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Central Michigan Life || Monday, Oct. 8, 2012 || 5B

[NEWS]

Med students don’t buy into medical show drama plot lines By Charnae Sanders Staff Reporter

Famous medical shows like “Grey’s Anatomy,” “ER” and “House” may have stolen the hearts of millions, but is it manipulating the minds of fans by showing them unrealistic plot lines and scenes? “‘Grey’s Anatomy’ is entirely Hollywood, but ‘ER,’ I know having a sister working in a hospital setting makes it a little bit realistic with that,” said Royal Oak graduate student Jessica Matyas. “Their back stories and things get kind of dramatic, but as far as the stuff that actually happens in the hospital, it is impossible. Especially things like ‘House,’ it’s completely off the wall, and you don’t see it very often but it still happens.” The psychology neuroscience major often calls her sister, who is a nurse, and together they laugh about episodes of “Grey’s Anatomy.” “We’ll call each other during the show and say ‘this is really cool except this isn’t accurate, and we’ll start citing with each other exactly what’s wrong with it,’” Matyas said. “We watch ‘Breaking Bad’ and my sister will say that is not how you run a IV for chemotherapy. I still enjoy them as much as anybody else, but I’m very critical of all the nit-picking little details.” Shelby Township sophomore Emily Harting, a communication disorders major, understands the overall aspect of the

By Lauren O’Leary Staff Reporter and Hailee Sattavara Metro Editor

NHAT V. MEYER/SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS/MCT

Dr. Karen Pike talks with a patient at the Community Medical Center Emergency Room in Los Gatos, Calif., in 2005. With the success of realistic medical and forensic science television programs such as “CSI,’’ “ER’’ and “Grey’s Anatomy,’’ many doctors and researchers have jumped at the chance to serve as consultants to Hollywood script writers.

show is to be very dramatic and exciting, but said it is accurate in some ways. “I love ‘Grey’s Anatomy,’” said Harting. “They try to make the surgeries that they do put in (and) the conditions realistic; the symptoms are realistic.” In order for viewers to get a glimpse of what the medical world is really like, Midland sophomore Katy Isles suggests producers of the shows portray it in a more realistic setting so people don’t go into the career thinking that’s going to happen. Harting said the drama is

high, but it’s not always that way in real life. “There aren’t people running through the hallways,” Harting said. “There’s not really gun shootings all the time in the hospital. The medical terms they use in the diagnosis and all that, that’s all real, but everything else is over-emphasized.” For people who are interested in working the medical field, Isles said it would be wise if people job shadow first. However, Matyas insists finding your passion. “Something very simple can

really just show you what you have a passion for,” Matyas said. “So there’s absolutely nothing wrong with going into a field because you were attracted to something you saw on ‘Grey’s Anatomy.’ You saw somebody working on open-heart surgery and you thought, ‘it looks really cool, I want to get involved in that,’ then fantastic. “Whatever it is that leads you to your passion. But being passionate about your work is an absolute must.” studentlife@cm-life.com

91.5 WMHW-FM changes name to ‘Moore Rock’ radio By Sean Bradley Senior Reporter

If your radio station is tuned to 91.5 WHMW-FM you may have noticed a change last week. The Central Michigan University radio station changed its name to Moore Rock 91.5 from Modern Rock 91.5 on Oct. 1, said WMHW-FM Program Director and California senior Evan Hodgens said. Hodgens said the change, which was decided at the beginning of the calendar year by the whole staff, is not just in name but also includes

Fourth-annual Wellspring Literary Series kicks off tonight

re-configuring some of the station’s content. “Pushing specialty shows to the weekends,” he said. “During the week will be for DJs on-air and giving people experience.” Specialty shows include hip-hop showcase Urban Exchange, as well as shows which cover sports, Hodgens said. The station will broaden the range of rock music it plays, going back to the mid-1990s and early 2000s to include different music other than current songs in rotation on major radio stations, said Dillon Stanco, WMHW station manager.

“We want more consistency out of the station,” Stanco said. “If someone wants to listen to music at 6 p.m., we’ll play the same thing at 6 p.m. Monday through Friday,” he said. Stanco said the shows won’t change format and the only thing that should change is the time when the shows air on the station. He said the idea of refocusing the station’s content came after a meeting in fall of 2011. “We met with a group on the east coast and they suggested broadening the rock music spectrum,” he said. He said about eight hours a

week are devoted to non-format specialty shows, including sports and genre-specific music shows. The name Moore Rock is a play on the hall’s name where the station is located in Moore Hall, but it’s also indicative of the changes in the station’s schedule and philosophy, Hodgens said. “We’re (also) broadcasting more rock music,” he said. He said the changes will make the station grow, in total listeners and the type of music it plays. studentlife@cm-life.com

Fleda Brown hosts her own radio show, but that’s not why she’s coming to Mount Pleasant tonight. Brown will travel from Traverse City to kick off the fourth-annual Wellspring Literary Series at 7 p.m. at Art Reach, 111 E. Broadway St. Associate Professor of English Language and Literature Robert Fanning said he expects a full house. “Her work is engaging, philosophical and moving, without being flashy,” Fanning said. “Her poems are good models that there can be great profundity in language that is simple, direct and clear.” Brown writes about anything around her, but it’s how she looks at life that makes her work profound, Fanning said. “She could be writing a poem about walking through airport security in which the speaker removes her own flesh, and we begin to question what is identity,” Fanning said. “She could be writing a poem about canoeing on a river, which becomes a meditation on what poetry is.” Brown will be accompanied by music professor Joanna White and CMU alum Joe Hertler will keep his tradition of opening the series. “It has a statewide reputation,” Fanning said. “I am starting to get requests from poets around the state who want come and read here.” The monthly series happens on Monday evenings and features prominent writers and poets from across the state. Each reading features a visiting writer, along with a reading by a student from the CMU creative writing department and a performance by a local singer/songwriter or performer from the CMU school of music. “It makes for a great cultural experience,” Fanning said. “Her poems are direct and plain-spoken, but deeply moving. I found her work this summer online, and was

extremely excited knowing she’d be another great poet to bring to Wellspring. When I invited her, she responded enthusiastically. “ In the past three years, the series has featured writers from Detroit, Kalamazoo, Ann Arbor, Grand Rapids, Traverse City and East Lansing. This year’s series will feature visits by more of Michigan’s premiere poets and writers, including Fleda Brown, Anne-Marie Oomen, Jamie Thomas, Glenn Shaheen and CMU student Courtney Kalmbach. “Robert arranges the speakers and musicians, while Art Reach provides the space, marketing and financial support via a grant from the Russ Herron Poetry Fund of the Mount Pleasant Area Community Foundation,” said Kathy Hill, executive director of Art Reach. Hill said she is especially pleased that the series has developed a loyal audience of community members and students alike. “Each poet is unique, and most readings are gripping and personal,” Hill said. All readings are free and open to the public and refreshments are provided by Max and Emily’s, 125 E. Broadway St. “My hopes for this year are that the series continues to draw strong audiences and to inspire creativity,” Hill said. Brown was the poet laureate of Delaware from 2007 to 2009 and taught for 27 years and directed the poets in the schools program at the University of Delaware. She is the recipient of the Felix Pollak Prize, a Pushcart Prize, the Phillip Levine Prize, the Great Lakes Colleges New Writer’s Award and her work has been a finalist twice in the National Poetry Series. “I expect another great year,” Fanning said. “This is the first time I don’t know any of the poets and hopefully it will draw more faculty and students who have never been here before.” metro@cm-life.com

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Central Michigan Life || Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012 || 3D

[YEAR IN REVIEW]

Justin Gawronski named SGA president; VP Anna Dvorak resigns in first week Staff Reports

Macomb junior Justin Gawronski was elected to be the president of the Student Government Association with 37 percent of the vote on March 18, with Alma junior Anna Dvorak originally as his vice president. Exactly one week after inauguration, Dvorak resigned as Vice President and was replaced by Hesperia senior Killian Richeson. The administration of Gawronski and Dvorak came under criticism in its first week from Treasurer Tony Grettenberger and three members of the House and Senate. Those allegations, regarding bylaw violations, led to the formation of three committees. “I think as a whole, we will continue to focus on ... the relevancy of the SGA,” Gawronski said. “My broad goals are going to stay the same, but, with Killian as my vice president, we will be able to change more. This is not the way I would (have) liked this to happen, and it wasn’t expected, but I am happy with the change.” Gawronski said Dvorak resigned because of personal reasons, which he would not

disclose. Gawronski made no connection to the recently formed review committees. He also would not comment about whether Dvorak would be involved in the SGA in the future. “I resigned to focus on my personal life,” said Dvorak, declining to give further comment. Richeson ran against Gawronski for the SGA presidency, finishing in third with 20 percent of the vote. Gawronski credited Richeson’s campaign as one of the main reasons he chose him to replace Dvorak. “He ran a good campaign and has an immense amount of experience with the SGA and all of its positions,” Gawronski said. “I cannot think of anyone more qualified for the position.” Gawronski said appointing Richeson to the position will not change his administration’s goals but will allow him to accomplish more. “I’ve been involved with SGA for a long time, and now that I have the chance to serve in a position like this, I’m going to pour everything I have into it,” Richeson said. “I’m going to be dedicated to the internal aspects of the SGA in working to possibly clarify

