers will vouch that getting the most authentic comida mexicana in University City is more than worth the 15–minute walk from campus. With reasonable prices, generous portions and true south–of–the–border flavors, Guacamole is a solid, nearby taco solution. Those Dhamaka guys get us all hot and bothered (and the rest are good too).

NP PA EN AR SE RT OS O TYY R R

There are few better things at Penn than fine dining with friends and a box of cheap wine.

pre-orientation programs byos

Coming into Penn with friends is always a plus.

aw e

Doesn't matter how it tastes if you're gonna throw it up anyway.

e

ELLLLA AG PE AP A GRR C C AA

• If an employee of the Fresh Grocer tells you a fact, the opposite is most likely true. For example: “Do you have grapes?” “No.” There are grapes.

library social This is only good in that you'll have something to laugh about at the end of the year.

• If you hear crackling noises outside your window at 4 a.m. and think they are just fireworks, congratulations! You’ve just witnessed your first shooting and are no longer just a

• There is a narcoleptic cab driver. Try not to get him. • Geno’s has the best cheesesteak but is also the most racist storefront around. Who knew we had our very own version of Chic-Fil-A?

Broad Street — it’s called the Avenue of the Arts for a reason. One of the city’s main drags, it’s home to everything from the Philadelphia Academy of Fine Arts to the Kimmel Center. Don’t miss the Instagramworthy architecture of City Hall and the Masonic Temple.

Penn has a

LIVE MUSIC IN PHILADELPHIA: A BRIEF GUIDE Street walks you through some of the city’s choicest venues. By Kiley bense, ben bernstein and Alex hosenball

Pros: Parties, brotherhood/sisterhood, Fling tanks. Cons: Vomit, hazing, Fling tanks

By faryn pearl and lizzie sivitz

sheltered kid from Westchester. It’s kinda like a Bar Mitzvah that happens every night.

15th Street

Penn has a football team?

Learn it, live it, love it.

The scene: Bartleby Gaines, a would–be freshman who has accidentally created his own fake college, decides to ask his “students” what kind of experiences they hope to have.

Street’s humor section gives you some real advice |

GE NG EVVE RTTIIN R O ENN PPO

11th Street

Accepted (2006)

THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT PHILLY

If the old–school cobblestones aren’t a big enough hint, the vintage swag of Vagabond Boutique and the abundant crop of galleries like Muse Gallery will tell you that Old City’s got your quirky culture needs covered. Get off at 11th and hit up Hipsterville... we mean, North Philly. For some offbeat galleries, including Grizzly Grizzly, Vox Populi, Tiger Strikes Asteroid and Progressive Sharing, walk past Vine and check out all six floors of 319 N. 11th.

IF WIL SKE&EK G E MAGR

The lesson: DO seek out the college experience you want to have, because you deserve it. The NSO activities fair is a great way to start. Try out as many things as you can, even if you’re not completely sure it’s for you. Clubs are more than just extracurriculars at Penn — they can be a huge part of helping you find and keep friends.

Trying to get your SEPTA on? Get off at these stops on the Market–Frankford Line, and you’ll be “so college” in an “I almost went to Oberlin” kind of way.

TTSS

The lesson: DON’T obsess over your roommate’s comings and goings. Learning to live with another person’s idiosyncrasies without resorting to passive aggression is one of the toughest parts of college. Magnanimity is often the best solution, unless of course there’s a real problem — then you should address it directly.

LOL

2nd Street

They're always fun to hear, but let's be honest, can you really tell any of them apart? Off-color humor isn't for everyone. But M&W has been embarrassing administration and entertaining students for over a century

FRESHMAN’S FIRST ARTS CRAWL

BY EILLIE ANZILOTTI AND MEGAN RUBEN

G

The Roommate (2011) The scene: Rebecca freaks out at Sara (her roommate) when she comes home late one night after failing to call. Sara sees this as a slight overreaction.

They're like Smoke's, but louder, darker and more expensive.

It's a long way away, but Fling has a reputation for a reason. Your first Fling is something to remember.

& WI AS IFGE EKEK L MR

What do Philos even do? Seriously, someone tell us; we're not sure.

Craving: Brunch Ditch: Metro (40th and Walnut) Try: The Gold Standard (48th and Baltimore) Metro is well and good when you’re on your way to your first Street meeting (holla), but do yourself a favor and try The Gold Standard. A back room, outdoor seating and coffee refills make this cozy place worth it.

PPSS OOUU

It sounds cheesy, but you will meet a lot of people during NSO. Hopefully you remember them after the blackout.

The scene: When Mark Zuckerberg sits in front of an administrative board after creating a website comparing women to farm animals, he condescends to the board members and acts like an all–around jackass. This leads to six months of academic probation.

downtowns

More like SWAG because of all the free movie and concert tickets you receive.

nso

philomathean society

Craving: Sandwich Ditch: Jimmy Johns (40th and Walnut) Try: Koch’s Deli (43rd and Locust) Koch’s, a Penn icon, is among the best Brooklyn–style delis outside of NYC. While Koch’s may not have the speed of Jimmy John's, their huge sandwiches are definitely worth the wait.

SOCIAL PLANNING & EVENTS COMMITTEE

som

Save the fro–yo for the first night you’re stuck in Van Pelt. Instead, check out Lil’ Pop Shop’s freezer full of delicious, if sometimes perplexing, frozen pops. Inventive flavors like “Rosemary Peach” earned it a spot on Food & Wine’s “Best Popsicles” list.

Smoke's is a Pennstitution, and you'll try to get in at some point.

NG G LIIN FFL

The Social Network (2010)

LOL

You can get your Venti Caramel Non–fat Soy Latte with two Splendas anywhere in the world – take advantage of Philly’s unique offerings and hit up one of Green Line’s idyllic locales just west of campus.

Craving: Ice cream Ditch: Kiwi (36th and Chestnut) Try: Lil’ Pop Shop (44th between Spruce and Locust)

l

The lesson: In the rare instances that you are confronted by an authority figure, DO be apologetic and DON’T act aggressively or belligerently. Any unkind words will only make things tougher for you.

Craving: Coffee Ditch: Starbucks (34th and Walnut) Try: Green Line Cafe (42nd and Baltimore)

The free early move-in is not worth the week of volunteering.

coo

Legally Blonde (2001)

ke e''s ok mo s ssm

dance groups

meh

BY BEN LERNER & SAMANTHA APFEL

The lesson: DO answer creatively in class! Professors love bold students who get involved early and often. The academic opportunities at Penn are too good to waste sitting in the back row, never asking questions.

Save Mickey D’s for a 2 a.m. drunken outing and try Checkers’ well–seasoned and perfectly–grilled patties. Grab some of their signature fries and a banana milkshake for the full experience.

phins

To help with the transition to college life, we here at Street recommend turning to our cinematic forebears for some valuable lessons on everything from dorm room living to weekend debauchery.

The scene: On her first day at Harvard Law, Elle Woods tells her professor she would rather have a client who committed no crime at all than one who was guilty, much to the amusement of her classmates.

Craving: Burger Ditch: McDonald’s (40th and Walnut) Try: Checkers (43rd and Market)

You wear heels to frat parties. Do less, ladies.

I don't see how that's a party.

LOL

In 1849, fearless young men and women ventured West, to California, looking for gold. Now it’s your turn, 2016–ers, to be a new generation of West–treading pioneers by blazing trails towards the most precious food gems in University City.

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PENN DO'S AND DON'TS: A CINEMATIC GUIDE

A West Philly food guide for freshmen

BY PATRICK DEL VALLE, ABIGAIL KOFFLER AND ISABEL OLIVERES

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You “reply all” to a listserve within the first week of being added to it. Congratulations! You’ve been added to your first listserve – that mystical construct of the future that allows you to send obnoxious drunk messages to EVERYONE in PennDems all at the same time! Unfortunately, with great power comes great responsibility. Think before responding, and avoid those double arrows like your (social) life depends on it…because it does.

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PHILLY LINGO: A COMPACT LEXICON “GET THE FUCK OUT OF THE WAY”: Excuse me “BLAaAAAah”: I’m crazy. Please stay away from me. “Goin’ A–Gutts”: Acting very professionally “Goin’ D–Trump”: Getting very rich “Goin’ W–Buffs”: Dropping out of Penn “I’m not mean, I’m from Philly”: I’m from Philly and I’m mean.

Trocadero 1003 Arch St. Conveniently located within Center City and smack dab outside of Chinatown, theTrocadero is a Philly landmark, unique not only for its diverse concerts, but also for its still– functioning cinema screens.

Union Transfer 1026 Spring Garden St. R5 Productions, Philly’s resident indie concert–booker, opened Union Transfer last year. It has fantastic sound and atmosphere, not to mention half–price beer after every show. The Electric Factory 421 N. 7th St. Old, dirty and yet somehow endearing, the Electric Factory’s smoky atmosphere and crowded floor never cease to entice, even when the heat reaches oven–status.

LOL

World Cafe Live 3025 Walnut St. World Cafe surprises us with its superb indie artists and jazz musicians from time to time, so don’t discount this classic venue just outside the Penn bubble. First Unitarian Church 2125 Chestnut St. Few churches can function both as a DIY concert venue and a place of worship, but the First Unitarian Church of Philly manages it perfectly, with cheap prices and free re–entry to boot. Johnny Brenda’s 1201 N. Frankford Ave. Though North Philly may be a bit of a trek, Johnny Brenda’s specialty taps make it a hit for any of its shows. Other All-Ages venues: Milkboy Philly, TLA, Tower Theatre, Mann Center 21+: Blockley, Kung Fu Necktie, The Barbary, The Fire Highlight


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The Daily Pennsylvanian

Finding diversity through Penn’s minority organizations The groups host engaging, unique events and panels throughout the year Penn offers dozens of cultural and minority support groups to cater to its increasingly diverse student body. There are five main coalitions for minority groups on campus: the United Minorities Council, the Latino Coalition, the Asian Pacific Student Coalition, UMOJA and the

Lambda Alliance, each with its own campus resource center. United Minorities Council The UMC encompasses Caribbean, black, Asian, Arab, Latino and American Indian student groups. Check One, a group concerning multi-ethnic and multi-racial experiences, is also part of the UMC. Asian Pacific Student Coalition The Asian Pacific Student Coalition is the umbrella organization for Penn’s Asian

and Asian American student groups. There are also many Asian-interest extracurriculars on campus including sororities and fraternities, the world’s first Hindi a cappella group, Penn Masala, and the Pan-Asian Dance Troupe. Latino Coalition The Latino Coalition is the overarching organization for Penn’s Latino groups. These groups also span a wide variety of interests on campus, f rom the W ha r ton Latino Undergraduate Association to the Onda Latina dance

troupe. UMOJA U MOJA is the umbrella organization that works to unite students of the African diaspora. Its member organizations include the Black Student League, Onyx Senior Honor Society and African Rhythms dance and drumming group. Lambda Alliance Penn’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender interest and support groups are united under the Lambda Alliance. These g roups include the

Queer Student Alliance and a Jewish-interest group called J-Bagel. The Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Center is located in the Carriage House at 3907 Spruce St. ARCH building The ARCH building at 3601 Locust Walk is home to the Pan-Asian American Community House, La Casa Latina and Makuu, the black student cultural center. Because of construction on the ARCH building this school year, you can find these groups in Houston Hall.

Greenfield Intercultural Center The Greenfield Intercultural Center is located at 3708 Chestnut St., and is the main hub for minority and intercultural events and student groups. Penn Women’s Center The Penn Women’s Center — which serves as a resource for women on campus and addresses issues including discrimination and sexual violence through advocacy programs — is at 3643 Locust Walk.

Greek life: figuring out Penn’s fraternities and sororities Freshman rush begins spring semester for all Greek organizations Whether you come from four generations of Sigma Alpha Epsilon brothers or are exploring the Greek system for the very first time, you can be sure that this year’s batch of hopeful Greeks have plenty to look forward to. You will likely be introduced to Greek life at Penn with New Student Orientation parties, but fraternity and sorority rush does not begin until January. In the meantime, here are some facts about Greek life at Penn to get you started: - Around 25 percent of Penn’s undergraduates are members of the Greek system. - There are 29 fraternities at Penn, which compose the Interfraternity Council. The sorority counterpart, the Panhellenic Council, is made up of eight chapters. The third council is the Multicultural Greek Council, which governs the historically black, Latino and Asian fraternities and sororities. MGC has 14 chapters. - Rush begins in January for both fraternities and sororities. Men can rush any fraternity or fraternities they wish and are introduced to the various options with free food and other handouts in a process known as open rush. As the process continues, invitations — which become increasingly exclusive with each event — become necessary before pledging a certain fraternity. Sorority rush is an entire-

Zoe Gan/DP Staff Photographer

2012 College graduates Siobhan Mulvey, Elisabeth Jacknis and Engineering senior Tess Donnelly cheer for Chi Omega sorority on Bid Night, where new pledges find out their sorority after a week of meeting and getting to know sisters from all eight Panhellenic sororities. ly different process. Women must visit all eight sororities and meet current members of each one. Invitations are issued to specific girls each round. MGC chapters have their own rush traditions which vary from chapter to chapter.

