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BACK TO SCHOOL EDITION T h e

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Thursday August 18, 2011

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Volume 93, No. 1 www.theshorthorn.com

Since 1919

Back to School 2011 Whether you’re new to UTA or returning, this year’s Back to School issue has got you covered. Inside you’ll find everything you’ll want to have on your mind to have an enjoyable and successful year. From stories about parking and shuttle services, to the latest news on the tobacco ban and library construction it’s all inside.

Sports Inside, several coaches share their take on the university’s move to the Western Athletic Conference and how they plan to compete on a new level.

Page 7

Scene Summer has ended but that doesn’t mean that the fun and music is over. Scene takes a look at the Levitt Pavilion’s Fall concert series.

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Thursday, August 18, 2011

THE SHORTHORN

TABLE OF CONTENTS

POLICE REPORT This is a part of the daily activity log produced by the university’s Police Department. To report a criminal incident on campus, call 817-272-3381.

WEDNESDAY Warrant Service - Misdemeanor During a routine traffic stop at 3:08 a.m. on 500 Cooper St., a nonstudent was arrested for a warrant out of Grand Prairie Police Department. He was transported to Arlington Police Department jail.

Maverick Stampede/Welcome Week Page 3

TUESDAY Suspicious Person At 8:30 p.m., a staff member informed officers that he had asked five individuals to leave UTA Intramural Fields but they refused. They were given Criminal Trespass Warnings and banned from the entire campus.

Theft Officers were dispatched at 7:30 p.m. to the Sigma Chi Fraternity house. A student stated that his wallet had been stolen from his bedroom. Drug Paraphernalia, Possession At 4:04 p.m., a student was issued a City of Arlington Citation for Possession of Drug Paraphernalia on 409 Summit Ave. Theft At 8 a.m., an employee reported that five chairs were stolen from the pool area at the Arbor Oaks apartment complex. Burglary, Vehicle At 1100 Fourth St., a student spoke with officers, at 12:50 a.m., and told them he had seen a person attempting to steal items from a vehicle in Lot

Chawla Hall, at 10:36 p.m., regarding the report of a burglary. A student reported that some items had been taken from her room.

29. He also reported seeing the suspect place items underneath another vehicle. DWI, Drunk Driving A UTA Police vehicle was involved in an accident at 2:30 a.m. on 100 E. Mitchell St. The police vehicle was struck by a nonstudent. The nonstudent was found to be intoxicated and arrested for DWI.

Criminal Mischief or Vandalism It was noticed, at 9:37 p.m. that a gate arm at 500 W. First St. was slightly bent. Investigation At 9:37 p.m., officers responded to the rport of what sounded like broken glass at West Crossing Apartments. A nonstudent slipped in his living room and had broken a window.

MONDAY Theft An officer was dispatched at 5:45 p.m. to the University Center to investigate a theft. The care master reported that someone unlawfully appropriated a company vacuum.

ONLINE

SUNDAY Burglary, Habitation Officers were dispatched to Kalpana

View an interactive map of today’s crime log at theshorthorn. com/crimemap.

Tobacco Ban Page 4

CALENDAR Calendar submissions must be made by 4 p.m. two days prior to run date. To enter your event, call 817272-3661 or log on to www.theshorthorn.com/calendar

Maverick Discount Program Page 5

TODAY

Opinion

Hot High: 105 Low: 81

Page 6

Sports

Broken Sugar: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Gallery 76102. Free. For information contact Corey Gossett at gallery76102@uta.edu or 817-272-0365.

Page 7

World View

One World, One Sky: 2-3 p.m. Planetarium. Tickets are $6 for adults, $4 for children. For information contact the Planetarium at planetarium@uta.edu or 817-272-1183.

Page 9

Scene Page 11

for children. For information contact the Planetarium at planetarium@uta.edu or 817-272-1183. $2 Movie - Mars Needs Moms: 2:30 p.m. Planetarium. $2 tickets. For information contact the Planetarium at planetarium@uta.edu or 817-272-1183. NanoCam: 5:30-6:30 p.m. Planetarium. Tickets are $6 for adults, $4 for children. For information contact the Planetarium at planetarium@uta.edu or 817-272-1183. Pink Floyd: 7-8 p.m. Planetarium. Tickets are $6 for adults, $4 for children. For information contact the Planetarium at planetarium@uta.edu or 817-272-1183.

Health Services Page 12

FRIDAY

Group exercise classes

Hot High: 105 Low: 82

Page 13

Campus keywords

New International Student Orientation: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Swift Center. For information contact the Office of International Education at international@uta.edu.

Pages 16 and 17

A look at the libraries

Hot High: 101 Low: 82

Page 18

Textbook buying

$2 Movie - Mars Needs Moms: 5:30 p.m. Planetarium. $2 tickets. For information contact the Planetarium at planetarium@uta.edu or 817-272-1183.

Page 20

New eateries around campus

SATURDAY

Page 22 Hot High: 103 Low: 81

Campus safety Page 23

Summer Recognition Ceremony: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. University Center. Free, by invitation only. For information contact Dusti Craig at dusti.craig@uta.edu or 817-272-9086.

Parking Page 24

CORRECTIONS Bring factual errors to The Shorthorn’s attention via e-mail to editor.shorthorn@ uta.edu or call 817-272-3188. A correction or clarification will be printed in this space.

News Front Desk ......................... 817-272-3661 News after 5 p.m........................ 817-272-3205 Advertising ................................. 817-272-3188 Fax ............................................. 817-272-5009 UC Lower Level Box 19038, Arlington, TX 76019 Editor in Chief ........................ Dustin L. Dangli editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

Broken Sugar11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Gallery 76102. Free. For information contact Corey Gossett at gallery76102@uta.edu or 817-272-0365. One World, One Sky: 1-2 p.m. Planetarium. Tickets are $6 for adults, $4

News Editor ......................... Johnathan Silver news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu Design Editor ........................ Lorraine Frajkor design-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu Copy Desk Chief .................... Natalie Webster copydesk-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu Scene Editor ........................... Ashley Bradley features-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

New International Student Orientation: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Swift Center. For information contact the Office of International Education at international@uta.edu. Broken Sugar: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Gallery 76102. Free. For information contact Corey Gossett at gallery76102@uta.edu or 817-272-0365.

Spacepark 360: 2:30-3:30 p.m. Planetarium. Tickets are $6 for adults, $4 for children. For information contact the Planetarium at planetarium@uta.edu or 817-272-1183. MONDAY

THURSDAY

Hot High: 102 Low: 81

First day of classes Late Registration New International Student Orientation Late Arrival: 8 a.m. to noon. Swift Center. For information contact the Office of International Education at international@uta.edu.

NanoCam: 6-7 p.m. Planetarium. Tickets are $6 for adults, $4 for children. For information contact the Planetarium at planetarium@uta.edu or 817-272-1183.

Social Work Survival Snacks: 8:15 a.m. to 9:45 p.m. The School of Social Work Building A. Free. For information contact the School of Social Work at 817272-3181.

Texas Rangers Discounted Tickets: 7:05 p.m. Prices vary. For information contact the ballpark at 972-RANGERS.

One World, One Sky: 2-3 p.m. Planetarium. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for children. For information contact the Planetarium at planetarium@uta.edu or 817-272-1183.

Waffleopolis: 8-10 p.m. UC mall. Free. For information contact Apartment and Residence Life at 817-272-2926. WEDNESDAY

Hot High: 101 Low: 82

Residence Hall In-Hall Events. 7-9:30 p.m. Start times vary by residence hall. Free. For information contact Apartment and Residence Life at 817-2722926. Texas Rangers Discounted Tickets: 7:05 p.m. Prices vary. For information contact the ballpark at 972-RANGERS.

Tuesday High: 103 Low: 80

Success U: All Day. UC Palo Duro Lounge. Free. For information contact Matt Hendricks at resources@uta.edu or 817-272-6107. Major Exploration Seminar: Noon. Ransom Hall Room 303. Free. For information contact Lynne Von Roeder at lvonroeder@uta.edu.

New and Gently Used Fine Furniture Show us your UTA ID Card for

10 - 30 Off

EXCEL Welcome Back Movie: 8:30-10:30 p.m. Maverick Activities Center west lawn. Free. For information contact EXCEL Campus Activities at 817-2722963.

ONLINE View more of the calendar and submit your own items at theshorthorn.com/calendar.

MavsMeet Faculty/Staff Reception: 5-6 p.m. University Club. Free.

Campus Ad Representative ........ Bree Binder campusads@shorthorn.uta.edu

FIRST COPY FREE ADDITIONAL COPIES 25 CENTS THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON 91ST YEAR, © THE SHORTHORN 2011

All rights reserved. All content is the property of The Shorthorn and may not be reproduced, published or retransmitted in any form without written permission from UTA Student Publications. The Shorthorn is the student newspaper of the University of Texas at Arlington and is published in the UTA Office of Student Publications.

Opinions expressed in The Shorthorn are not necessarily those of the university administration.

402 South Cooper Street #109 Cooper Chase www.uta.edu/sustainability

RENT A BIKE FOR $30 A SEMESTER!

817-275-6600

This ain’t your Grandma’s used furniture Store”

Texas Rangers Discounted Tickets: 7:05 p.m. Prices vary. For information contact the ballpark at 972-RANGERS.

MavsMeet Convocation: 4-5 p.m. Texas Hall. Free.

Success U: All Day. UC Palo Duro Lounge. Free. For information contact

Ice Worlds: 6-7 p.m. Planetarium. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for children. For information contact the Planetarium at planetarium@uta.edu or 817-272-1183.

Registration Ends for Fall Term — Regular Session

Broken Sugar: 2-6 p.m. Gallery 76102. Free. For information contact Corey Gossett at gallery76102@uta.edu or 817272-0365.

TUESDAY

2899 W. Pioneer Pkwy. Arlington, TX 76013 One light west of Bowen Road Monday - Saturday: 10am-6pm Sunday: 11am-5pm

Welcome Back BBQ: 6-9 p.m. Greek Row (in front of University Village). Free. For information contact Greek Life at 817272-9234.

Hot High: 102 Low: 81

Residence Hall Move-In Event: 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. All residence halls. For information contact Apartment and Residence Life at 817-272-2926.

Photo Editor ................................... Aisha Butt photo-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu Online Editor ........................... Jessica Patzer online-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu Webmaster ......................... Steve McDermott webmaster.shorthorn@uta.edu Student Ad Manager .................. Daniel Kruzic admanager@shorthorn.uta.edu

%

Texas Rangers Discounted Tickets: 7:05 p.m. Prices vary. For information contact the ballpark at 972-RANGERS.

Texas Stargazing: 2-3 p.m. Planetarium. Tickets are $6 for adults, $4 for children. For information contact the Planetarium at planetarium@uta.edu or 817-272-1183.

Second Home Furniture

%

$2 Movie - Source Code: 5:30 p.m. $2 tickets. Planetarium. For information contact the Planetarium at planetarium@uta.edu or 817-272-1183.

Enter the Grid: Game the System with Your Librarian: 5-10 p.m. Central Library Room B06. Free. For information contact Kevin Schuck at 817-272-3000.

Ice Worlds: 1:30-2:30 p.m. Planetarium. Tickets are $6 for adults, $4 for children. For information contact the Planetarium at planetarium@uta.edu or 817-272-1183.

Broken Sugar: 2-6 p.m. Gallery 76102. Free. For information contact Corey Gossett at gallery76102@uta.edu or 817272-0365.

MavsMeet After-party: 5-7 p.m. Central Library mall. Free. For information contact University Events 817-272-9234.

University College Presents: “Dude, Where’s My Class?”: 2-4 p.m. Ransom Hall. Free. For information contact Matt Hendricks at 817-272-6107.

SUNDAY

Ice Worlds: 6-7 p.m. Planetarium. Tickets are $6 for adults, $4 for children. For information contact the Planetarium at planetarium@uta.edu or 817-272-1183.

Matt Hendricks at resources@uta.edu or 817-272-6107.

FREE MAINTENANCE AT THE MAVERICK BIKE SHOP

SEMESTER PACKAGES BASIC – $20 • Two tube replacements • One tune-up (no replacements) • Unlimited air refills • 15% discount on any replacement parts

WEEKENDER – $40 • Two tube replacements • One tune-up (no replacements) • Unlimited air refills • 20% discount on any replacement parts • Two Slime fills • Two wheels trued • One chain cleaning

BLAZER – $80 • Two tube replacements • One tune-up (with cable housing, cables, cable tips) • Unlimited air refills • 20% discount on any replacement parts • Two Slime fills • Two wheels trued • One chain cleaning

TUBES • TIRES • SLIME LOCKS • LIGHT SETS HELMETS • BIKE RACKS BELLS • BOTTLE CAGES OTHER REPLACEMENT PARTS


The Shorthorn Thursday, August 18, 2011

Page 3

Student Life

Mavericks stampede back onto campus Both new and returning students of all majors can find a Welcome Week for them. By Shelly Williams The Shorthorn staff

The Shorthorn: File Photo

Then business freshman Jessica Santos, left, and then civil engineering sophomore Pooja Patel respond to greetings from the cheerleaders at the MavsMeet After Party on August 25, 2010 on the Central Library mall. The event welcomes incoming freshman with a variety of activities that include live music, food, a photo booth and character sketches.

CALENDER LISTING OF WELCOME WEEK EVENTS AUGUST 22 Residence Hall Move-In Time: 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Place: All residence halls Residence Hall In-Hall Events Time: 7-9:30 p.m. Place: All residence halls

MavsMeet After-party Time: 5-7 p.m. Place: Central Library Mall

University College Presents: “Dude, where’s my class?” Time: 2-4 p.m. Place: Ransom Hall

Social Work Survival Snacks Time: 1-2:15 p.m. Place: Building A, The School of Social Work

Enter the Grid: Game the System with your Librarian Time: 5-10 p.m. Place: B06, Central Library

Welcome Back BBQ Time: 6-9 p.m. Place: Greek Row (In front of University Village)

“Waffleopolis” Time: 8-10 p.m. Place: University Center mall, Rain site: UC Bluebonnet Ballroom

EXCEL Welcome Back Movie Time: 8:30-10:30 p.m. Place: Maverick Activities Center west lawn

AUGUST 24

AUGUST 26

“Success U” Time: 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Place: Check in at UC Palo Duro Lounge; sessions at various locations.

Social Work Survival Snacks Time: 8:15 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. Place: Building A, The School of Social Work

Graduate School New Student Orientation Time: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Place: UC

College of Liberal Arts Snack Attack Time: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Place: University Hall

AUGUST 30 Movin’ Mavs Back to School Game Time: 1 p.m. Place: Texas Hall International office Big Howdy Party Time: 6-9 p.m. Place: UC Rio Grande, UC Red River, UC Concho

Welcome Back Splash Time: 5-8 p.m. Place: Outdoor Pool, MAC

Social Work Survival Snacks Time: 1-2:15 p.m. Place: Building A, The School of Social Work

AUGUST 29 Social Work Survival Snacks Time: 8:45 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.

AUGUST 31

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Carter BloodCare Blood Drive Time: 9 a.m. Place: Central Library and UC malls Maverick Cookout featuring the Activities Day Fair Time: 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Place: UC mall College of Science Welcome Back Ice Cream Social Time: 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Place: Life Science Building lobby UTA Night at DSW Shoes Time: 5-9 p.m. Place: DSW Shoes at The Parks at Arlington

Shelly Williams news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

SEPTEMBER 6 Link International Friendship Informational Session Time: 6 p.m. Place: Swift Center SEPTEMBER 7 Engineering Welcome Bash Cookout Time: 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Place: Engineering Mall Link International Friendship Informational Session Time: 6 p.m. Place: Swift Center SEPTEMBER 8

SEPTEMBER 1 Carter BloodCare Blood Drive Time: 9 a.m. Place: Central Library and UC malls College of Nursing Floats ‘n’ Quotes Time: 2:45-4 p.m. Place: TBD Honors College Game Night Time: 5-8 p.m. Place: UC Bowling and Billiards

Global Grounds International Coffee Hour Time: 4-5:30 p.m. Place: UC Palo Duro Lounge SEPTEMBER 9 Freshman Day Time: 4-6 p.m. Place: UC

Multicultural Mavericks Kick-Off Time: 6:30-8:30 p.m. Place: UC Bluebonnet Ballroom

PHC Greek Splash Time: 7-10 p.m. Place: Meadow Run Pool and Club House Cost: $3

SEPTEMBER 2

SEPTEMBER 10

Carter BloodCare Blood Drive Time: 9 a.m. Place: Library and UC malls

Mavericks on a Mission Time: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Place: TBA

Promoting Going Green

New donors earn $50 per donation for the first five donations (total of $250) New donors are always welcome — Just bring your valid photo I.D., social security card and proof of residency. We look forward to assisting you with your life-saving donation. HOURS Monday–Saturday 8:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

on Campus

Visit us online! www.theshorthorn.com

Biomat Arlington 1519 South Cooper St. Arlington, TX 76019 817-461-4764 Within walking distance from UTA

GIVE PLASMA

Looking for used textbooks, furniture or roommates?

cl

Organizations director. “Buffalo Wild Wings will bring the wings, and we’re going to have water slides and water balloons, hot dogs, things like that. That’s on Saturday just outside the UC [University Center].” But the biggest change this year involves Rangers baseball tickets for anyone and a new program called “Success U.” On Aug. 1, Student Activities started selling $5 tickets for Welcome Week’s UT Arlington Student Night with the Rangers. Nagy said the tickets were going quickly. While the baseball game is for anyone, “Success U” is geared toward freshmen, Nagy said. Newcomers will hear from faculty and staff about UTA expectations and what it takes to succeed in class. “That’s a two-day program for incoming students to get kicked off on the academic side — studying skills, balancing, time management, those kinds of things,” she said. Ultimately, Welcome Week is for everyone who wants to have fun, meet new people or get reacquainted with old friends, Nagy said. “More of our non-traditional students can find events they can bring their kids to as well,” she said.