NO CONFIDENCE | CONTINUED FROM 1D Student senators Christopher Benison and Michelle Campbell presented the motion in the last 10 minutes of the meeting. Benison read the motion and A-Senate Chairman Jim McDonald opened the floor to discussion. Campbell said in an email the next step after the vote is for the Central Michigan University Board of Trustees to “examine the leadership of President Ross and Provost Shapiro.” “I and Senator Benison felt it was appropriate to present this at the meeting today because the evidence was overwhelming that the president and provost have

ignored shared governance and the voices of the CMU community to the detriment of CMU’s students, faculty and staff,” she said. “I hope that the board of trustees takes the vote of no confidence seriously and reacts in an appropriate manner that will satisfy the concerns and grievances of students, faculty and staff on this important issue.” The motion was approved against Ross and Shapiro in less than a minute. Former Student Government Association President Vincent Cavataio said the wording in the motion regarding the “Resolution for the Proposed Central

and expand upon the bylaws and the constitution so that they are concise, and, most importantly, focus on serving the student body.” Vince Cavataio, a Shelby Township graduate student and former SGA president, said he expected Gawronski’s administration to move past Dvorak’s resignation and said he will continue to play an advisory role. “Justin and Killian are both highly qualified and very capable. They’ll take SGA in the right direction,” he said. “Throughout the rest of the year, I plan on staying involved with Justin, helping him with the transition.” The Gawronski administration came under fire by Senate and House members because of how the senators acted following multiple appointments, which was allegedly in violation of Bylaw Article II Section 1, which in part states, “A Senate seat that becomes vacant shall be filled by the General Board.” The complaints also address recent appointments made by the Gawronski administration to previously appoint Richeson as elections director and Grosse Pointe junior Anthony J. Smith as

Michigan University College of Medicine” is inaccurate. The motion states “Dr. Ross and Dr. Shapiro have ignored the results of a vote taken by the Academic Senate on Nov. 1, 2011 to support a motion entitled “Resolution for the Proposed Central Michigan University College of Medicine.” “The motion in question was introduced as an incidental resolution. That means that no discussion can take place,” Cavataio said. “No one had a choice in the matter even if they wanted to.” During the presentation and discussion of the motion, Ross remained silent and Shapiro appeared to shake his head, chuckle and talk to surrounding senators. Ross and Shapiro left immediately following the vote. university@cm-life.com

membership director only 45 minutes after their inauguration, as well as appointing Cavataio as the graduate student representative in the Senate. The complaints alleged the Gawronski administration was filling governmental positions with friends and supporters. The administration was also accused of violating Bylaw Article V Sections 7 and 9, which require a campus-wide application process in selecting an elections director, one that complaints said couldn’t have been achieved in the 45 minutes it took to appoint Richeson and Smith. The SGA has responded to the recent allegations by forming three new committees. The first, the review committee, is composed of the treasurer, two senators and two House representatives randomly chosen by the House and a representative of the Office of Student Life. Grettenberger has previously stated he will step down from the committee because of personal bias. The review committee will review the

BETHANY WALTER/FILE PHOTO

Macomb junior Justin Gawronski and Alma junior Anna Dvorak address Student Government Association members in the Charles V. Park Memorial Library Strosacker Room.

constitutionality of the recent actions taken by the Gawronski administration. Also formed was the constitution committee, which will review the constitution and deem if any changes should be made, and the ad hoc committee, which will focus on student concerns outside of the constitution.

Both committees, as stated in the bylaws, will be chaired by Richeson and composed of representatives from both the Senate appointed by Richeson and members of the House appointed by the Speaker of the House, Westland junior Patrick O’Connor. studentlife@cm-life.com

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Central Michigan Life || Friday, Sept. 28, 2012 || 9

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I N D I A N A D A I LY S T U D E N T | M O N D AY, J U N E 1 1 , 2 0 1 2 | I D S N E W S . C O M

REGION EDITOR: MARK KEIERLEBER | REGION@IDSNEWS.COM

WONDERLAB TO HOST RADIO KIDS’ DAY Children will be able to talk with other children from across the country using short-wave radio technology, try out Morse Code communication and

participate in a scavenger hunt to locate radio-related exhibits. The event costs $7 for WonderLab members and $10 per kit plus museum

admission for nonmembers. WHEN 1 to 4:30 p.m. WHERE WonderLab Museum 308 W. Fourth St., Bloomington

U.S. House passes bill ending tax on medical devices BY MARK KEIERLEBER mkeierle@indiana.edu

MARK KEIERLEBER | IDS

Protesters listen as Father Elias Mills of Bloomington's Mother of the Redeemer Retreat Center reads a prayer Friday during the Stand Up for Religious Freedom Rally on the Monroe County Courthouse lawn. During the rally, protesters expressed opposition to the Department of Health and Human Services’ mandate requiring employer health plans to provide free contraceptives, sterilizations and abortion-inducing drugs to employees.

Health care mandate protested BY MARK KEIERLEBER mkeierle@indiana.edu

More than 100 Stand Up for Religious Freedom Rally protesters gathered on the Monroe County Courthouse lawn Friday to express opposition to the United States Department of Health and Human Services’ mandate issued in January. The date for the rally, according to a press release, was chosen to highlight the HHS mandate’s unconstitutional infringement of religious freedom, coming just weeks before the highly anticipated ruling on the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act from the U.S. Supreme Court, expected at the end of June. The mandate, under President Barack Obama’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, requires employer health plans to provide free contraceptives, sterilizations and abortion-inducing drugs to employees. Although the mandate includes a “religious exemption,” Friday’s protesters said the mandate is a violation of their religious freedom guaranteed by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. “As a Christian, I completely oppose the abortion

of unborn children,” protester Andrew Henry said. Henry, who graduated from IU in 2006, is currently a history teacher and staff member at ClearNote Church in Bloomington. “We’re made in the image of God, and a human life is sacred and should not be killed.” The protest began with a rosary at 11:30 a.m. and the rally commencing at noon. As speakers prayed into a microphone, the protesters bowed their heads in silence. From the elderly in wheelchairs to young children, attendees held cardboard signs that read, “your freedom is next,” “Stop Obama’s HHS mandate” and “stand up for your religious freedom.” The HHS mandate, Henry said, requires religious institutions to directly fund contraceptive and abortion drugs, although these religious institutions specifically oppose such practices. “This whole idea of the president mandating things to the American people is against our constitutional rights,” said Carole Canfield of ClearNote Church, who helped organize the demonstration. “That’s not the way this is set up, that is a dictatorship. He has no right

to dictate these things, especially when they go against the Constitution.” The Bloomington protest, which was organized by IU Jacobs School of Music student Martha Sliva, 18, was part of a nationwide movement. With the closest protest in Indianapolis, Sliva said she organized the event to inform the Bloomington and IU communities. “I think it was a really good show of people who aren’t going to take it, who are being treaded on by the government,” Sliva said. “There are so many people who just stopped and looked and saw people are not in the closet about this and we won’t take it. I mean, if you go to any other country, they can’t believe what America is letting slide by.” In more than 150 cities throughout the nation, more than 10,000 people rallied against the HHS mandate during the second Stand Up for Religious Freedom Rally. The first rally was in March. Friday was also the 223rd anniversary of the day James Madison introduced the Bill of Rights to the first Congress, including what would later become the First Amendment.

“If Obamacare is ruled unconstitutional, we must insure that religious freedom will be protected in subsequent health care legislation,” Stand Up Rally national codirector Monica Miller said in the release. “But if Obamacare is not struck down, we’ll be sending the federal authorities a clear message that the faith based institutions and private businesses affected by the HHS mandate simply will not comply with it.” According to Miller, the federal government does not have the right to define “the scope of religious ministry,” referring to the “religious exemption” in the mandate that does not include several religious institutions, including Catholic schools and hospitals. “We have an obligation as citizens to do everything in our power, from praying, talking to our friends and family, writing letters to our representatives in the city, county, state, the governor, Congress, anybody we can to oppose this because it is evil,” Henry said. “When the laws of a nation are evil, the nation will not prosper. The nation will suffer and eventually die.”

The United States House of Representatives passed the Health Care Cost Reduction Act of 2012 on Thursday by a 270-146 vote. The bill, co-sponsored by Indiana Representatives Todd Young and Mike Pence, intends to repeal a 2.3-percent tax on medical devices imposed under President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act. The medical industry is heavily centered in Indiana, Young said in a press release, and the tax on medical devices would have negative impacts on the state. If the Health Care Cost Reduction Act is not enacted, the medical device tax will begin in January 2013. “The medical device industry employs more than 20,000 Hoosiers, with nearly 6,800 in Warsaw alone,” Pence said in a press release. “Every day these researchers, scientists, technicians and high-tech manufacturers produce a multitude of life-saving and life-enhancing products that are sold around the world, generating an economic impact of more than $10 billion in Indiana.” The tax could also have an impact on the economy in Bloomington, where Cook Medical is headquartered. Cook Medical is the nation’s largest privately owned medical device company and has plants in Indiana, Illinois, North Carolina, California and Pennsylvania. “This repeal is vital to patients and their caregivers who want their critical-care devices manufactured in the U.S.,” Steve Ferguson, chairman of the board of Cook Group, parent of Cook Medical, said in a press release. “The threat of this imminent tax has already led companies to move existing manufacturing offshore and plan for future growth outside the U.S.” In addition to the repeal of the medical device

“This repeal is vital to patients and their caregivers who want their critical-care devices manufactured in the U.S.” Steve Ferguson, chairman of the board of Cook Group

tax, H.R. 436 would repeal limitations on the purchase of over-the-counter medications under the ACA. It would also make changes to the use of health savings accounts and flexible spending accounts. “This tax would be devastating to Indiana and to device manufacturers across the country,” Young said in a press release. “Indiana is recognized internationally in this industry because dozens of medical device manufacturers are headquartered here, and 20,000 Hoosiers work in this field. I’m proud to co-sponsor and vote for a bill to protect Indiana jobs.” The Congressional Budget Office and the staff of the Joint Committee on Taxation estimate this bill would increase the deficit by $2.2 billion in 2013 and $3.2 billion during the 2013-17 period but decrease the deficit by $6.7 billion during the 2013-22 period. That total reflects onbudget savings of about $9.2 billion and off-budget costs of about $2.5 billion, according to the CBO. “We applaud the U.S. House of Representatives, which today passed bipartisan legislation that repeals the medical device tax,” Ferguson said. “We hope the U.S. Senate will act in the near future. If not repealed, this tax will lead to U.S. technology and jobs being relocated outside the U.S. Further, we will see a loss in future jobs and delays in the latest medical innovations being available to American patients. Americans want their critical devices manufactured in the U.S. and to have access to the latest medical technologies.”