- Women must register and pay a fee in December to rush Panhellenic sororities. Men do not have to register or pay a fee, and the first rush events are normally open to everyone. - Greek organizations perform a variety of community

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service work on campus and in the greater Philadelphia area. Throughout the year, you may see Greek members on Locust Walk advertising events to benefit charities or around Philadelphia improving the city. - Penn regulates Greek life

through the Office of Student Affairs/Fraternity Sorority Life. - If you decide that pledging a fraternity or sorority is not for you, you can still attend many Greek events. Though Greek life provides excellent opportunities for those inter-

ested, it is not the sole source of social activity on campus. Whatever your religious, political, academic or artistic interests, there is probably a student organization that will fit your needs — and if there isn’t, you can always start your own.

Head west for off-campus coffee shops FOOD from page C1 and on 38th and Walnut streets) for cheesesteaks and chicken sandwiches and Bui’s (corner of 38th and Spruce streets) for famed breakfast sandwiches. Other food trucks like Marrakesh Express, a Moroccan food truck on 40th and Locust streets, and Sugar Philly, a dessert truck that moves around the city, have brought more gourmet options to campus. For food trucks that cater citywide, follow the trucks on Twitter to see when they are parked on campus. Sansom Street Your eating adventures can continue down Sansom Street, which is home to White Dog Cafe, known for its community activism and locally sourced cuisine. Nearby are New Deck Tavern, Baby Blues BBQ, Mexican-food favorite Mad4Mex and Asianfusion Pod, one of Philadelphia’s posh Stephen Starr venues. 40th Street The diverse options around 40th Street between Chestnut and Spruce streets are diet staples for many students. Here you’ll find New Delhi and Pattaya Grill, serving up Indian and Thai food, respectively. Nearby, you can also try Mizu for sushi and Mexicali for burritos and other Mexican favorites. Also on 40th Street, you’ll find Greek Lady and Allegro Pizza, two Penn favorites that draw huge crowds.

Sarah Tse/DP Staff Photographer

Voted one of “America’s Top 10 New Sandwiches” by the Huffington Post, Sammy Chon’s K-Town BBQ’s Koagie sandwich could be worth a trip downtown. Down Walnut Street, stop by Hummus for falafel, Sweetgreen for salads and soups made with local, organic ingredients and Bobby’s Burger Palace, renowned chef Bobby Flay’s restaurant for burgers and shakes. City Tap House, located on the terrace level of the Radian near 39th and Walnut streets, is a bar and grill with a slightly more upscale atmosphere and price. Capogiro’s gelato was named the world’s best ice cream by National Geographic. Heading west Past 40th Street, West Philadelphia offers many hidden treasures. Spend some time sipping coffee off the beaten path at Green Line Cafe (at 42nd and Baltimore streets and 45th and Locust streets) or Lovers and Madmen (at 40th and Ludlow streets). For an authentic Jewish

deli experience, Koch’s Deli at 43rd and Locust is a mustvisit. A few blocks beyond that is Abyssinia, a fun place to try your hand at Ethiopian cuisine. Manakeesh, on 45th and Walnut streets, is a new Lebanese cafe offering authentic fare, such as hummus and baklava. Center City For those looking to venture outside University City, Philly’s biannual Restaurant Week offers an affordable taste of the creme de la creme of Center City’s restaurants. Between Sept. 30 - Oct. 5 & Oct. 7 - 12, sample a three course lunch for only $20 per person and a three course dinner for $30 per person. Participating restaurants include Jose Garces’s Amada, which serves tapas and Michael Solomonov’s Zahav in Society Hill serves modern Israeli cuisine.


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WELCOME BACK ISSUE ­— AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 Page C7

Figuring out student government The six branches deal with everything from Fling, Hey Day to clubs and classes

Christina Wu/DP Senior Photographer

2012 Law School graduate and 2009 College graduate Bharat Moudgil reaches out to a crowd as he performs a solo part in a Penn Masala concert. Penn Masala, founded in 1996, is the oldest Hindi a cappella group in the world and has performed in the White House for President Obama.

Clubs create communities on campus Learn about the groups you’d like to join at the Student Activities Fair Sept. 3 With each trip down Locust Walk, you are bombarded with flyers and information about every event on campus, every charity drive and every meeting that week — and these groups represent only a small fraction of the student body. To help get a better idea of the diverse groups on campus, hit the Walk for the on Sept. 3 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Many groups will be represented there, catering to all talents and interests. Arts The Performing Arts Council oversees more than 40 student-run performance arts organizations and puts on over

60 performances a year. With 12 dance troupes, six theater groups, 12 a cappella/singing groups, seven music groups and three comedy groups, there’s something for every kind of performing artist. If you’re interested in joining performance arts or just want to see what Penn’s groups have to offer, check out the Freshman Performing Arts Night on Sept. 8 at 8 p.m. at Zellerbach Theater. For those who came to Penn with their beloved saxophone or guitar in tow, groups like the Penn Symphony Orchestra and Penn Jazz Ensemble might be the perfect place to showcase talent. The writers and literaryminded students at Penn will find their niche at the Kelly Writers House, located at 3805 Locust Walk. Writers House hosts readings and workshops

and publishes journals devoted to creative writing. Students are invited to stop by throughout the year. Community service Civic House, located at 3914 Locust Walk, is the central hub for community service at Penn. At Civic House, you can learn more about the many student volunteers that coordinate volunteer programs on campus and in the city, like the West Philadelphia Tutoring Project. Intramural sports For the average Penn student not looking for the commitment of varsity sports, intramurals are a great way to get your athletic fix. Sponsored by the Residential Advisory Board, each college house competes in sports like flag football and volleyball. Students can create house teams or join existing ones at

Pottruck gym. Politics The political clubs on campus may be where you want to spend much of your time. The Penn Democrats is one of Penn’s largest student groups, with over 2,000 members. College Republicans organizes the conservative vote on campus. Penn Leads the Vote is a non-partisan group sponsored by the Fox Leadership Center that works to get out the vote during elections. For more information on all of these groups, check out the Student Activities Fair or the website of the Office of Student Affairs at vpul.upenn.edu/osa.

Hitting the books: find the best places to study

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Dorms aren’t the only option — some spaces also double as academic resources For freshmen, the week of New Student Orientation is a blur of activities, new faces and navigating Locust Walk. But in between attending fraternity parties and finding their way from the Quad to College Hall, Penn students do find time to study. So where are good places to go for quiet study time after the craziness of NSO? Here are some study tips for finding the quietest study spots, snagging a free tutor and getting someone to read over your paper -— pro bono. Just remember: no cheating. Where is a good place to study late at night? The bottom floor of Van Pelt Library, open 24 hours a day during the year, provides a study mecca for those who plan on never falling asleep. The area features spacious desks, computers, printers and individual outlets, but you need to stake out a spot early in the day, as Van Pelt tends to become crowded in the evening. What if I don’t like to study in Van Pelt? There are plenty of coffee shops around campus to hit the books — Saxby’s on 40th and Locust streets, Starbucks at 1920 Commons or on 34th and Walnut streets as well as Capogiro Gelato Artisans on 39th and Walnut streets. Some great alternatives include Huntsman Hall, Houston Hall and other libraries on campus, including the biomedi-

If you want more opportunities to effect change on campus, you can get involved with Penn’s student government. The undergraduate student government is made up of six branches that represent students in all aspects of University life. The Undergraduate Assembly (UA): The UA advocates student concerns to the administration. In addition to serving on one of the six committees that make up Penn student government, it is responsible for distributing approximately $2 million each year to itself and the other five branches. The UA meets on Sunday nights. There is a 10-minute open forum at the beginning of each meeting when the general public is invited to speak. Meeting locations can be found online. Nominations and Elections Committee (NEC): The NEC’s internally selected members oversee student government elections and the nomination of representatives for University committees. They are also responsible for

educating students about student government activities. Student Activities Council (SAC): SAC controls the funding allocated to most of the student groups on campus. Clubs must apply for recognition and send a representative to general body meetings. Student Committee on Undergraduate Education (SCUE): For those who want to be more involved in the quality of their education, SCUE is the place to go. This group acts as a watchdog group for undergraduate education. Members are chosen in an application process during their freshman or sophomore year. S o c i a l P l a n n i ng a n d Events Committee (SPEC): SPEC coordinates and plans most of the social events on campus, including Spring Fling. The group is divided into nine different subcommittees that organize art gallery trips, film screenings, concerts and speakers. Members can sign up for committees at the beginning of the year. Class Boards: The elected representatives in each class coordinate class-wide activities that boost school spirit, like the annual Hey Day for juniors. Any activity or event suggestions should be directed to the Class Boards.

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A student runs through class notes at one of the desks in the Van Pelt Library basement. During exam season, come early to snag a spot at these tables. cal library and ever-silent Fisher Fine Arts Library. If you happen to be on the east side of campus, give the new Education Commons a try. Located at Franklin Field, the Commons opened in March and has several reservable group study rooms and over 100 various seats and study spaces. How can I get help writing a research paper? When writing a research paper, you can use an online library form to email research questions to librarians or even use Instant Messager or LiveChat to talk directly to a librarian online. The Penn Libraries website also offers subject-specific research guides to help you jumpstart your research. How do I find a tutor? The University’s Tutoring

Center offers tutorials in several formats, ranging from individualized sessions to student-led workshops. There are also weekly math review sessions held on Sunday nights in David Rittenhouse Laboratory and special late-night tutoring events are held before common midterms and finals of introductory courses. Where can I go for help with my writing? The Penn Writing Center at 3808 Walnut St. offers writing assistance to Penn undergraduate and graduate students. Students are allowed up to 10 individualized appointments per semester, each of which lasts up to 45 minutes. Other writing resources are also available in the Kelly Writers House at 3805 Locust Walk and in Van Pelt.

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Sports AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012

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Penn hires new assistants M. HOOPS | Bowman, Polykoff and Pera replace three departed assistant coaches for Quakers BY alyssa kress Sports Editor The men’s basketball team had a lot of empty space on its bench this summer after all three of its assistant coaches left to pursue other opportunities. But head coach Jerome Allen quickly found the right people to fill the vacancies, men who fit the program he is in the process of rebuilding. “You look for a guy who has strength in three or four different

categories,” Allen said. “But really at the end of the day, it comes down to their core values, how they feel about the privilege of mentoring young men and staying connected to that on a daily basis.” In June, the Quakers lost Mike Martin, who returned to his alma mater, Brown, as its new head coach after spending six years at Penn.

Red and Blue set up for success

“Mike Martin has an unbelievable opportunity, and I would like to think that Penn, how he performed at Penn, had a lot to do with him receiving that,” Allen said. Around the same time, volunteer assistant Rudy Wise chose to leave the program to seek other opportunities. Shortly after, Penn announced the hiring of two new assistants. Filling the void left by Martin is Ira Bowman, who transferred to Penn and played two seasons for the Red and Blue in the mid’90s. His first season, in 1994-95, also happened to be Allen’s fi-

nal one for the Quakers, and the two have been close friends ever since. Allen called Bowman’s hiring “a home run.” “He’s passionate about this place the same way I am,” Allen said. Bowman echoed the sentiment. “I just think that my heart and my dedication and my love for this university and school is one of my biggest attributes that I’m going to bring to the guys,” he said. SEE M. HOOPS PAGE D5

DP Archive Photo

Penn hired former basketball player and 1996 grad Ira Bowman as an assistant in June to replace Mike Martin, who left for Brown.

Penn enters ’12 healthy, mature

MEGAN SOISSON

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ast season, the Penn football team set out on a ‘Watch the Throne’ tour. The Quakers were seeking a threepeat of the Ivy League championship, but after opening conference play with two lastsecond victories over lesser teams, it would have needed a group of Navy SEALs to adequately Watch the Throne. Penn found a rhythm after outscoring Yale, 275, in the final quarter en route to a 37-25 victory, but a week later its 18-game Ivy win streak came to an end at Brown. Harvard encroached on the Throne. Two games later, the Crimson completely took it over in championship fashion with a 37-20 win in Boston. Picked first in this year’s Ivy Preseason Media Poll, it’s Harvard that is now watching the Throne. And the Quakers? They’re perfectly fine with that. In fact, they’re better than fine. Coach Al Bagnoli is the first to admit he didn’t keep his squad focused enough last year. Something just wasn’t right. “It really started with me and worked itself all the way down,” he said. “We probably didn’t do as good a coaching job as we needed to do.” Offensive coordinator and offensive line coach Jon McLaughlin pinpointed inconsistency as a weakness. “We were a very inconsistent team [last seaSEE SOISSON PAGE D7

Jing Ran/Sports Photo Editor and Megan Falls/DP Senior Photographer

Sporting a new look, senior quarterback Billy Ragone (right) speaks with his teammates on Monday’s football media day. Senior QB Andrew Holland (bottom left) will serve as Ragone’s backup after Ryan Becker suffered an offseason injury. The team also showcased their new alternate jerseys (top left).

football | After youth crippled Penn a year ago, 17 starters return to anchor this season’s squad BY Mike Wisniewski Sports Editor The bar may have been set just too high for Penn football in 2011. After losing 33 seniors and 11 All-Ivy players, the Quakers entered last year as the preseason favorite, but an unprecedented third straight Ivy title eluded the Red and Blue, who finished in a four-way tie for second place.