GIVE LIFE

Looking to sell or advertise among fellow students?

www.adsdorm.com

Carter BloodCare Blood Drive Time: 9 a.m. Place: Library and UC malls Information Superheroes: Cape, Tights, to the Library! Time: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Place: Central Library

AUGUST 28

visit:

Computer Appreciation Breakfast Time: 7:30 -9:30 a.m. Place: In Front of the MAC Social Work Survival Snack Time: 8:15 a.m.-9:45 a.m. Place: Building A, The School of Social Work

Pajama Jam — Get Your Glow On Time: 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Place: UC Bluebonnet Ballroom and UC Bowling and Billiards

UT Arlington Student Night with the

sponsored by www.adsdorm.com

Carter BloodCare Blood Drive Time: 9 a.m. Place: Central Library and UC malls

Social Work Survival Snacks Time: 1-2:15 p.m. Place: Building A, The School of Social Work

Wings, Wieners, & Water Time: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Place: Outside the University Center

Social Work Survival Snacks Time: 1-2:15 p.m. Place: Building A, The School of Social Work

. Easy . Fast . Reliable

Place: Building A, The School of Social Work

AUGUST 27

AUGUST 25

AUGUST 23

MavsMeet Convocation Time: 4-5 p.m. Place: Texas Hall

Rangers Time: 7:05-10 p.m. Place: The Ballpark in Arlington Price: $5 per ticket www.utatickets. com

MavsMeet Faculty/Staff Reception Time: 5-6 p.m. Place: University Club

Social Work Survival Snacks Time: 8:15-9:45 a.m. Place: Building A, The School of Social Work

UTA is about to host a two-weeklong bash throughout the campus. As part of Welcome Week and Maverick Stampede, students, friends and family, faculty and staff can participate in more than 50 events from Aug. 22 to Sept. 10 , starting with Move-In Day, where the Apartment and Residence Life staff volunteers to help students move their belongings in. “These first couple of weeks are to not only to meet new people, but to see old friends you haven’t seen all summer,” said Lisa Nagy, coordinator of Welcome Week and Student Affairs assistant vice president. “It’s not just for one population. It’s for all of our students, not just our new ones, or graduate students.” Events for Welcome Week have been going on for more than 20 years, Nagy said, but the two-week event wasn’t dubbed Welcome Week/ Maverick Stampede until about five years ago. That’s when UTA really started to bring a calendar of events together. What used to be only a week has

become two weeks because of the amount of participation, Nagy said, with sometimes an estimated 2,000 people at an event. “You’ve got Student Activities, Campus Recreations, Multicultural Affairs that do some of the events, and then you’ve got some of the academic colleges that are involved,” she said. “The library sponsors some events, the international office sponsors some events. Welcome Week/Maverick Stampede is really a campus-wide community.” This will be business finance senior Gita Christy’s second year attending Welcome Week. “Last year, it was crowded ­— hot,” the international orientation leader said. “I didn’t get into convocation, but I did go to the after-party. That was a lot of fun. Then I pretty much went around school to see what they had.” After convocation, the university hosts various games, activities and free food on the Central Library mall. Nagy said students could look forward to getting free food for about two weeks, especially with almost all events free. The only time students may have to pay is at the Activities Fair, and that’s $2 for a hot dog or drink. “Our first event in Welcome Week for our department is Wings, Wieners and Water on Aug. 27,” said Carter Bedford, Student Governance and


Page 4

The Shorthorn

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Student Life

Smoke clears on tobacco ban reality The UTA will not give tickets to smokers, but other students can report them. By Monica S. Nagy The Shorthorn senior staff

Students stepping on campus for the first time since spring semester will notice it’s smoke-free, for the most part. As of Aug. 1, the campus became tobacco free. A move Jeff Jones said began more than 18 months ago with surveys, research and Town Hall meetings, “overwhelmingly” supporting the ban. Jones is the Human Resources learning and development manager. “We are by no means on the cutting edge,” Jones said. “There are 531 campuses in the U.S. to model this after.” He said UTA looked to the University of Michigan as a school that effectively made the change. The UTA community and its guests are now prohibited from using any type of tobacco product on any part of the university – its sidewalks, parking lots and housing to name some areas. This also includes the building in Fort Worth and leased places such as research and development sites. Smokers can only do so in their vehicles with the windows up. The UTA Police Department has not and will not give out citations, assistant police chief Rick Gomez said. “I don’t even think a ticket would do it,” said English senior Amy Tuttle as she took a drag of her cigarette. “I would probably just be sneakier the next time.” Tuttle said she spends much of her time on campus with her full class load and working two on-campus jobs. “If someone asks me to put it out, I will,” she said. “It’s just courteous to not smoke, but to say there’s no place we can smoke is ridiculous.”

Smoking Cessation Class

TOBACCO-BAN POLICY

The university offers a smoking cessation program to those interested in quitting smoking.

A. Effective Aug. 1, 2011, the use of tobacco products (including cigarettes, cigars, pipes, smokeless tobacco and other tobacco products) by students, faculty, staff and visitors are prohibited on all UTA properties.

The classes are divided into four sections — Understanding Addiction, Steps to Quitting, How to Cope and There is Help.

B. The use of tobacco products (including cigarettes, cigars, pipes, smokeless tobacco or other tobacco products) is prohibited:

Classes are offered every third Tuesday and Wednesday of each month.

The university’s Health Services requires that classes be taken in sequential order. The next classes are Sept. 20 and 21.

To register call Health Services at 817-272-2711.

Enforcement will come in the form of self-policing. Jones said regardless of who is in violation, someone can speak up and say, “Do you know there is a new policy?” Students can contact the Office of Student Affairs or a professor to report someone in violation. They’ll address it through the student judicial code. “Unless there is an absolute egregious refusal, I don’t know if there will be an immediate citation and ticket,” Jones said. “What we’re really trying to create is a culture of compliance.” The Christian Campus Center and Baptist Student Ministry across from the University Center are not owned by the university, but the owners say they’re on board with the tobacco ban. “We had a smoking ban here before the university,” center director Bob Frazier said. Frazier said he used to let students smoke on the property several years ago, but it became littered with cigarette butts, so he changed his mind. “We had to police our ground ourselves,” Frazier said. He said all he’s had to do is

1. In all interior space on UT Arlington campuses; 2. On all outside property or grounds of UTA campus* including partially enclosed areas such as walkways, breezeways and bus shelters; 3. In UTA vehicles, including buses, vans and all other university vehicles; 4. In all indoor and outdoor athletic facilities, as well as the grandstands of outdoor facilities.

C. The use of tobacco products (including cigarettes, cigars, pipes, smokeless tobacco or other tobacco products) is allowed for use in personal vehicles, provided:

1. the windows are closed; 2. all tobacco waste products are properly disposed of.

D. The university prohibits the campus-controlled advertising, sale or free sampling of tobacco products on campus. E. Littering the campus with remains of tobacco products or any other disposable product is prohibited. Stock Photo: sxc.hu

As part of the tobacco ban, the university removed ashtrays around the campus before Aug. 1. In addition to cigarettes, all tobacco products are banned.

kindly ask someone to stop, and they’ve complied. Center office manager Doris Frazier said she used to smoke and understands the difficulty in quitting. “I do understand why these students want to smoke,” she said. “It’s social. It’s a true addiction.” Gary Stidham, BSM director, said via email they too already

have a smoke-free policy that has been in effect and will continue. Jones said there are cessation courses people can go through and take advantage of for help with the transition. “It’s not just we’ve gone tobacco free and you’re on your own,” Jones said. Monica S. Nagy

F. Organizers and attendees at public events, such as conferences, meetings, public lectures, social events, cultural events and sporting events using UTA facilities will be required to abide by the tobacco-free policy and procedure. Organizers of such events are responsible for communicating the policy to attendees and for enforcing this policy. G. Campus organizations are prohibited from accepting money or gifts from tobacco companies. *Main Campus, all satellite locations and all other buildings or facilities leased off the main UT Arlington campus Source: UTA

news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

t n e d u t S y e H ! s g r O Deadline: Friday,

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Re-Registration

ALL student organizations must re-register to remain active for 2011-2012. All forms can be completed online at mavorgs.uta.edu

ssell Doug Ru Park

Questions? STUDENT GOVERNANCE AND ORGANIZATIONS DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS

Contact Student Governance & Organizations at 817-272-2293 or at mavorgs@uta.edu


The Shorthorn Thursday, August 18, 2011

Student Services

Mav Discount Program website updated to engage community

Page 5

Personal Care Accent Optical - 20 percent off complete pair of eye glasses Hair Works - 20 percent off services

Dans Import Service - 10 percent off all car repairs

Cushing - 10% Discount for Printing Services

R1 Concepts Inc. (Automotive) - 10 percent off purchase

Kristie’s Cleaning Service - 10 percent off any service

Texas Ballet Theater - 20 percent off single ticket price

Modous Vivendi Chiropractic - Free consultation, not including exam, and 20 percent discount of treatment costs

Lonestar Comics - 10 percent off purchase

Barber’s Unique - 10 percent haircuts

YourCruiseAgents - Discounts and perks on cruises and all-inclusive resorts

Daireds - $20-$25 haircut and style Texas Vision Care - 20 percent off complete pair of glasses or 10 percent off contact lenses

Restaurants ATOMIC Subs and Wings Sports Grill 10 percent off all food items as well as non-alcoholic beverages. Hooters by the Ballpark - 10 percent off any food item

Sean Holland, owner of ATOMIC Subs and Wings, poses with his chicken wings on Jan. 2011. The restaurant is part of the Maverick Discount program and offers 10 percent off all food items and non-alcoholic beverages.

it’s easier to navigate for students and businesses,” said Amy Schultz, Communications and Community Relations associate vice president. The website makes it easier for By Monica S. Nagy students to sign up and get the The Shorthorn senior staff information they want quickly by Equipped with new vendors and using the categorized merchant a new website, the Maverick Dis- areas, she said. “This is continuing count Program is changing to cater more to stu- “One of the best to grow, it’s not static at all,” Shultz said. dents, faculty and staff. “More and more busiThe UTA community features of the nesses will be particican receive at least 10 per- new website is pating in it.” cent discounts on things that merchants One of the goals in such as entertainment, updating the website food and personal items can apply to was to expand the proby showing cooperating be on it. In the gram’s visibility and be merchants their Mav Exgood ol’ days, more of an asset to the press Card. campus community, “I think we’ve increased we had to conSorensen said. about 25 percent of ven- tact merchants “One of the best feadors in the last year,” said tures of the new webJeff Sorensen, Student Af- in person. With site is that merchants fairs assistant vice presi- this, we don’t can apply to be on it,” dent. have to do all he said. “In the good Student Congress Presol’ days, we had to ident Jennifer Fox said that footwork.” contact merchants in there are currently 125 person. With this, we vendors involved with the Jeff Sorensen don’t have to do all that program, and that she Student Affairs assistant vice president footwork.” wants to see 200 to 250. A business needs to University Communications worked with SC and So- offer at least a 10 percent discount rensen for the 2010-2011 academic to be eligible. The updated website also lets year to update the Maverick Disstudents know exactly what the discount Program’s website. “What the website does that count is for, like if it excludes desthe previous website didn’t do is sert or alcohol.

New vendors can more easily be added to the program, students can view discounts.

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Fox said businesses can update the website with daily specials. Merchants are given stickers to display on their windows and little plaques to put by the register that reads they are a Maverick Discount Program participant. Genghis Grill manager Richie Labarbera said they have been on the discount program for two years. Labarbera said the restaurant, which offers 10 percent discounts to the UTA community, gets a lot of traffic from students taking advantage of the program. Music media sophomore Ross Owen said he hasn’t heard of the program during his two and a half years here. “I think they should advertise on signs around campus,” Owen said. “I think that would help make it stand out.” Besides the website, SC advertises the program by listing the website on all of their brochures and by telling students about it at meetings. University Communications advertises to local businesses and university updates. Fox said if there are any merchants that students want to see discounts from that aren’t on the website, they can visit SC offices at the University Center lower level or email her at sc-pres@uta.edu. Monica S. Nagy news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

Travel/Entertainment

Arlington Chayon-Ryu Martial Arts - 25 percent off lessons

Southwest Natural Health Center - 30 percent discount consultation, exam, x-ray and computerized spine scan.

The Shorthorn: File Photo

Texas Professionals (Automotive) - 10 percent discount

Trail Dust Steak House - 20 percent offthe total bill, excluding alcohol Ventana Grille - 10 percent off total food purchase, excluding alcoholic beverages WingStop - 10 perent off any regular price menu items or combo meal

Platinum Parking-DFW International Airport - $6.00/day + taxes and fees (25 percent off regular rate) Chester W. Ditto Golf Course - 20 percent off green fee, cart and non-sale merchandise Monday through Thursday and after 12 p.m. Friday-Sunday Arlington Tennis Center - discounts on court fees, classes, recreational leagues and drills Lake Arlington Golf Course - 20 percent off green fee, cart and non-sale merchandise Monday through Thursday and after 12 p.m. Friday-Sunday Meadowbrook Park Golf Course - 20 percent off green fee, cart and non-sale merchandise Monday through Thursday and after 12 p.m. Friday-Sunday Tierra Verde Golf Club - 20 percent off green fee, cart and non-sale merchandise Monday through Thursday and after 12 p.m. Friday-Sunday

shojimoto - 10 percent off any purchase with valid Mav Express card. (students only)

Retail

J. Gilligan’s Bar and Girll - 10 percent off any food item

Stanza Textbooks - 10 percent off purchase

Mavericks Bar and Girll - 10 percent off food and non-alocholic beverages

Kelly-Moore Paint Co. - 20 percent off purchase

J.R. Bentley’s English Pub - 10 percent off food purchase

Little Angel’s Shop - 10 percent off purchase

Woodys Bar BQ - 10 percent off food and non-alcoholic beverages

Arlington Scuba Center - 10 percent off non-sale merchandise

Automotive

Arlington Animal Hospital - 10 percent off veterinarian services

Firestone - 10 percent off purchase

Sign a Rama - 10 percent off all orders

Clay Cooley Mitsubishi - 10 percent off MSRP New Mitsubishi

Jewelry Central - 10 percent off engagement rings, settings and jewelry. Does not include loose diamonds.

Carquest Auto Parts - 15 percent off purchase

AT&T Mobility - 12 percent off qualified voice and data plans

High Tech Transmission - 10 percent off purchase

Bedroom Shop - 10 percent off all products

Goo Goo 3 minutes express wash - $2 off The Works Wash or GooGoo Special Wash

Clear Phone Services of North Texas 10 percent off services

A1 Committed Autocare and Repair - 10 percent discount

From You Flowers - 20 percent off regularly priced floral and gift items Source: Maverick Discount Program


ABOUT OPINION Bianca Montes, editor opinion-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu Opinion is published Monday and Wednesday. Page 6

OPINION THE SHORTHORN

YOUR VIEW

Start looking ahead While it’s tempting to be nostalgic, pay attention to where we are now — UTA Since late July, I’ve been forcing myself to stay up later so I can watch my favorite ’90s Nickelodeon television shows. I grew up watching Kenan and Kel , All That , Doug and Clarissa Explains It All. The cable network Teen Nick started a special block of shows for the summer called “The ’90s Are All That.” During this block that starts at 11 p.m., the network plays their best DUSTIN L. DANGLI shows from the decade. It’s the perfect formula to cash in on nostalgia. M e r r i a m - We b ster defines nostalgia as “a wistful or excessively sentimental yearning for returning to or of some past or ir- Dangli is a journalism recoverable condi- junior and editor in chief of The tion.” It’s that rich feel- Shorthorn. ing of remembrance of the things that Join the discussion used to have such an impact on our lives. by commenting at For me, it’s eating a theshorthorn.com. Lunchable and seeing flashes of the care I would take to stack the perfect cracker sandwiches. It’s reading old love letters that set my heart aflutter with the joys and downfalls of puppy love. It’s watching my favorite childhood shows that make me feel like a kid. But like any vice, nostalgia is only good in moderation. Take this semester to focus on the world around you and the future. For incoming freshmen, this means taking advantage of your new setting at UTA. Maybe you were the coolest thing in high school. Maybe you weren’t. It doesn’t matter. As you start a new chapter in your life, it’s a point where you can be the person you want to be. Transfer students, don’t focus on what the college experience has been, think about what it can be here at UTA. College doesn’t have to be class after class until graduation, UTA offers much more. There’s an organization to fit your liking so you can be the person you want to be. Returning students, you’ve heard it all before. But don’t hold on to the nostalgia of what UTA was. The university is changing, a lot of it is physical — new structures, new features and more improvements. But as the university strives to be recognized as a national research institution, students’s experiences are being impacted. Give UTA a fresh look this semester and be the person you want to be.

ALMOST THERE by Mason LaHue

Since 1919

REMEMBER The Shorthorn invites students, university employees and alumni to submit guest columns to the Opinion page. Thursday, August 18, 2011

EDITORIAL/OUR VIEW

Take the time, save money Use your Maverick discount at local businesses That shiny Mav Express card does more than open doors and keep you in the Central Library past midnight, it can also save you money around campus. More than 120 businesses in Arlington offer discounts that you can only receive by flashing the blue and orange ID card, or for those that joined UTA before 2008, the card with the fountain background. This may sound like an outrageous suggestion, but students: use it. The first step is researching what businesses offer student discounts. Some places advertise their discount, but many don’t. The university’s Maverick Discount Program webpage features a robust list of companies and their discounts. The next step to retrieving a dis-

count is to let an employee know you’re a UTA student. Don’t be afraid to ask if a location offers student discounts. The reason a lot of businesses offer the deals in the first place is because they want student business. One strategy is to ask, “You offer a UTA discount, right?” Another is to hand the employee at the register your Mav Express card with your credit card like it’s business as usual. If saving money isn’t enough incentive to do the work, there are intangible benefits of taking advantage of the discounts offered exclusively to the UTA community. The city, especially around campus, houses local businesses you can only experience here in Arlington. Especially when it comes to eateries, student discounts make trying a new

burger or taco less damaging to your wallet. But the discounts don’t stop at eateries. In addition to restaurants; retail, services, entertainment and personal-care businesses offer student discounts as well. That means students can save in most avenues of purchases from daily meals to the larger investments or emergencies. All that’s left is to find out where you would like to save money. — The Shorthorn editorial board

ONLINE Tell us where you use your Mavericks discount online at theshorthorn.com.