Disney Institute leadership program to visit Ivy Tech The Ivy Tech Corporate College in Bloomington will coordinate Disney’s Approach to Leadership Excellence program, an event sponsored by the Disney

Institute on Wednesday. The event starts at 8:30 a.m. and ends at 4:30 p.m. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m., costs $399 per person and includes all course ma-

terials. Corporate groups with five or more people may register for $399 per person as well. “This program is designed to teach the philosophies of

the Walt Disney company for creating vision, implementing vision and then creating an environment that allows SEE DISNEY, PAGE 9

s e n a L c i s s Cla Back by Popular Demand

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Looking for students with good organization, time management and communication skills for work in advertising sales. Previous sales experience recommended. Students must be able to work through May 2013, including summer. Approx. 15 hours per week.

1421 N. Willis Dr. . Off W. 17 th St.

812-332-6689

Email ads@idsnews.com for a complete job description or to apply. EOE


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CLASSIFIEDS

To place an ad: go online, call 812-855-0763 or stop by Ernie Pyle Hall 120 from Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Full advertising policies are available online. www.idsnews.com/classifieds

CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING POLICIES

ONLINE POSTING: All classified line ads are posted online at www.idsnews.com/classifieds at no additional charge.

If you used Yaz/Yazmin/Ocella birth control pills or a NuvaRing Vaginal Ring Contraceptive between 2001 and the present and developed blood clots, suffered a stroke, heart attack or required gall bladder removal, you may be entitled to compensation. Call Attorney Charles Johnson, 1-800-535-5727.

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per hour

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ARE YOU HIRING? Try the IDS Classifieds... THEY WORK 855-0763 idsnews.com/classifieds/ Courtyard-Marriot Bloomington Part time breakfast server Must be able to work weekends. No phone calls. Please apply in person.

NEED MONEY? SAVE A LIFE. Schedule a plasma donation. For a limited time, receive up to $240 in a month. Call 812-334-1405 or visit www.biolifeplasma.com to make an appointment.

StudentPayouts.com Paid survey takers needed in Bloomington. 100% FREE to join! Click on Surveys. Nolan’s Lawn Care Service Inc. Now hiring reliable workers for spring semester, possible summer. Also, hiring “on call” employees (employees that we can call if and when the need arises). Flexible hrs. Must have at least 4 hr. blocks: 8:30-4:30/45, 8:30-12:30 or 12:30/ 1-4:30/45, M-Sat. through June. M-F after June. $7.75/hr. & up. Must be dependable, willing to work in adverse weather. Taking applications to begin week of 3/12/12 (optional), or week of 3/19/12. Applications avail. only at: Career Development Center.

3 1 2 4 9 5 6 8 7

4 5 9 6 7 8 1 2 3

7 8 6 2 3 1 5 4 9

5 6 1 8 4 9 7 3 2

2 7 8 3 1 6 4 9 5

9 3 4 5 2 7 8 1 6

1

www.campwaynegirls.com.

Apartment Furnished

Look for the crossword daily in the comics section of the Indiana Daily Student. Find the soultion for the daily crossword here.

Send feedback or comments to marketing@idsnews.com

Apt. Unfurnished !!SHERWOOD HILLS!!

2 & 3 BRs, 2.5 & 1.5 BAs twnhs. W/D, ceiling fans, and deck. 336-2026 ***************************** Close to campus and stadium. Large 1 & 2 BR apts. Inclu. heat, water, internet, and DirectTV. 812-334-2646 ************************

Apt. Unfurnished

MARCH HOUSING Save up to

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MADNESS $12,360 on 2-5 BRs

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*COLLEGE PARK* 2 BR, 2.5 BA, all appliances, close to IU stadium. 336-2026 BrownstoneTerrace.com 14th and Dunn. 1, 2, 3 BR, 812.332.3609

Apt. Unfurnished !!!HENDERSON CROSSING!!!

Deadline to apply is Mar. 19. Email ads@idsnews.com for a complete job description or to apply.

Sell your stuff with a

FREE CLASSIFIED AD

Place an ad 812-855-0763 for more information: www.idsnews.com/classifieds *excludes ticket sales

*Students* On campus bus route. 1-4 BR avail. $300-$800. Stove, fridge, W/D, prkg., & internet incl. Call City to Country Real Estate. 812-887-7653 *Varsity Villas* 4 BR, 2.5 BA, W/D, prkg. incl. $1,400/mo. Call Courtney: 847-863-1230. 1 BR - Newly remodeled. 1 blk. from Law School. $615 per month. 812-333-2332 1, 2, & 3 BR apts. avail. Aug.,12. 2 blks. from Law School/Downtown. thunderboltproperty.com

3 BR, 3 BA apts. 320 S. Dunn St. Close to Law school. $2,220/mo. Internet included. burnhamrentals.com 812-339-8300

1, 2, 3 BR Open House March 1 & 2 12:30-5:30

March 3 11-5

**Now Leasing** August 2012 Omega Properties 812-333-0995 OmegaBloomington.com

Apt. Unfurnished 2 BR, 1 BA apts. 344/352 S. Dunn St. Close to campus. $1,150/mo. No utilitiess incl. burnhamrentals.com. 812-339-8300

***Varsity Villas*** 2,3,4 BR. 2012-13. 812-340-4847

3 BR/2 BA. All applncs., W/D, decks, on bus line. 336-2026

Students must be able to work through May 2013, including summer. Approx. 15 hours per week.

© Puzzles by Pappocom

CROSSWORD PUZZLE ANSWER

****Crescent Park**** Near College Mall and bus-line. Walk-in closet. 3 BR/2 BA, D/W, W/D, $795/mo. Small pets OK. (812) 332-4984

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Looking for students with good organization, time management and communication skills for the position of Advertising Account Executive. Previous sales experience recommended but not required.

2 9

How to play: Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 grid contains the digits 1 through 9, without repeating a number in any one row, column or 3x3 grid.

HOUSING

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BUILD YOUR NETWORK

6

6 8 4 7 1 3

www.mannixproperties.com

SUMMER OF YOUR LIFE! CAMP WAYNE FOR GIRLS! Children’s Summer Camp Pocono Mountains, Pennsylvania. June 16 - August 12. If you love children and want a caring and fun environment we need Counselors, Instructors, and other staff for our summer camp. Interviews on IU Campus on March 28th. Select The Camp That Selects The Best Staff! Call (215) 944-3069 or apply online at

2

Difficulty Rating =

******************** VarsityVillas.com VarsityVillas.com VarsityVillas.com ********************

2 BR APTS. Close to Opt. & Law Schools. Free parking, 336-2026.

EOE

1 4 7 9 6 3 2 5 8

5

Technical

Must be avail. M-F, 8-5. 15 hrs./wk., 1 yr. (3 sem.) commit. includes Summer. To apply for this paid opportunity: Send resume & samples: gmenkedi@indiana.edu. Ernie Pyle Hall, Rm.120.

305

210 220

Psychology research study seeking daily smokers. $10/hr. erplab@indiana.edu

8 2 3 7 5 4 9 6 1

6

3 1 9 8 6 8 4 3 9

Restaurant & Bar

Great opportunity for IU students to expand your portfolio & resume. Must have experience in Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign.

310

!BARTENDING! UP TO $300/day. No exp. nec. Training avail. 800-965-6520, x.112 .

6 9 5 1 8 2 3 7 4

Now Hiring

Camp Staff

General Employment

Answer to previous puzzle

Graphic Designers

EMPLOYMENT Valparaiso, Indiana Children’s Camp Lawrence looking for counselors & nurse. 6 weeks. (219)736-8931 or email: nwicyo@comcast.net.

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Dairy Queen is now hiring. Flexible hours, flexible days. Immediate openings for the lunch shift. Apply in-person at 2423 S. Walnut St., Bloomington. 255

110

Announcements

$9 Ϊ

7 5

Office/Clerical Closing Assistant John Bethell Title Co. is looking for an energetic, self-starter with excellent interpersonal skills for a part-time entry-level position in our fast paced closing department. Must have good keyboard and math skills, familiarity with Word and Excel. Prior experience in mortgage or real estate preferred but not required. Must be available to work full-time through the summer. Please email your resume to: koltman@johnbtitle.com. No Calls Please.

up to

ANNOUNCEMENTS

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General Employment

24 hour airport service

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PAYMENT: All advertising is done on a cash in advance basis unless credit has been established. The IDS accepts Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, Cash, Check or Money Order.

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REFUNDS: If you cancel your ad before the final run date, the IDS will refund the difference in price. A minimum of one day will be charged.

Shared-ride and private cars available

COPY ERRORS: The IDS must be notified of errors before 3 p.m. the date of the first publication of your ad. The IDS is only responsible for errors published on the first insertion date. The IDS will rerun your ad 1 day when notified before 3 p.m. of the first insertion date.

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HOUSING ADS: All advertised housing is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act. Refer to www.idsnews.com for more info.

COPY CHANGES: Ad copy can be changed at no additional charge when the same number of lines are maintained. If the total number of lines changes, a new ad will be started at the first day rate.

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AD ACCEPTANCE: All advertising is subject to approval by the IDS.