“I don’t think any of us were really happy with how we played, and maybe we overestimated everything,” coach Al Bagnoli said Monday at Penn football media day. “We probably didn’t do as good a coaching job as we needed to do.” There’s no doubt the Quakers entered last season as a young

team — four of five offensive linemen alone were first-year starters — but the silver lining in their 4-3 league record can be found in the experience gained by the 17 starters who will be returning this year. Senior Steve Lias comes in after taking the reigns at linebacker last season, where he finished with 34 tackles in six starts. Senior nose guard Taylor Brown will build upon a season in which he started all 10 games and recorded 29 tackles and a sack on the defensive line. Juniors Jake

Schwertner and Chris Bush and seniors Mike Pinciotti and Joe Bonadies return on a suddenly veteran offensive line. “We have just so much more depth because kids were forced to play last year so early,” Bagnoli said. “I think we’re in a much better position at this point than we were last [season].” In addition to youth, the Quakers had to battle a slew of injuries that started before the opening kickoff and continued throughSEE FOOTBALL PAGE D7

Golden girl Francia wins again Olympics | Rower and Penn alum Susan Francia earned a second straight gold medal with the U.S. women’s eight BY Anna Strong Senior Staff Writer

inside

ing members from the 2008 crew that took gold in Beijing, had an increased set of pressures entering this summer’s race. In 2008, the boat had just begun to make an international splash. After taking gold at the World Championships in 2006 and the World Rowing Cup in 2007, it was looking to upset 2004 Olympic champ Romania. After the win in Beijing, the eight continued to assert its dominance,

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• Senior Kerry Scalora returns from last season’s injury • A look at what’s ahead

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Former Penn rower Susan Francia visited the Penn Athletics office last week after winning gold in London. She is pictured with current women’s rowing coach Mike Lane.

When the United States women’s eight crossed the finish line at England’s Eton Dorney on Aug. 2, Susan Francia became the first female Penn alum to ever win two gold medals in a single event. Francia and the Americans rowed the 2,000-meter course in 6:10.59, nearly a second and a half and a full boat length ahead of silver medalist Canada. The U.S. boat, which had six return-

winning Worlds three more times in 2009, 2010 and 2011, and setting a worldrecord time at the 2012 Samsung World Rowing Cup (5:54.17). Still, it didn’t make their job in London any easier. “We had a different role going into it,” Francia said. “It was a different mindset, because there was a lot more media and a lot more hype.” Her coach, she added, was not thrilled with the large amount of media attention the boat received, even though the hype was good for the sport. “Our goal was just to keep it internal SEE OLYMPICS PAGE D2

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Penn looks to build on record-setting year w. soccer | Junior Kerry Scalora returns from injury to lead the Red and Blue attack BY mike tony Staff Writer A year after the Penn women’s soccer team achieved the greatest regular-season winning percentage in school history and delivered 13 shutouts, it’s back to square one. At least that’s how coach Darren Ambrose is approaching the upcoming season. “We’re just trying to get our game legs right now,” Ambrose said. “We’ve done okay, we’re reasonably fit.” Thanks to the return of several key components from last year’s squad, the Quakers should find themselves well past square one soon enough. Junior Kerry Scalora returns after having last season cut short by injury. She earned Ivy League and Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference Rookie of the Year honors in 2010 and figures to be a major force in Penn’s offensive at-

tack once again. “It’s been about 10 months since the surger y so I feel pretty much normal,” Scalora said. “The strength in my leg is probably about 97 percent. I feel strong. I wouldn’t put myself in a situation where I would play if I didn’t feel like I was 100 percent.” Ambrose agreed. “She’s in pretty good shape,” he said. “She’s got to get her game legs. But she looks good the way she’s been.” Scalora’s injury didn’t come without a lesson. “I had never been injured before and I learned a lot about myself,” she said. “I climbed to the top of the pedestal and had to kind of get shot back down and work myself back up again. “I was developed as a player completely but maybe I needed

to develop a little bit more as a person. My only role wasn’t on the field — it was helping players off the field.” But Scalora also learned that her teammates can get by on the field just fine without her. Midseason injuries to both her and 2011 senior captain Ursula Lopez-Palm resulted in greater offensive responsibilities for the younger players on the team — four of Penn’s top six scorers were underclassmen and three were freshmen. “Last season we scored 39 goals, gave up seven and we were 14-2-1,” Ambrose recalled. “So I don’t really see what we lacked last season. I think [Scalora] adds some power, she has an ability to score goals from the left-hand side. She’s an additional threat for us.” “I thought the underclassmen definitely produced a harder offensive attack last year,” Scalora said. “If anything, they made up for [my absence] completely.”

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Scalora and company will have to find their game legs more quickly than Ambrose would like. “Unfor tunately, the way the Ivy League allows us to schedule, our first game will be against James Madison,” Ambrose said. “So we’ve got our work cut out for us, that’s for sure.” The Quakers will host the Dukes at R hodes F ield on Friday seeking their second all-time victory over the program after ek ing out a 1- 0 win last year. Sunday, Penn hosts Temple for the f irst time since 2005. Both matches are critical early-season

Pressure and hype didn’t faze Francia OLYMPICS from page D1 and ignore all the outside pressure and noise,” Francia said. “If you think of it just as the culmination of your training and not this big, spectacular, unattainable thing, you race — you just race.” The immense pressure wasn’t the only factor the eight had to overcome. The women also had to contend with a major crosswind on race day that Francia felt prevented the boat from breaking their own world record. And then there was the noise. “I’ve never been in a race where, for 500 meters, I couldn’t

Frances Hu/DP File Photo

Junior Kerry Scalora received Ivy Rookie of the Year honors in 2010 but was sidelined by an injury last season. She returns Friday against James Madison. tests for a team that has all “We just have to push each the potential to take the Ivy other a little bit more,” Amcrown. brose said.

hear the coxswain,” Francia said. “We could hear people shouting and cheering for a mile. And it was so crazy to think, gosh, that’s for us.” Francia said supporters came to watch and cheer even during team practices, which had to be scheduled around the official races and heats. “People would just stay after the races and watch us practice,” she said. “I’ve never heard chants of ‘USA! USA! USA!’ when we were just doing drills before.” All the pressure, all the hype and all the noise eventually made the gold medal that much sweeter. But as with any gold-medal athlete, the question that follows is always, “What’s next?” For Francia, the fall will be busy — but not on the water. She recently threw out a first pitch at a Phillies game with

Women’s EIGHT Gold MEdal Final 1. United States, 6:10.59 2. Canada, 6:12.06 3. Netherlands, 6:13.12 4. Romania, 6:17.64 5. Great Britain, 6:18.77

fellow Philadelphia gold medalists Carli Lloyd and Heather Mitts of the women’s soccer team and Jordan Burroughs, a gold-medal wrestler. She is also slated to soon present an award to Muhammad Ali, an “incredible honor,” and one for which Penn President Amy Gutmann recommended her. The team also has a date set at the White House. And as for the 2016 Summer Games in Rio de Janeiro? “[I’m] just trying to have fun and live in the moment.”

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WELCOME BACK ISSUE ­— AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 Page D3

New-look Quakers seek bounce-back year volleyball | Penn adds five freshmen to roster, two assistant coaches to bench

as a member of the Chinese along with our captains,” Carr national team, will be a vol- says. “I think when you have unteer assistant coach while players of that caliber that working on his master’s de- come to the gym and they’re BY brette trost Senior Staff Writer gree in applied geoscience. fit and they’re in shape, they The New York Times Syndication Corporation Chen Sales played at A rk a nsas set the tone at practice as to 620 to Eighth Avenue, York,where N.Y. 10018 The Penn volleyball team is they need compete forNew Tech, his team ad- what is expected and the level For Information Call:vanced 1-800-972-3550 ready to reclaim its place atop starting squad spots right to the 2011 Division II of play.” For Thursday, August 2012 the Ivy League, and it starts away.” NCAA30, Tournament. The Quakers will open the with plenty of new additions. But the freshmen aren’t the “He brings international season with the Big 5 TourAfter winning back-to-back only new elements of the 2012 experience,” Carr said. “He’s nament, where they finished Ivy championships, the Quak- Quakers. Casey Shingler and constantly questioning what second behind Villanova last ers found 2011 to be a more Zhiyu “Charley” Chen will we do and why we do it, which year. While this will be Penn’s challenging year, as they fin- join coach Carr and assistant Edited is good forby us to get better and first challenge, all three of the Will Shortz No. 0726 ished in fifth place. coach Seth Rochlin on the look at different things.” teams they face will already ACROSS 34 73-Across 70 Colorful dress This year, however, coach staff units: this season. Though faces are 1 2 3 4 the new 5 6 7 8 9 have 10 played 11 in 12 games 13 14 this seaAbbr. 1 White-robed 71 Hideout Kerry Carr believes an infuBefore coming to Penn, an important factor to the 2012 son. figure of Greek 36 “Family Guy” 72 Rays’ home, 17 sion of new faces both on and for one year 15squad, Carr also16believes the “It’s just getting the jitters mythology wife Shingler worked informally off the 5court propel Penn as the head73coach at Arkanveteran players will have a out, just getting everyone out Many will an ad buy 38 Goofus 18 19 20 Figure in Hindu of scripture to the11front the Ancient sas-Monticello, a Division II huge impact on the Quakers’ there, seeing how we flow,” 39 “Capeesh?” Newton’s 21 22 23 said. “The next weekend 1975 Tony 44 Torque symbol second law Eight 15 standings. program. success this season. Carr winner for Best “It’s good to get a little45 bitEchelon of “As a young coach, it’s not 24 “There 25are two things this we fly28out to California and 26 27 29 Play Plastic fresh 16 blood year,”46she ever yday that aDOWN Division I year making us play already play the big dogs [CaliforniaBringevery back on surgeon’s 1 Unit of length 32 33 Northern Arizona said. 17 “I Target feel like we got a concern lot program calls,” Shingler said. at a30better level and 31 one is the Berkeley, of some that’s roughly this yearsprays … and the girls “Coach it so that Carr said. “Ev- and UC-Riverside], so it’s im47 reLead-in to boy Carr built the diameter of a experience,” 34 35 36 37 38 18 Ones coming ally like the energy.” protonto come eryone has a full year under portant for us to have a good of set people awant 49 1894 lot opera from the Arc de in Alexandria Time’s 1986 After losing just one senior, here, a lot of 2coaches 39 belts 40 43 want to their together.”41 42 tournament. But also the foJackson 5 here and Woman the the Red Triomphe? and the Blue will52add coach she’sofproven The Quakers are returning cus will be on finding the right 19 Situated features, slangily Year 44 45 46 five freshmen to the squad, that we can win here.” 13 letterwinners, including ju- system for us and cutting back somewhere 55 Gymnasium 3 Jerks four f rom Califor “He’s really4 going help us 47nior Dani48Shepherd, who was between two nia, who 49 50 51on mistakes.” 52 53 54 floor choice Poet’s to ending? come to extremes Penn with a wealth of as far as having another selected first-team All-Iv y, “I don’t think there’s any57 Will-o’-the-wisp 5 Go just together as 56 57 58 59 21 It orbited Earth 60 Lottery experience. setpicks of eyes,” Carr said. “He’s 55and senior Amanda a group Pacheco, thing we can’t handle,” Shin86,331 times Megan Falls/DP Senior Photographer 62 They may be 6 Music halls, e.g. “Even though they’re fresh- someone that’s been in my who gler said. “But 60 was selected 61 honorable 62 63 it’s going to be 22 Brief promises? drawnshoes from aand has 7 California county Senior Amanda Pacheco (left), who was selected honorable mention All-Ivy men, 23 they’re not playing like another world mention All-Ivy and led the how do we put it all together Urge to attack 63-Across 8 Shot 64 65 66 67 last year, is one of 13 returning letterwinners for the Quakers this season. freshmen,” Carr said. “Conview of the court.” team with kills and hitting with new faces.” 24 Forever 63 See 62-Across 9 “El tiempo es tending for national champiChen, played indoor percentage last season. 28 European 64 Like some bags who ___” 68 69 70 (Spanish onships blackbirds [in high school] has of food and beach volleyball “Dani and Amanda are reproverb) profes72 73 30 Home of 67 Tea party given them the experience sionally in China andmarks? served 71ally kind of leading the team 10 Beauty Literature Nobelist Sigrid Undset 31 Give approval 33 Station

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Athletes WAnted Penn Rowing Wants YOU! COntACt A COACh tO leARn MORe

nO PRIOR ROWInG eXPeRIenCe neCessARY

Ed Golding - Assistant Coach Heavyweight Men’s Rowing 215-898-6144 egolding@pobox.upenn.edu

PleAse Attend the InFORMAtIOnAl MeetInG

Colin Farrell - Assistant Coach Lightweight Men’s Rowing 215-746-0302 colinfar@upenn.edu Mike Lane - Head Coach Women’s Rowing 215-898-6283 mtlane@upenn.edu

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012 Men’s Meeting: 6:00 – 7:00 PM Women’s Meeting: 7:00 – 8:00 PM donaldson Room – Weightman hall (in front of Franklin Field) 235 s. 33rd street

WhO We ARe lOOKInG FOR... the University of The University of Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Rowing Teams willRowing be holding teamstryouts will bein holding open open September. While the rower tryouts in prototypical september. While is the tall prototypical and lean, werower are lookis ing for athletic poeple with tall and lean, we are looking a desire to workpeople hard, with a comfor athletic petitive spirit and a willinga desire to work hard, a ness to learn aspirit new and sport. competitive a If thewillingness challengestoassociated learn a newwith becoming a Division 1 athlete sport. If the challenges sound exciting to you, then associated with becoming you are exactly the type of a division athlete sound person we Iare looking for. interesting to you, then you are exactly the type of person we are looking for.