YOUR VIEW

The Shorthorn: Mason Lahue

A presidential welcome Student Congress President Jennifer Fox welcomes students

H

ey Mavericks! If you are a new Maverick, welcome to UT Arlington! If you are a returning Maverick, welcome back to campus! This is an exciting time to be a student at UT Arlington. The College Park District is well under construction, part of the new parking garage is opening for the fall semester, and the new UT Arlington tower is shining bright on the corner of South Cooper Street and UTA Boulevard. I hope you are ready for a new school year and are looking forward to making some great memories on campus. I encourage you to take advantage of everything UT Arlington has to offer. From the Welcome Week events to Oozeball, Bed Races, the Maverick Speakers Series and the Big Event, there is always something going on! Your classes should always come first, but your co-curricular involvement definitely adds to your education and total college experience. I encourage each of you to find your niche on campus. Find a student organi-

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Dustin L. Dangli E-MAIL editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

JENNIFER FOX Jennifer Fox is Student Congress President and guest columnist for The Shorthorn. Join the discussion by commenting at theshorthorn.com. zation, an intramural team, a fraternity/ sorority, or any cause that you feel passionate about. I guarantee the friendships, connections and personal skills that you will develop by joining an organization on campus will make a huge impact on your life. A great way to see what clubs and organizations the university has to offer is to attend the Fall Activities Fair Day that will be held on Aug. 31 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the University Center mall. More than 200 organizations will be represented. Find a

The Shorthorn is the official student newspaper of the University of Texas at Arlington and is published four times weekly during fall and spring semesters, and weekly during the summer sessions. Unsigned editorials are the opinion of THE SHORTHORN EDITORIAL BOARD and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of individual student writers or editors, Shorthorn advisers

group that you want to join, then have lunch at the Maverick Cookout! If student government interests you, I encourage you to consider joining Student Congress. It is a great way to make a difference on campus, be the voice of the student body and leave your legacy at UT Arlington. I also invite you to attend any of our Student Congress meetings on Tuesday nights at 6 p.m. All of our meetings are open, and we would love for you to join us! If you ever have a question, concern, or need help with anything at all, please do not hesitate to contact me. I, as well as the other Student Congress executive officers, hold office hours in the Student Congress office, suite B150 in the UC lower level. You are also welcome to email me at sc-pres@ uta.edu. I wish you the best of luck in the upcoming year, and I hope you engage yourself in campus life. Get involved, and leave your mark on The University of Texas at Arlington. Go Mavericks!

or university administration. LETTERS should be limited to 300 words. They may be edited for space, spelling, grammar and malicious or libelous statements. Letters must be the original work of the writer and must be signed. For identification purposes, letters also must include the writer’s full name, address and telephone number, although the address and telephone number

will not be published. Students should include their classification, major and their student ID number, which is for identification purposes. The student ID number will not be published. Signed columns and letters to the editor reflect the opinion of the writer and serve as an open forum for the expression of facts or opinions of interest to The Shorthorn’s readers.


sports

about sports

remember

Check out theshorthorn.com for video Josh Bowe, editor of volleyball coach Diane Seymour giving sports-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu more thoughts on the WAC. Sports publishes Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. Thursday, August 18, 2011 Page 7 The Shorthorn

Campus Recreation

WAC

Intramural sports offers something for everyone

Coaches dish on WAC

The Shorthorn: File

Students play flag football at Maverick Stadium on Sept. 9, 2010. Intramural sports offer a variety of activities including softball, sand volleyball, soccer, poker, raquetball and tennis.

Unique opportunities are available for freshmen learning the ropes. by josh bowe The Shorthorn sports editor

UTA intramural sports is making itself more open to all students at UTA, whether it is a freshman looking to fit in, a senior wanting to try something new or everyone else in between. Drew Barfield, intramural sports assistant director, said the goal for intramural sports this year was to give everyone an option. That means more emphasis on freshman-exclusive leagues and lower-level leagues. Starting this year, there will be a freshman league for every intramural team sport. Barfield believes many of the veteran flag football teams were too dominant for any freshmen to join and compete. Thus, the freshman league was developed to give new students a more competitively balanced playing field. The freshman league for last year wasn’t as big as Barfield hoped, he said. Barfield didn’t think enough freshmen knew about the opportunity. The intramural program allows students to stay active in their favorite sport even if they don’t have the ability to play on a NCAA team. Intramural sports coordinator Tak Momose said the program is a great way to become acquainted with UTA. “You can meet a lot of new people,” he said. “That’s one of the biggest things about playing.” Criminal justice senior Billy Miller had enough trouble making new friends when he first started at UTA, commuting from Bedford — a 20-minute drive from campus — with

a part-time job as well. But after playing flag football for several seasons, that problem began to evaporate. “There are a lot of good guys that play the game,” Miller said. “It was very open for someone not as familiar with UTA as a freshman.” That openness has allowed a wide range of students to participate. Barfield said one of the things he finds most remarkable is the diversity of students involved. “It’s very interesting to go out and see all the different types of people,” Barfield said. “Seeing all the interactions that are, for the most part, positive.” UTA will be offering eight different team sports to go along with 12 individual events. Being an athlete isn’t even required. If you prefer to do battle on the virtual field or in the recreation room, UTA offers a tournament for the video game “Madden 12,” fantasy football, foosball and poker. Barfield wants to make sure freshmen take advantage of the unique opportunity — they are the only group allowed to join more than one flag football league. “This gives freshmen more options,” Barfield said. “They have a league for them, so it’s not as competitive without more experienced teams.” Regardless of what sport or league a student chooses, Barfield believes the entertainment of intramural sports is second to none at UTA. Miller certainly agrees. “It’s the best thing I’ve done at UTA,” he said. “I can’t imagine having more fun with any other program.” Josh Bowe

How to sign up: After forming a team, designate a team manager. Have the team manager fill out a roster, and deliver that and the entry fee to the Campus Recreation offices by the entry date. For a complete list of sports visit theshorthorn.com

Sign-up info: Bowling: Entry date - Sept. 2 Fee - $18 per week 3-on-3 basketball: Entry date - Sept. 7 Fee - $20 Pre-season flag football tournament: Entry date - Sept. 13 Fee - $10 Flag football: Entry date - Sept. 14 Fee - $20 Softball: Entry date - Sept. 21 Fee - $20 Ultimate Frisbee tournament: Entry date - Sept. 28 Fee - $10 Indoor soccer: Entry date - Oct. 5 Fee - $20 Volleyball: Entry date - Oct. 12 Fee - $20 3-on-3 wheelchair basketball: Entry date - Nov. 15 Fee - $10

sports-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

Enrolled in a UTA SCUBA class? ARLINGTON ARLINGTON SCUBA CENTER CENTER SCUBA

The move will demand more for UTA sports programs, coaches say. By Josh Bowe The Shorthorn sports editor

Darin Thomas was both surprised and excited. The UTA baseball head coach knew immediately what his program had to live up to and what level of excellence his program needed to meet with the announcement of the move to the Western Athletic Conference. “I knew we were getting into a great conference,” Thomas said. “Since 2003, they have two national championships in baseball (Rice, 2003, and Fresno State, 2008).” UTA formally accepted an invitation to the WAC on July 14. The 14 teams here at UTA will compete in the Southland Conference for its last season before officially changing conferences on July 1, 2012. With that change comes the higher expectations that Thomas believes will change the way he handles his program. That means more hours spent scouting and recruiting players to raise the level of play for his baseball team. Thomas said he has to raise the level of work that he expects from himself. “No question. We’d be fooling ourselves if we were to follow the same routine,” he said. “It’s going to be a challenge.” Thomas isn’t alone in that sentiment. Other UTA coaches are planning to step up their games up, as well. Volleyball head coach Diane Seymour said she’ll have to continue to improve at molding young players. In the WAC, she said, the players aren’t necessarily bigger or overwhelming, but faster and well-coached. “It is a step up for sure,” Seymour said. “They will be faster athletically. That’ll be an exciting change of pace.” The benefits of moving from the SLC to the WAC won’t only be competition for UTA coaches. Although the move was made official a month ago, coaches have already seen the effects on their recruiting. “We’re talking to players we’ve never talked to before,” women’s basketball head coach Samantha Morrow said. “It’s just a stronger conference. It has traditionally a lot more NCAA appearances as far as women’s basketball goes.” Seymour agrees. She’s already had some potential recruits change their tune after hearing about UTA’s move. “There have been a couple of kids that have said ‘Yeah, I’ll get over there and visit at some point,’ ” Seymour said. “Then you mention that we’re making a move to the WAC and they

Five things to know about the WAC: 1. Originally conceived on July 12, 1962, the WAC is the sixth oldest conference among the 11 Division I conferences. 2. The WAC was the starting ground for some of the nation’s top athletic programs. Some teams that spent time in the WAC: Southern Methodist University, Texas Christian University, Arizona, Arizona State, Brigham Young University, New Mexico, San Diego State, University of Nevada, Las Vegas and Boise State. 3. In 2001, the WAC signed a TV deal with ESPN to broadcast select games for both football and basketball. 4. The conference headquarters has been in Denver since its inception and ironically, the University of Denver will finally be joining the conference along with Seattle University in 2012. 5. The WAC is a non-automatic qualifier for the Bowl Championship series. Source: www.wacsports.com

go ‘Oh, really? When can I get over there to visit?’ The tone definitely changes, and they seem to be more receptive.” But even with the more high-profile competition, more talented recruits and more attention, Seymour recalled how well the SLC treated UTA. UTA and the SLC have gone hand-in-hand since the Mavericks opened as one of the SLC’s charter members in 1963. “I’ve been a member of the Southland conference as a player and a coach for 20 years,” Seymour said. “I’ll miss those coaches because they’ve become friends in my life.” Seymour and other UTA coaches won’t be saying goodbye to all of their coaching colleagues. Texas State and UTSan Antonio will join UTA in the WAC in 2012, as well. The schools will have room to make their own names in the conference as the WAC is seeing some of its teams leave. The headlining school, Boise State — most known for its football teams’s rise from Cinderella to perennial contender — has jumped to the Mountain West Conference. Boise State won’t be alone, because Fresno State, Hawaii and Nevada will all leave the WAC in 2012, leaving the door open for UTA to grab a spot in the limelight. For Thomas, to get there, he knows his program will have to grow. “I knew that we had to raise the level of the entire program,” Thomas said. “The level of play, recruiting – all of it. We have to keep it up.” Josh Bowe sports-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

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Page 8

The Shorthorn

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Computing and Technology

Computer centers pop up all over campus Computing Lounge Areas with Wi-Fi: 1. Pickard Hall: First floor lobby 2. University Hall: Room 107 3. Architecture Building: Second floor lobby 4. Fine Arts Building: First floor North lobby 5. University Center: First floor lobby 6. University Center Room 152 7. Business Building: Room 340 8. Business Building: First floor Corridor 1C6 (lounge pit area)

Computer Labs: 1. Architecture Building Rooms 319 and 324 2. Business Building Room 336 3. Engineering Lab Building Room 256 4. Fine Arts fourth floor 5. Maverick Activities Center first floor 8. Nedderman Hall Room 231 9. Sam’s Click Internet Cafe, Central Library first floor 10. University Hall Room 04 11.Center Room 152 and second floor common area

Printing Prices, effective Aug. 17 On a pay-as-you-go basis • $0.04 per black and white A4 sheet • $0.24 per color A4 sheet The Shorthorn: Casey Holder

From left to right: business managment senior Candice Negbenebor , business managment senior Reed Anthony and biology alumna Nhi Le use the computer lab Wednesday afternoon on the third floor of the Central Library. The Central Library has computers available for students to use on the first through fifth floors.

quickly. “It is difficult to get a computer in one of the labs,” she said. “Especially during the busy hours right before a class. There is a lot of rush.” Cardwell was a member of the Committee on Student Technology in 2010, which proposed more Wi-Fi on campus. Maurice Leatherbury, Office of Information Technology vice president, said the

Log on at one of many locations that feature wireless internet. By Vallari Gupte The Shorthorn staff

Alaina Cardwell said the wireless Internet connection at UTA is perfect for her. The marketing junior uses her own laptop whenever she’s on campus so that she can get her work done

department spent between $200,000 and $225,000 to renovate six computer spaces and enhance wireless connections at UTA. Leatherbury said the office installed more power outlets because students are expected to own more portable computers. “We want UTA to be prepared for the wave of tablet computers,” he said. Students have been reluc-

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tant to bring laptops because there aren’t many places to recharge them, Leatherbury said. He said the eight computing spaces have been updated with high-speed wireless connections, extra power outlets and more lounging areas. Frank Lamas, Student Affairs vice president, was part of the team that proposed the Maverick Activities Center’s social zone’s development.

The social zone is the computer area on the first floor of the MAC. More than 4,000 students and faculty visit the MAC everyday, Lamas said. He said the social zone in the MAC wasn’t serving as many people as it could have. The MAC will serve more people, more efficiently, now that the social zone has more computers, and a lounge area

where students can study and spend their free time, he said. New furniture and computers were added to the MAC’s social zone in August 2010. Commuter students can enjoy the lounge atmosphere and feel at home, rather than traveling back between classes, Lamas said. Vallari Gupte news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu


World View

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Page 9

The Shorthorn

Nation

WORLD

Police: School bomb plot aimed for mass casualties

Turkey PM compares Syrian leader to Gadhafi

17-year-old Jared Cano faces felony charges for possession of bomb-making materials. Associated Press

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — Police were already keeping an eye on 17-year-old expelled student Jared Cano when they were tipped off that he was allegedly planning to bomb his old high school when classes resumed. In his apartment, they found shrapnel, plastic tubing, and timing and fuse devices that he was amassing in a plot he intended to be worse than the Columbine mass killings, police said Wednesday. Before Tuesday’s discovery, Cano had been arrested several times, and most recently accused of breaking into a house and stealing a handgun, Tampa police said. He had a court-ordered curfew and was on a police watch list. Officers checked up on him from time to time. “We’ve been very, very familiar with him,” police Maj. John Newman said. Besides the bomb-making materials, officers said they also found a journal with schematic drawings of rooms inside Freedom High School and statements about Cano’s intent to kill specific administrators and any students who happened to be nearby next week. His juvenile arrests included burglary, carrying a concealed weapon, altering serial numbers on a firearm and drug possession. None had stuck. They had been either dismissed or no action had been taken, beyond putting his name on the police watch list. The school scheme was mapped out minute-by-minute and he wanted to cause more casualties than the 1999 Columbine High School massacre, which killed 13 before the two shooters killed themselves, said Police Chief Jane Castor. Police and the school system

AP Photo/St. Petersburg Times, Cherie Diez

Jared Cano, 17, center, is led out of the courtroom in Tampa, Fla., Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2011after being charged with possession of bomb-making materials in connection with a plot for an attack at Freedom High School on the first day of school. He was arrested Tuesday night, after a confidential informant told Tampa police the teen was planning to blow up Freedom High School on the first day of class. Cano, an expelled student, faces felony charges of possessing bomb-making materials, cultivating marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, possessing of marijuana and threatening to throw, project, place or discharge a destructive device.

“were probably able to thwart a potentially catastrophic event, the likes of which the city of Tampa has not seen, and hopefully never will,” Castor said. He also had a marijuana-growing operation, police said. On his Facebook page, he says he attends the “University of Marijuana,” where he is studying “how to grow weed.” Principal Chris Farkas and other administrators knew Cano, too. He’d been expelled in April 2010. Farkas said Tuesday that Cano likely would have been “redflagged” as soon as he stepped on campus and probably would not have been able to pull off his plan. Farkas said he is accustomed to all sorts of threats at a school

of 2,100 on a large campus in the northern suburbs. Still, he was spooked about what might have been. “My first response was shock,” he said. “I wanted to see if it was a real threat.” “Once I found out and saw the information and saw what was taken from the apartment complex, that was when the reality and the fear set in that this was a real situation,” he said. The St. Petersburg Times reported that prosecutors at a hearing Wednesday said that when Cano was arrested, he repeated his plan to detonate a bomb and cause mass casualties at Freedom High School, which opened in 2002 and was named to honor

BEIRUT — Turkey’s prime minister compared Syria’s president to Libya’s Moammar Gadhafi on Wednesday, as Damascus defied international calls to end the crackdown on a 5-month-old uprising. President Bashar Assad has unleashed tanks, ground troops and snipers in an attempt to retake control in rebellious areas. The military assault has escalated dramatically since the start of the holy month of Ramadan in August, killing hundreds and detaining thousands.

the victims of 9/11. Cano tried to speak when he appeared before a judge but was quickly hushed by a public defender standing beside him. “The plot wasn’t...” Cano said, before the public defender stopped him and told the judge that “he has no comment,” according to the Times. Police told Farkas that Cano worked alone. Parents of every student got a recorded call informing them about Cano’s arrest, said the principal of the highperforming school built to handle the overflowing northern suburbs in an area some locals refer to as New Tampa. Authorities did not name the administrators targeted nor would they disclose who tipped them off. After Cano was expelled from Freedom, he attended a charter school and left voluntarily in March, according to Hillsborough County schools spokeswoman Linda Cobbe. At that point he was 16 and could have chosen to drop out. He was not registered to attend classes this upcoming school year. Cano faces felony charges of possessing bomb-making materials, cultivating marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, possessing of marijuana and threatening to throw, project, place or discharge a destructive device. The Department of Children and Families said the agency investigated Cano’s family in 2009. A spokesman gave no other details except to say DCF found no evidence of abuse or neglect. Police said his mother let them search the apartment in a modest complex just a few miles from the school. The Tampa Tribune reported that Cano’s great-grandfather Elliot Horning said that Cano’s mother, Michelle, was divorced from his dad and worked as a math teacher at another Tampa high school. His mother was not at the apartment Wednesday.

Volunteer planned gas attack on protestors MADRID — A chemistry student working as a volunteer for the pope’s visit to Madrid was arrested on suspicion of planning a gas attack targeting protesters opposed to the pontiff’s stay, officials said Wednesday. Pope Benedict XVI is due to arrive Thursday for a nearly four-day visit to celebrate World Youth Day, and thousands of protesters railing against his visit staged their march Wednesday night to Madrid’s central Sol plaza where they have held months of demonstrations against Spanish politicians and the government’s antiausterity policies.

NATION

Obama’s plan: New jobs proposals, challenging GOP WASHINGTON — Under fire in a nation desperate for jobs, President Barack Obama will soon announce a broad package of tax cuts, construction work and help for the millions of Americans who have been unemployed for months, a White House official said Wednesday. Republicans immediately cast doubt about any such plan, setting up a fresh economic showdown as the presidential campaign intensifies. Obama will unveil his economic strategy in a speech right after Labor Day, hoping to frame the autumn jobs debate by pressuring Republicans in Congress to act or face the voters’ wrath. The country is in a deep state of disgust about Washington politics, piling urgency on both parties to help the economy quickly — or somehow position the other side to take the blame.

Make it Hampton. We’d love for y you to stay y with us. Here at the new Hampton Inn & Suites South Arlington, the hospitality and friendly service we offer will make you feel like you’ve never left home. Our Cloud 9 bedding is so comfortable you wouldn’t want to get out of bed if it wasn’t for our Full Hot “On the House Breakfast” that is awaiting you in the lobby. If you’re running late and don’t have time for breakfast, we have “On the Go” Breakfast Bags you can grab as you rush off for class. (M-F) We also know computer connections are vital for research, etc., therefore we offer FREE Wi-Fi, hard wired and wireless throughout the hotel. Those are just a few of the amenities we offer at our new hotel and want to make the students, faculty and parents, as well as anyone else affiliated with UTA, feel welcome and offer you a GREAT discount.