APARTMENTS Water Sewage Trash Removal Free Parking W/D & D/W Microwave All electric

812.339.8777 Get your ticket to savings at:

TenthAndCollege.com Rent your room 855-0763 idsnews.com/classifieds/

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1, 2, & 3 BR units. Close to Campus. Avail. in August, 2012. Costley & Co. Rental Management, Inc. 336-6246 tuckerbloomington.com

3 studio apts. at 3rd and Grant. $275/mo. plus utils. No pets. 812-879-4566

1-3 BR apartments. Leasing now for Aug. 334-8819, M-F, 9-4. hallmarkrentals.com

www.shaw-rentals.com

3, 4, 5 BR House & Condos. Close to Campus, parking avail. www.pavprop.com 812-333-2332

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Washer & Dryer Crest Residents Also Receive: Free Direct TV & High-Speed Internet

omes


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I N D I A N A D A I LY S T U D E N T | T H U R S D AY, M AY 3 1 , 2 0 1 2 | I D S N E W S . C O M

CAMPUS EDITOR: NONA TEPPER | CAMPUS@IDSNEWS.COM

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT TALKS E. COLI The IU Department of Chemistry is sponsoring the “Characterization of the Interaction between the E.coli Cobdesnsin MukB and ParC, a Subunit of Topoisomerase IV”

talk as part of a departmental seminar series. IU professor Nichole Stewart will serve as guest lecturer. WHEN 2 p.m. Thursday

WHERE 800 E. Kirkwood Ave., Chemistry Building Room C033 MORE INFO The event is free and open to the public.

Professor receives sociology awards BY RACHEL WISINSKI rlwisins@indiana.edu

In 1966, Edgar S. Furniss received the Wilbur Lucius Cross Medal for his contributions to the fields of scholarship, teaching and academic instruction. Now, 46 years later, Bernice Pescosolido has kept it in the family. Pescosolido, distinguished and chancellor’s professor of sociology at IU, has been honored for her research of social issues. Pescosolido received the Cross Medal as well as Leonard I. Pearlin Award for Distinguished Contributions from the American Sociological Association’s Section on Sociology of Mental Health. The Pearlin award honors a scholar who has contributed to research of mental health. The Cross Medal was awarded to Pescosolido by her alma mater, Yale University. Furniss is her son’s great grandfather. “It’s interesting, all these years later I’m awarded the Wilbur Cross Medal as well,” Pescosolido said. She has also served as the director of the Indiana Consortium for Mental Health Services Research. “I think it’s a wonderful recognition for the work my consortium does and the resources Indiana University gives us,” Pescosolido said. “It’s about the work of the deeper way society functions and making things better for people who are vulnerable.” Pescosolido specializes in the understanding of health, disease and health care utilization through social networks. Pescosolido’s NetworkEpisode Model has evolved through several decades and has influenced her research in three areas: health care services, stigma and suicide. “I’ve always been fascinated with how people recognize and respond to health problems,” Pescosolido said. “My work was aimed at developing a scientific model of people which represented facing stigma. I think looking at one problem opened doors

to others.” She began to see how people dealt with problems in society through networks. Uncovering these facts helped her become aware of existing stigmas. “Each time I dug deeper, it led to a new level of research and added to the complexity of it all,” she said. “If we had solved the problem as a society there wouldn’t be any need for this kind of research, but these problems continue to exist and dampen the recovery for people who have health problems.” Alex Capshew, associate director for the Indiana Consortium for Mental Health Services Research, said he does most of the research administration and project management for Pescosolido’s funded studies. “What I appreciate is that the awards give her a national and international platform to create awareness of mental health issues,” Capshew said. “She has a strong platform, and we translate her research findings in order to improve the lives of real people. The recognition gives her a voice in reaching a broader community.” Pescosolido was also named a member of the scientific advisory board of Bring Change 2 Mind. Led by actress Glenn Close, the campaign is an antistigma movement dedicated to removing misconceptions about mental illness. “My job is to help the foundation understand the science being done and use it to create effective programs,” Pescosolido said. “The last 15 years we have taken new directions in understanding stigma, and that will be a foundation for the programs.” Despite this progress, Pescosolido said there doesn’t appear to be a link between understanding and tolerance. She continues to explore what approach can be taken in order to lessen rising prejudices. “I’m in the middle of an 18-country study of the stigma of mental illness,” she said. “We’re trying to do some myth

STEPH AARONSON | IDS

“Surplus Sam,” the store’s unofficial mascot, wears an IU vest and sits among the items on sale at the IU Surplus Store.

CAITLIN O’HARA | IDS

IU professor Bernice Pescolido receives an honor from Yale University, American Sociological Association.

busting in developing countries in figuring out which are more tolerant and what we can learn from them here in America.” Pescosolido has also been the recipient of other universities and disciplinary teaching and mentoring awards. “I am proud to be part of the organization and working for a director that is so well recognized and respected,” Capshew said. “I first started here and said I could never envision myself working in the same place more than three years because it gets monotonous. I’ve worked for her for 10 years. She keeps things interesting and keeps the staff motivated.” IU graduate student Ann McCranie said Pescosolido’s leadership and awards have helped bolster her own study, as McCranie is pursuing a graduate degree in sociology and Pescosolido is chair of her dissertation. “I say I work with Bernice and people know who she is,” McCranie said. “She is very helpful in that she wants to work with graduate students to get them into the best place in their careers. She is helping to create the next generation of mentors. She’s a great mentor, teacher, teacher of teachers and researcher, but she’s also a great person. She’s the whole package.”

Surplus store downsizes BY NONA TEPPER ntepper@indiana.edu

Surplus Sam is a lifesized, plastic skeleton, once moved from the IU Health Rehabilitation Services to the IU Surplus Store, but who is now certainly resting in peace with a “Not For Sale” sign taped to his left shoulder. Sam has been named unofficial mascot of the Surplus Store and is the only item not for sale among desks, dressers and computers in the 5,000-foot warehouse. The Surplus Store collects and sells used University products to promote sustainability and conserve tax dollars. Todd Reid, manager of the Surplus Store, said Sam represents the “bare bones prices” the store offers to the community. And, with PCs priced at just $75, about a third less than the Craigslist asking price, “bare bones prices” might be right. In January, the Surplus Store moved locations and lost about 15,000 square feet of space. The cramped quarters have forced the store to consolidate, as well as price products and advertise more effectively. Sales Representative Jon Paquette said both actions have generated a flurry of sales. “It’s almost impossible to find things this quality at a

better price,” Paquette said. “It’s a pretty addicting place to shop, so I try and remember to leave my checkbook at home.” Reid said sales have increased by 100 percent, or more than doubled, since the move. He estimated that the store now generates upwards of $60,000 per month. All revenue received benefits the IU general fund, an account that serves the primary objectives of the University, such as instruction, research and public service. But if a product sells for more than $200, Reid said half the proceeds go toward the department the item originated from. The program can use these funds at its discretion. Increased marketing has also increased the store’s customer base. Before the store started advertising online, utilizing social networking sites and selling through live auctions, Reid said individuals would come from no more than 100 miles away to shop at the Surplus Store and would often re-sell the goods for profit. “We’re essentially cutting out the middleman that used to make a lot of money off of IU, and using tax dollars more efficiently,” he said. Now, the Surplus Store has shipped overseas and to almost every U.S. state.

Recently, Reid said two individuals bought optometry equipment and used it to create a small clinic in rural Mexico. Paquette said products such as furniture and electronics are the most common and are often received from University Information Technology Services or IU Residential Programs and Services. He estimated that the largest discount is a $1,300 Mac computer that would normally sell for about $5,000. Bloomington resident Adam Covey works at Upland Brewing Company and was browsing computers and furniture for the office Tuesday. This time, Covey said he couldn’t find what he came for. But he said he has purchased a variety of personal items from the store, such as a “big, solid” desk he uses at his home office. The desk traveled the University circle of surplus and, like Sam the skeleton, ended in a state of rest. “The whole point of the store is reduce, reuse, recycle. We don’t want anything to go to waste,” Paquette said. “It’s taxpayers’ dollars, so we want that money to get the maximum value it can and to be used as efficiently as possible.”

Students experience “Quake Cottage” earthquakes FROM IDS REPORTS

Indiana Geological Survey employees drove a truck outfitted with an earthquake simulator, nicknamed the “Quake Cottage,” on Thursday to help raise awareness about the dangers of earthquakes. Walter Gray, IGS educational outreach coordinator, estimated that more than 40 students experienced a simulated earthquake. “What the simulation does is provide an educational tool for people to safely experi-

ence a high-magnitude earthquake,” he said. Gray said when individuals first enter the vehicle, which is set up to look like a living room, the simulator is set to reach about a 3, the magnitude at which individuals first detect an earthquake. Since 1817, there have been 43 earthquakes in Indiana, all magnitude 5 or lower. Because none of the earthquakes have been technically classified as risks, Gray said this had led to complacency in earthquake preparedness.

“When you enter it it’s an eye-opener,” Gray said. “It makes you rethink your attitudes about earthquakes in Indiana.” Although Indiana has not recently experienced a highmagnitude earthquake, the state does have the potential for such a natural disaster. The most recent large earthquake occurred in 1909 on Indiana’s border with Illinois, and had a magnitude of 5.1. Rocks and chimneys reportedly were destroyed, and

individuals who lived up to 30,000 square miles from the border felt the shock. Gray said a similar earthquake could occur again. “People go in interested in feeling, ‘what does a high magnitude earthquake feel,’” Gray said. “Hopefully that experience will inspire them to take action to obtain an earthquakepreparedness kit and take precautions.”

EXPAND YOUR RESOURCES

— Nona Tepper

Looking for students with good organization, time management and communication skills for work in advertising sales. Previous sales experience recommended.

FAMILIES WANTED Are you married and do you have a child aged 9-11? The Psychology department at IU wants you to participate in the Kids & Parents Project, a study about families. Participate to receive $100!

Students must be able to work through May 2013, including summer. Approx. 15 hours per week.