Page D4 AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 ­— WELCOME BACK ISSUE

The Daily Pennsylvanian

A great university. A great newspaper. And 15 great ways to join The Daily Pennsylvanian. In some ways, college is just like high school. You sit in class, listen and take notes. At test time, you regurgitate the information you’ve memorized. But wait. There’s more to college life. Want excitement? The opportunity to meet new people? The chance to learn by doing, not by watching? Join The Daily Pennsylvanian. The DP, the 128-year-old daily student media organization of the University of Pennsylvania, is one of the top college newspapers in the country. The DP has won the Columbia Gold Crown Award, one of the highest honors in collegiate journalism, and the prestigious Pacemaker Award for excellence in American student journalism. And the DP is much more than a daily newspaper. Our weekly magazine, 34th Street, is the most popular arts and lifestyle magazine on campus. TheDP.com offers readers news 24/7, and our blog, Under the Button, covers all things Penn. Students, faculty, and administrators look to us as their main source of news and information about the University and West

EDITORIAL

1

Philadelphia. Local businesses see us as the most cost-effective way to present their message to the lucrative Penn market. In fact, nearly 25,000 people read the DP every week. Most importantly, the DP — a corporation independent of the University — is run and managed by students. Students just like you. Every day, we write and edit the stories, shoot and edit the video and photographs, lay out and put together the pages of the newspaper. Every day, we sell and design the advertisements, handle customer inquiries, conduct market research, and develop budgets and financial statements. As a DP staff member, you’ll get the opportunity to learn in the trenches, to apply what you’ve learned in the classroom to the real world. From reporting and blogging to shooting photographs to selling advertisements to designing pages, you don’t watch — you do. And, in all of our departments, you’ll begin doing from day one. All you need is enthusiasm, imagination, and drive — we’ll teach you the rest.

2 34th Street Writer 3

6 Artist 7 Designer 8

4 Blogger

9 Video Producer

5

10 Multimedia Designer

News Reporter

You’ll receive first-hand journalistic experience by learning reporting and writing skills. You’ll conduct interviews, cover events and write hard-hitting stories that keep our readers informed. In the past, our reporters have interviewed celebrities like Stephen Colbert, Anderson Cooper, Gym Class Heroes and Nicholas Kristof.

Sports Reporter You’ll cover all 33 Penn varsity sports

as a DP sportswriter. In the past few years, DP sportswriters have covered games in Florida, Hawaii, North Carolina and Texas and interviewed sports celebrities like Andrea Kremer, Brandon Jennings and Mark DeRosa.

34th Street Magazine is a guide to culture in Philadelphia and an outlet for commentary on campus life. As a writer for Street, you’ll cover a variety of content, including a feature and humor section, restaurant and film reviews, and much more. In addition to theDP.com and 34st.com, The Daily Pennsylvanian hosts several popular blogs. Under the Button is 34th Street Magazine’s campus lifestyle blog. The Buzz is the DP’s sports blog and The Red and The Blue is the DP’s politics blog, which should be very popular this coming fall.

Copy Editor

Can you spel? Got good grammar? As a copy editor, it will be up to you to make sure that errors do not slip past our reporters and editors and into the published paper. The copy editor is the DP’s last line of defense.

BUSINESS

11 Advertising Sales

DP advertising representatives hit the streets running, serving our current customers, and bringing in new business on campus and in downtown Philadelphia. Besides earning commissions on ads you sell, you’ll learn valuable business skills such as making presentations, closing techniques, managing your time, communicating effectively, and providing good customer service. Simply put, you’ll gain experience you can use to land that first job. And you’ll make money while you’re learning.

12 Marketing

Our marketing department brainstorms new ways to promote the paper to attract readers and advertisers. You will conduct and analyze market research, generate selling strategies and promotional materials, and work together with the editorial and business departments to increase sales and readership for the print and online products. The marketing department also keeps in close contact with the community, assessing its satisfaction with our products.

Photographer

As a DP photographer, you’ll work with high-tech cameras, scanners, and software to create images for the printed paper and the web. DP photographers are sent on assignments around campus and the city to capture the events that affect the Penn community. Cartoon artists create the editorial cartoons that appear every day on page six of The Daily Pennsylvanian. The cartoons are a key part of The Daily Pennsylvanian’s Opinion Page.

DP designers work nightly on page designs, graphics and illustrations. They orchestrate the presentation of the newspaper by laying out the front and sports pages and designing graphics. You will utilize state-of-the-art software and equipment — Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop and InDesign, electronic drawing tablets and film and flatbed scanners — to get the job done.

As a member of the video staff, you’ll employ the most advanced tools in the video publishing industry. You’ll have the chance to shoot and edit video using the newest versions MPEG Streamclip and Final Cut Pro. Our web designers produce innovative multimedia features using the newest versions of Soundslides, Photoshop, and Illustrator. You’ll be part of the team that is producing the most innovative new media on campus and seen by thousands of viewers every week.

13 Finance

How does $800,000 sound? The DP is big business — our revenues top the $800,000 mark each year. You can study the theory of finance at Wharton, but the DP gives you an ideal business laboratory — and the money is real. Finance members control the funds by preparing budgets and financial statements. Few other activities on campus offer as much independence with such real stakes.

14 Credit 15

As a member of the credit staff, you’ll take on the responsbilities of collections for The Daily Pennsylvanian. The credit staff provides customer service and deals with the DP’s customers that are unhappy with their bill or their advertising.

Ad Design

You’ll work with customers to create print and Internet ads and campaigns using Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator. You’ll also work with the marketing staff to produce all of the DP’s promotional materials.

Join The Daily Pennsylvanian! If you are interested in joining the editorial staff of The Daily Pennsylvanian, please email Sarah Gadsden, Managing Editor, at gadsden@theDP.com. If you are interested in joining the business staff, please email Emily Kuo, Business Manager, at kuo@theDP.com.

For more information, go to www.theDP.com/join

We will hold our Introductory Meeting Tuesday, Sept. 11 and Wednesday, Sept. 12 at 6:00 p.m. for Business and 7:30 p.m. for Editorial.


S P OR T S

The Daily Pennsylvanian

WELCOME BACK ISSUE ­— AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 Page D5

Chemistry the key for soccer M. Soccer | Coach Rudy Fuller says 2011 squad was lacking a certain ‘X-factor’ BY John Phillips Staff Writer There are voids on the pitch, barely visible, but the Penn men’s soccer team is asking everyone to pay no attention to the men of yesteryear. Yes, for mer st a rs Ja ke Levin, Christian Barreiro and two-time captain Thomas Brandt are gone, but coach Rudy Fuller doesn’t want his team to grieve. “Every team is different,” Fuller said. “It’s not about replacing three guys.” Rather, it’s about building chemistry with the current set of players, something that may have been lacking last season. The Quakers finished a disappointing sixth in the Ivy League, letting numerous games slip through the cracks

as the clock neared its 90th minute. “We just weren’t putting in the extra effort,” junior Jonny Dolezal said. “We’d try to get people to stay after practice, to get a few more reps in, and it just didn’t happen.” Dolezal will take Brandt’s place at the center of Penn’s defense, as well as inside the locker room as captain, working to keep the team motivated. The late-game collapses left a bitter taste in the mouth of Penn’s returnees, but last season also taught them a valuable lesson about the chemistry that Fuller is cultivating this preseason. “It was kind of a self-made

lesson,” sophomore forward Duke Lacroix said. “We have to bond together when we get down and learn to fight back.” For Fuller, that process starts with players getting comfortable with teammates — every starter other than forwards Lacroix and Steven Baker will be playing in new positions on the pitch. A fter they ’ve developed chemistry on the field, Fuller hopes they’ll be prepared for those tough Ivy matches. “You don’t lose close games for soccer reasons — there’s an X-factor missing,” Fuller said. “It’s something intangible.” With only two seniors on the squad, Fuller expects the sophomores and juniors to step to the forefront as leaders. The majority of the offense will come from Lacroix, last season’s Iv y Rookie of the Year, and Baker. Each scored five goals and had two assists a

year ago, tying them for second on the team in points. Defensively, Dolezal will be paired on the inside with fellow junior Nicky Yin, who made 16 starts last season. Sophomore keeper Max Kurtzman was unable to finish last year’s campaign due to injury but is now fully healthy. The goalie had two shutouts in 14 games as a freshman while posting a 1.17 goals against average. The Quakers start the season at home this weekend. They play Lafayette Friday, follower by a matchup with New Hampshire on Sunday. The potential is there, but Penn’s hopes rely on finding chemistry and being able and willing to put in the work necessary to win the Ivy League. “We’re making sure everyone’s on the same page, that everyone has the same goals,” Fuller said. “All of the cliches.”

Van Roten gets opportunity with Packers ers, particularly in his junior and senior seasons, certainly helped him impress N F L scouts on Penn’s Pro Day back in March. On the Pro Day, at which Van Roten’s teammates Luke Nawrocki, Erik Rask and Matt Hamscher also participated, Van Roten put up numbers on par with results reported from the NFL Regional Combine hosted at the New York Jets facility. In the 40-yard dash, Van Roten ran a 5.06, compared to the average combine time of 5.11 seconds. His vertical jump

reached 34.5 inches, two inches better than the combine average of 32.5. As a result, Van Roten was invited to three NFL minicamps in May. The invites came from the Chargers, the Jets and the Packers, and he chose to attend the San Diego and New York camps, as the Packers camp was the same weekend as the Jets camp. In his senior season, despite his switch from tackle to guard midway through the year, Van Roten anchored the fifth-best offense in program history (2,284 total yards of offense). Van Roten was also an AllIvy honoree on the 2010 squad that had the highest rushing and scoring offense in the

campus and program history well enough to consider his hiring a homecoming. “I think that one of the biggest things is that I’m just so excited to be at Penn and so excited to be here that I just can’t wait for the season to start,” he said. The last remaining assistant coach from last season would have been Dan Leibovitz, but he took a position as a player development coach with the Charlotte Bobcats earlier this month. A 1996 Penn graduate, Leibovitz returned to his alma mater in 2010 after spending 10 seasons as an assistant at Temple and four as head coach at Hartford. Allen wasted no time finding a man for the team’s third vacant assistant position of the summer, calling on Arizona State assistant Scott Pera. Though Penn has not officially announced the hire, Pera has confirmed the move on his Twitter account. He will become the Quakers’ top assistant. Prior to his five seasons with the Sun Devils, Pera was the head coach at Artesia High

School in Lakewood, Calif., where he coached Oklahoma Cit y Thunder star James Harden. Pera coached Harden again at Arizona State from 2007-09. Allen had nothing but praise for his former assistants, saying they “helped us turn the corner,” but his team is now in an unenviable position of starting the season with an entirely new assistant staff. However, Bow man says this could actually benefit the team. “You get a chance to be a part of a different team and I think that everybody’s ideas are a little fresher and a little newer,” he said. “It’s always fun being able to learn the intricacies of new offenses, new defenses, new personalities and the process.” And while there may be some new faces on the bench, Allen made it clear that the objective hasn’t changed. “I’m just excited about working towards our ultimate goal of bringing a championship back to the University of Pennsylvania.”

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Jason Polykoff was added as the new volunteer assistant coach. He comes to Penn after spending five years as the high school head coach at nearby Friends Central, where he coached Allen’s son. He guided the team to four consecutive Pennsylvania Independent Schools State Championships from 2009-2012. “Just watching from afar how he interacted with his kids and what I thought he stood for, I just felt it would be a good fit for him,” Allen said. “And when he expressed interest, I pretty much told him it’s your job to turn down.” Polykoff, who grew up in the Philadelphia area and played college basketball at Haverford, said even though he is not a Penn alumnus, he knows the

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allow his team to sign another American player. But making aliyah is also a religious and spiritual commitment. Rosen said he won’t make aliyah just for basketball reasons: “It’s a good thing and something I’ve wanted,” he said. He won’t be alone in Israel, despite the seven-hour time difference. His dad has a halfsister who lives near Tel Aviv. Penn grad Sarah Friedman is also playing soccer in Tel Aviv and has already reached out to him. And the fans? “Absolutely sick,” he said. According to Rosen, the league is getting better and better, and he likes that his team is up and coming. From what he knows about the fans and atmosphere, he compared it to Cameron Indoor. “Part of [that fandom] is the soccer culture … it infiltrates into basketball.” While Rosen had a lot of options once he chose to play overseas, it ultimately came down to a gut decision. “I liken it to college recruiting … There are no perfect decisions,” he said. But he liked the coach and his reputation and feels like he made the best decision. In the end, though, above all else, he’s a rookie again. “It’s kind of like starting over, you have a clean slate, your reputation is sidelined.” Knowing Rosen, it shouldn’t take too long to adjust and create a new reputation for himself.

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Polykoff was Allen’s son’s coach in H.S.

UPDATE: Van Roten survived Green Bay’s roster cuts on Monday as the roster was trimmed to 75 players.