96.00 UTA Rate

$

Hampton Inn & Suites Arlington South 1100 East I-20 (Collins & I-20) Arlington, TX 76018 Phone 817-419-3700 Fax 817-419-7177 www.dallasarlingtonsouth.hamptoninn.com

*

* Based on availability and subject to blackouts

FOR RELEASE AUGUST 18, 2011

Solution

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Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com

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DOWN 1 Rm. coolers 2 Stand-up performance 3 Current contraption 4 Align the cross hairs 5 Fly in the ointment 6 Slows 7 Prom corsage 8 Work on the street 9 MapQuest output: Abbr. 10 Pilot in a show 11 Prepare for the hot tub 12 Painting the town red 14 “A __ upon thee!” 17 Oldies players 21 Gets cozy 23 [Facepalm!] 25 Lay one’s hands on 27 Undid the blindfold 28 Do more than just consider 29 “The Clan of the Cave Bear” writer

Instructions:

8/18/11

By Don Gagliardo and C.C. Burnikel

8 2

1 5 8 7 9 6 2 3 4

Page 2 of 25 #5

Apr4 HARD

#6

Q: I’m getting married in a few months’ time, and my fiancee A: Exactly how and I are not going to have sex it might affect your sex life until after marriage. She has would depend on how much never had sex of any mutilation was done, kind before, and I’ve and whether there been gradually trywere any problems ing to talk about sex after doing so, since with her even though very often the process she gets very embaris done crudely and rassed about it (I even there can be complibought her “Sex for cations from infecDummies” to read!). tion, etc. Studies have My question is about Dr. Ruth shown that women female genital muti- Send your who have undergone lation/female genital questions to this horrible process cutting. It is a prac- Dr. Ruth Westheimer can have orgasms, but tice that unfortunately c/o King Features I can’t say for sure Syndicate still exists over here in that it will be possible 235 E. 45th St., the Middle East, and New York, NY in her case. Once you even though I would 10017 marry, this is a subject not feel any differently that you will discuss, toward my wife-to-be but I don’t know that whether she has had it or not, it is a good idea to discuss it I’m wondering how I might ask ahead of time, especially as her if she has had it done to she seems hesitant to talk about her. It’s a bit of a tricky ques- sex. Since she has never had tion to ask, even though we’re sex, and may never have tried gradually opening up to con- to masturbate, she may have no versations about sex. Also, if idea whether she is capable of she has had it done to her, how having orgasms. As long as it would that affect our sex life? wouldn’t change your decision Would it be impossible for her to marry her, I don’t see the to orgasm, for example? What point in talking about it now, should I do to help her enjoy when the conversation is likely sex more? to dwell on the hypothetical.

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

ACROSS 1 Altar constellation 4 Picked locks? 8 Where to see Goyas 13 Translating computer program 15 Had pizza delivered, say 16 Rikishi’s contest 18 Vice __ 19 DFW airport home 20 Lei presenter 22 Bit for the dog bowl 23 Tapped-out character 24 Popping up all over 25 Plaintive wind, perhaps 26 First-year law student 28 City known as the political capital of Africa 30 Battlefield display 32 King’s problem in “The King’s Speech” 33 Polo Grounds #4 34 Place to see bull horns 35 Reorganize, and then some 39 Thrill 43 Pacific Northwest cedar monuments 45 NYC neighborhood 46 Make __ dash 47 Scandinavian saint 48 Rascal 49 Like Gen. McChrystal 50 Quite soon 52 Bearded beast 53 What a case may go to 55 The three in this grid are a hint to the starts of 16-, 28- and 43Across 58 Gravy no-no 59 Billie Holiday’s real first name 60 El primer mes 61 Houston MLBer 62 “Just kidding!”

www.sudoku.com

Dr. ruth

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

2

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Page 10

The Shorthorn

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Go to

www.theshorthorn.com (Click the “UTA Textbook Center” link in the right column)

Sing in UTA Choir Open Auditions August 24 - 27th by appointment

averick Stam M e ped n th i e o J

WELCOME WEEK

Calendar of Events

Welcome Week Spotlight

August

22 MON › Residence Hall Move-In Event 23 TUE

› Residence Hall In-Hall Events › Success U** › University College Presents:

30 TUE

“Dude, Where’s My Class”*

› Enter the Grid: Game System with Your Librarian*

24 WED

› Waffleopolis* › Success U** › MavsMeet Convocation, Faculty/Staff Reception and Student AfterParty*

25 THU › Classes Begin*

› Social Work Survival Snacks › Welcome Back BBQ* › EXCEL Welcome Back Movie* 26 FRI › Social Work Survival Snacks › Cowboys Stadium Private Tour*** › UTA Student Night with the Rangers* 27 SAT › Graduate Student Orientation*** › Wings, Wieners, and Water* › Movin’ Mavs Back to School Game* › International Office Big Howdy Party › Pajama Jam: Get Your Glow On* 28 SUN › Welcome Back Splash* 29 MON › Social Work Survival Snacks

31 WED

› Carter BloodCare Blood Drive* › College of Liberal Arts Snack Attack › Commuter Appreciation Breakfast* › Social Work Survival Snacks › Carter BloodCare Blood Drive* › Information Superheroes: Cape, Tights, to the Library!* › UTA-HOSTS! Welcome Mixer* › Carter BloodCare Blood Drive* › Maverick Cookout Featuring the Activities Fair Day* › College of Science Welcome Back Ice Cream Social

September

1 THU › Carter BloodCare Blood Drive* 2 FRI 6 TUE 7 WED 8 THU 9 FRI 10 SAT

› College of Nursing Floats ’n Quotes › Honors College Game Night › Multicultural Mavericks Kick-Off* › Carter BloodCare Blood Drive* › Link International Friendship Informational Session › Engineering Welcome Bash Cook-Out › Link International Friendship Informational Session › Global Grounds International Coffee Hour › Freshman Day* › PHC Greek Splash* › Mavericks on a Mission*

* Open to all students

** Open to all freshmen

*** Open to all graduate students

DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS For event times, locations and additional information, visit

maverickstampede.com

M avs M eet CONVOCATION

Wednesday, Aug. 24 4 p.m. Texas Hall

www.theshorthorn.com

www.uta.edu/music/vocalarts


ABOUT SCENE Ashley Bradley, editor features-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu Scene is published Tuesday. Thursday, August 18, 2011

SCENE

REMEMBER Check out this semester’s Scene for articles about interesting students and interesting trends. Page 11

THE SHORTHORN

Levitt Pavilion powers through fall The Texas Power concert series has lined up jazz, and indie, and everywhere in between Vocalist and guitarist Ray Benson, left, performs with Asleep at the Wheel on Oct. 2, 2010, during Levitt Pavilion’s final concert of the fall season. Some of this fall’s upcoming shows will include Brad Thompson and Lannie Flowers, Eleven Hundred Springs, Spoonfed Tribe and Deryl Dodd and The Homesick Cowboys.

CAMPUS

SCENE

Do you still buy back-to-school clothes, and if so, what’s one thing you always get? “Yes, I do, jeans.” What’s one Chloe Corbett, thing you biology junior are looking forward to this upcoming semester? “Seeing all my friends that went home. Starting new classes. Just being back on campus every day.” Do you still buy back-to-school clothes, and if so, what’s one thing you always get? “I do. I haven’t in a while. I just get a lot of comfortable sweats and T-shirts.”

Andrea Salazar,

undeclared sophomore

What’s one thing you are looking forward to this upcoming semester? “Get back to school. Get everything done with. Just to be back in the environment.”

SOUND The Shorthorn: File Photo

The Age of Hell

N

Arlington City Hall Abram Street South Street

UTA Boulevard Engineering Research Building

Levitt Pavilion Border Street

Bookstore UTA The Shorthorn: Jose D. Enriquez III

there’s a huge portion of our residents who can’t afford to do those things.” She said the fact that events at the Levitt Pavilion are free is what’s most important. The Levitt Pavilion starts its fall series with the mosh-pit polka band, Brave Combo, on Sept. 1. O’Neal said kicking off every fall concert series with this band has become a tradition. From there, artists such as blues musician Ruthie Foster, contemporary Christian band Luminate and indie rockers The Burning Hotels and Calhoun will also perform. From the fall concert series, Zarmbinski is most interested in Jeff Coffin’s performance, the Grammywinning saxophonist from Dave

Matthews Band, with the UTA Jazz Orchestra, on Sept. 25. Coffin will also come to UTA Sept. 24 to do a music clinic with the university’s Jazz Orchestra. “This is a collaboration we do every year,” she said. “It’s become tradition.” Last year, jazz saxophonist Bob Mintzer performed with the orchestra at the pavilion. O’Neal said several performers will appeal to the UTA crowd this fall, including post-punk revivalist The Burning Hotels and Texasbased indie-pop band Calhoun. BIANCA MONTES features-editor.shorthorn@mavs.uta.edu

2011 Texas Power Fall Concert Series THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Sept. 1 Brave Combo

Sept. 2 Jason D. Williams

Sept. 3 Melissa Lawson

Sept. 4 Ruthie Foster

Sept. 10 Jamie Richards

Sept. 8 Salero!

Sept. 9 Brad Thompson & Lannie Flowers

Sept. 15 Eleven Hundred Springs

Sept. 16 The Burning Hotels

Sept. 17 Ecofest • 6:30 p.m. Velvet Love Box • 7:30 p.m. Spoonfed Tribe

Sept. 11 Luminate

Sept. 18 No Concert Sept. 22 Wayanay Inka

Sept. 23 Calhoun

Sept. 29 Soul Rebels Brass Band

Sept. 30 Carolyn Wonderland

Artist: Chimaira Label: eONe Metal Album Release Date: Aug. 16 Ranking: ★★★

et

School of Social Work

Pecan Stre

Levitt Pavilion has released its fall concert calendar with 18 performers on the docket. The pavilion, which is located in Founder’s Plaza on Abram Street in downtown Arlington, has lined up everything from reckless rock to a Grammy-winning saxophone player to perform for its 2011 Texas Power Concert Series. Levitt Pavilion currently hosts 50 free concerts per year. This summer more than 66,000 people attended a concert in the park. Economics junior Aaron Zarmbinski said he first found out about the pavilion this summer at the Independence Day concert. “I was surprised because I had never heard of any concerts going on at the Levitt Pavilion,” he said. “It looked like all of Arlington showed up.” Because the Independence Day concert was the last concert of the summer, Zarmbinski said he is already planning to attend in the fall. He said attractions like the Levitt Pavilion help make UTA have that “college-town feel.” “It is all about becoming part of the community.” Cathy O’Neal, Levitt Pavilion communications director, said before the venue arrived in October 2008, there was no reason for people to come to

downtown Arlington at night. “A lot of attention has been paid to try to revitalize the downtown Arlington area,” she said. “Part of the reason they had trouble getting that going is because there was no reason for people to come.” O’Neal said she and executive director Patti Diou did not expect the pavilion to grow as quickly as it has. During the first mini series, she said, they questioned how many people would show up. “We both decided we’d be thrilled if 500 people came to the concert,” she said. “Now, we’ve gotten so jaded. We’re disappointed if there is not 2,000 people on the lawn.” Diou said they are excited to see the pavilion building a community. “It’s so nice to see families sitting together, people that don’t know each other laughing and kids playing together,” she said. “It’s very rewarding to look out and see that — people enjoying the music.” All four current staff members of the Levitt Pavilion are UTA alumni and have strong ties to the community. O’Neal said watching the revitalization of the area has been very important for them. In Arlington, she said, there are a lot of great activities such as watching the Texas Rangers and visiting Six Flags Over Texas. “But,” O’Neal said, “The reality is

Cooper Street

BY BIANCA MONTES The Shorthorn senior staff

BYTES

Sept. 24 Bruce Robison & Kelly Willis Sept. 25 Jeff Coffin & the UTA Jazz Orchestra Oct. 1 Deryl Dodd & The Homesick Cowboys

Right before this album was recorded, the Cleveland-based band’s drummer and bass player dropped out, forcing singer Mark Hunter and guitarist Rob Arnold to fill in for them. The band hasn’t decided if it is going to add members before it goes on tour. Read the album review and listen to a sound byte at theshorthorn. com.

TO-DO

LIST

Back to School Bash with Bowling for Soup When: Doors open 7 p.m. Sunday Where: Granada Theater 3524 Greenville Ave. Dallas Cost: $15 Contact: 214-824-9933 What: 100.3 Jack FM is presenting Sunderland, The Dollyrots and Bowling for Soup to help The Granada Theater and Community Partners of Dallas collect school supplies for area schools. A list of wanted supplies is listed at www. cpdtx.org. Beta House Back to School BBQ When: 6-10 p.m. Monday Where: Beta Fraternity House 803 UTA Blvd. Arlington Cost: Free Contact: charlie.vann@mavs.uta. edu What: The event will include games, food, music and free Redbull. Any new or returning UTA students are invited.

Fright Night When: In theaters Friday Where: Wide-release Cost: Cost varies What: The remake of the 1985 comedy is about high school senior Charley Brewster who just wants to be popular at school. As soon as he ditches his lame friend “Evil” and starts dating the most popular girl in his class a hunky new neighbor shows up to get in the way.


Page 12

The Shorthorn

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Health Services

Health Services offers medical programs Smoking cessation and HIV testing are just a few of the programs for students.

Free HIV Testing When: 3-6 p.m., Friday Where: University Center Palo Duro Lounge

By Bianca Montes The Shorthorn senior staff

UT Arlington Health Services will have 13 outreach programs on campus this fall to educate students on health related-issues. Health Services is available to all students as part of the flat-rate tuition. Office visits are typically free to students, and the clinic provides discounts to uninsured students for other services. All pricing is available on the Health Services website. Donielle Smith, health promotion and substance abuse coordinator, said the clinic would provide free HIV testing 3-6 p.m. Friday in the University Center Palo Duro Lounge. The testing is offered on a first-come-first-served basis to the first 125 students. Students need to bring a valid Mav Express card to verify enrollment, but results remain confidential. Smith said the testing encourages students to raise their awareness and know their status. “Don’t be afraid,” she said. “Just get tested.” During the fall, Health Services outreach will provide awareness events covering topics including prescription drug awareness, Love Your Body Day, a DUI simulator event and World AIDS Day. The outreach center will officially begin its events Sept. 26 to raise awareness for World Heart Day. Groups will raise money from noon to midnight for the American Heart Association with a 12-hour cycling marathon in the Maverick Activities Center. In October, the outreach program, along with the Women’s Clinic will host an event for Breast Cancer Awareness month. Smith said the date is still tentative, but the event always takes place in October. Stephanie Johnson, director of nurse practitioners, said in previous years the event had informed students about the risks of breast

Testing is provided on a first-comefirst-serve basis for 125 students. Each student tested will receive free concert tickets to the fourth annual Hip Hop 4 HIV event Aug. 21 at the Palladium Ballroom in Dallas.

“We are really being proactive in providing our smoking cessation classes because of the new anti-tobacco ban that’s on campus.” Robert Blum

Health Services Director The Shorthorn: File Photo

Then education sophomore Sonia Alexander gets her blood sugar checked by nurse practioner Jan Holtberg from Health Services during the Fun in the Sun Health Fair in the University Center Bluebonnet Ballroom on March 8, 2011.

cancer and how to administer a self-exam. Office visits to the Women’s Clinic are free. The clinic also has paid services for birth control counseling and management, family planning, Pap smears and sexually transmitted infection screenings. Health Services director Robert Blum said from Sept. 1, 2010, through Aug. 16, 2011, approximately 13,000 students visited various departments of the health center. At the Medical Clinic, students can receive medical attention for general medical and mental health services, immunizations and women’s health services. The clinic also is offering free classes to assist students who are looking to quit smoking. “We are really being proactive in providing our smoking cessation classes because of the new anti-to-

bacco ban that’s on campus,” Blum said. On Aug. 1, the university instilled its tobacco-free campus policy on campus. He said the classes would be beneficial for students, and the clinic will provide nicotine replacements such as patches and lozenges, free of charge, for students who complete the classes. Smith said the program is designed to give students a fresh start from tobacco and is broken down into four sessions: Understanding Addiction, Steps to Quitting, How to Cope and There is Help. August classes are finished, but classes will resume Sept. 20 and 21. To get an appointment for the health center, students can call the front desk at 817-272-2771. Bianca Montes news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

hours Health Center Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday – Friday Pharmacy Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday – Friday Location: 605 S. West St. Phone: 817-272-2771

Services offered Medical Clinic – Various medical services are offered at the clinic free of charge (excludes labwork, X-ray and prescriptions). Mental Health Services – Professional support and treatment is available, including therapeutic services and medication treatment. Women’s Health Clinic – Paid services include cervical cancer and STD screenings, Pap smears and birth control options. Immunization Clinic – No appointment is necessary to visit the clinic. Several types of immunizations are offered and prices vary. Source: Health Services website


The Shorthorn Thursday, August 18, 2011

Page 13

Student Life

Group exercise classes to kick students into shape by natalie webster The Shorthorn copy desk chief

After New Year’s Eve, many people hit the gyms with hopes of spending the new year getting fit. According to group exercise instructor Elsa Apilado, the same applies for coming back to school after breaks. “At the beginning of the semester, there’s a lot [of students] because everyone wants to get in shape,” she said. “Because classes overlap, they can be quite full. Especially yoga, Latin fusion and kickboxing. Mid-semester, it starts falling. There’s about 10-15 [in each class] at the end.” Apilado has been teaching exercise classes for 28 years, eight of which have been at UTA, and is one of three or four non-student instructors at the Maverick Activities Center. During the first week of classes each semester, the group exercise classes at the MAC are free of charge. Alumna Kathryn Garner, who has took the yoga and kickboxing classes while she was a student, advises students to attend classes during this time. “Try as many as you can and find out what you like,” she said. “It is a fun, easy way to work off some calories with your friends.” Kim Gray, Earth and Environmental Science senior office assistant, has taken group exercise classes at the MAC for about four or five years. When deciding which classes to take, she checked the schedules online and attended the classes she thought she’d enjoy. “I’ll go, and if it worked out, then I would come back,” she said. “I’d get to know the

The Shorthorn: Casey Holder

Education senior Abigail Wing leads dance cardio craze Monday afternoon at the Maverick Activities Center. She’s been teaching dance classes at the MAC since spring 2010 and will be teaching a class this fall.

Fees for Group Exercise:

Aug. 15-24 Group Exercise Schedule

First week of each semester is free.

Participants must have an activated Mav Express card and will only be granted access to the class up to five minutes after posted class time.