Email ads@idsnews.com for a complete job description or to apply. EOE

Jake New Editor-in-Chief

Vol. 145, No. 52 © 2012

Study will take up to 3 hours. For more info, call 812-856-2588 or email kandpproject@gmail.com

www.idsnews.com

Newsroom: 812-855-0760 Business Office: 812-855-0763 Fax: 812-855-8009

Colleen Sikorski Managing Editor Aliya Mood Art Director Tim Beekman, Caity McNicholas Advertising Sales Managers

The Indiana Daily Student and idsnews.com publish weekdays during fall and spring semesters, except exam periods and University breaks. From May-July, it publishes Monday and Thursday. Part of IU Student Media, the IDS is a self-supporting auxiliary University enterprise. Founded on Feb. 22, 1867, the IDS is chartered by the IU Board of Trustees, with the editor-in-chief as final content authority. The IDS welcomes reader feedback, letters to the editor and online comments. Advertising policies are available on the current rate card. Readers are entitled to single copies. Taking multiple copies may constitute theft of IU property, subject to prosecution. Paid subscriptions are entered through third-class postage (USPS No. 261960) at Bloomington, IN 47405.

120 Ernie Pyle Hall • 940 E. Seventh St. • Bloomington, IN 47405-7108


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I N D I A N A D A I LY S T U D E N T | W E D N E S D AY, F E B . 3 , 2 0 1 1 | I D S N E W S . C O M

CLASSIFIEDS

To place an ad: go online, call 812-855-0763 or stop by Ernie Pyle Hall 120 from Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Full advertising policies are available online. www.idsnews.com/classifieds

CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING POLICIES

PAYMENT: All advertising is done on a cash in advance basis unless credit has been established. The IDS accepts Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, Cash, Check or Money Order.

220

Dear Rachel, Will you be my Valentine too? Love, Carly

Announcements

Help wanted: students to promote our gaming website. Part time, great pay. Call Michael at 602-759-9153.

115

Dr. P.K. Samaddar, MD. Ears, nose & throat practice and allergies. Experienced, no unneccessary surgery. 420 W. 2nd St.-Blgtn., IN. 812-339-1253

Apartment Furnished

3 2 8 6 4 1 7 9 5

Earn $1000 - $3200/mo. to drive our cars w/ ads. www.FreeCarJobs.com

1, 2, & 3 BR apts. avail. Aug.,12. 2 blks. from Law School/Downtown. thunderboltproperty.com 1, 2, & 3 BR units. Close to Campus. Avail. in August, 2012. Costley & Co. Rental Management, Inc. 336-6246 tuckerbloomington.com

ADVERTISING SALES REPS

4 8 2 5 9 7 3 1 6

9 5 6 1 3 8 4 7 2

EOE

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HOUSING Apartment Furnished

© Puzzles by Pappocom

$Lowest price VARSITY VILLAS Aug. ‘12. $310/person. 3 BR,2 BA. W/D, D/W, internet, prkg. 812-360-3460 bloomingtonrentals.org ************************** Huge 4 BR townhouse, close to campus. Incl. heat, water,internet, directv, garage. 812-334-2646 ************************** ***************************** Close to campus and stadium. Large 1 & 2 BR apts. Inclu. heat, water, internet, and DirectTV. 812-334-2646 ************************

BrownstoneTerrace.com 14th and Dunn. 1, 2, 3 BR, 812.332.3609

Cedar Creek. 2 BR, 1 & 1/2 BA. Outdoor pool. Great location. LiveByTheStadium.com Check out our Online Housing Guide: idsnews.com/housing

the college life.

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from

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Varsity Villas

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varsity-properties.com

334-0333 3 BR - AVAIL NOW. Across from Dunn Meadow. $1250. www.pavprop.com 812-333-2332 3 BR units at The COTTAGES avail. Aug., 2012. 2 blks. East of Education & Music. Spacious. 333-9579 3 BR, 3 BA apts. 320 S. Dunn St. Close to Law school. $2,220/mo. Internet included. burnhamrentals.com 812-339-8300

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BrownstoneTerrace.com 14th and Dunn. 1, 2, 3 BR, 812.332.3609 BrownstoneTerrace.com 14th and Dunn. 1, 2, 3 BR. 812.332.3609 Campus Walk Apts. 1& 2 BRs for Fall, 2012. 812-332-1509

HOT 11th Street. Area, NoCo. 3,4,5 BR twnhs. Wi-Fi, prkg, W/D, huge BR’s and BA’s, very close to dntwn. In the heart of NoCo. www.curryurbanproperties.com

812-332-5638 NOW LEASING FOR 2012! burnhamrentals.com 812-339-8300

3, 4, 5 BR House & Condos. Close to Campus, parking avail. www.pavprop.com 812-333-2332

Spacious 4-5 BR, 3 BA. Prkg. incl. W/D avail. $350/mo., per person. bestrentsrdw@yahoo.com

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2 BR, 1 BA apts. 344/352 S. Dunn St. Close to campus. $1,150/mo. No utilitiess incl. burnhamrentals.com. 812-339-8300

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Brand New 3 BR/3 BA. ALL UTILS. INCLD! Live Downtown! 812-330-9700 RailwayManors.com 9NorthApartments.com

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Avail. now & Aug., 2012. Newly remodeled 1BR. 1BA. Utils. incl.$470/mo.

Studios, efficiencies, 1-2 BR avail. Aug., 2012. Close to campus. Starting at $450/mo. Parking incl. 333-9579

Beautiful. Brand new. Avail. immediately! 1,2,3 BR units ALL UTILS. INCLD! 812-330-9700 wsmanors.com

2 BR townhouses at The GABLES avail. Aug., 2012. Dwntwn., covered parking incl. HUGE. 333-9579

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Deadline to apply is Friday, February 3rd.

Apt. Unfurnished

1-3 BR apartments. Leasing now for Aug. 334-8819, M-F, 9-4. hallmarkrentals.com

Looking for students interested in Sales Rep positions.

Stop by the IDS office in Ernie Pyle Hall, Room 120, or email: ads@idsnews.com for a job description and application.

Apt. Unfurnished

1 BR - Newly remodeled. 1 blk. from Law School. $615 per month. 812-333-2332

Sales

2012 APARTMENTS

1 3 7 2 6 4 5 8 9

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Attn: Early Risers NOW HIRING IU Student to deliver the IDS Monday-Friday 5:30 a.m. to 7:30 a.m. Reliable vehicle required. To apply send resume to glewis2009@gmail.com or fill out an application at the IDS office in Ernie Pyle Hall, Room 120.

8 6 3 4 1 2 9 5 7

How to play: Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 grid contains the digits 1 through 9, without repeating a number in any one row, column or 3x3 grid.

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General Employment

** Part Time Leasing Agent ** Must be enthusiastic, outgoing and reliable. Inquire within: 400 E. 3rd St., Suite 1.

5 7 4 9 8 6 2 3 1

7 1 3 6 5

Send feedback or comments to marketing@idsnews.com

245

210 220

Have the summer of your life at a prestigious coed sleepaway camp in the beautiful Pocono Mntns. of PA, 2 1/2 hours from NYC. We’re seeking counselors who can teach any team & individual sports: Tennis, Gymnastics, Horseback Riding, Mt. Biking, Skate Park, Theatre, Tech Theatre, Circus, Magic, Arts & Crafts,Pioneering, Climbing Tower, Water Sports, Music, Dance, Science. Great salaries & perks. Plenty of free time. Interviews on February 15th. Apply online at: www.islandlake.com. Call 800-869-6083 btwn. 9 & 5 eastern time on weekdays for more info.: info@islandlake.com.

7 4 5 8 2 9 1 6 3

2

Difficulty Rating =

EMPLOYMENT Camp Staff

6 9 1 3 7 5 8 2 4

7 5 8 3 4

5 1 4 8 3 9 7 8 2 8 6 9 9 1 2 6 3 5 9 1 6 5 4 2

Answer to previous puzzle

Found Black Olympus Camera. Found at 8th Street. Call: 219-241-9311.

4

su do ku

310

110

Adoption: We’re excited to share our life with a child. Bright future filled with love and opportunity awaits your newborn. Expenses paid. Charlie & Nancy: 1-866-953-6670, bighopesforalittleone.com

ONLINE POSTING: All classified line ads are posted online at www.idsnews.com/classifieds at no additional charge.

310

Hoosier Spirit

An awesome summer job in Maine! If you’re looking to spend this summer outdoors, have fun while you work, and make lifelong friends, then look no further. Camp Mataponi, a children’s summer camp, has positions available in Land Sports (lacrosse, soccer, basketball, softball, volleyball, field hockey), Waterfront (sailing, canoeing, waterskiing, life guarding, WSI, boat drivers), Ropes Course, Tennis, H.B. Riding, Arts & Crafts, Theater, Dance, Gymnastics, Video, Photography, Nurses, Maintenance, Cooking and more. Top salaries plus room/board & travel provided. Call us today, 561-748-3684, or apply online at www.campmataponi.com

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REFUNDS: If you cancel your ad before the final run date, the IDS will refund the difference in price. A minimum of one day will be charged.

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305

HOUSING ADS: All advertised housing is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act. Refer to www.idsnews.com for more info.

COPY CHANGES: Ad copy can be changed at no additional charge when the same number of lines are maintained. If the total number of lines changes, a new ad will be started at the first day rate.

310

AD ACCEPTANCE: All advertising is subject to approval by the IDS.