Aug. 3 — I had the chance to speak with 2012 graduate Zack Rosen the day after he announced that he signed a contract with Israeli club Hapoel Holon. He’s very excited about playing pro ball, but he was sure to clarify that going to Israel was not a sign that he has given up his dream to play in the NBA. “By no means am I surrendering,” he said. Rosen didn’t want to play a waiting game, and he knew that was happening w ith NBA teams. So before it was too late, he signed a one-year deal with Hapoel Holon. Since it’s just a one-year contract, ending when the season does in May, Rosen could then opt to return to the United States to continue pursuing his ultimate goal. He can attend mini-camps and play in summer leagues, just as he did this summer, and again make a decision based on the interest. Rosen has been to Israel only once, but it was the experience of a lifetime as he participated in the Maccabi Games for the United States. It was also enough to make him want to return. Since the summer after his freshman year at Penn, he’s wanted to go back and play professionally. Both sides expressed interest before Rosen finally signed his deal. When Rosen arrives in Holon, a suburb of Tel Aviv, he will begin training camp for a month and a half. He will also begin making aliyah, a process which grants citizenship to Jews and will

LA FAMIGLIA RUSSO GRAZIE

July 25 — Three-time All-Ivy offensive lineman and recent graduate Greg Van Roten has signed a free agent contract with the Green Bay Packers. Van Roten will attend the Packers training camp, which runs from Thursday, July 26 to Tuesday, August 28 and includes preseason games against the San Diego Chargers, Cleveland Browns, Cincinnati Bengals and Kansas City Chiefs. Though Van Roten will face unprecedented challenges to his capabilities on the field, his performance with the Quak-

From The Daily Pennsylvanian’s sports blog, THE BUZZ

CORNER OF 23rd & Spruce • 215-735-7357

From The Daily Pennsylvanian’s sports blog, THE BUZZ

league. That year, the Red and Blue also finished with the sixth-best rushing attack in the FCS and the second-best rushing season in program history. Van Roten finished his Penn career with a 28-12 record overall and a 23-5 Ivy League mark. The Class of 2012 won two Ivy titles and were just the third team ever to string together back-to-back undefeated Ivy seasons.

BY megan soisson

- Philadelphia Magazine

BY ANNA STRONG

Zack Rosen signs one-year contract with Israeli team

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S P OR T S

Page D6 AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 ­— WELCOME BACK ISSUE

The Daily Pennsylvanian

Where the Quakers Play 1

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franklin field

the palestra

ringe squash courts

Rhodes Field

Teams: •Football •Field Hockey •Men’s and Women’s Lacrosse •Track and Field

Teams: •Men’s and Women’s Basketball •Volleyball •Wrestling Better known as the “Cathedral of College Basketball,” the Palestra has hosted more college basketball games than any arena in the country and seats 8,722 fans. It also serves as the home of the Big 5.

Home to Penn football and the Penn Relays Carnival since 1895, historic Franklin Field seats over 50,000 spectators. The NFL’s Philadelphia Eagles also played here from 1958-1970.

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hamlin tennis center

dunning-cohen champions field

Penn Park

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Meiklejohn Stadium

Teams: •Softball

Practice Facility

Teams: •Baseball

The university completed construction of the park last September, which contains the stadium where Penn’s softball team plays its home games. The park is open to the entire student body and the general public from 6 a.m. to midnight daily.

Better known as “The Bubble,” the Dunning-Cohen Champions Field provides Penn’s teams with a warm place to train during the winter. The seasonal air structure covers the field from November to March.

Officially still less than a year old, the state-of-the-art Hamlin Tennis Courts can’t be missed when crossing the bridge over the railroad tracks when entering Penn Park.

Rhodes Field can sit up to 650 fans for men’s and women’s soccer home soccer games and is located south of Penn Park along River Fields Drive.

The Penn squash teams have played at the Ringe Squash Courts since 1958. Hutchinson Gymnasium, currently undergoing renovations, connects the Ringe Courts and the Palestra.

5

Teams: •Men’s and Women’s Tennis

Teams: •Men’s and women’s soccer

Teams: •Men’s and Women’s Squash (Ringe Squash Courts) •Men’s and Women’s Fencing (Hutchinson Gym)

“The Meik” has been the home to Penn baseball since 2000. The major league-size field measures 330 feet down each foul line and 380 feet to centerfield. The ballpark accommodates up to 850 spectators.

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The Pulse of Penn Sports | The highs and lows of 2011-2012 By Megan Soisson

Sept. 25 Sept. 15, 2011

Penn Park officially opens, providing athletic facilities for softball and tennis

The Palestra hosts NBA stars LeBron James, Chris Paul and others at Battle for I-95

Oct. 29

Women’s soccer posts its school-record 13th shutout of the season in 0-0 tie at Brown

March 24

Feb. 25

M. Hoops beats favorite Harvard on the road to stay alive in the Ivy title race

March 22-25

Fencer Luona Wang takes second at NCAAs, wrestler Micah Burak places seventh

Gymnastics wins ECAC title crown at home by .025 points

April 29 M. Golf wins Ivy championship in a team playoff

Fall

May 5, 2012 Alexis Borden pitches the first perfect game in program softball history

SPRING

2011

2012

Dec. 30

Oct. 29

Football’s historic 18-game Ivy win streaks comes to an end with 6-0 loss at Brown

Nov. 7

Despite 14-2-1 record, W. Soccer misses out on NCAA at-large bid

Jess Knapp goes down with a torn ACL at San Diego State, and the Quakers lose the next six games before her return

April 24 W. Lacrosse wins sixth straight Ivy crown but eventually falls to Loyola in first round of NCAA tourney


S P OR T S

The Daily Pennsylvanian

Quakers taking things day-by-day

30 seconds with...

Senior defensive end Brandon Copeland

SOISSON from page D1

What should Snooki have named her baby? Can she do Snooki Jr? Mark Sanchez or Tim Tebow? Tebow. Best Olympian this summer? I think Bolt. He’s too cocky for me, but he killed it this year. Who’s the worst singer on the team? I would have to go with [OL] Mike Pinciotti. What’s your secret talent? I’m not really too talented … I can dunk a basketball. Describe this year’s team in five words or less: Young, flashy, humble, prepared and hungry.

Sr. Holland in as new backup QB

man hopes his players can use it as a motivating factor. “I don’t mind being picked second or third,” he said. “That’s fine because then you can play with a chip on your shoulder.”

Football from page D1 out the year. Wide out Conner Scott, tailback Lyle Marsh and several key freshmen were lost for more than the majority of the season. “We not only were young last year, but we incurred so many injuries that we became even younger,” Bagnoli said. Entering 2012, expectations have been tempered. Harvard was the overwhelming choice for the No. 1 spot in the Ivy League preseason media poll — something Bagnoli expected. Penn ranked second. “I’m always of the belief that the defending champion should always be picked until someone knocks them off,” Bagnoli said. At the same time, the head

Becker out as backup QB Junior passer Ryan Becker, who has played in 15 games and started twice in his first two years with the Red and Blue, will not serve as backup to Billy Ragone after getting injured in the offseason. “He was running around at home back in Florida and he planted … doing passing drills, and he blew out his knee,” Bagnoli said. “He will not be available to us.” The Florida State transfer has racked up 735 yards and thrown for two touchdowns and four picks since 2010. Senior Andrew Holland will take over the second-string duties. “He throws the ball better than any of the quarterbacks, so it gives us a real throwing

threat,” Bagnoli said. “If we ever really wanted to open it up, we can turn into Cornell if we wanted to.” Marino, Bailey not playing in 2012 Neither senior Anthony Marino nor sophomore Aaron Bailey will hit the gridiron this fall for the Quakers, but for different reasons. Marino, a defensive back, has opted not to return to the team while Bailey, a wide receiver, is academically ineligible to begin the year. “[Bailey] is trying to regain eligibility,” Bagnoli said. “He’ll probably be another semester away. … Hopefully by another semester, spring ball we should get him back.” Marino played in 10 games and started twice in 2011, recording 25 tackles, a fumble recovery and an interception. Bailey pulled in five receptions for 36 yards but was more effective running the ball. He carried 23 times for 191 yards and a pair of scores.

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ACROSS 1 Insect segment 8 With 68- or 69-Across, what 16-, 32-, 42- and 60-Across each consists of 13 Get by 14 Big name in diamonds 16 Fools evaluate bodies of water? 18 Flier of legend 19 “___ bin ein Berliner” 20 Opposite of baja 21 Dump, so to speak 24 “Rabbit, Run” writer 27 ___ milk 28 Ocean State sch. 29 Competition of sorts 30 Scrap for Fido 32 Renter finds a buyer for fish? 39 Sign up 40 Oospheres, say

41 Amalgam, e.g. 42 Musical combo designs experiments? 45 Elevs. 46 Cartoon “devil,” for short 47 Hairy sitcom cousin 48 Puccini’s Cio-Cio-___ 51 Barber, at times 54 Figs. in company reports 55 “Prik khing” cuisine 57 “Superman ___” 58 ___ Dhabi 60 More embarrassed forest creature screwed up? 66 Short operatic piece 67 Is exhausted 68 See 8-Across 69 See 8-Across DOWN 1 Smart ___ whip

A S I A G O

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M O N E Y B T A I G N O X I E N N G D S

B O K B R D E E E R B I I N E S S E C B U A R T E

A D A Y

R U L E

C R A S H R B E A I R R D E E D N A E S A T H S H E A S T

H E R A N T N C E E A L

For the answersL L Y M E N U M to today’s puzzle, S E X R E see page D3 B O B B O S W

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JOIn tHe DaIlY pennsYlvanIan! Come to an introductory meeting on Tuesday, September 11, or Wednesday, September 12. The DP seeks people interested in reporting, writing, photography, sales, marketing, accounting, and print & web design. See our display ads in today’s paper for more details. Come for information about Business departments at 6:00, Editorial departments at 7:30, or come for both! 4015 Walnut Street, 2nd floor.

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MEGAN SOISSON is a senior Health and Societies major from Mechanicsburg, Pa., and is the Senior Sports Editor of The Daily Pennsylvanian. Her email address is soisson@theDP.com.

theDP.com/sports

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

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Conner Scott, Ryan Mitchell and Joe Holder. No longer the defending champs, the Quakers are in a much better position now than they were at this time last year. Now it’s all about reclaiming that Throne.

not getting ahead of ourselves and certainly not looking back,” McLaughlin said. “That’s what I like about this team — they’re really focused on each day.” That focus will pay dividends come opening kickoff Sept. 15 and when the Ivy slate begins at Dartmouth on Sept. 29. The Red and Blue return four starters to the offensive line, have a healthy corps of running backs and three reliable targets for Billy Ragone:

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Senior running back Brandon Colavita is one of 17 starters returning for the Quakers. He said the senior class is “looking to go out with a bang.”

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son] and that’s something we’re working on,” he said. “We’ve been talking about our approach to practice, our approach to the weight room, our approach to watching film, and … developing our consistency.” Now, their heads are back in the game. “We’re much better prepared, we’re much better focused, we have a much better gauge of where we are,” Bagnoli said. And it shows. At the start of last season, there was a sense of cockiness — not always a bad trait in football — and feeling that they could get through the season relatively unscathed to win a third straight title. But the task was a difficult one — the team was young and the expectations were high. In this position twice before, Bagnoli had never coached his team to three consecutive championships. Let’s say it wasn’t exactly a recipe for success. This season the Quakers have a crop of seniors who won championships their freshman and sophomore years, then fell short as juniors. They don’t want to leave on a low note. “As … veterans going into our senior years,” senior running back Brandon Colavita said of his classmates, “we’re looking to go out with a bang.” A day-by-day, no-lookingback attitude has been adopted, and it’s present in every member of the program. “We’re really just concentrating on doing one thing right at a time, taking it day by day and snap by snap …

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WELCOME BACK ISSUE ­— AUGUST 29–SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 Page D7

“Daily Pennsylvanian”.

B U E S N O

A O B A B

D D I T Y

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2 Tour ride 3 Hosp. figures 4 In-your-face 5 Bowlful at a Japanese restaurant 6 Runner from a bomb scare, e.g. 7 Super Mario Bros. letters 8 “Lopez Tonight” channel 9 The Crystals’ “___ Rebel” 10 Moves like a tosspot 11 Lyre-holding Muse 12 Nora Ephron work 14 Metric system prefix 15 Ben-Gurion successor 17 Funny Caesar 21 Cartoonist Feiffer 22 “Me, Myself & ___” (2000 comedy) 23 Isn’t upright 25 Change in Chile 26 Like chicory vis-à-vis coffee 29 Guardian Angels’ toppers 31 Intro to marketing? 33 MacFarlane of “Ted” 34 Palindromic time 35 It might be served with a cinnamon stick 36 Girl’s name that sounds like two letters of the alphabet

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Puzzle by Daniel Raymon

37 There’s a drawing of it on TV 38 Ways of operating: Abbr. 43 Gymwear item 44 “Less Than Perfect” actress, 2002-06 48 What a sucker may have

49 “Don’t try to be ___” 50 Rock bottom 52 Opera that premiered in Cairo 53 Go (for) 54 Subjected to a hex 56 Carded at a club, say

59 Wacky, as humor

61 “V” visitors, briefly

62 Schubert’s “The ___ King” 63 ___ v. Wade

64 Home of Ukr. 65 Tosspot’s affliction

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.


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WELCOME BACK ISSUE AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 Page D8


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Freshman Guide

Table of Contents Top-5 Food: One writer catalogs his favorite off-campus restaurants, p.6 Tailgating: New Tigers get advice on sitting in the student section, p.8 Academics: Choosing and changing majors doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be stressful, p.11 Health: University offers options for studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; mental health, p.22

Entertainment: New Orleans offers options for additional fun, p.28

LSU Living

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Five off-campus eateries offer best food Many delicious options nearby Taylor Balkom Staff Writer

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TAYLOR BALKOM / The Daily Reveille

Ingaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Subs and Salads has locations on West Chimes Street and Brightside Drive.