Students and employees: $30 per semester Others: $40 per semester Source: www.uta.edu/campusrec

instructors and go to their classes.” She couldn’t decide on a favorite class, though. “I don’t know. I like the core pole,” she said. “I like Elsa’s class.” Adjusting her microphone for the class she was about to teach, Apilado laughed. “Because I talk a lot,” she interjected. Apilado says the classes are predominately female, but jokes that the classes are deceptively hard. “Guys come to kickboxing and don’t realize how hard it is,” she said. “They get here and go, ‘Wow! That’s hard!’ We’d like more guys to come.” Every year, she plans to retire, but can’t bring herself to, she said. “The exercise class students are absolutely wonderful here,” she said. “I keep thinking I’m going to retire, but I love teaching here.” Although the fall schedule for the group exercise schedules has not been released, Apilado said she will be teaching four classes, two of which will be free all semester. Natalie Webster news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

Cardio Dance Craze When: noon to 12:50 p.m. Monday Where: Maverick Activities Center Room 102A Kickboxing When: 5:30-6:20 p.m. Monday Where: MAC Room 102A Yoga When: 4:30-5:30 p.m. Tuesday Where: MAC Room 102A BOSU Blast When: 6-6:50 p.m. Tuesday Where: MAC Room 102A Pilates When: noon to 12:50 p.m. Wednesday Where: MAC Room 102A Step & Sculpt When: 6-6:50 p.m. Wednesday Where: MAC Room 102A Yoga When: 4:30-5:30 p.m. Thursday Where: MAC Room 102A Cycle & Abs When: 5:30-6:20 p.m. Thursday Where: MAC Room 135 Ultimate Conditioning When: noon to 12:50 p.m. Friday Where: MAC Room 102A Fall 2011 schedule was not available at time of publication. Source: www.uta.edu/campusrec

“Guys come to kickboxing and don’t realize how hard it is. They get here and go, ‘Wow! That’s hard!’ We’d like more guys to come.” Elsa Apilado

group exercise instructor


Page 14

The Shorthorn

Thursday, August 18, 2011

The Shorthorn Thursday, August 18, 2011

Page 15

live new. close. college

stude nt

livin g

com in g

fall

2 012

walk to class + resort-style amenities + hardwood-style floors + 2� wood-style blinds + 4 bed & 4 bath spacious apartments

usb power plugs + undermount sinks + quartz stone countertops + stainless steel appliances + leather-style sectional sofa

scan>learn

campusedgeuta.com amenities subject to change | renderings subject to change


Page 16

The Shorthorn

Thursday, August 18, 2011

The Shorthorn: Andrew Buckley

The Engineering Research Building, which opened earlier this year, was certified as a LEED Gold structure. The honor, which is awarded for sustainable buildings, recognized the building’s light-reflecting roofs and ability to capture rain water.

5

words and phrases you’ll hear this fall

UTA’s hot topics include construction, research goals and going green

T

he following are a few of the words and phrases that will float around this fall via newsletters, The Shorthorn and other media across campus. These keywords are essential to understanding some of what the university is prioritizing. This fall, you’re likely going to hear the following words more than anything else, since all relate in some way to each other and the ambitions of the university. – Johnathan Silver

1. COLLEGE PARK DISTRICT The district, sitting on the east side of campus, will house College Park Center, The Green at College Park, and residence and retail space. Updates on the district’s construction will be news throughout the fall because the center is expected to be complete in December. Men’s and women’s basketball teams and the women’s volleyball team will play in the new venue. The entire district is slated to be ready August 2012. The Green at College Park is already open. The outdoor area, south of the College Park Center, has a butterfly garden and a walkway made of crushed and tumbled glass.

2. TIER ONE The university is pursuing Tier One status, or national recognition for research. This phrase will be used a lot during the fall as the university actively seeks funds for research. A clear definition of the phrase is not set or agreed upon, university spokeswoman Kristin Sullivan said. Generally, though, Tier One institutions spend more than $100 million annually on research, have distinguished faculty who are members of national academies, more than 1,000 tenured or tenure-track faculty, and offer more than 200 doctoral degrees a year. Such institutions are also members of the Association of American Universities, an elite group of American and Canadian public and private research universities. Membership is by invitation only. UT-Austin, Texas A&M University, Columbia University and the University of Chicago are a few of the 61 institutions in the association. UTA is aiming high with hopes of getting more research dollars, distinguished faculty and students who excel academically. Having national recognition would make degrees from UTA more valuable, Sullivan said. “It’s the difference between your university being recognized on a regional stage, and a national and international stage,� she said.

3. COLLEGE TOWN, UTA College Town, UTA is a one-stop shop information hub for the community surrounding UTA. Businesses and campus neighbors can use this program to connect with the keywords continues on page 17

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The Shorthorn Thursday, August 18, 2011

Keywords continued from page 16

university. The program reaches out to the local community through online media, newsletters and invitations to campus events. And through the Paint the Town Blue program, College Town, UTA helps businesses reach a university audience. The Grease Monkey Burger Shop and Social Club reached out to College Town, UTA to advertise its opening and find potential employees, Amy Schultz used as an example. Schultz is UTA’s assistant vice president for communications and community relations. The program also benefits students, Schultz said. She said, for example, if people in the community like classical music and classical music students on campus are performing, the program would promote it. “The more the business community understands the range of talent our students have, the more they will look for opportunities to these students into their place of business as interns or permanent employees,” she said. College Town, UTA also helps build university pride, Schultz said. Seeing UTA posters, stickers and other memorabilia in local businesses makes for a positive, uplifting college-town environment, she said.

4. BUDGET Following the Texas legislative session, UTA received $10.2 million less in state funding for the next two years. Since before then, the university has made cuts in personnel and services. University administrators stressed that the cuts

The Shorthorn: File Photo

Arlington Mayor Robert Cluck, left, and President James Spaniolo toss dirt with shovels during the groundbreaking of the College Park District on Oct. 11, 2010, in the parking lot next to College Park Center.

were tough to make, but UTA fared better than many other Texas institutions. Effective Aug. 31, faculty and staff services will end at the Student Health Center. The university administration made the cut to save money and continue a strict focus on student services.

5. SUSTAINABILITY Though the university is focused on making cuts, it has also given sustainability on campus a high priority. Sustainability at UTA means teaching the campus community about the

importance of conservation, changing behavior, energy-efficient buildings and waste reduction, Sustainability Office director Meghna Tare said. The university incorporates sustainability practices through construction projects, on-campus dining, recycling and degree programs, Tare added. During an open forum for Campus Sustainability Day on Oct. 20, students, faculty and staff can talk about sustainability issues and give ideas about what they’d like to see on campus. Attendees also will learn about opportunities to join the University Sustainability Committee.

CLEARING

THE AIR ON CAMPUS BREATHING

I S E A S I E R AT

UT ARLINGTON

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UT Arlington is proud to be tobacco-free. All tobacco products—including cigarettes, cigars, and smokeless tobacco—are prohibited on campus at all times. This includes all indoor and outdoor spaces on the main campus and all the affiliated campuses. Fostering a healthier community is a central goal of the University. By providing students, faculty, staff, and visitors with a tobacco-free campus, we are helping to provide a better quality of life for everyone. Visit uta.edu/tobaccofree to learn more about the policy and to find information on free smoking cessation programs offered by UT Arlington.

w w w . u ta . e d u / t o b a c c o f r e e

Page 17


Page 18

The Shorthorn

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Libraries

Students find solace in resources and renovations Libraries offer everything from computers for student use to tutors and research help. by Christian Keitt The Shorthorn staff

UTA has five libraries, each offering different facilities and resources to students. The Central Library, the Architecture and Fine Arts Library, the Electronic Business Library, the Social Work Electronic Library and the Science and Engineering Library are spread across campus and available to students.

CENTRAL LIBRARY The Central Library, UTA’s primary campus library, has undergone a face-lift this summer. The second floor of the library has been closed for construction, but Tommie Wingfield, assistant to the dean for marketing and external relations at the Central Library, said it will reopen for students by the time school starts. “They removed some books and are putting in a research area,” Wingfield said. “They’re repainting it and putting in new carpet. The new thing is the research area on the north end of the building.” On the first floor, Sam’s Click Internet Cafe contains both PC and Mac computers for students, as well as study areas. The Central Library Cafe and a Starbucks are also available for students on the first floor. “The circulation desk is also on the first floor,” Wingfield said. Social work senior Monet Leighman works as a circulation desk assistant at the Central Library. “I like interacting with people at the library,” Leighman said. “It’s very laid back.” Computer workstations are also available on floors two through five, according to the library’s website. The second floor contains a reference desk where Wingfield said students should go if they need research help. For education majors, the second floor has an education collection with state-approved textbooks and children’s books. Students can also find government documents and a map collection on the second floor, as well as the newly renovated research area.

The third and fifth floors are designated “Quiet Study” spaces. The fourth floor houses the writing center, run by the English Department. Here, tutors help students with class essays, projects, reports, applications for scholarships or graduate programs, job application letters and resumes, or personal writing, according to the library’s website. Special Collections is located on the sixth floor of the Central Library and contains more than shelves of books. The library hosts exhibits which everyone, not just students, can view. “Right now, we have the best-attended exhibit we’ve ever had on the history of Six Flags [Over Texas], celebrating their fiftieth anniversary,” said Ann Hodges, special collections program coordinator. “Normally, we have something from our own collections, but this one has a lot of borrowed items in it.” The library also has more than four million photographic images, along with older forms of graphics, and a map collection that Hodges said is “well known in certain research circles.” “We don’t have just books, we have visual things of various sorts,” Hodges said. “We’ve got information in every possible format you could think of.” The Special Collections library’s hours are 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. The sixth floor is an administrative space and also houses the Center for Greater Southwestern Studies and the History of Cartography. The basement contains a digital media studio. “You can go there to get music and videos and create posters, and whatever you do with multimedia projects,” Wingfield said.

ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS The Architecture and Fine Arts Library provides computers, an image scanning work station, laptops for checkout and two library catalog work stations, according to the library’s website. “Everything’s not on Google,” said Beverly Carver, Architecture and Fine Arts Library branch manager. “We have access to information that people need in order to do their research and learn.”

“I’ll begin to study the contemporary architecture of the current projects that are going on around the world,” he said.

ELECTRONIC BUSINESS LIBRARY The Electronic Business Library is located on the first floor of the Business Building. It has seven computers available for students to access the Library’s online catalog and electronic resources, according to the library’s website. Hours are 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday-Thursday and by appointment only Friday.

SOCIAL WORK LIBRARY The Social Work Electronic Library provides access to electronic resources dealing with social work disciplines. The library is located in the Social Work Complex, Building A, on the first floor. It has eight computers and provides access to several digital research tools and databases, according to the library’s website. The library’s hours are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday.

ENGINEERING LIBRARY

The Shorthorn: Casey Holder

The second floor of the Central Library was closed for the summer sessions to undergo major renovations but has reopened in time for the fall semester. The second floor of the Central Library houses computers and a map collection.

The library also has a conference room with a computer projections system available for student use. “Our busiest time here seems to be mid-afternoon, between noon and 6 p.m.,” Carver said. Carver said she urges students in the Architecture and Fine Arts Library not to be afraid to ask for help. “I hate to see students struggling when they could ask one of us, who do this for a living, for help,” she said. Although fall library hours haven’t officially been approved yet, Carver said the proposed hours are 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m. to 6

p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and 1-9 p.m. Sunday. Architecture senior Mario Izquierdo works at the Architecture and Fine Arts Library. “I help patrons if they need help finding a book or with research,” Izquierdo said. “Usually I help art and music majors. That’s the population that comes here most of the time.” He said his favorite part about working at the library is helping and meeting other students. When it isn’t busy, Izquierdo said he takes advantage of the library’s architecture books and magazines.

Like other libraries on campus, the Science and Engineering Library provides computer workstations and books available for reference and checkout. This library is the only library on campus that allows students to borrow graphing calculators for 24 hours, said C.D. Walter, reference assistant at the Science and Engineering Library. “It’s fairly quiet here. A lot of nonengineering people like to come here and study because it’s a lot quieter than the Central Library,” Walter said. “It’s a lot smaller and a lot more homey.” Library hours aren’t yet approved for the fall, but Walter said it will probably be 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and 1-9 p.m. Sunday. Christian Keitt news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

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The Shorthorn Thursday, August 18, 2011

Page 19

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The Shorthorn Page 20

Student Life

Students explore thrifty textbook shopping options Websites and off-campus bookstores offer textbooks at sometimes cheaper prices.

Thursday, August 18, 2011

“See all the people walking around working? Those are students. The bookstore provides jobs, gives a portion of its earning back to the campus, and has a direct interaction with professors.” Paul Beaulieu

UTA Bookstore director

Price comparison (Prices as of 5 p.m. Aug. 11) Books needed for English 1301044

They Say/I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing UTA Bookstore: New — $23.50 Used — $17.75 Rent — $11.74 Amazon.com: New — from $13.00 Used — from $12.00 CollegeBookRenter.com: Rent — 130-Day rental for $9.49

UTA Bookstore Hours Aug. 18 - 21 Thursday: 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m Friday-Saturday: 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

By Ashley Bradley The Shorthorn Scene editor

Art history senior Kathleen Forrest has a money-saving process when she buys books each semester. She prints off her schedule and goes to the UTA Bookstore. Once there, she looks at the books she needs, writes down titles and prices, then she searches online for the best price. “If I can find it on Amazon, I do that,” she said. “Otherwise, I rent it from the cheapest place I can find.” Each semester, students have to figure out a way to pay for classes, their place of residence if they are living away from home, a parking spot if they have a car, food and books. Because most students are struggling with money, books can be the easiest area to look at when trying to cut expenses. Architecture senior William Rojas said he normally tries to ask friends who have taken similar classes if they have the books. “There are a lot of people I know on campus who are a couple classes ahead of me,” he said. “Borrowing their’s is easy and free.” He said he avoids buying books at the UTA Bookstore because of how expensive each text can get. Another choice students have is to go to bookstores off campus such as The College Store and Half Price Books, though management senior Zabreion Moore doesn’t think they are the best options. As she walked out of The College Store on Doug Russell Road, she said she felt a little frustrated after trying to sell a book back. “I bought this book for over $60,” she said holding up an economics book. “They said they would only give me $6. No, thank you.” Moore said she normally rents

Aug. 22 - 28 Monday-Wednesday: 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m Thursday-Friday: 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Ugly American UTA Bookstore: New — $13.95 Rent — $6.97 Amazon.com: New — from $7.97 Used — from $3.95 BookRenter.com: New — $7.62 Used — $4.35

Aug. 29 - Sept. 4 Monday-Tuesday: 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday: 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Friday: 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The Scott Foresman Writer 5th Edition UTA Bookstore: Used — $54.00 Rent — $35.96 Amazon.com: New — from $53.50 Used — from $38.14 BookRenter.com: New — $57.84 Used — $38.52

Standard Hours Monday-Thursday: 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Friday: 7:30 p.m. to 5 p.m Saturday: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday: Closed Source: www.bkstr.com

her books from three websites: bookrenter.com, chegg.com and collegebookrenter.com. “I can end up saving over $100 per semester,” she said. UTA Bookstore director Paul Beaulieu said the prices the store charges for books isn’t up to the bookstore, but governed by a contractual obligation with the university. He said students don’t understand what the bookstore does for the campus. “See all the people walking around working?” he asked. “Those are students. The bookstore provides jobs, gives a portion of its earning back to the campus, and has a direct interaction with professors.” Beaulieu said in the event that a professor decides to change a book they use in the class, the bookstore would know immediately about the change and take care of any issues as

The Shorthorn: Casey Holder

Social work senior Rachel Kuchem searches for her textbooks at the UTA Bookstore. The bookstore on campus will have extended hours until 5 p.m. on Sunday and August 28 to accommodate students returning for the fall.

soon as possible. “Here, we would refund or exchange the book,” he said. “Good luck trying to do that online.” He said ordering books online comes with many risks, like getting the wrong edition of a book, whereas the bookstore does not. “People think that the bookstore is out to gouge you, but that’s just not the case,” he said. Last year, students saved more than $2.7 million by buying used books and more than $788,000 by using the Rent-A-Text program, according to a

UTA Bookstore pamphlet. At the UTA Bookstore, students also can buy or rent books digitally, putting the book on any electronic device they want. “The digital books are about half the price of new books and have a lot of features,” Beaulieu said. He said he knows students get books at other places, but advises them to come to the campus bookstore instead.

How the Other Half Lives UTA Bookstore: Used — $12.00 Rent _ $7.97 Amazon.com: New — from $12.64 Used — from $9.06 Chegg.com: Used — $5.00 Book needed for Biology 1333002

Campbell Biology: Concepts and Connections UTA Bookstore: New — $173.50 Rent — $86.66 Amazon.com: New — from $160.97 Used — from $161.17

Ashley Bradley news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

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The Shorthorn Thursday, August 18, 2011

Page 21

Student Organizations

Students use groups for more than fun Director challenges every student to find something they don’t know anything about and try it. By Shelly Williams The Shorthorn staff

With school starting, marketing senior Phillip Truong said there are a number of ways for students to get involved in something they want to do at UTA. He’s been a part of the Multicultural Affairs department since his sophomore year and is currently chairman for Asian Heritage Month. Growing up in Texas, Truong said people were losing connections to their roots even though the state is full of diversity. “I was kind of under the realization that with this position, I could help re-establish the roots, where we’re actually becoming more Americanized,” he said. “It’s a unique opportunity to help others learn more about themselves, and also share that culture with everybody else.” Carter Bedford, Student Government and Organizations director, said the keys for students to get involved are finding something which relates to their major, finding something they enjoy on campus, volunteering, attempting something new and using the MavOrgs website. Bedford said he challenges every student to find something they don’t know anything about, and try it at least once. “A personal thing, I used to hate ballet and dance, but I had a fraternity brother who sang opera,” he said. “We were sitting in the back [at the opera], with hats on, and at one point

I was like ‘Oh, shoot, I’m too into it, people can see me.’ But now, I really do have a new appreciation for art, for all types of music, just because I went to one performance.” For business law senior Cedric Radford III, the best way to get involved and learn about organizations was joining one. “My favorite part about being involved in any organization at UTA is meeting new people, and listening and learning about the different area of study they focus on,” he said. “My advice on how others can get involved at UTA is find at least two organizations in your college, be it business, math, engineering, or student [related], and get involved. Supporting fundraisers is how I learned about many organizations on campus and got a good meal.” Joining an organization or activity that relates to a career field of choice can help students learn more about that field from an outside-the-classroom perspective, Bedford said. “I’m not saying necessarily being the president, but you want to join something related to your major,” he said. “Because you want to get those connections, you want to be with students who are in that field and who are hopefully older, upperclassmen who can give you advice.” Student Affairs is currently working to update all the organization websites, but Bedford said not all the contact information may be up yet because it’s the beginning of the semester. Bedford said he wants stu-

The Shorthorn: File Photo

Nursing freshman Cecilia Avelar (right) speaks with psychology junior Shelby Adams (center) and nursing sophomore Kaitlyn Dryer (left) about Delta Zeta during New Maverick Orientation on June 17, 2011 in the Bluebonnet Ballroom. There are more than 200 student organizations at UTA.

dents to keep in mind one thing before they join activities and organizations this fall. “Of course, it builds up your co-curricular experiences and gives you some wonderful things outside of the classroom,” he said. “But this is a key point, your academics come first. You can’t do all this other stuff if you’re not going to class — you’re not doing well.”

The Honors College Council float parades through University Center mall during the 2009 Homecoming Golf Cart Parade.