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5 BR house avail. Aug., 2012. Dwntwn, parking incl. 333-9579 5 BR/4.5 BA ALL UTILS. INCLD.! 812-330-9700 CherryHillManors.com

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wednesday, october 31, 2012

page 3

the collegian

FREE ASSISTANCE FOR K-STATE STUDENTS PERSONAL BUDGETING

STUDENT LOAN MANAGEMENT

BUILDING & MANAGING CREDIT

REQUEST AN APPOINTMENT AT www.k-state.edu/pfc 809 K-State Student Union

785.532.2889

powercatfinancial@k-state.edu

4 student-friendly job markets open to graduates

Andy Rao One of the biggest concerns for today’s college students is securing a job after graduation. With unemployment rates still hovering at 7.8 percent as of September, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, fixing the economy remains a high priority for the U.S. As globalization continues to dominate corporate strategies and technology continues to improve, some industries will experience consistent downsizing and high unemployment rates. ere are, however, industries that will still continue to undergo rapid growth with years of transformation lying ahead. Don’t let the so-called experts discourage you. e job market

will be ripe for people our age because of the huge transformation the workforce will undergo in a few short years. According to Investopedia.com, “baby boomers,” or workers between the ages of 48 and 64, now represent roughly 20 percent of the American public. Many of these workers will be retiring within a few years, opening up many positions in job markets that were previously saturated. Here are four student-friendly job markets that will continue to offer career advancement opportunities for recent graduates.

1.

Health care e controversy behind this tumultuous industry is wellknown. With Obamacare set to be put into action by 2014 (unless it is repealed), health care companies are set to undergo historic changes. Whether you agree with the basis of the new health care laws or not, it is hard to deny that it will present new opportunities for people who have recently graduated or students who are set to gradu-

ate in the next couple of years. ere will also always be a high demand for professionals in this field. Physicians, nurses, pharmacists and others in the health care industry are invaluable and irreplaceable members of our community who are highly trained and highly skilled. No matter where you go, health care will always present opportunities for people seeking to build a career.

2.

Financial services In 2008, the U.S. experienced one of the worst market collapses in recent memory. Huge firms that were seen as industry leaders were involved in scandals, corporate irresponsibility and more than questionable business ethics and strategies. is is another industry that is set to experience massive overhauls. In addition to higher regulation and increased legislation, the financial services industry is under close watch by the American public.

Firms will need new blood with fresh ideas, which is where students who are soon to be graduates can play a huge role. Accounting, finance, management information systems, and other business degrees are in high demand right now.

3. Technology/engineering One of the biggest campaign platforms that President Obama ran on in 2008 and continues to stress in 2012 is the need for America to regain a global advantage in technology research and math and science jobs. According to whitehouse.gov, President Obama has set a goal of providing tech sectors with $148 billion in research funding in order to support research initiatives. With a renewed focus on making research, technology and engineering jobs a national priority, students in this field may find a growing job market as they complete school and enter the workforce. Jobs such as alternative energy research are also hot; Obama has

continually been vocal of his support in finding an alternative to our nation’s gasoline addiction.

4. Education/academia According to the National Center for Education and Statistics, the U.S. has experienced a drastic increase in demand for college educators; between 2000 and 2012, the nation experienced a 37 percent increase in college attendance. K-State is an example of a university that has seen record enrollment rates in recent years, a trend that is expected to continue. Logically, if there are more people who want to learn, we are going to need more people who are willing to teach. Pursuing a career in education or academia as a professor or researcher may very well provide you with the job security that you are looking for. Andy Rao is a junior in finance and accounting. Please send comments to news@kstatecollegian.com.

Business beat: Disney buys LucasFilms, UPS to hire 55,000 seasonal employees Darrington Clark managing editor Hurricane/superstorm Sandy shuts down stock market, airlines In addition to the 49 lives now claimed by superstorm Sandy, airlines to and from New York have been grounded for days, according to a Tuesday article published by the Wall Street Journal. U.S. financial markets are also set to reopen today after having been shut down Monday due to the storm’s devastation. Runways at LaGuardia and John F. Kennedy International airports were flooded by Sandy, and by Tuesday afternoon, nearly 19,000 flights had been

canceled. Newark Liberty International airport was left without power, but both Newark and Kennedy airports are due to be opened at 7 a.m. today for limited use. Disney buys LucasFilms for $4 billion It was confirmed Tuesday that Disney has purchased the LucasFilm franchise from George Lucas for approximately $4 billion. According to a report published Tuesday in the L.A. Times, Disney’s first plan with the rights is to release a version of “Star Wars Episode VII.” LucasFilm also owns the Indiana Jones franchise, which Disney gained from the transaction as well as Skywalker Sound

and Industrial Light and Magic, LucasFilm’s sound and special effects companies. is purchase adds to Disney’s growing collection of rights, as Disney purchased Marvel and Pixar earlier this decade. Google releases phone and tablet to compete in Appledominated market To compete with Microsoft and Apple in the personal technology market, Google unveiled a new Nexus phone and tablet on Monday. According to an article published Monday by CNN, the new phone, a joint effort by Google and Android, also comes with a two-year contract for $299 in an attempt to boost sales.

A launch event was scheduled in New York, but was canceled due to superstorm Sandy. UPS to hire 55,000 workers for expected holiday rush According to a Tuesday article by CNN, UPS expects a 9.8 percent increase in holiday shipments this year, and will hire 55,000 more seasonal workers to accommodate these shipments. Due to online shopping, UPS expects a boost in sales on websites like Amazon.com, for which UPS is the main delivery company. UPS also expects its peak delivery day to be Dec. 20, on which it will handle twice the normal amount of packages: 28 million.

Photo courtesy of First Post Investing

Superstorm Sandy’s devastation in New York prompted a shuttering of the stock market Monday as Wall Street was flooded and high winds and rain kept New Yorkers indoors. Stocks have been closed until today, when the stock exchange plans to reopen for full use. Airlines are also grounded in the state, but some are opening for limited use today.

A Common Sense Approach

She saved K-State and K-12 education from severe cuts last year.

Sydney is our state representative in Topeka.

Vote Carlin Nov. 6th Endorsed By: Citizens for Higher Education, Kansas Farm Bureau, KNEA PAC, Kansas Sierra Club, International Association of Machinists & Workers - Kansas State Council, United Transportation Union, Kansas Families for Education, Associated General Contractors, Kansas AFL - CIO, Carpenter’s Local 918

Relive the past Stay updated with K-State football!

Check out our Gameday edition every Friday.

Costume Contest

Today winner receives

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Pd. for by the Committee to elect Sydney Carlin, State Representative 66th District, John E. Carlin, Treasurer.


Shop West Manhattan thursday, november 29, 2012

page 5

the collegian

How to enjoy holiday treats that won’t weigh you down

Jena Sauber With one holiday full of food behind us and another one coming up, there are plenty of temptations to derail diets, tighten pants and create New Year’s resolutions to go to the gym. When faced with eating a holiday dinner, it can be difficult to pick and choose from a spread of delicious food. The whole “eat good things in moderation” thing can kind of go out the window when you are celebrating with family, friends, significant others and just about anyone else for multiple days. I’m no exception. I love holiday food, from green bean casserole to my family’s white chocolate pudding and brownie bite trifle dessert. Holiday meals often leave me feeling like I either need to take a nap or a 10-mile run. The nap usually wins out. The holidays don’t have to send you into a diet tailspin. While nutritional values depend on individual recipes, there are some holiday treats you can choose that will leave you feeling happy when you eat them, and when you step on the scale. Here are a few foods that you should avoid and alternatives to try instead.

Avoid: green bean casserole I love green bean casserole. I didn’t like to find out that a single serving comes with a 424-calorie price sticker. I ate at least three servings in one day last week. Green beans are a vegetable, but apparently smothering them in cream of mushroom soup and covering them in fried onions negates the vegetable value. Instead: cranberry sauce While not a vegetable, cranberry sauce is a lowercalorie side dish. One serving of cranberry sauce contains around 95 calories, a significantly lower amount than green bean casserole. Of course, that doesn’t mean you should load your entire plate with cranberry sauce. Avoid: fudge While all fudge recipes are different, an average 1-ounce piece of fudge (about one bite) contains about 115 calories. Eating three or four of these for dessert can add up to almost 500 calories. Instead: sugar cookie While cookies might not seem “healthy” (and they aren’t), they are often a better option than other rich desserts. An averaged-sized sugar cookie contains about 60 calories, without frosting. Stick to one or two and you’ll be better off than eating multiple pieces of 115 calorieper-bite fudge or a 500-calorie slice of pecan pie. Avoid: egg nog Homemade eggnog, without alcohol, has around 230

calories per 1/2-cup serving. Store-bought brands have around the same number. A 1/2-cup serving also has more than half your daily recommended amount of cholesterol. Instead: hot chocolate A multitude of hot chocolate recipes require everything from maple syrup to sweetened condensed milk. ese can weigh in heavy on the calorie scale. But there aree plenty of good old-fashioned recipes that call for milk, chocolate drink powder and marshmallows. Sticking to the basics can get you a delicious hot drink for around 100 calories and much less cholesterol. e holidays are a time to celebrate and be with loved ones. When the celebration includes rich and delicious meals, you don’t have to feell guilty later. Making smart choices and swapping somee foods for lower-calorie alterrnatives can ensure you don’t’t end up spending your Christstmas money on new pants. If very unhealthy optionss are at the top of your wish list, ist, practice moderation when possible, or research your own healthier versions of traaditional foods and bring them em to your gatherings. Search the he Web for healthy Christmas recipes, such as roasted fall vegetables in a cheddar crust st or glazed ham with blackberry sauce. Yum. Jena Sauber is a junior in journalism and digital media. e@ Please send comments to edge@ kstatecollegian.com.