6"($6"/# "+,)$%"# $%0# "&1# $%0# 8&%,)$+? @:6# 7,+.$7-# -$%0C&'.,-# $+,%F6#>":+#6.&%)?#N6F-#"2$>#%"6# 6"#1&2,#6.,#)+,$6,-6#*""09+,1$69 ,0# &%8,%6&"%# &%# .&-6"+>???# %"# "%,F-# W:0)&%)?# Q,,7# C$12&%)# 0"C%# P.&(,-/# )"# $+":%0# 6.,#

':+8,# $%0# >":F11# A,# "%# D6$6,# D6+,,6/# *$'&%)# H&).1$%0# S"$0?# <%# >":+# +&).6# C&11# A,# G":&,F-# P$*,/# "%,# "*# @$6"%# S":),F-# ("-6#*$(":-#,$6,+&,-? <+&)&%$11># A:&16# &%# X53X/# EATERIES see page 46


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TAYLOR BALKOM / The Daily Reveille

(top left) American Market, also known as Am Mart, is home to some of the best sandwiches in Baton Rouge. (top right) Nine Dragon is surrounded by Secret Nails, Mellow Mushroom and Yogurtland. (bottom left) Louieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cafe, located on State Street, is open 24/7 and has been in business since 1941. (bottom right) Bacio di Roma, an Italian gelateria, opened in 2011.


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photos by BRIANNA PACIORKA / The Daily Reveille

[Left] LSU coach Les Miles (center) and Tiger football players sing the Alma Mater with the student section after every home game. [Right] LSU students show off their school spirit during a September 2009 game against Vanderbilt in Tiger Stadium.

Student section a raucous experience Unwritten rules key to enjoyment Chandler Rome Staff Writer

Incoming students may be familiar with the daunting #/.>.%3 /& )'%2 4!$)5- from either the west or east sides. But according to more 3%!3/.%$ )'%2 &!.3 &2%3(men canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fully grasp what transitioning into the vaunted north endzone student section is all about. International trade and >.!.#% *5.)/2 2%4 !2.!$/ said even if incoming fresh-%.(!6%"%%.4/%!4(!,,%9 ./4().' #!. #/-0!2% 4/ what they will experience /. %04%-"%2  7(%. 4(% )'%23 +)#+ /&& 4(% 3%!3/. !'!).34/24(%8!3 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even if theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been in 4(%34!$)5-"%&/2%4(%97),, not understand until theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in the section how crazy it )3<!2.!$/3!)$ !2.!$/ !,3/ !$6)3%$ freshmen to arrive â&#x20AC;&#x153;at least -).54%3%!2,9<)./2$%24/ ensure a good view. However crazy the 345$%.4 3%#4)/. -!9 "% there are numerous unwritten rules that can

15)#+,9%.$!.9/.%=3.)'(4). )'%24!$)5- Citing a humorous per3/.!, %80%2)%.#% +).%3)/,ogy senior Kristen Dobies cautioned incoming fresh-!. !"/54 (52,).' /"*%#43 /.4/4(%>%,$ /")%3 2%#/5.4%$ (/7 ,!34 3%!3/. ! '2/50 /& (%2 friends threw cheese onto 4(% >%,$ !.$ 7%2% 02/-04,9 escorted out of the game by 0/,)#%/&>#%234/!#(/253/& *%%23&2/-4(%2%34/&4(%345dent section. Nutritional sciences *5.)/2 ).$3%9 ).!5$/ 5.earthed another unwritten rule of the student section. ;/.=4 %6%2 3)4 $/7.< ).!5$/ 3!)$ ; /5 (!6% 4/ 3%%%6%294().'!.$9/5(!6% 4/+%%04(%(90%50< Kinesiology senior Bridgett Prier warned female &!.3 4/ $2%33 #/-&/24!",9 especially when choosing &//47%!2!.$,%!2.4/!$!04 to the tradition of standing throughout the game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go expecting to 3)4 $/7. !.$ *534 "% 15)%4< Prier said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Get ready to interact with the people next to 9/5%6%.)&9/5$/.=4+./7 7(/4(%9!2%< With premier home games involving defending .!4)/.!,#(!-0)/.,!"!-! and top-25 caliber foes in

/54( !2/,).! !.$ !3().'4/. 4(% 345$%.4 3%#4)/. promises to be raucous for all eight battles. ).!5$/ !.$ !2.!$/ agreed that while they both have seen their fair share of games from the student 3%#4)/. 4(%9 2%-!). 5.able to put the experience

into words. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really indescrib!",%< ).!5$/ 3!)$ ;(% energy is so high and everyone is so pumped up. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so -5#(&5.< Contact Chandler Rome at crome@lsureveille.com


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[Top Left] FIle photo [Bottom Left, Right] BRIANNA PACIORKA / The Daily Reveille

[Top Left] The student section, lead by the Tiger cheerleaders, took its show on the road for the 2011 season opener versus Oregon in Cowboys Stadium. [Bottom Left] Students mug for the TV cameras during a September 2010 game vs. West Virginia. [Right]. Les Miles thanks the section after the 21-14


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Choosing a major a dilemma for many UCFY a resource for freshmen Taylor Schoen Contributing Writer

One of the most challenging and exciting dilemmas incoming freshmen face is deciding what they want to do with the rest of their lives. A multitude of students may not have the faintest idea about which vocation choice is right for them, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why the University College/ Center for Freshman Year is available to provide help. Whether freshmen want to keep their options open and be undeclared or if they have an inkling about what major to choose, UCFY can assuage the typical questions and doubts of new students. Many believe there is

nothing wrong with being undeclared or changing a major. In fact, both of these practices are common. ##/2$).' 4/ 4(% &>#% of Budget and Planningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website, in the spring of 2012, the University College/ Center for Freshman Year had 4,070 freshmen, 562 sophomores and 10 juniors who had not yet declared a major. And for those who are worried about going against 4(%)2 >234 -!*/2 #(/)#% !5, Ivey, executive director of University College, told The Daily Reveille in June that, nationally, students end up changing their major three times from the beginning of their freshman year to graduation. Ivey stated that he thinks the reason behind this is due to the fact that high school seniors are asked to indicate what they would like to study

when applying for colleges. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most 17 or 18-year-olds donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always know what they want to study, but are asked to pick a subject matter without knowing much about it or (/74(%97),,>4).7)4(4(!4 major,â&#x20AC;? Ivey said. UCFY tries to clear this confusion by scheduling mandatory advising meeting with incoming undeclared students. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The purpose of UCFY and Career Services is essentially to aid students in dis#/6%2).'!.$>.$).'7(!4#! reers and majors are available to them at the University,â&#x20AC;? Ivey explained. For those who are uncertain where to begin in choosing a career path, Ivey recommends attending UCFYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s True Colors workshop. The workshop features a simple and non-intimidating personality test where

students are asked to pick amongst four cards. The two cards that appeal to a student tend to give an indication about their character qualities and interest, according to Ivey. The cards are color-coded and correlate with a sheet that suggests a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s values, talents and the possible careers and majors that would best suit them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;True Colors is a good starting point for students who are unsure about what they want to do with their time at LSU,â&#x20AC;? Ivey said. If freshmen are unsure at any time about their major, they are encouraged to visit a counselor at UCFY, which is located at 150 Allen Hall.

Contact Taylor Schoen at tschoen@lsureveille.com


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Residence halls prepare for new crop Kristen Frank

Contributing Writer

Many local incoming freshmen must make a choice: live at home with their parents or live on campus in a residence hall. Cost effectiveness notwithstanding, living in a residence hall, according to Jay High, associate director of communications and development for Residential Life, is worth it. High said the staff at Residential Life want to spread the use of the term â&#x20AC;&#x153;residence hallâ&#x20AC;? instead of â&#x20AC;&#x153;dormitoryâ&#x20AC;? because the buildings and the Reslife program are improved from what they had been. He said the term changes the perception of life on campus from casual to something students would want to take

part in. High advises incoming freshmen to get involved with everything. He said the basic idea of living on campus is that students are in the middle of everything, from classes to dining locations. He also suggests talking to Residential Advisors about anything from where to get food on campus to issues with roommates. He said parental fears that their children arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t learning properly because they live in campus housing are unfounded. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Studies consistently show that students who live in a residence hall have higher retention rates, ()'(%2 &/529%!2 >6%9%!2 or even six-year graduation rates and higher GPAs compared to students who live off-campus,â&#x20AC;? High said.

Morgan Decuir, elementary education sophomore, agreed that living in the residence hall was a great experience. She said she stopped commuting to campus after the fall of her freshman year in favor of living in McVoy Hall, where there was more freedom than living at home. She said she could have friends over when she wanted â&#x20AC;&#x201C; within reasonable hours. She also said she can call her roommate a true friend now. Channyn Stanley, business management sophomore, said the same for her spring semester of freshman year because she was Decuirâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roommate, though the preceding fall semester was different for her. Stanley said her fall roommate would often

borrow her belongings without asking and eat her food without discretion. According to Stanley, the roommate was eventually moved to another room, and Stanley was given a new roommate. Trey White, microbiology senior, said he also had an unpleasant roommate 7(%.(%>234-/6%$4/!34 Laville Hall. White said his former roomie would come in at random hours of the night and argue with him for no reason, either due to intoxication or anger problems. Whiteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s experience in the residence hall wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t all bad, however. He said it (%,0%$()-,%!2.4/>.$()3 way around campus and he made some of his current RES HALLS, see page 44

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File photos

[Top Left] Students can get creative when decorating their residence hall room by bunking beds and using futons to create a homey living room-style space. [Top Right] Roaring into the Halls offers freshmen help with moving into their residential hall each fall. [Bottom Left] McVoy Hall is a co-ed residential hall that offers two-student rooms with hall baths. [Bottom Right] East Laville Hall houses Honors College students and is recently renovated. The hall is for female and male residents and offers two-student rooms with hall baths.


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A basic guide to Greek life rush week Mike Gegenheimer

the rushees.

Round two is more formal with PNMs returning Contributing Writer WHAT TO EXPECT to their top six houses for What do Pete Maravich, 20-minute rounds. With the Mary Landrieu and Huey P. Fraternities extended time, rushees can Long have in common? Fraternity rush takes begin to truly get to know the All of them were Greeks place over the course of four members of the house. After at LSU. days and consists of three this round, rushees will select As thousands of fresh- rounds. their top three choices out of men storm LSU’s campus (%>2342/5.$)3!47/ houses that invite them back. this fall, hundreds will decide day event that brings every /24(%>.!,2/5.$253(to join the ranks of one of the rushee to every house for ees are allotted one hour at largest Greek communities in 15 minutes at each chapter. each house before the deadthe country. Round one is a more relaxed, ,).% 4/ 35"-)4 >.!, #(/)#%3 /7%6%2 4(% >234 34%0 with rushees getting a feel for However, this typically turns toward becoming a member each house. After round one, into a chance spend as much of a Greek house is going prospective new members se- time as you want at each through formal rush. lect six houses to return to out house and have your selecFormal rush is a four- of the chapters that invited tion in by this time. By now day-long event for fraterni- them back. PNMs should know certain ties and a week-long event ;(% >234 2/5.$ members of the house and for sororities, comprised of they’ll meet a ton of guys,” begin to feel more comfort-5,4)0,% 2/5.$3 !.$ 30%#)># said Clint Crowson, vice !",%7)4(-!+).'!>.!,$%events centered around get- president of Interfraternity cision. ting to know the members Council Recruitment. “A of each chapter and for the lot of meeting people and Sororities members to get to know shaking hands.” Expect some clapping,

jumping and singing upon arrival to each house. Sorority rush is a much more involved and formal process over the course of eight days and four rounds that carefully selects each girl who will receive a bid. (% >234 2/5.$ )3 ;#% Water” and is similar to 4(% >234 2/5.$ /& &2!4%2.)49 rush in that it involves short rounds at each house in order to let girls get a feel for the personality of each house. PNMs will select up to seven (/53%3 &/,,/7).' 4(% >234 round. The next round is “philanthropy,” where the girls of each house show off their philanthropic endeavors to PNMs and the longer rounds allow for more interactions with members. PNMs will RUSH see page 43


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Parking confuses, frustrates students Appropriate permits required

4(!4 7(/,% !2%! 9/5=2% >.% because there’s that huge lot right across the street,” he said. “But if you’re anyone else, it’s awful, because they put the commuters in the Joey Groner strangest places, like in the Contributing Writer track stadium parking lot.” According to the ParkThere are many things that unite the entire LSU ).' 2!&># !.$ 2!.30/24!student body. Tiger football 4)/. /&>#%    345$%.43 games and free pancakes are had commuter permits last among them. But few things year. An additional 3,717 rebring people together quite sided on campus and used the like the complaints about resident lots. English junior Shaye Anparking. The University’s student derson has lived both on and parking lots are generally split /&&#!-053(%3!)$3(%>.$3 into four categories. There are commuter parking far more lots for on-campus residents, stressful than resident parkwhich are designated by a ing. “Residents really have it green “3.” Some lots near the fraternity and sorority houses easy, their lots are really close are reserved for the Greek to most of the halls,” Andersystem, while the Law Cen- son said. “But as a commuter, File photo ter has its own spots as well. it really sucks. The spots are [[Top] A view of a commuter lot near Tiger Stadium. [Bottom] Two cars, Commuting students can park in short supply, and they’re forced to park illegally due to lack of space, recieve tickets. far away from everything.” in lots with a blue “1.” Anderson and LeBas said To park in any lot, students must have the correct there are no special secrets to respective parking permit. If getting a good spot. Both only anyone parks in any lot with- offered the advice of either out the correct permit, they taking the bus or getting to 7),, !,-/34 #%24!).,9 >.$ ! campus early. “I’m going to live about ticket from the LSU Police Department when they return >6%-).54%3!7!9&2/-#!-pus during the fall, so I’m to their car. The lots that often get the planning to leave my apartmost attention are the com- ment about 30 minutes early muter lots, for those who live each day,” LeBas said. “The off-campus. Students who use best thing to do is take the the commuter lots often com- bus, so you’re not wasting gas plain about a lack of spaces and you don’t have to worry /2 4(% 3)'.)>#!.4 $)34!.#% /& about a spot.” 45$%.43 #!. >.$ 2/54% the lots from most of the halls maps for the bus on the Parkwhere classes are held. “There’s no way around ).' 2!&># !.$ 2!.30/24!it, parking if you don’t live on tion website. An app called campus just sucks,” said art TransLoc is also available junior Jake LeBas. “Parking for smartphone users, which on campus sucks, it always tracks the buses in real time has sucked, and it always will to let students know when they’ll arrive. suck.” LeBas said his biggest problem with parking is that the lots are so far from the classrooms. Contact Joey Groner at “If you have a class in CEBA [Patrick F. Taylor] or jgroner@lsureveille.com