Shelly Williams news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

“I’m not saying necessarily being the president, but you want to join something related to your major. Because you want to get those connections, you want to be with students who are in that field and who are hopefully older, upperclassmen who can give you advice.” Carter Bedford

The Shorthorn: File Photo

Student Government and Organizations director

Department of Theatre Arts

WELCOME BACK

MAVERICKS

Presents

THE MOUSETRAP

by Agatha Christie

October 14, 15, 20-22 at 8pm and October 23 at 2:30pm

The School For scandal by Richard Brinsley Sheridan

November 11, 12, 17-19 at 8pm and November 20 at 2:30pm

The seduction & Deception of Mozart Selections from the works of Mozart

“Presented as a joint Production of the UTA departments of music & theatre arts”

February 24, 25, March 1-3 at 8pm and March 4 at 2:30

Paparazza

by Natalie gaupp

April 12-14 at 8pm and April 15 at 2:30pm

Spring Theatrefest The Office of the President wishes you a successful and exciting fall semester

One-Acts April 19-21 at 8pm and April 22 at 2:30pm Studio & Mainstage theatres fine arts building (North Section)

FOr more information call: (817) 272-2669 or Visit our website: www.uta.edu/theatre/


Page 22

The Shorthorn

Thursday, August 18, 2011

New restaurants bring in collegetown vibe From pizza to catfish, eateries for every craving are coming to downtown Arlington

T

his semester, students will have a few new options for places to eat off campus. Within a block of UTA, students already have several options for food, but new restaurants are offering different flavors. Four new establishments have opened or will open around campus, giving students further options for their meals. – Bianca Montes

The Shorthorn: File Photo

The Flying Fish is located on the corner of Abram and Elm streets, and is open Monday trough Friday from 11am to 10pm.

Flying Fish Mellow Mushroom Old School Pizza and Suds

Opening: Late August/early September Location: 200 N. Center St. Hours: To be determined Type of food: Stone-baked pizza

Now open Location: 603 W. Abram St. Hours: Sunday through Thursday 11 a.m. to midnight The Mellow Mushroom has more than 20 speFriday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. cialty stone-baked pizzas on its menu. Owner Kim Type of food: Old School-style pizza Flawson said the ingredient list is endless and that they have vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free opOld School Pizza and Suds houses 20 differ- tions available. ent tap beers, 20 different bottled beers, and has named its supreme pizza The Maverick in honor of UTA.

Grease Monkey Burger Shop and Social Club Opening: Scheduled to open the week before school starts with an official grand opening celebration Labor Day weekend Location: 200 N. Mesquite St. Hours: To be determined Type of food: Burgers, chicken sandwiches and salads The Grease Monkey is designed to bring an Austin/New Orleans flavor to downtown Arlington, owner Greg Gardner said. Live music, including a singer/songwriter night, will add to the ambiance. Ten drafts, 30 bottled beverages, alcoholic slushies and homemade spiked fruit ice pops will all be on the menu.

Now open Location: 300 E. Abram St. Hours: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily Type of food: Seafood, chicken, “poor boys” and salads The Flying Fish in downtown Arlington opened its lake-front West Texas-inspired restaurant this summer. Flying Fish is also home to one of the largest Big Mouth Billy Bass collections, the robotic fish that sing, and owners can drop off their bass for a free basket of catfish.


The Shorthorn Thursday, August 18, 2011

Page 23

Safety

Students can help prevent campus crime Crime Prevention Officer Ron Cook offers tips on how to stay away from dangerous situations. By Nicole Luna The Shorthorn staff

Students in need should not hesitate to call the UTA Police out of fear of disturbing them, Crime Prevention Officer Ron Cook said. However, there are some things students can do to avoid becoming victims of crime on campus. The crime that occurs the most throughout the fall semester is the theft of unattended items, Cook said. Most textbook thefts occur in the beginning of the semester because that is what students are looking for, and people who steal them can make a profit, Cook said. “Generally, people, at any time, leave their items unattended,” he said. “Students [should] be aware of their surroundings and their items and belongings, especially in their cars.” Cook said sometimes people who are looking to steal will just walk by cars in the parking lot, looking into windows to see if there is anything they can take. “Students should not leave their expensive items such as a GPS and laptops out in the open,” Cook said. If students want to leave their items in the car, they should put it away where it can’t be seen, he said. Cook said the police department is the official lost and found of the university. “Students should mark their belongings with their driver‘s license number so that if someone turns in a lost item, the police department can look up the number and find the person that lost the

item,” he said. Bike theft is another crime that happens often. Cook said that students should buy “U-locks” for their bikes because they are more secure than chain locks. He also said students should register their bikes online. If a student’s bike was stolen but it was registered, there is a greater chance for it to be returned. UTA Police offers a bike registration service online. Cook also suggested students not walk alone on campus especially if they are not familiar with it. “Students should walk with a friend who knows the campus or they can request a police escort by calling the dispatch number,” Cook said. The dispatch number is 817272-3381. Students may use the MAV Escort Ride for free from SundayThursday 7 p.m. to 1 a.m. “The MAV Ride escorts are generally made by student employees,” Cook said. “But any university patron who has a safety concern may call the UTA Police Department at any time for an escort by a member of the UTA Police Department.” Biology junior Tina Vu took a 6-10 p.m. lab class in the summer and said she takes necessary precaution. “As a young woman, I think it’s extremely important to be aware of your surroundings wherever you go,” she said. “I do have UTA Police’s number stored in my phone in case of an emergency. And I make sure to carry Mace around with me just in case and I always avoid dark areas if possible.” Journalism senior Kim Bauer says it is extremely important to be aware of one’s surroundings and she tries not to walk alone at night.

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“I think the services offered by the campus are great and should be taken advantage of. None of us want to end up victims on the next crime bulletin.” Kim Bauer

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MAVERICK ESCORT RIDE What: Free escort to your car from anywhere on campus Hours: 7 p.m. to 1 a.m. SundayThursday Contact: 817-272-3381

UTA POLICE Emergency or crime in progress: 817272-3003 Nonemergency or to report a crime: 817-272-3381

LOST AND FOUND The Lost and Found Department holds unclaimed items for 90 days before disposing them. Students can report lost items via telephone or on an online form on the Lost and Found Department’s website. Contact: 817-272-2904 Source: Various department websites

“I think the services offered by the campus are great and should be taken advantage of,” Bauer said. “None of us want to end up victims on the next crime bulletin.” There are emergency phones inside many of the campus buildings and more than 60 outdoor assistance call boxes around campus. When a student presses the call button, it is a direct connection to UTA Police and will pinpoint their exact location, Cook said. On Oct. 4, on the University Center mall, UTA Police will have their third annual National Night Out campaign to partner with the UTA community and address crime on campus. UTA Police is also participating in the Department of Homeland Security’s “If You See Something,

The Shorthorn: Casey Holder

The solar-powered call box located outside the University Center stands guard. There are call boxes located across the campus.

Say Something” public awareness campaign, Cook said. “We want the students to be safe, so for anything we want them to call us. That’s what we’re here

for,” Cook said. Nicole Luna news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

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Page 24

The Shorthorn

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Parking

3 Things to know about cruising lots at UTA From shuttling to stalking, students have different ways and places to park.

“My strategy is to get here early in the morning, leave home at 6, get here at 7. I have classes at 8 or 10, but it’s better to come in early than to spend time circling around looking for a spot.”

By Vidwan Raghavan The Shorthorn copy editor

Before classes start, many students have to manage finding a parking spot on campus. The Shorthorn has compiled three things to know that can make parking a better experience.

PARKING STRATEGY Every student has a different approach to finding the coveted “best” parking spot, be it circling around until they find one, or coming to school early. Biology senior Akash Sharma said he thinks the parking facilities on campus are inadequate but he has a plan to get a good spot. “My strategy is to get here early in the morning, leave home at 6, get here at 7,” he said. “I have classes at 8 or 10, but it’s better to come in early than to spend time circling around looking for a spot.” Sharma said he usually parks in Lot 49 or by Pickard Hall because those lots are close to his classes in the Life Science Building. Criminal justice sophomore Steven Tanuz said parking is a problem even though he lives in Arlington Hall. “Eventually, you’ll learn the timings of classes and know when people get in and out. You’ll learn when you can get a spot up front,” he said. “If I’m getting in at a bad time, I’ll head straight to the back of the lot.” Tanuz said he hopes the reserved space for Arlington Hall residents in the College Park Garage would ease the

Akash Sharma biology senior

shuttle routes Blue - Stadium Long Route Timings: 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday to Friday Frequency: Every 30 minutes Stops: Lot 26, Arbor Oaks apartments, Meadow Run apartments, Swift Center, Timber Brook apartments, Maverick Activities Center, Social Work Complex The Shorthorn: File Photo

Then-engineering sophomore Nathan Wethington looks at his first parking ticket as a new university student on July 8, 2008, at Lot 38 near the University Center. Last fall, the university police discontinued the grace period for students and ticketed improperly parked vehicles.

situation for him.

NO GRACE PERIOD Starting last fall, students lost a one week grace period to buy their parking decals. Since then, cars without a decal receive a citation from day one of the semester. “We allowed the grace period from a customer service aspect, because the lines were long in the parking office,” assistant police chief Rick Gomez said. He said it wasn’t an op-

tion anymore because students have to buy decals online. People who come to the parking office are directed to a kiosk to get a permit. It can be done anytime via MyMav. Students who don’t receive their decals by the first day of class can display their receipt to avoid a citation. “Students have the opportunity to order permits and get them well in advance,” Gomez said. “They should take the opportunity to get them online.” An annual Student Parking permit costs $130 and remote

parking costs $50.

SHUTTLE SERVICES Students can get to different parts of campus for free by using the shuttle service. Students who choose to buy remote parking decals, which are $80 cheaper annually than regular ones, can park on the far edge of campus and ride the shuttle to class. Remote decals are available to students with only day-time classes. According to the Shuttle Services website, there are four

Yellow - Stadium Express Route Timings: 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Frequency: Every 20 minutes Stops: Lot 26, Smart Hospital Green - South Shuttle Route Timings: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Frequency: Every 10 minutes (only one bus from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.) Stops: Lot 50, Lot 56, Business Building

Vidwan Raghavan

Source: UTA Parking Office

news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

Monday Night is COLLEGE NIGHT

urban student living

CLose to school. close to friends. close to perfect.

routes running across campus: Red, Blue, Green and Yellow. The Red, Blue and Yellow routes go to Lot 26, a remote lot. The Green route does not go to remote lots but to the southern lots, which require regular parking decals. The shuttle stops at Lot 50, Lot 56 and the Business Building. A bus runs every 10 minutes except between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. when there is only one bus.

Red - Stadium Short Route Timings: 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Frequency: Every 15 minutes (Only one bus from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.) Stops: Lot 26, Lot 45, Business Building

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The Shorthorn Thursday, August 18, 2011

Page 25


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The Shorthorn

Thursday, August 18, 2011

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9 2 9 2 -272


Smart Hospital

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THE GREEN AT COLLEGE PARK

COLLEGE PARK CENTER Under Construction

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COLLEGE PARK NORTH GARAGE Under Construction

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Campus Map

The Shorthorn Thursday, August 18, 2011

Page 27


T H E

The Shorthorn

U N I V E R S I T Y

O F

T E X A S

A T

T HT E N nI iV vE eRrS s I i TT Yy h eU u

A R L I N G T O N

Wednesday July 27, 2011

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www.theshorthorn.com

www.theshorthorn.com

since Since 1919 1919

CRIME

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Google Plus’ website structure is based on practical socializing. SCENE | PAGE 6

Columnist wants source of movies to get as much attention as the films. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

NICOLE LUNA The Shorthorn staff

Friends and family of two UTA employees killed in a Saturday shooting are planning their memorial and funeral. Sisters Trini Do and Michelle Ta, along with three of their family members, were shot dead by Do’s estranged husband, Tran Do, Saturday night at a birthday party for Tran and Trini Do’s 11-year-old son at the Grand Prairie Forum Roller World skating rink. Four others were injured. Tran Do shot and killed himself at the end of the rampage, police say. A public visitation is scheduled for today at 7 p.m. at Moore Funeral Home in Arlington. A candlelight vigil will follow at 8:30 p.m. outside the funeral home. Do, 29, filed a protective order against her husband in December claiming he threatened her with a gun three times last year. She asked that it be dismissed weeks later, saying, “My husband promised to change and will work on our marriage for the kids,� according to Tarrant County court documents. Trini Do joined TMAC, former-

ly the Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center at UTA, in 2002 and had worked as a research associate handling financial records. Ta, 28, joined the TMAC staff in October 2004 and earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting from UTA in August 2008. She also managed financial records for the center, which is based at UTA’s Automation & Robotics Research Institute campus in Fort Worth. The sisters were good employees, Drew Casani, TMAC regional director, said in a statement. He helped organize a small wedding reception for Ta when she married about a year ago. “They were, without a doubt, two of the hardest workers and best people I have ever worked with,� he said in the statement. The sisters attended Vietnamese Martyrs Catholic Church. Members expressed sorrow for the family. The women had many friends in the congregation. Ta was youth leader. Accounting junior Si Nguyen was close friends with Ta. He organized the vigil. “I was speechless,� he said, referring to when he learned about the shooting. “I couldn’t say anything. I didn’t want to believe it.� SHOOTING continues on page 3

STUDENT LIFE

Conversation and coffee at Free Bucks The Keeslers intern at the Christian Campus Center’s shop and set up the free food. BY VALLARI GUPTE The Shorthorn staff

Tom and Chelsea Keesler moved into their apartment in the Christian Campus Center building last spring. They decided to do an unpaid internship at Free Bucks and at least one of them is there throughout the day. “If people need something and drop by, we are here,� said Tom Keesler, kinesiology and physical education sophomore. The Keeslers wake up early each morning to make sure students have enough coffee and snacks by 7:30 a.m. Free Bucks, a part of the Chris-

tian Campus Center located across the University Center Starbucks, offers free food and a place for students to gather. More than a hundred students go to the center every day during spring and fall, Tom Keesler said. It is hard to build a personal relationship with each and every person because there are many students going in and out of the center, he said. The Keeslers also read and talk with international students who may want to learn English or become fluent in it. Mechanical engineering alumnus Hui Wang loves to meet strangers. “I like to meet people of different cultures and learn more about them,� Wang said. COFFEE continues on page 8

Fan Lovin’ from the Oven

On the XyXyXy: XyXyXyXyXyXyXyXyXyXyXyXyXyXyXyXyXyXy. Xy

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World View  Opinion  Sports 

No concrete plans for building  have been announced and no  definite location either. By Sarah Lutz Contributor to The Shorthorn    

While preparations for a proposed Honors dorm are definite, plans for construction of the building are not in the near future. Honors Dean Robert McMahon said although the dorm is just a proposal, it will still happen. Right now,

“The students seem to be really happy,� she said. UTA’s proposed dorm was a recommendation from McMahon. It’s one of two major goals he has for the college before his retirement in August, along with increasing space in College Hall. President James Spaniolo said he would like to have an honors dorm or residence hall at some point. “There are a lot of things that we

89FLKFG@E@FE 89FLKFG@E@FE ABOUT OPINION

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www.theshorthorn.com

Wednesday, October 22, 2008

The Shorthorn: Casey Holder

Mechanical engineering junior Chris Moulckers takes the UTA Racing 2007 Formula SAE car around the track during competition Saturday afternoon on Parking Lot 49. Moulckers managed the second fastest time of the day, 0.2 seconds slower than Kansas University’s Nick Roberts.

BY VALLARI GUPTE The Shorthorn staff

Karen Hibbard came out to support her son’s team in the Autocross races. Karen Hibbard’s son, Michael Hibbard, is a UTA Formula SAE team member.

BY MONICA S. NAGY The Shorthorn staff

Designs for a refresher of the University Center’s lower level are almost complete. The refresher will affect Student Affairs entities that work from the lower level, or basement. The majority of the update includes new carpeting, paint, branding, and

some furniture and cabinet space by the first few weeks of fall. Jeff Hazelrigs, Student Congress vice president, works in the basement and said the update will help make the workspace more of a destination. “Student groups suffer from a lack of exposure,� the business junior said. “Making it brighter and bringing it up to date will help.� Hazelrigs said he’s worked in the basement since he was a freshman and calls it his “home on campus.�

FM8C

Honors continues on page 6

Heaps of Hypocrisy

Students must be diligent and forward-thinking to succeed, but the favor isn’t always returned

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Stomping the Competition BSA takes the prize with an ‘I Love New York’ theme By mECCa aLI Contributor to The Shorthorn

Some stomped. Some stepped. Some strolled. Regardless of how participants worked the Texas Hall stage Tuesday night, they had the audience members on their feet. Seven student organizations, fraternities and sororities competed in the Homecoming Step Show, packing the hall with close to 600 people, said Seth Ressl, Greek life

For video coverage, visit 

The ShorThorn .com associate director and University Events. This year, steppers and performers had more room to perform than in the Rosebud Theatre, where the event was held last year, to represent their organization. “I think it’s beyond terrific,� Ressl said. “This is our first year to move it to Texas

Hall. It took it to another level.� The night began with high energy radiating from all the Greeks and other campus life who danced in the audience before the show. Members of Omega Psi Phi fraternity opened the show in all black clothes and gold boots. Their theme was “Star Wars.� Members of Alpha Kappa Alpha soror-

Forensic artist explains how  the Arlington Reads program, which has a “mystery� theme she uses art to recreate  this year. victim’s facial features. Forensic art uses clay to By JhErICCa JohNSoN The Shorthorn staff

ONLINE The Shorthorn: Rasy Ran

GrIND houSE Glass grad student Matthew Patterson grinds down a glass bowl Tuesday  at the Studio Art Center. Patterson plans to donate 20-30 art pieces to  the UT Arlington Glass Art Show in mid-April.

Forensic art and art are not the same. Suzanne Baldon, forensic artist and anthropology and sociology senior secretary and lecturer, explained the difference at her lecture Tuesday night at City Hall. The discussion was as a part of

T H E

reconstruct facial features from skulls, to identify lost or missing persons. Baldon said she tries to depict the person as best as possible in her work, not make them look great. That’s the difference between forensic art and art, she said. “Good art is a representation from the artist — it expresses

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such — professionally and respectfully. “I think of it like these are people and I want to help them,� she said. “They’re humans and they lived as humans, so you have to respect them too.� Andi Davis, Arlington Library marketing and development coordinator, said Arlington Reads was a collaboration among the Public Library, Arlington Indepen-

the artist’s views,� she said. “But good forensic art has a job. It gets people identified.� Baldon explained how she does facial reconstruction and showed the audience how to make physical features like ears, eyes and noses. “My teacher always said that with the eyes, you just eyeball them in,� she said. Baldon said she isn’t afraid of the skulls she works with. She said because the skulls were people at one time, they need to be treated as

Forensic continues on page 6

Across the street from campus, All-Stars has lots to offer.

Mingo Fishtrap talks before its Levitt Pavilion show Sunday.