College Life reported in The Collegian, soon owned by you. You can buy the photos you see in the Collegian. photos.kstatecollegian.com

Relive the past kstatecollegian.com/print-edition

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monday, october 29, 2012

page 5

the collegian

GRADE | Klein: ‘Success is fleeting’

PEP | Rally heard from far away

Continued from page 3

Continued from page 1

a foundation to show me what is really important. Success is eeting in this world. ere are bigger things at stake, and I recognize that we are human and we do make mistakes and are susceptible to complacency or whatever you want to call it. But that is the ďŹ rst step to be able to identify, attack it and go against that sin nature every day.â€? — quarterback Collin Klein on the pressure of being undefeated

Quote of the day: “I think I have been very blessed. God has provided me my upbringing in a way that I have had parents and coaches who have invested in me and have provided

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Announcements

Sale-Houses

Help Wanted

FOR SALE 2003 Schult Manner Hill manufactured home. Three-bedroom, two-bathroom, in excellent condition. Please call 785-3415927.

LABORERS NEEDED. Howe Landscape Inc is currently seeking laborers for several of our divisions. This is for fulltime and part-time help, ZLWK à H[LEOH VFKHGXOHV for students, preferably four-hour blocks of time. Applicants must be 18 years of age, KDYH D YDOLG GULYHU¡V OL cense and pass a preemployment drug test. Apply three ways, in person Monday- Friday, 8a.m.- 5p.m. at 12780 Madison Rd in Riley; call 785-776-1697 to obtain an application; or email us at askhowe@howelandscape.com. You may also visit our website, www.howelandscape.com.

FOR SCRIPTURAL understanding to solve your unanswered quesRoommate Wanted tions. Use subject (faith) reply to: russell66521@yahoo.- THREE AG students com. seek a male roommate. Nice residence. $400/ LEARN TO FLY! K- month. No pets. Call State Flying Club has Ron at 913-269-8250. three airplanes and lowest rates. Call 785-5626909 or visit www.ksu.edu/ksfc. Sublease

Lost and Found LOST BOOK. Any help appreciated. Website for details: https://sites.google.com/site/findthelostbook/

SUBLEASE NEEDED as soon as possible for December 1- June 1. Exceptional two-bedroom one bathroom $860 rent. Only pay electric, cable, internet. Walking distance to campus & two blocks from Aggieville. Email:charlesspncr2@gmail.com

Housing/Real Estate Employment/Careers

Rent-Apt. Furnished MANHATTAN CITY Ordinance 4814 assures every person equal opportunity in housing without distinction on account of race, sex, familial status, military status, disability, religion, age, color, national origin or ancestry. Violations should be reported to the Director of Human Resources at City Hall, 785-5872440.

Rent-Apt. Unfurnished MANHATTAN CITY Ordinance 4814 assures every person equal opportunity in housing without distinction on account of race, sex, familial status, military status, disability, religion, age, color, national origin or ancestry. Violations should be reported to the Director of Human Resources at City Hall, 785-5872440. FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO bath. Available now! $960/ month. Twobedroom, two bath. Available now! $695/ month. Close to K-State Football. Pool, on-site laundry. 2420 Greenbriar Drive. (785) 5377007.Âœ ONE-BEDROOM CLOSE to campus. MidOctober lease. Holly, 785-313-3136. THREE-BEDROOM DUPLEX 1006 Houston. Washer, dryer, dishwasher. Quiet neighborhood. $900. 785-341-3669. Ăƒ THREE-BEDROOM NEWER apartment. Fresh paint and carpet with washer and dryer. Call 785-341-4024 or 785-313-4524. TWO AND Three-bedroom, close to campus. Central air, dishwasher, laundry facilities, no pets. January lease. 785-539-0866.

Help Wanted THE COLLEGIAN canQRW YHULI\ WKH ÀQDQFLDO potential of advertisements in the Employment/ Opportunities FODVVLÀFDWLRQV 5HDG ers are advised to approach any such business opportunity with reasonable caution. The Collegian urges our readers to contact the Better Business Bureau, 501 SE Jefferson, Topeka, KS 66607-1190. 785-2320454. $BARTENDING!$ $300 a day potential. No experience necessary. Training provided. Call 800-965-6520 extension 144.

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she said that it was so loud she could hear it from afar. “It felt great to be in the parade. To be part of something special put a smile on my face,â€? said ompson. “I would do it all over again if I could.â€?

LOOKING FOR a career? Howe Landscape Inc is looking to hire a maintenance shop mechanic/ foreman with small engine and lawn mower mechanical abilities. Job duties to include mower service and repair, performing minor truck/ trailer service and repair, overseeing all other shop equipment, inventory and supplies. Applicants must be 18 years of age, have a YDOLG GULYHU¡V OLFHQVH and pass a pre-employment drug test. Previous shop experience and mechanical background required. Must be self organized, motivated and able to diagnose and complete repairs in a timely manner. Hours for position will be variable, with option for being part-time or possibly a full-time employee, based on apSOLFDQW¡V DYDLODELOLW\ Pay dependent upon knowledge, experience, and hours available. Apply three ways, in person Monday- Friday at 12780 Madison Rd in Riley; call 785-7761697 to obtain an application; or e-mail us at askhowe@howelandscape.com. You may also visit our website, http://www.howelandscape.com.

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MARKET RESEARCH Participants wanted. Need market research participants to evaluate local establishments. Apply FREE: Shop.BestMark.com or call 800-969-8477.

NOW HIRING Bell Ringers. Part-time positions available from November 9th to December 24th. Starting pay is $7.25/ hour with a bonus schedule throughout the season. Must be able to stand for four hours at a time, work in cold and be available on weekends. Apply in person at The Salvation Army 121 S. Help Wanted Section 4th Street, Manhattan. 10a.m. - 6p.m. Please MEDICAL OFFICE ReEULQJ YDOLG LGHQWLĂ€FDWLRQ ceptionist - Large mediand your social security cal practice seeking card. part-time clerical personnel. Must possess the following qualities: cheerful/ positive atti- STUDENTPAYOUTS.tude, leadership abili- COM. PAID survey takties, emotional maturity, ers needed in Manhatprofessional attitude, a tan. 100% free to join. desire to help col- Click on surveys. leagues/ team player, dependability, self-motivation, attention to detail, basic computer skills and excellent telephone skills. We are open weekdays Monday- Friday and offer an exceptionally pleasant work environment with competitive compensation. Please submit your resume to: Advanced Dermatology and Skin Cancer Center 1133 College Ave. Ste E230 Manhattan, KS 66502. No phone calls, please.

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ASSISTANT COORDINATOR: KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, New Student Services. Responsibilities include coordination of on and off campus recruiting events for prospective student and their families, and providing leadership for the SPIRIT Scholars Program. Job Requirements: BacheORU¡V GHJUHH RQH RU more years of experience in higher education administration, and at least one year of experience supervising undergraduate students. 3UHIHUUHG TXDOLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQV and skills include excellent written communication skills; experience in public speaking, training undergraduate students and peers; communicating with diverse audiences; experience with CRM software, including knowledge of GDWD Ă&#x20AC;OWHUV GHPRQ VWUDWHG SURĂ&#x20AC;FLHQF\ LQ multiple computer programs (including MS OfĂ&#x20AC;FH 6XLWH  DQG H[SHUL ence in planning, implementing, and evaluating programs. Salary range of $34,000-36,000. Send letter of application, resume or vita, and contact information for three work-related references to vpsl@kstate.edu or Search Committee, KSU, New Student Services, 122 Anderson Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506. Application deadline is November 9, 2012. For more information, call 785532-6237. KSU is an Equal Opportunity Employer and actively seeks diversity among its employees. Background check required.

ANNUAL SIGMA Lambda Gamma National Sorority, Inc. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stroll Off.â&#x20AC;? Nov 5, 2012, Forum Hall at 7p.m. $3.00 entrance fee. UDIĂ HWLFNHW

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C O O R D I N ATO R : KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, New Student Services. Responsibilities include coordination of orientation and enrollment activities for undergraduate students and parents/ families; coordination of the AllUniversity Family Day committee; and serving on University committees designed to promote larger efforts to welcome new students. Job Requirements: MasWHU¡V GHJUHH RQH RU more years of experience in higher education administration, and at least one year of experience supervising undergraduate students. 3UHIHUUHG TXDOLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQV and skills include excellent written communication skills; experience in public speaking, training undergraduate students and peers; communicating with diverse audiences; experience with CRM software, including knowledge of GDWD Ă&#x20AC;OWHUV GHPRQ VWUDWHG SURĂ&#x20AC;FLHQF\ LQ multiple computer programs (including MS OfĂ&#x20AC;FH 6XLWH  DQG H[SHUL ence in planning, implementing, and evaluating programs. Salary range of $35,000-39,000. Send letter of application, resume or vita, and contact information for three work-related references to vpsl@kstate.edu or Search Committee, KSU, New Student Services, 122 Anderson Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506. Application deadline is November 9, 2012. For more information, call 785532-6237. KSU is an Equal Opportunity Employer and actively seeks diversity among its employees. Background check required.

B R O K E?

Relive the past

ticipated in the Homecoming Parade as part of the Black Student Union. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe that the parade was a success,â&#x20AC;? î&#x20AC;ąompson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had a lot of fun.â&#x20AC;? Although, î&#x20AC;ąompson was unable to attend the pep rally,

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was pretty cold, but everyone still cheered loudly and did well.â&#x20AC;? Gutierrez cheered with the greek community at the pep rally and also participated in the Homecoming Parade, which he appreciated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great display of student spirit,â&#x20AC;? he said. Chante î&#x20AC;ąompson, freshman in animal science and industry, par-

Adam Suderman is a junior in journalism. Please send comments to sports@kstatecollegian.com.

W or

Special teams: A Texas Tech brought out its ďŹ eld goal unit late in the second quarter to go for the 13-10 lead. î&#x20AC;ąe Wildcats were in need of a big play and Meshak Williams gave them exactly that. î&#x20AC;ąe senior reached high above the Red Raiders oďŹ&#x20AC;ensive line and blocked the ďŹ eld goal with his outstretched arm. î&#x20AC;ąe play gave the Wildcats their ďŹ rst blocked ďŹ eld goal and punt of the year. Snyder said it was an important play and shows consistent

improvement in Williamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; play. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meshak plays well, and he has been improving and just falls in line with what we are talking about,â&#x20AC;? Snyder said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He just gets better and better and better, and I think maybe three or four ballgames ago he really started to come into his own.â&#x20AC;?