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CAS offers study tips, tutorial center Students usually learn not to cram

Another available resource is Smart Thinking. This allows students to get free online help in math subjects. Students can use Joshua Bergeron up to 900 hours of Smart Thinking for free. Staff Writer “Smart Thinking is reStudents often lay ally a great way for students awake at night, wondering to get help if they are strughow to ace a test they have gling with math,” Wheeler not prepared for adequately. explained. “It is especially The Center for Aca- helpful if they can’t make it demic Success can’t help to the tutorial center while them in the hour before an it is open.” Many exam, but tips the cenErin Wheelter provides er, Science are things and Math students alLearning ready know Strategies they should consulbe doing, tant, said according the center fi to Wheeler. can prevent File photo But she Students can take advantage of the Center for Academic Success to students — Erin Wheeler stressed that learn better study methods or do homework in the tutorial center. especially Science and Math Learning studying for freshmen — Strategies consultant long hours from getting before a test is a poor study into bad situations. Wheeler said one way habit. “Cramming is just a to prepare for tests is to use the center’s “Gold Stan- 4%-0/2!29 >8< 3(% 3!)$ “You might feel like you dard” approach. “It is all about getting have a good grasp of the the most out of homework,” information. When you are Wheeler explained. “It is taking your test an hour latimportant not to go into er, most of that information your homework cold turkey will probably have been too. They should review forgotten. We tell students ./4%3 "%&/2% !.$ !&4%2 >.- that they should have short, intense study sessions on ishing.” Students don’t have to top of studying after each do their homework alone. class.” Wheeler said the real One thing that Wheeler suggested is to go to the tutorial problem is that most students don’t take advantage center. The tutorial center al- of the center. She said they lows students to study or have a decent amount of complete homework with 42!&># %6%29 3%-%34%2 "54 the assistance of tutors. The not near what it should be. services are provided free Wheeler estimated that she of charge. Students simply sees about 100 students drop into room 141B in each semester. Middleton Library and pick 50?!'3&/2).$)6)$5!,35"*%#43 (%3% ?!'3 !2% 53%$ Contact Joshua Bergeron at to notify tutors when students need help. jbergeron@lsureveille.com


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Comfort a must when dressing for class Flat shoes good for crossing campus

Those cute, strapp-y wedges that go just perfectly 7)4( 9/52 /54>4  %3)34 Your feet will want to murder your fashion sense once youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve walked from Patrick Danielle Kelley F. Taylor Hall to Middleton Contributing Writer Library. Accounting junior HanComing from a high school with a strict uni- nah Chon advises freshmen form policy, I was at a loss 4/ #(//3% ?)0?/03 /2 3!.for what to wear to college $!,3 2534 (%2  ?!43 #!. classes. I had heard students work with that sundress. could wear pajamas, but I Male students should conmade the decision to bypass sider a pair of boat shoes that bit of information and if open-toe is not their preference. wear actual clothes. You should only wear /2 4(% >234 &%7 $!93 I normally picked clothes business attire for a class similar to my roommate. presentation, and even then, But have no fear! This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t some professors donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t grade high school. Your class- on dress. When the time mates wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t judge you for comes to make a speech dressing down. That is, if or show a powerpoint, female students should wear they even notice you. Just in case you are still a modest dress, skirt or pant apprehensive, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve prepared suit with heels or wedges. I would advise you to throw some guidelines. I prefer to dress com- the heels in your book sack fortably. Ladies, throw on !.$ 7%!2 ?)0?/03 7(),% Nike shorts and your favor- walking to class for comite t-shirt. Gentlemen, bas- fortâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sake. Male students ketball shorts and a tee will should choose a buttondo. If you are comfortable, down with khakis, or a coat thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all that really matters and tie. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be afraid to show in Louisiana heat. Like philosophy senior personality in your profesEdwin Johnson put it, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I sional attire. Just make sure donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see any fashion com- 9/52 /54>4 $/%3.=4 4!+% away from what is most immittee stopping people.â&#x20AC;? But please, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get so portant: the presentation. comfortable that you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even change out of what you slept in. If you are a person who prefers to have your top and bottom match in a presentable manner, still go for comfort. A breezy skirt can work wonders for female students, and khaki shorts and a thin polo is a great combo for male students. Contact Danielle Kelley at Shoes are not somedkelley@lsureveille.com thing to be compromised.


!"#$%&'()*"+#(,',+*()-.+/#)!"#$%&' Edwin Johnson (left), philosophy senior, and Andi Bodin (right), psychology freshman, dress comfortably for class.

Hannah Chon (left), accounting junior, and Sanjeev Joshi (right), graduate student, still show off their style while wearing shoes that wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fail them while walking across campus.

Danielle Kelley (left), mass communication sophomore, and Josh Englund (right), graduate student, wear great outfits for a class presentation or speech.

photos by ALYSSA SIRISOPHON / The Daily Reveille


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Health Center also aids mental health Online resources, seminars offered

Marylee Williams Contributing Writer

The University has a variety of resources for students, and the Student Health Center is one of them. Students with allergies, sprained ankles and other aliments stream in and out of the facility, but what about a studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mental health? The Student Health Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mental Health Services is available for any student dealing with emotional issues that impair everyday life, such as anxiety, self-esteem or depression. Julie Hupperich, Student Health Center associate director, said whenever

students are transitioning to college, there is likely to be anxiety and stress. She said campus and national data show more students are entering college with prior mental health diagnoses, and students have increased levels of anxiety, stress and depression. Mental Health Services student resources arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t limited to individual therapy. Students can attend group therapy or seminars on different topics pertaining to mental health, like depression. Hupperich said in past years, Mental Health Services has increased the number of group therapy sessions, and students have responded well to this increase. She said some students donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need the individual counseling, but rather

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education on time management or stress. Randi Kirk, kinesiology junior, said although she has never used mental health services, she believes a lot of freshmen are concerned with >44).' ). !.$ 7),, .%',%#4 their mental health needs. ;2%3(-%. 7!.4 4/ >.$ that niche they can call home for four years,â&#x20AC;? she said. However, Hupperich said she has noticed students are less apprehensive about reaching out to Mental Health Services. According to the Mental Health Services website, a studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s psychological health can affect his or her school work and social interactions. Kirk said, as freshmen, students have to manage school work, a social life and the â&#x20AC;&#x153;whole new world of

going out,â&#x20AC;? which adds stress for students managing their own lives away from home. Mental Health Services also offers online resources for parents who may be unsure or uneasy about their children. Kirk, an LSU ambassador, said parents of freshmen are grateful for the Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health services because students can use on-campus resources rather than venture into an unfamiliar city. Hupperich said students need to identify the source of their stress or anxiety and >'52% /54 4(% 35"3%15%.4 solution.

Contact Marylee Williams at mwilliams@lsureveille.com


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Campus buildings steeped with history Hill also a quiet place to study Joshua Bergeron Staff Writer

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File photo

Huey P Long Pool stands in its original location on Field House Drive as time and rain slowly decay the linning of the pool and bricks on the walls.

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ontact Joshua Bergeron at jbergeron@lsureveille.com


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Your crash course to nightlife near LSU Tigerland the student hot spot Mike Gegenheimer Contributing Writer

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Football team poised for better ending Chandler Rome Staff Writer

January 9, 2012, sucked. For the droves of people who pledge allegiance to the purple and gold, who spent countless Saturdays with 92,600 of their best friends and Sundays playing armchair quarterback, that Monday night inside the Mercedes-Benz Superdome made them question why they should even wake up the next morning. The most dominating regular season in college football history was all but forgotten with each AJ McCarron completion and every feeble Jordan Jefferson option attack. Fights were rumored, coaches were questioned and players were threatening to never play another down as

a Tiger. Fast-forward six months. The sting is still there, but the optimism is far more prevalent. With a slew of juniors anchoring a vaunted defense, a bevy of running backs who would make any offensive coordinator drool and a prostyle quarterback that will actually hit his targets, hype has never been so high around Baton Rouge. And with eight games in Death Valley — one against Steve Spurrier and one against that team in red — the energy and hype resonating from that north endzone will be unparalleled to any season in recent memory. I was fortunate enough to witness the aforementioned “most dominating regular season in college football history” as a new student

BRIANNA PACIORKA / The Daily Reveille

A tearful Brad Wing, sophomore punter, watches as Alabama’s football team celebrates their BCS win Jan. 9, 2012 in New Orleans, La.

at LSU. But the new freshmen this fall – they have no idea how good they have it. My freshman home games evoked memories of a couple of my classes in my >234&!,,3%-%34%2:!7+7!2$ ly timed in the afternoon and

boring after about 20 minutes. Don’t get me wrong, I still get chills thinking of the Honey Badger’s punt return against Arkansas, Brad Wing’s fake punt or

An Outdoor Music Festival in Tigerland with

C O B R A S TA R S H I P s K R E W E L L A SUPER MASH BROS s FORCE FEED RADIO

SAT. AUGUST 25th s

5 P M –M ID NIG HT

TICKE TS O N S AL E @ W W W. R O UX L O U X . C O M

FOLLOW US

FOOTBALL, see page 40


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New Orleans provides fun alternatives Austen Krantz

given weekend. New Orleans hosts the annual Voodoo Music ExWhen a student arrives perience in October in City ). !4/. /5'% &/2 4(% >234 Park. As in past years, the time, there are plenty of ac- weekend of the festival falls tivities in the area to look on an off week for LSU footforward to. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to ball, meaning students wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ignore the fact that the Big (!6%4/3!#2)>#%/.%&5./0Easy is a little more than an portunity for the other. With hour away. a lineup of big-name artists, While there are plenty cool weather and numerof events going on between ous parties and shows that campus and downtown Baton continue after the park shuts Rouge, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve found driving to down, this weekend usually New Orleans will nearly al- proves a fun few days to stay ways provide an enjoyable in the city. option to ensure there are no Spring brings the New dull weekends for incoming Orleans Jazz and Heritage freshmen. Festival, another musical The city holds large- opportunity with an incredscale events on a fairly reg- ibly varied lineup, which ular basis in the fall as well often sees top-caliber acts as the spring, but there are from around the world. Acts a constant series of note- often appeal to multiple worthy performances in the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s many venues on any NOLA, see page 40 Staff Writer

File photo

Snoop Dogg performs at the 2011 Voodoo Music Experience on Halloween weekend at City Park in New Orleans, La.


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University numbers show solid standing LSU proves a good choice Kristen Frank Contributing Writer

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<WH%.,,#9&44> % Q$(% ='"7(+/"#3% X(*1 +(&#",'% *('#(+% &4/,% 5"7(/% /#02('#/% #$(% 8(&'/% #,% 5(#% "'7,47(2% "'% &#$4(#"*/6% (7('% ".% #$(3% &+('@#% ,'% &'%% 4+E(.&1!9*&29<.11-489 &% 804#"#02(% ,.% "'#+&80+&4% /-,+#/% #(&8/% "'% #$(% *,8"'5% .&446% "'*402"'5% &'% =4#"8&#(% Y+"/9((% #,0+'&8('#% 4(&50(6% #$+((1,'1#$+((%9&/:(#9&44%&'2%% (4(7('1&1/"2(%/,**(+>

Contact Kristen Frank at kfrank@lsureveille.com


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Be a college kid, no matter your class College is one long question Phil Sweeney Columnist

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34<9-&99-.30 /<')+%,+23% $-&9>*&7&2A1&) >4: &80*) &4  <&8 <'0&%,&%:HI%A%5*/0%'>%+.*% 4=.+D23492.89&0*3B A!:5*78*3.47B 842* E+9->*&7 89:)*398 8&> 4*1>6#/+,#>5,&715-% +''% A% &8 .+ .9 <*7* 842* +&'1*) 4:786:&7*'&),* *11D;*(-*(0*)4:9 247* 9-&3 D;* (-*(0*) .3 D2 & 8:5*7 ):5*7 J<*0-% )1+0/-% ;*7/6#*&,'0-%% +*=.&,=/1152%

photo courtesy of PHIL SWEENEY

Columnist Phil Sweeney (lower right) claims to have learned from his youtful indiscretions, like passing out in public after a night of debauchery.