Page 3

Page 6

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Reconstructing life through science

RENOVATE continues on page 8

costs students time, money, stress Bg mZdbg` k^lihglb[bebmr bg ma^l^ Zk^Zl% bm lahne] Zelh [^applied ni mh for ma^on-campus *1&r^Zk&he] Students who housing ran into problems this semesZ]nemmhmZd^k^lihglb[bebmr_hkma^fl^eo^l ter â&#x20AC;&#x201D; there wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough to go around. hgma^blln^h_]kbgdbg`'BmblgĂ?mnimhma^ University Housing should be more orngbo^klbmrmh[Z[rlbmZ]neml' ganized accountable for its mistakes. Ahp bland maZm ihllb[e^8 Phne] ma^ ngb& More than 4,000 students live in o^klbmri^k_hkfkhhfbgli^\mbhglbg^o^kr campus residence halls or apartments. ]hkfmhlgb__hnmma^Ze\hahe8Ma^gma^k^ With enrollment increasing, housing will Zk^ ma^ lmn]^gml remain an issue. pah ebo^ h__ \Zfinl Ă&#x2030; paZm phne] ma^ waiting ikhmh\helist [^numbers ma^g8 Lmn& The reported ]^gml Zg] iZk^gml phne] ghm [^took aZiir werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t concise â&#x20AC;&#x201D; some students Z[hnm ma^bk ngbo^klbmr [^\hfbg` Z iheb\^ apartments off-campus and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t inform housing so the list was incorrect, lmZm^' said Housing Ma^Matthew lbfie^Hendricks, _Z\m k^fZbgl3 ma^OpeZp erations assistant director. ]h^lgĂ?mphkd'Ma^_Z\mmaZmbmblbee^`ZefZr said ]kbgdbg` the list now comprises fewer ^o^gHe fZd^ l^^f fhk^ ^gmb\bg` 100 pah students, and housing is still mhthan fbghkl fb`am _^^e maZm bmĂ?l Z pZr available at Centennial Court and Johnmhk^[^e' son Creek apartments. F:== lZrl ]kngd&]kbobg` Z\\b]^gml Hendricks said K_\J_fik_fie18ekfe`eX;f\jZ_\i his department â&#x20AC;&#x153;will aZo^ ]^\k^Zl^] lbg\^demand ma^ eZpfor aZl [^^g continue to monitor housbging^__^\m% Zg]decisions GZmbhgpb]^ and make about BglnkZg\^ building ikh]n\^]Zlnko^rlZrbg`maZm0+i^k\^gm more housing based on the number of students interh_ Z]neml mabgd ehp^kbg` ma^ ]kbgdbg` ested in living mh Z`^ pbee fZd^ Ze\hahe fhk^ Z\\^llb[e^ EDITORIAL BpZlma^bk[Z]bg_en^g\^'on campus.â&#x20AC;? fbghkl' ROUNDUP Some stu- Ă&#x160;[Z] Ghp% BĂ?f ghm lZrbg` B pZl ma^ mrib\Ze R^mp^ZelhaZo^mh\hglb]^kmaZmma^eZp The issue: db]'Ă&#x2039;K^eZmbo^erli^Zdbg`%ahp^o^k%BpZlfhk^ dents felt the maZmkZbl^]ma^]kbgdbg`Z`^pZliZll^]bg fbl\ab^ohnl fr _kb^g]l pah p^k^ fZ]^ StudentsmaZg on waitdepartment gave *21-% Zlists mbf^ pa^g ma^ eZpl \hg\^kgbg` bgmh ing ]h\be^ shf[b^l ma^bk ]Zber werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in-[r them theHoZembg^' runA^Zkbg`ma^flZrĂ&#x160;Fhk^HoZembg^%ie^Zl^Ă&#x2039;pZl Ze\hahep^k^`^g^kZeerfhk^k^eZq^]'@^m& formed of housing around. At ori\k^^ir' mbg`Z=PBbg*21-pZlZ\Zd^pZed\hf& availability and had entation in July, BpZlma^db]pahl^ahnl^ma^rphne]`hmh to find other places iZk^]mhpaZmZi^klhg`h^lmakhn`aghp% one freshman, pa^gma^rpZgm^]mhpZm\aZfhob^hkieZrZ to live. pab\ablZ\mnZeerZ`hh]mabg`' who asked not `Zf^]^^f^]mhhobhe^gmhki^ko^kl^_hkma^bk We suggest: ik^\bhnlebmme^fbg]l'GZmnkZeer%mable^]mhZehm to be named, :\\hk]bg`mhma^:e\haheIheb\rBg_hk& University Housing h_[eZf^makhpgbgfr]bk^\mbhg' was told by a fZmbhg Lrlm^f% Z[hnm .%))) ng]^kZ`^ should commuHg^ mbf^ bg iZkmb\neZk% Breceptionist pZl k^Zf^]that [r Z ]kbgdbg` ]^Zmal h\\nk nicate better with iZk^gm _hkk^eZm^] ^qihlbg` abl hk a^k \abe]ZggnZeer% mh Fhgmr no wait list ex_khf\ZkZ\\b]^gmlmhahfb\b]^hklnb\b]^' students to prevent Irmahg_beflbgma^_hnkma`kZ]^'Hhil' isted atlZrl all. Z[hnm confusion in the _^^e NembfZm^er% B ]hgĂ?m mhh [hma^k^] Ik^lb]^gm CZf^l LiZgbheh maZm She was given fr k^o^eZmbhg' B ]hgĂ?m iZkmb\neZker fbg] fr future. fhk^k^l^Zk\ag^^]lmh[^]hg^[^_hk^ma^ said iZlm Zl ma^ [Z] bg_en^g\^' aB letter `hm mhthat lahp fr ngbo^klbmr\ZgmZd^Zihlbmbhg' _kb^g]l lhf^ h_ ma^ _nggb^lm tofZm^kbZe show upZkhng] on Ng]^kZ`^ `hbg`toZpZr' pZr[^_hk^ma^rĂ?]_bgZeer[k^Zdma^laZ\de^lh_ the first day]kbgdbg` of classesbltoghm attempt ma^bkiZk^gmlĂ?bg_en^g\^Zg]l^^bmma^fl^eo^l' Fhk^ Zk^room ghmfrom ma^ no-show lhenmbhg'stuMa^r grabeZpl a dorm B]hgĂ?mdghpb_ma^r^o^kjnbmmaZmHoZembg^ \hne][^ZiZkmh_ma^ikh[e^f' dents on a first-come first-serve basis. mahn`a'BmĂ?lZ[Z]l\^g^%fZg' seems like a chaotic situation â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ma^Lahkmahkg^]bmhkbZe[hZk] &This

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The majority of the work should be done by September, and the carpet should be installed sometime between Aug. 8 and Aug. 12, institutional construction director Bryan Sims said.

For visual renderings of the proposed designs, visit www. theshorthorn.com.

Page 5

EDITORIAL/OUR VIEW

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Hate Where? Muslim students shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to denounce Bad information, poor communication terrorists fails=kbgdbg`Z`^k^lmkb\mbhglbg^__^\mbo^%`khnik^\hff^g]l\aZg`^ to address the deeper problem

K_\Nfic[`j

Andrew Munoz geology and physics junior

LECturE

The downstairs renovation should not affect operations, says construction official.



Home Sweet

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FORMULA continues on page 5



D

A teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s research may reduce the average consumerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s software prices. Jeff Lei, assistant computer science professor, has spent the last two years researching ways to reduce product testing that software developers perform. The research will help increase productivity by reducing the time used to test software. Software is tested to see if the code used to write the software will perform the tasks it was designed Eachâ&#x20AC;&#x160;weekâ&#x20AC;&#x160;Theâ&#x20AC;&#x160;Shorthornâ&#x20AC;&#x160;willâ&#x20AC;&#x160;coverâ&#x20AC;&#x160; for, Lei said. researchâ&#x20AC;&#x160;projectsâ&#x20AC;&#x160;fromâ&#x20AC;&#x160;schools,â&#x20AC;&#x160;â&#x20AC;&#x160; Software collegesâ&#x20AC;&#x160;acrossâ&#x20AC;&#x160;campus. companies can spend as much as 50 percent of their development costs on testing, a factor that increases software prices. He said the process can be extremely timeconsuming. But Lei and his team of computer science graduate students designed a combinatorial testing approach that, he said, would reduce the testing time. Combinatorial testing is a way to set up the number of parameters being tested and combining them to reduce steps in the testing process. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our application will make testing easier,â&#x20AC;? said Tony Opara, computer science graduate student and research team member.

She said she wanted to support him to be successful in whatever he loves.



MA> A>L L AHKMAHKG M T HE SAHKMAHKG HORTHORN

THE SHORTHORN

W

By CohE BoLIN

The Shorthorn: Casey Holder



A

Theâ&#x20AC;&#x160;Shorthornâ&#x20AC;&#x160;staff

Abby Rimel, University of Kansas mechanical engineering alumna (left), and mechanical engineering senior J.P. Merkel (center) discuss some details of the battery technology that went into UTA Racingsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2011 hybrid Formula SAE race car Saturday afternoon on Parking Lot 49. UTA Racing hosted the 11th annual Texas Autocrsoss Weekend beginning with an open house Friday in Woolf Hall.



BmpZlZfZsbg`' :\khll ma^ \hngmkr% *+1 \hee^`^ \hee^`^lmn]^gmlm^g]mh]kbgdpa^gma^r Ang]k^]l h_ i^hie^ kZg Z\khll ma^ an`^ BmĂ?lmbf^mh\^e^[kZm^' ik^lb]^gmlZg]\aZg\^eehklaZo^lb`g^]ma^ only deep reflections on society will help. guards are employed to potentially war, ande^Zo^ahf^_hkma^_bklmmbf^'Ma^iZk^gml s students go back to school this week, campus Israel, armed lmZ`^%jnb\derZll^f[ebg`bgmhma^i^k_^\m]ho^ P^Ă?o^\kZff^]_hkma^iZlm_^p If it is not the case, then lh arming everybody fend off:f^marlm terrorists from Israeli schools. In Z both security will again be an issue. BgbmbZmbo^% hi^gbg` ]bZeh`n^ Zk^gĂ?m Zkhng] lmn]^gml Zk^may `hbg` mh laZi^Zlma^eb`amlhgma^bklnbml`ehp^]]b__^k^gm p^^dl%Zg]fb]m^kflZk^_bgZeerho^k' countries, the necessity of these measures is backfire. Recently, Shorthorn reported that crime \hehkl' Ma^r The jnb\der ]bl[Zg]^] Zg] \k^Zm^] Z Z[hnmehp^kbg`ma^]kbgdbg`Z`^_khf+* ^qi^kbf^gmĂ&#x2030;fZr[^bkk^lihglb[er' A professor trained to shoot and licensed to imposed by a state of war that involves potentially had risen from last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s data. g^p_hkf%cnlmZlik^\bl^Zlma^eZlm%[nmfhk^ Ghp%ma^\hngm]hpgblhg'HgerZ mh*1' on civilians. lmhkb^l +*lm if [bkma]Zr carry a gunFZgr may himself becomeh_ a weapon he serious attacks So it will not be surprising that campus security Z\kh[Zmb\Zeer m^\agb\Ze Zl i^k_hkf^kl lmhh] hg _^p^q\kn\bZmbg`ahnklk^fZbgngmbe Mablpbee[^bg^__^\mbo^'Ma^hkb`bgZeeZp \^e^[kZmbhgl bgoheo^ +* lahml h_ ebjnhk% If the U.S. now also resorts to such extreme turns mad. will again come to the fore, ^Z\ahma^klĂ?lahne]^kl' likbg`[k^Zd[^`bgl' The hkoZkbZmbhglh_[bg`^]kbgdbg`maZmh_m^g fact that citizens have to provide for their measures, shouldma^ we then understand especially comes to defense maZm Cnlm Zlwhen ma^it<abg^l^ \aZg`^] ]kbgdbg` Z`^ that mh +* pZl own defense points to a failure of the law to do it. the nation is at war? I mean, at war with itself. guns. :lrhnĂ?k^_bgZebsbg`ieZgl%]hgĂ?m i^k_hkf^kl ]blZll^f[e^] bg^__^\mbo^mhh'Fbghkl]kbgdpa^ma^kma^ ^g] now bg ]kngd ]kbobg` ]^Zmal hk Ze\hahe The problem becomes to create better laws. If If this is the case, then guns will not solve the Most of us remember Zg] ik^iZk^] mh lmng ma^ e^mma^\^e^[kZmbhg[^knbg^][rma^ eZpblma^k^hkghm' ihblhgbg`' not, every one will enforce his own law, and the incident involving Zn]b^g\^pbmaZghma^k^r^& \hgl^jn^g\^lh_[bg`^]kbgdbg`' itself will be the final Fhma^kl :`Zbglm =kngd =kbobg` bl the Constitution IZk^gml Zg] F:== lZrvictim ngbo^klbmr a student allegedly [h``ebg`_^Zm%bmaZii^g^]' BmfZr[^_nggrmhpZm\ama^ it will become carrying a gun inmhhis Ă&#x160;Bl bm ihllb[e^ _bm Z ahiibg` fZ] Z[hnm ma^ bgbmbZmbo^% lZrbg` â&#x20AC;&#x201D;h__b\bZel Zk^ useless. ghm mZdbg` k^lihglb[bebmr _hk Possessing a weapon is not in itself deadly, car lasti^` semester, ]kngd^g^l\ZiZ]^lh_Z_kb^g]%[nm ljnZk^ bgmh which Z khng] maZm ehp^kbg` ma^ ]kbgdbg` Z`^ bgobm^l neither lmn]^gmlĂ? ng]^kZ`^ ]kbgdbg`' <hee^`^ is shooting it for fun. But when guns revived talks gunahe^8Ă&#x2039; Zg of Zgghrbg`% bmĂ?lgheZn`abg`fZmm^kpa^gabl fhk^Ze\hahe&k^eZm^]_ZmZebmb^l' areik^lb]^gmlZg]ikhihg^gmlh_ma^bgbmbZmbo^ associated with madness and lack of selffriendly policies on \hngmkb_b^]ohb\^lZb]_khf bgmhqb\Zmbhgikh`k^ll^lmhZe\hahe control, they become lZrfbghklpbee_bg]ZpZr deadly and no one can our own campus. The Ma^eZppZlZm*1r^Zklhe]ngmbe ma^MO'Ă&#x160;P^ee%b_maZmljnZk^ I8P<;N8I; ihblhgbg`' predict madness. memory of Virginia SYLVAIN REY i^` bl PaZmZ[nk`^kĂ?l g^p gh fZmm^k paZm ma^ GZmbhgZe Fbgbfnf =kbgdbg` 9L==@E>KFE@M The question to ask should be: Why are Tech is still fresh in our ;^\Znl^fhlmi^hie^pah[bg`^ iZmmrf^em%Zg]maZmkhng] ma^eZplZrl' :`^ :\m h_ *21-' Ebd^ fhlm eZpl there school shootings in America? minds. ahe^ bl rhnk dbll^k% rhn ]kbgdZk^gĂ?mZe\hahe&]^i^g]^gm% Lh pa^k^ <hg`k^lliZll^l%mablhg^ In Switzerland, where every single ]h^l It is to avoid such violence that the Harrold [^m\aZ'Ă&#x2039; ma^ikh[e^fbl^Zlrmh]blfbll';nm household owns a weapon â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ma^ everyk^lihglb[bebmr person school smallh_ district near\hff^k\bZe Wichita pZl Z ebmme^ Zf[b`nhnl' Mabldistrict, pZl ahg^ fZgr g^Zkerhg^&mabk]h_\hee^`^lmn]^gml is a citizen-soldier, no such shootings are Falls, has, with Gov. Rick Perryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s makhn`ahnm support, bgm^kknimbhgl bgl^km^] i^kbh]b\Zeer :i^klhgng]^k+*blghm reported. The problem then lies in the heart passed a decision that makes Harroldhi^gbg` the pbee^g`Z`^bg[bg`^]kbgdbg`Zme^Zlm ma^ _hnk&ahnk +))1 ;^bcbg` Herfib\l Zeehp^] mh [nr Ze\hahe of American society. first school[khZ]\Zlm district in the pass such \^k^fhgr hg nation G;<' to B dghp fZgr hg\^]nkbg`likbg`[k^Zd%Z\\hk]bg` hk ihll^ll Ze\hahe% [nm If schools, which were founded to make a measure. i^hie^ hnm ma^k^ fZr [^ lni^k ^q\bm^] Z[hnm mhma^GZmbhgZeBglmbmnm^hg:e\hahe better citizens, are themselves victims of The resolution, passed last\hp&Zg]&f^em^]& week, allows ma^eZp]h^lghmikhab[bm PaZmZ[nk`^kĂ?l _Zg\r g^p :[nl^Zg] social violence, then they have failed in their teachers to carry guns at school ifmabl theyk^o^eZmbhg have a \a^^l^&hg&[k^Z] \k^Zmbhg% Zg] ]kbgdbg`Ze\hahe' role. School shootings and violence are the state permit and district authorization. :e\haheblf' fZraZo^aZ]Z_^ph_ma^fbgma^bk\Zklhgma^bk <;@KFI@8C H_ \hnkl^% ma^k^  bl ma^ most dramatic symptoms of a deeper illness. The logic behind the decision is simple: pZrmhma^_Zlm&_hh]k^lmZnkZgmaZe_pZrmakhn`a BmmZd^lma^ r\abe]ahh]pZlZlbfie^mbf^pa^gma^And guns Bg maZm fhf^gm fbghk^q\^imbhg'BgM^qZl%b_ are not the cure.B iZll^] bgmh ma^ phke] If IFLE;LG licensed teachers;nm carry^o^krhg^Ă?l weapons, defense ma^ \hff^k\bZe' ikbhkbmb^l [h]rmphahnkl phke] pZl Zg] pabm^' Ebg^l p^k^ h_ ln[c^\mbobmr Ă&#x2030; ma^ phke]% Only a deeper analysis of Z]nem the roots and pa^k^ against a potential murderer will be\ahhl^ made Z pbma iZk^gml hk[eZ\d Z `nZk]bZg% Zk^ ]b__^k^gm' I^klhgZeer% B phne] K_\`jjl\1 ghm[enkk^]pbmama^laZ]^lh_`kZrmaZmconditions ^o^krmabg` ghm violence Zl bm l^^fl' aZ] bf[b[^]% hgZo^kZ`^mh of bl social will Bprovide easier and quicker. jnZ]k^ggbZengbo^klZe^o^gmho^k_Zlm&_hh]' Jgi`e^Yi\Xb ]kbgdbg` bl Zeehp^]' B_ rhn fZkkr bg_^lm fr eb_^ ghp' ;Z\d ma^g% hg^ mabg` pZlan ng]^k ma^ `nbl^ h_ \ah\heZm^ fbed% ma^ fhlm explanation and shape better, long-term But,gh thelnkikbl^ very fact that are now allowed ]b`^lmZg]_neer BmĂ?l maZmguns Z]o^kmblbg` aZl mZd^g Z\c\YiXk`fejZXec\X[kf lhf^hg^pahblho^k+*pabe^rhnZk^ mkn^%hg^mabg`pZl\^kmZbg' ]^lib\Z[e^ _Zel^ ikhia^m h_ ]Zbkr mk^Zml lbg\^ policies. inY`e^\[i`eb`e^% schools, where our children ho^k hnk ebo^l' >o^krpa^k^ p^theoretically mnkg% p^ Zk^ k^\ho^k_khf MaZmmabg`pZl\ah\heZm^fbed' G^lme^JnbdĂ&#x2030;HoZembg^' ghmr^m+*%rhnZelh`^mmh]kbgd' And America will avoid an undeclared, receive the they to be a part of mh N\jl^^\jk1 ^qihl^] mheducation ang]k^]l h_ need Z]l hk `bffb\dl hg^]kbgd%Z\& :l ZbgbmbZmbo^ [hr B ^gchr^] fbed bg eZk`^underground HoZembg^ civilpZl war. 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We take a look behind the scenes at a local haunted house. Page 4 Online Audio Slideshow at www.theshorthorn.com

Theirâ&#x20AC;&#x160;approachâ&#x20AC;&#x160;mayâ&#x20AC;&#x160;helpâ&#x20AC;&#x160;decreaseâ&#x20AC;&#x160;timeâ&#x20AC;&#x160; ofâ&#x20AC;&#x160;productionâ&#x20AC;&#x160;andâ&#x20AC;&#x160;pricesâ&#x20AC;&#x160;forâ&#x20AC;&#x160;consumers.