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Students enjoy Opti mus tamer W.I.L.D. Hab itat wins from prior years WU Building Challenge

BY CHLOE ROSENBERG entitled them to three complimentary beers each. For the first time in According to sophomore nearly a decade, stu- Casey Hochberg, co-presi- BY dents were served MICHAEL TABB beer at dent of Team 31, Team member of the team that W.I.L.D. built 31 supplied enough Optimus Habitat, said Nonetheless, only kegs Constructed entirely her one for 1,500 students of group was excited to have cardboard student was treated to take the and duct tape in in three beers each. top prize at the event. Although two hours, the paramedic tent Optimus Habitat at students stopped “Last year our team got the event, and just being the collapsible secone served when robot won ond, so the beer sta- three we were determined other alcohol-related tion prizes at the fifth annual was shut down at 9:30 to come back and win call was made on Washington this Friday, p.m., there University year,” Rhoades were three kegs Building Washington said. University left over. Challenge. At the competition, groups Police Department Six teams with a total chief While some students of were given cardboard, Don Strom said. 21 students participated duct were initially against in tape and utility Indie-soul band Fitz the the annual knives and fundraiser for allowed and policy, many said that it the to construct anything The Tantrums headlined University’s chapter worked well. of they chose. They the event. were judged Habitat for Humanity, which on criteria Senior Peter Hynes This ranging from was held Sunday afternoon year’s spring had anticipated at creativity and the new Ursa’s Fireside. W.I.L.D. featured a aesthetic to change alcohol structural integrity, functionpolicy causing in the event’s alcohol They raised just over pol- more students $200 ality and team to pregame for the icy. Prior to this semester, spirit. local and internaW.I.L.D., thus making Last year, Rhoades’ students ages 21 it tional branches group and up more dangerous. of Habitat made a pirate ship. This year, were permitted to for Humanity, which PAUL GEODEKE bring a A baby goat munches works she said, most “I am worried about on the lawn on the South | STUDENT LIFE six-pack of beer of the group’s to eliminate homelessness into the them getting 40 Swamp Saturday afternoon. The planning happened baby animal petting zoo, rid of the and Brookings in the sponsored by the subsidized housing Quadrangle alcohol Congress of the South by hour before the out of everything 40, presented students actual buildwith an opportunity prior to 6:00 p.m. This providing individuals for an outdoor study break of W.I.L.D. because with ing started. over the weekend. semester, no one I inexpensive but was think that is respectable “We had a long list part of the fun living allowed to bring beer of spaces. into of W.I.L.D. and part of the event; rather, Junior Colleen Rhoades, all stu- the allure. a SEE The BUILD, policy dents of legal age PAGE 9 that were they create won’t cut back given wristbands upon entering the Quad, SEE W.I.L.D., PAGE 3 which

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hired as director form in Alum inability John Oliver to per of susta show campus comedy VOL. 133, NO. 01

Union executive (GEC), a Student helping stuMICHELLE MERLIN group focused on events, said. EDITOR IN CHIEF dents host sustainable the director of sustainabilsearch, “What is ideas and directions Following a yearlong hired Phil ity provides susWashington University University to be more to fill the for the than on a larger level Valko, a 2003 graduate, sustainability tainable make possible.” vacant director of student groups can sustainability position late this summer. The director of having a for promoting and Students hope that both is responsible will sustainability activities, director of sustainability come to life facilitating with students, faculty help student initiatives campus more collaborating working to impleand and make the entire staff and an institutional sustainable on ment sustainable principles. for a open level. The position has been it would go an interim “The way I imagine during which time the students year, in. Debra Howard, filled would be to provide and a little director, ran initiatives a little more resource Students mostly gradwhen we have more direction for Will Fischer, a 2010 like to do or through of Green something we would and former president he’d like to uate if he has something 9 Yue, a co-chair SEE DIRECTOR, PAGE see done,” Michael Commission Events of the Green

ALEX DROPKIN ASSOCIATE EDITOR

British politiJohn Oliver, the “The Daily cal comedian of be headlining Show” fame, will Council’s Campus Programming show, (CPC’s) fall comedy from Student pending approval Union. that had been “He was a name a while…We thrown around for the spring, and got our budget in through our we were looking ‘What kind contacts, [thinking], we get for our of big name can CPC Comedy range?’,” budget a junior, said. Chair Evan Cory, stuck out, “John Oliver really on a great and we try to put with him.” show, so we went Union According to Student Harrison York, president John totaling the budget appeal, approved on $47,000, will be Friday. for his Oliver is best known correspondent work as a leading In 2008, on “The Daily Show.” Presidential he covered the Vice place in the debate, which took Complex, for Wash. U. Athletic the show. to bring always is goal “Our

SEE OLIVER, PAGE

8

Student Life to print twice weekly

change. will be a temporary relish this “While we did not us with the option, it presented staunch immediate way to scaling back most been eating Student Life will be the losses that have Satter per week for the to two print issues the paper’s reserves,” balance the into when we get 2011-12 year to help said. “We hope that be stable footing we will organization’s budget. more a to published moving back to Student Life has able to consider per week since three print editions three days a week.” newspaper the the change 2003, 2003. Prior to Satter estimates that schedule. between printed on a semiweekly save Student Life had difficulty will for the 2011$21,000 Student Life has and the $16,000 its funds due to last maintaining losing 12 year. funding decision Life’s staff trend of print publications constill need the possible Members of Student wasn’t Students as approval Center. their Fitness the publibut spring, but advertisers and circulation and board are confident to sign up for memberships, the same role essary. come available online MICHAEL TABB NEWS EDITOR

MICHAEL TABB

COURTESY OF COMEDY

John Oliver will visit Daily Show” correspondent Comedian and “The campus comedy show. to perform the annual

SU maintains free

of Washington University

THURSDAY, APRIL 26,

CENTRAL

campus

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2012

From college romance

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2012

HOW TO AVOID STUDYING

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What happens to relationships in the real world? You have to figure out how to make a life together.

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Students give mass ages to University joins raise teen suicide awareness national dialogue over but fall hundreds short of goal student loan concerns

BY MICHAEL TABB reporters to communicate the importance of Congress His slow jam on “Late mainNight taining the lower interest rate. with Jimmy Fallon” brought in “If Congress doesn’t two million viewers act... and was just interest rates on Stafford loans, one stop on President Barack on student loans from the fedObama’s ongoing campaign to eral government, will pressure Congress to double. pass legisla- Nearly 7.5 million students tion to freeze the interest will rate on end up owing subsidized student loans. more on their loan payments, and that The president, who would be, spoke obviously, a tremendous blow,” at the University of Colorado Obama said. Boulder on Wednesday after He discussed his and visiting the University the first of North lady’s personal experiences Carolina at Chapel Hill and the working to pay off student University of Iowa debt earlier in the before suggesting that students week, said failure to maintain the join forces to urge Congress current 3.4 percent to interest rate act—urging them to take to social would have ramifications for mil- media to make their case. The lions of students. hashtag he advertised, Some students have #dontdouexpressed blemyrate, has appeared more concern over the Students form a massage possibility of than chain on Francis Field BEN GOTTESDIENER a thousand times over | STUDENT LIFE rising interest in an unsuccessful attempt nized by Senior Michael rates, the to break a world record. but accord- past Weiss, was intended to few days, according raise awareness for the The event, orgaing to Bill Witbrodt, to hashJason Foundation and director tracking.com. the plight of teen suicide. of BY MICHELLE MERLIN Student Financial Services, he came home in Students 1997 to find to their on campus said that Washington University own friends and family students rising interest that his 16-year-old On Tuesday night, will largely be insulated son Jason members. rates are definitely 306 stu- had committed from the a concern, dents and a few adults suicide. The even for students impacts of potential formed a foundation “This is awesome,” interest rate who he said of changes, may not be involved aims to educate massage chain with based on the fact the hope of people in the the event. “This is that national discussion. something I the about teen suicide reclaiming a world University has taken so know Jason is record while people many looking down on can recognize the signs “I think they’re probably also raising awareness steps to minimize the if and is proud of.” about teen their friends like number of me in or family members suicide. the sense that they loans that students don’t In spite of not approaching take out. know a lot of the Though the record-breaking become suicidal and intervene the The interest rate specifics, but world record, Weiss on Federal I definitely before it’s too late. was pleased Stafford target of 2000 people think that the idea Loans used to be with the turnout. stayed out Each attendee was 6.8 of student loans, of reach, former percent before Democrats asked especially for pastor Clark to “The only reason I wanted to in upperclassmen, donate at least $1 Flatt, the president Congress cut it to to JFI. make the is definitely of the Jason Michael 3.4 percent on their record was to have Weiss, the senior Foundation, said minds as far as knowa in 2007. If Congress who more memorable would have organized chooses ing that effect for the not the event, estimated been happy to see they’re going to have to to intervene, that legislation a foundation and his message fundraising its mission to will pay it back at some total of $500. reach just one person. expire in July, and point. Even raise awareness,” rates will underclassmen, Flatt thanked the Weiss said. return The Jason Foundation crowd of “Even it’s to 6.8 definitely percent. Inc. 300 and asked though not thousands something to worry (JFI) was started by them to spread of Between his stops about just Flatt after awareness in Chapel because about teen suicide this is a really expensive Hill SEE MASSAGE, PAGE 2 a and Boulder, Obama took conference call with college SEE LOANS,

New

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BY CHLOE ROSENBER

comentitled them to three y beers each.


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