3)*;*3D23498:7* :3)*7,7&):&9**):(&9.43 4';*% ()*#+,'&#% ')7.+% ,>%+./+:#%/%1,*2 K,>*:#% '&*% <,7% ()*#6 94,4:3&80*)1*89>4:'* +,'&-%)1+,;/+*15%A%,#&:+%,+G% 941)1.*8 B)+% ,+:#% &'+% '&*% +./+% (&3'*&80*)9-4:,-9-&9D8 431> &55&7*39 @ (4:,- Contact Phil Sweeney at @ .3 >4:7 9-.7) :3.;*76 psweeney@lsureveille.com 8.9> &3) *.,-9- >*&7 4+%


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Be bold, open to make friends early Use move-in day for intros Danielle Kelley Contributing Writer

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Contact Danielle Kelley at dkelley@lsureveille.com


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Students seek valuable work experience Even part-time job can help Marylee Williams Contributing Writer

Career Services’ Assistant Director of Job Search Jesse Downs said in March that a number of students come to college without any work experience. She stressed that work experience is how students can develop skills that will make them more marketable. In the Career Services 2011-12 LSU Job Search Handbook, the types of work experience listed are part-time, volunteer, summer jobs, cooperative education and internships.

Kayla Lato, experiential 7()#( !,,/7 ?%8)"),)49 !.$ education coordinator, said can pay well because they in March that on-campus are tip-based. jobs are in demand for Another job that allows students flexibility because for student the work workers is schedules a job in re!2% ?%8)",% tail, Downs and Universaid. Some sity staff are stores will mindful of also give a student’s discounts to workload. employees. O n InternKayla Lato campus jobs experiential education coordinator ships are are available also popular to students jobs for stuthrough the Federal Col- dents. lege Work-Study Program, “An internship, paid or which is a federal program unpaid, is worth the time for undergraduate students because it helps with a stu7)4(>.!.#)!,.%%$ dent’s career path,” Lato Downs said other popu- said. lar jobs are in the hospitality Students can also parservice, like waiting tables, ticipate in cooperative

education, which are fulltime paid internships that last for one or two semesters. Careers2Geaux is one of Career Services’ resourc%34(!4(%,0345$%.43>.$).ternships. Downs said she doesn’t think students see volunteering or student leadership as employment, but these positions still offer valuable experience.

Contact Marylee Williams at mwilliams@lsureveille.com


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BR hosts bands of all genres, shapes, sizes Nicholas Persac Contributing Writer

Cover bands, Louisiana styles, soon-to-bes and has-beens take the stages in Baton Rouge at the many venues around town, giving incoming freshmen the chance to relieve the music itch. THE COVER BAND Cover bands are a staple at college bars, and many LSU hangouts often have cover bands, giving students a chance to sing along and dance through the night. Most of the bars in and near Tigerland â&#x20AC;&#x201D; like Fredâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar, Mikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Daiquiris and Grill and JLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Place â&#x20AC;&#x201D; have stages where party-style cover bands play on a regular basis to give students a mix of popular songs. But go to The Varsity Theatre near the North Gates on Highland Road, and nationally touring groups covering only one band â&#x20AC;&#x201D; like Led Zeppelin â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will perform. Most of these concerts have a bar atmosphere with rowdy drinkers, passionate dancers and typical socializing among the college crowd. LOUISIANA STLYES Out-of-state freshmen are in for a treat, and those from the pelican state can relish in the local bands making Louisiana famous. Rebirth Brass Band, the New Orleans-based group seen on HBOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s series â&#x20AC;&#x153;Treme,â&#x20AC;? have played in

Baton Rouge at venues like Chelseaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cafe on Perkins Road or in tents outside bars like Fredâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s during football season. Chelseaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is also known to book the cajun band Pine Leaf Boys, vocalist and bassist from The Meters, George Porter Jr. and Soul Rebels Brass Band. Bogieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on East Boyd Drive once booked Troy â&#x20AC;&#x153;Trombone Shortyâ&#x20AC;? Andrews, who is also featured on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Treme.â&#x20AC;? New Orleans jam band Galactic has played at The Varsity Theatre multiple times. Hearing the music for which Louisiana is known is part of the LSU experience, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ample opportunities to blend with the locals and seasoned Baton Rougians at these concerts. THE BIG BANDS The Spanish Moon Bar and Live Music Headquarters on Highland Road near I-10 is known not only for featuring local, electronic and indie bands, but also for being a spot to see the next big band. College-radio favorites The xx, Girl Talk, High Top Kicks and Spoon have all played in the twostory venue. The Varsity Theatre hosts more than its fair share of bands with strong grassroots followings â&#x20AC;&#x201D; such as Blues Traveler, Perpetual Groove and Keller Williams. The Manship Theatre on Lafayette Street in downtown Baton Rouge often pulls in national acts like Colin Hay, Dr. John and The B-52s for more upscale performances. The Baton Rouge River Center in downtown Baton Rouge also features some big names â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Mayer,

Sugarland and Indigo Girls have played there. TRAVELING New Orleans is about an hour from Baton Rouge, and many students travel there to catch national acts. Tipitinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x201D; with both uptown and French Quarter locations â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and the House of Blues have hosted bands like Phoenix, Passion Pit and Wilco and frequently have impressive lineups of well-known and local bands. Arena-style tours wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t often be found in Baton Rouge, but students can travel to the New Orleans Arena â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Britney Spears, Eric Clapton, Lady Gaga and Jay-Z have all performed there â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or befriend a Texas Tiger and travel to

the Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion in the Woodlands, Texas, where bands that favor amphitheaters â&#x20AC;&#x201D; like Jack Johnson, and Dave Matthews Band â&#x20AC;&#x201D; make their closest stops to the University. STAYING ON CAMPUS 6%. #!-053#/.>.%$ freshmen can catch a number of great musical performances. Most obviously, the Golden Band from Tigerland puts on pre-game and halftime shows at every home football game, while their in-game tunes keep the Death Valley crowd energized. The band also performs at the annual Fall Fest celebration in the Quad. MUSIC, see page 36

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!"#$%&'!!"#$%&'()!*#+$),(,+*)!-.+/$ MUSIC, from page 34 Groovin’ on The Grounds is an annual spring concert typically held on the Parade Ground with a drug and alcohol-free message that has featured Ludacris, Huter Hayes, FreeSol, OneRepublic, Shinedown, Big Boi, Wyclef Jean, Ying Yang Twins and Better Than Ezra in past years. In the fall semester, Students On Target hosts the annual Battle of the Bands competition, where the winner earns an opening slot to perform during Groovin’ on The Grounds. This past year, the competition was held on the same day as a football game to give tailgaters a taste of University talent. Those with a more classical taste can enjoy showcases at the University’s School of Music of student and faculty talent in choirs, ensembles, bands and

orchestras. Some freshmen will be required by courses to attend these performances, but many have at least one performance each semester and won’t disappoint curious listeners.

BRIANNA PACIORKA / The Daily Reveille

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Memphis band FreeSol performs at Groovin’ on the Grounds on the LSU Parade Ground on March 24.


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photos by BRIANNA PACIORKA / The Daily Reveille

[Top left] Local band Hazy Ray, winner of Battle of the Bands, performs at Groovin’ on the Grounds on March 24. [Bottom left] Ludacris performs at Groovin’ on the Grounds on March 24. [Right] MUTEMATH lead vocalist Paul Meany performs during the band’s Oct. 14, 2011, performance at Chelsea’s Cafe.


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A guide to technology around campus Text-and-walk a go-to move Taylor Balkom Staff Writer

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CAMPUS RESTARAUNTS THAT ACCEPT TIGERCASH Smoothie King (Student Recreation Center) LSU Faculty Club (Raphael Semmes) Atrium Cafe (Design Building) CCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (Law Center) CCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (Middleton Library) Chick-N-Grill (Patrick Taylor) SUBWAY (Foster Hall) Snack Bar (Vet School) BizCafe- CCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (Business Education Complex) Student Union - Magnolia Room - McDonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s - Einstein Bros - CCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s - Papa Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza - Bayou Bistreaux - Salsaritaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s - Jamba Juice - Chick-fil-A - Panda Express - ON-THE-GEAUX The 5 (Pentagon) The Take 5 convenience store 459 Commons (Laville) Outtakes

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Contact Taylor Balkom at tbalkom@lsureveille.com


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File photo

Students show their Tiger spirit at a home football game last season.

FOOTBALL, from page 27 Jeffersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jump pass just to %84%.$4(%-)$$,%>.'%24/4(% Gators. 547)4(-/34'!-%3/54 of reach by the second quarter, the atmosphere wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as electric as some are accustomed 4/ ,%!6).' -% 9%!2.).' &/2 ! .!),")4).'.)'(4'!-%).)'%2 Stadium. So as the most wonderful time of the year rolls around, I shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to tell you all the reasons to make sure File Photo

The Raconteurs perform a headlining set at the 2011 Voodoo Music Experience at City Park in New Orleans, La.

NOLA, from page 28

'%.%2!4)/.3 /& -53)# ,/6ers, with performers like last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Al Green, Bruce 02).'34%%. 4(% %!#( Boys and Bon Iver, but the festival also seeks to exhibit New Orleans culture as well. With an overwhelm).'.5-"%2/&&//$/04)/.3 from local vendors and a series of shops and displays &/2 !24 !44%.$%%3 '%4 3/-% snapshots of Southern Louisiana before they even leave the festival. Besides music and more %6%.43'//$&//$)3!,7!93 just as easy to come by in New Orleans as it is in Ba4/./5'%(%4(%2)4=3>.% $).).' /2 ! -/-!.$0/0 "52'%2 */).4 4(%2% !2% 535ally options within walk).'$)34!.#%&2/-7(%2%6%2 you end up in New Orleans.

And while there are plenty of seafood options, the city isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t short of variety either, 7)4(.5-%2/53()'(15!,)49 %4(.)# 2%34!52!.43 /&&%2).' selections in Indian, Italian and Mexican to name a few. Students without a ride south shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fret. If one canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t catch a ride with a friend, the LA Swift bus service offers a one way 2)$% "%47%%. !4/. /5'% and New Orleans for a $5 &!2% (% 3%26)#% 7()#( )3 operated by the Louisiana %0!24-%.4 /& 2!.30/24!tion, was recently extended 4(2/5'(!.5!29/&

Contact Austen Krantz at akrantz@lsureveille.com

9/5=2% ). )'%2 4!$)5- /. 4(/3%%)'(4!452$!93 & ! ,%')4)-!4% %)3-!. #!.$)$!4% ! 342/.' !2-%$ quarterback and a rematch of 4(%.!4)/.!,4)4,%'!-%$/%3.=4 persuade, I really donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what will. Enjoy it, freshman, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never experienced any4().',)+%)4 /0%&5,,9 7%=,, !,, -%%4 in Miami on January 7. Contact Chandler Rome at crome@lsureveille.com


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Contact Mike Gegenheimer at mgegenheimer@lsureveille.com


!"#$%&'()*"+#(,',+*()-.+/#)!"#$%&' RUSH, from page 14 cut at least two houses for the next round. The third round is “skit,” in which the sorority sisters put on a skit for PNMs to allow the girls to see a more fun side of the house, and cuts are made to final three houses following skit round. The final round is “preference.” By then, most of the PNMs have decided on a house or are debating between two. This is the last chance for the members of the house to get to know the girls before finals cuts are made and bids are sent out. BEHAVIOR Fraternities “Be yourself and go into rush open minded,” Crowson said. “If you’ve heard bad things about a particular house,

it’s most likely just talk and rumors.” For the most part, fraternity rush is a very laid back and friendly atmosphere. PNMs will be judged rigorously on their social skills and how they interact with the brothers of their house. However, a firm handshake and good conversation can go a long way. PNMs should ask questions about the house, pledgeship and the financial and time commitments that are expected of them if they are to join. Sororities For the most part, sorority PNMs can expect to act the same way in regards to being themselves and make sure to get to know the girls at the house. Sorority rush can be a very stressful and fast-paced time, but the important thing to

remember is that a lot of the time the sorority sisters are just as nervous as the incoming girls. It’s important to always be very lady-like and make a good first impression. In Greek rush, the house is looking to show off what they have to offer, but at the same time

the PNMs are showing off what they have to offer. PNMs should go into rush with an open mind and base their decision on which house they feel most comfortable with, not what their friends do. Contact Mike Gegenheimer at mgegenheimer@lsureveille.com

File Photo

Prospective sorority new members walk down sorority row during rush.


!"#$%&&!!"#$%&'()!*#+$),(,+*)!-.+/$ Of the different residence halls, High said, best friends while there. the renovations to East Residential Lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s asso- Laville are complete; the ciate director said he urges new engineering college, anyone who has roommate Residential College One problems to talk to their North Hall, is complete; and Residential Advisors and the bathroom renovations try to set up a roommate on both the Pentagon and agreement. This agreement Highland Hall are complete details boundaries of what for the upcoming school should and shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be year. done in the room. If these High said Reslife is boundaries are breached, very excited for the new High said, the resident group of students that will should talk to his or her grace its residence halls this 2//--!4% !.$ >'52% /54 fall. what can be done about the problem. If needed, there is a period wherein the resident can request to switch roommates after the seventh day of class. High said there are more than 5,000 students who choose to live on campus, and roommate issues affect a very small percentage of them. He said each Contact Kristen Frank at case is handled differently kfrank@lsureveille.com and individually.

RES HALLS, from page 12

TAYLOR BALKOM / The Daily Reveille

Mike the Tiger swims in his habitatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pool on a hot evening. Many students visit Mike on their way to and from class.


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Contact Taylor Balkom at tbalkom@lsureveille.com


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2013-2d-6