Research



EDITORIAL/OUR VIEW

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Team works to improve software testing

Twelve universities battle on the pavement for 11th Texas Autocross Weekend.



Thursday, August 18, 2011 I<D<D9<I I<D<D9<I REMEMBER

K_\J_fik_fie `em`k\jjkl[\ekj#le`m\ij`kp K_\J_fik_fie The Shorthorn`em`k\jjkl[\ekj#le`m\ij`kp invites students, university REMEMBER \dgcfp\\jXe[Xclde`kfjlYd`k^l\jk \dgcfp\\jXe[Xclde`kfjlYd`k^l\jk employees and alumni to submit guest The Shorthorn invites students, university Zfcldejkfk_\Fg`e`fegX^\% Zfcldejkfk_\Fg`e`fegX^\% columns to the Opinion page. employees and alumni to submit guest ?kb]Zr%FZk\a*-%+))1 IZ`^. Page 7 columns to the Opinion page.

;Z[rlbmmbg`:]neml WrongDon Answer Don TheCare Vo e

Know Your Haunts

the shorthorn entertainment & dining guide thursday, october 16, 2008 | www.theshorthorn.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Honors dorm will give students a chance to become a community within their college and progress in their Honors degree together.â&#x20AC;?

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FACILITIES

The Shorthorn: Aisha Butt

ous majors make up the Honors College, McMahon said. Of the 600 students, the proposed dorm will be able to hold up to 55 residents. The National Collegiate Honor College considers an honors dorm an important characteristic for an Honors College. The University of North Texas added an honors dorm to its campus a few years ago in an attempt to have students live on campus long-term, said Sharon Miller, UNT honors dorm resident life coordinator.

several other construction projects will need to be finished before the honors dorm will be allowed to start, he said. He said the dorm is a part of the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 20-year Campus Master Plan and funding for the new dorm will come from building funds from the state. The dorm may be located near the Thermal Energy Plant and College Hall but no concrete plans have been made at this time, he said. Roughly 600 students with vari-

UC lower level designs get finalized

Kinesiology sophomore Tom Keesler and Arlington resident Chelsea Keesler set up hot dogs, coleslaw and baked beans Tuesday afternoon at the Christian Campus Center Free Bucks Coffee Shop. Free Bucks provides free coffee, tea and snacks Monday through Friday and free lunch Tuesday and Thursday.

Volume 83, No. Xy

2Day | paGE 2

Honors dorm still in works

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As the mercury soared past the 100-degree mark, cars roared to action during Texas Autocross Weekend races. Twelve universities competed Saturday for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fastest Time of the Dayâ&#x20AC;? on UTA Parking Lot 49. The University of Kansas made the laps in the least time in two races, followed closely by UTA. University of Kansas driver Nick Roberts completed the morning lap in 51.273 seconds, and UTAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s driver Chris Moulckers took 51.886 seconds. Roberts completed the afternoon track in 38.613 seconds and Moulckers in 38.909 seconds. Some cars sped 80 miles per hour. During the afternoon race, UTAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Formula Society of Automotive Engineers team members participating in the friendly competition threw ice cubes down each othersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; shirts to beat the heat. But the heat didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t slow anyone down. Students had been preparing for the 11th Texas Autocross Weekend with an unprecedented passion throughout last week. UTA Formula SAE is a group of car enthusiasts who design and drive race cars that they build themselves. Formula SAE is a collegiate engineering design competition sponsored by the Society of Automotive Engineers. Moulckers, a mechanical engineering junior, started racing with his father when he was 16. He has been on the UTA Formula SAE team for three years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have this hobby, and I would like to make it a lifestyle and even get paid for it,â&#x20AC;? he said.

Surface

Students paint â&#x20AC;&#x153;No Coalâ&#x20AC;? on their faces to raise emission awareness.

A university employee bakes cookies for basketball players as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Team Mom.â&#x20AC;? SportS | paGE 8

CampuS

Two staffers Racers blaze through die at hands 100 degree-Texas heat of relative Michelle Ta and Trini Do were killed by Doâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s husband at her sonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birthday party.

PULSE

volume 89, no. 77

Since 1919

Comics deserve eyes Social Circles

OPINION | PAGE 4

A lR iL nI gN TGoTnO N TT eE xX aAs S a AT T a r

Wednesday february 13, 2008

Volume 92, No. 124

THE

Page 28

THE SHORTHORN .com

T H E

U N I V E R S I T Y

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The Shorthorn: Marissa Hall

A R L I N G T O N

>=BMHK&BG&<AB>? >=BMHK&BG&<AB>? EDITOR-IN-CHIEF EDITOR-IN-CHIEF <Zllb^Lfbma >fberMhfZg Emily Toman Emily Toman >&F:BE E-MAIL E-MAIL >&F:BE ^]bmhk'lahkmahkg9nmZ'^]n editor.shorthorn@uta.edu editor.shorthorn@uta.edu Volume 83, No. Xy ^]bmhk'lahkmahkg9nmZ'^]n www.theshorthorn.com

The Shorthorn is the official student newspaper of the Ma^Lahkmahkgblma^h__b\bZelmn]^gmg^pliZi^kh_ma^ Ma^Lahkmahkgblma^h__b\bZelmn]^gmg^pliZi^kh_ma^ University of Texas at Arlington and is published four Ngbo^klbmrh_M^qZlZm:kebg`mhgZg]blin[ebla^]_hnk Ngbo^klbmrh_M^qZlZm:kebg`mhgZg]blin[ebla^]_hnk times weekly during fall and spring semesters, and mbf^lp^^der]nkbg`_ZeeZg]likbg`l^f^lm^kl%Zg] mbf^lp^^der]nkbg`_ZeeZg]likbg`l^f^lm^kl%Zg] twice weekly during the summer sessions. Unsigned mpb\^p^^der]nkbg`ma^lnff^kl^llbhgl'Nglb`g^] mpb\^p^^der]nkbg`ma^lnff^kl^llbhgl'Nglb`g^] editorials are the opinion of THE SHORTHORN ^]bmhkbZelZk^ma^hibgbhgh_MA>LAHKMAHKG>=B& ^]bmhkbZelZk^ma^hibgbhgh_MA>LAHKMAHKG EDITORIAL BOARD and do not necessarily reflect the MHKB:E;H:K=Zg]]hghmg^\^llZkberk^_e^\mma^ >=BMHKB:E;H:K=Zg]]hghmg^\^llZkberk^_e^\mma^ opinions of individual student writers or editors, Shorthibgbhglh_bg]bob]nZelmn]^gmpkbm^klhk^]bmhkl%Lahkm& hibgbhglh_bg]bob]nZelmn]^gmpkbm^klhk^]bmhkl%Lahkm&

horn advisers or university administration. LETTERS ahkgZ]obl^klhkngbo^klbmrZ]fbgblmkZmbhg'E>MM>KL ahkgZ]obl^klhkngbo^klbmrZ]fbgblmkZmbhg'E>MM>KL should be limited to 300 words. They may be edited lahne][^ebfbm^]mh,))phk]l'Ma^rfZr[^^]bm^] lahne][^ebfbm^]mh,))phk]l'Ma^rfZr[^^]bm^] for space, spelling, grammar and malicious or libelous _hkliZ\^%li^eebg`%`kZffZkZg]fZeb\bhnlhkeb[^ehnl _hkliZ\^%li^eebg`%`kZffZkZg]fZeb\bhnlhkeb[^ehnl statements. Letters must be the original work of the lmZm^f^gml'E^mm^klfnlm[^ma^hkb`bgZephkdh_ma^ lmZm^f^gml'E^mm^klfnlm[^ma^hkb`bgZephkdh_ma^ writer and must be signed. For identification purposes, pkbm^kZg]fnlm[^lb`g^]'?hkb]^gmb_b\Zmbhginkihl^l% pkbm^kZg]fnlm[^lb`g^]'?hkb]^gmb_b\Zmbhginkihl^l% letters also must include the writerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full name, address e^mm^klZelhfnlmbg\en]^ma^pkbm^kĂ?l_neegZf^%Z]]k^ll e^mm^klZelhfnlmbg\en]^ma^pkbm^kĂ?l_neegZf^%Z]]k^ll and telephone number, although the address and teleZg]m^e^iahg^gnf[^k%Zemahn`ama^Z]]k^llZg]m^e^& Zg]m^e^iahg^gnf[^k%Zemahn`ama^Z]]k^llZg]m^e^&

phone number will not be published. Students should iahg^gnf[^kpbeeghm[^in[ebla^]'Lmn]^gmllahne] iahg^gnf[^kpbeeghm[^in[ebla^]'Lmn]^gmllahne] include their classification, major and their student ID bg\en]^ma^bk\eZllb_b\Zmbhg%fZchkZg]ma^bklmn]^gmB= bg\en]^ma^bk\eZllb_b\Zmbhg%fZchkZg]ma^bklmn]^gmB= number, which is for identification purposes. The stugnf[^k%pab\abl_hkb]^gmb_b\Zmbhginkihl^l'Ma^lmn& gnf[^k%pab\abl_hkb]^gmb_b\Zmbhginkihl^l'Ma^lmn& dent ID number will not be published. Signed columns ]^gmB=gnf[^kpbeeghm[^in[ebla^]'Lb`g^]\henfgl ]^gmB=gnf[^kpbeeghm[^in[ebla^]'Lb`g^]\henfgl and letters to the editor reflect the opinion of the writer Zg]e^mm^klmhma^^]bmhkk^_e^\mma^hibgbhgh_ma^pkbm^k Zg]e^mm^klmhma^^]bmhkk^_e^\mma^hibgbhgh_ma^pkbm^k and serve as an open forum for the expression of facts Zg]l^ko^ZlZghi^g_hknf_hkma^^qik^llbhgh__Z\ml Zg]l^ko^ZlZghi^g_hknf_hkma^^qik^llbhgh__Z\ml or opinions of interest to The Shorthornâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s readers. hkhibgbhglh_bgm^k^lmmhMa^LahkmahkgĂ?lk^Z]^kl' hkhibgbhglh_bgm^k^lmmhMa^LahkmahkgĂ?lk^Z]^kl'

A R L I N G T O N

theshorthorn.com

Fall Semester 2011

Since 1919

Your Life, Your News

Long Before UTA Was UTA, The Shorthorn Was The Shorthorn

Our goal at The Shorthorn is to provide news, information and a public forum for UT-Arlingtons growing, diverse and active campus community. The Shorthorn is UT-Arlingtons student-run newspaper. It is published Monday through Thursday and is available 24/7 online at www.theshorthorn.com. Here s some information to help you utilize resources The Shorthorn provides for the UTA community.

Years be ore the â&#x20AC;&#x153;UTâ&#x20AC;? preceded the â&#x20AC;&#x153;A at the co ege now known as the Un vers ty o Texas at Ar ngton and years be ore there was a Longhorn n the am y there was The Shor horn No re at on thanks In 1919 students at what was then known as Grubbs Vocat ona Co ege needed a name or the r fledg ng terary/ humor magaz ne W th a $2 50 pr ze rom the dean as ncent ve an ensu ng contest y e ded such poet c poss b t es as KornKob Swat News Horse Sense Grubworm and Too or the name o the new pub cat on In a three-ba ot e ect on runo the student body chose Shor horn over other fina sts GVC Shots and Th st e The first ssue â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 6 by 9 nches 48 pages w th a bu n a bu s eye or a cover â&#x20AC;&#x201D; appeared n Apr 1919 The first newsroom masqueraded as a w de spot n the ha way ead ng to the adv sers o fice on the th rd floor o Ransom Ha the campus o dest bu d ng The Shor horn evo ved nto a newspaper n 1921 and has thr ved n sp te o a wor d war the Depress on ce storms too many techn ca convers ons and computer crashes to count and deb tat ng attacks w th n the student sta o trans ent hormona surge On a campus noted or change The Shor horn has been a constant grow ng nto a da y pub cat on n 1977 a ter st nts as a b week y and week y It rema ns one o UTAs o dest trad t ons and most-respected sources o news and exper ence

HOW DO I GET A STORY IN THE SHORTHORN? The Shorthorn s d v ded nto sect ons and each sect on has an ed tor who dec des what content w be pub shed n that sect on If you have a story dea or coverage request contact the ed tor whose sect on s most s m ar to your event or top c (See â&#x20AC;&#x153;Contact Usâ&#x20AC;? nformat on be ow ) If you re not sure wh ch ed tor to contact e-ma Ed tor n Ch ef Dust n Dang ed tor shorthorn@uta edu The ed tor n ch ef has fina author ty over a Shorthorn news and ed tor a content

WHY DOES THE SHORTHORN WRITE STORIES ABOUT SOME EVENTS AND NOT OTHERS?

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On any g ven day there are more th ngs go ng on than Shorthorn reporters and photographers can cover Dec s ons about what to cover are made each day by Shorthorn ed tors T me ness of a story s a ways a factor: Someth ng happen ng today s more t me y than someth ng happen ng two weeks from today Ed tors a so cons der the s gn ficance and potent a mpact someth ng w have on UTA students as we as human nterest when cons der ng stor es about peop e trends and th ngs ke that The amount of space ava ab e n each day s ed t on s determ ned by the number of ads so d for t If you have an event that you wou d ke The Shorthorn to wr te about or cover contact ed tors preferab y at east a week n advance: If you wa t unt the ast m nute a ava ab e staff on the day of your event may have been ass gned to other stor es before ed tors knew about your event

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Shorthorn page des gner Jose Enr quez and Des gn Ed tor Lorra ne Fra kor put the fin sh ng touches on a page o th s ed t on

Get Involved JOIN THE SHORTHORN STAFF You don t have to be a ourna sm or advert s ng ma or to work at The Shorthorn You do have to have t me and comm tment Any current y enro ed UT-Ar ngton student s e g b e to app y for a staff pos t on Many staff members use t as career preparat on that comp ements coursework Others do t ust because they en oy t A pos t ons are pa d P ck up an app cat on at the front desk n the Student Pub cat ons office Un vers ty Center ower eve or pr nt an app cat on from www theshorthorn com

A ong the way t has a so won the country s most prest g ous co ege ourna sm awards and has moved many t mes most recent y n 1994 to the Un vers ty Centers ower eve wh ch s to say basement n the s te ormer y occup ed by the campus now-de unct bar Peop e who ca The Shor horn the r first newsroom ob now ho d key pro ess ona pos t ons at newspapers and other med a operat ons throughout the Metrop ex and beyond We hope you w make read ng The Shor horn n pr nt or on ne one o your da y hab ts at UTA th s year Let us know what you ke Use Shor horn space to share your op n ons and become part o the campus d scuss on A so et us know when we dont meet your expectat ons We want The Shor horn to be your ma n source o news and n ormat on â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ust as t has been or students acu ty and sta here s nce 1919 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Edi ors

HOW DO I GET MY GROUP S EVENT LISTED IN THE SHORTHORN S CAMPUS CALENDAR? You can subm t nformat on for the Campus Ca endar by e-ma ca endar shorthorn@uta edu or by fi ng out the Campus Ca endar form ava ab e n our office Inc ude a br ef descr pt on of the event as we as t me date p ace pr ce and a pub shab e phone number or webs te A so nc ude your name and te ephone number n case we need to contact you about your subm ss on

SEND US NEWS TIPS If you have an dea for a story contact an ed tor (See the Contact Us nformat on be ow ) If you re not sure wh ch sect on the story be ongs n send an e-ma to ed tor shorthorn@uta edu If you see break ng news ca us at 817-272-HORN (4676)

FOLLOW THE SHORTHORN

HOW DO I PUT AN AD IN THE SHORTHORN?

Facebook: The Shorthorn Newspaper (www facebook com/theshorthorn) Tw tter: @utashorthorn On ne: www theshorthorn com

Advert s ng he ps pay for The Shorthorn We make our owest ad rates ava ab e to campus organ zat ons and departments Contact Sa es Manager Dan e Kruz c admanager@shorthorn uta edu to d scuss pa d advert s ng Reg stered student organ zat ons a so may be ab e to earn d scounts for pa d ads by part c pat ng n Shorthorn market ng n t at ves Contact Br an Schopf bschopf@uta edu The Shorthorn a so offers free c ass fied ads to current UTA students p ac ng ads for themse ves Free ads can be p aced n person at The Shorthorn office (Br ng your student ID w th you ) To p ace a pa d c ass fied ad come to our office or go to our webs te www theshorthorn com/c ass fieds

We re a so retoo ng the eShorthorn news d gest Watch for the announcement about how to get The Shorthorn s most nterest ng content sent d rect y to you

JOIN THE DISCUSSION The Shorthorn s your campus-w de pub c forum You can comment on any Shorthorn story on ne at www theshorthorn com Have more to say than that? Subm t a Letter to the Ed tor to op n on-ed tor shorthorn@uta edu Have someth ng to say about someth ng that The Shorthorn hasn t wr tten about? Subm t a Guest Co umn to op n on-ed tor shorthorn@uta edu

CONTACT US

COOPER ST

UC 3rd

MON CA NAGY

JONATHAN S LVER

V DWAN RAGHAVAN

B ANCA MONTES

JOSH BOWE

Ed or n Ch e

Manag ng Ed or

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Genera 817-272-HORN (4676) Newsroom 817-272-3661 after 5 p m 817-272-3205 Advert s ng 817-272-3188 Fax 817-272-5009 Office Un vers ty Center, Lower Leve On ne www.theshorthorn.com

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ASHLEY BRADLEY

ANDREW BUCKLEY

JESS CA PATZER

NATAL E WEBSTER

LORRA NE FRAJKOR

DAN EL KRUZ C

Scene & Pu se Ed or

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Page 29

must have that

STASH

Visit your bookstore for a chance to win one of thousands of prizes

The Shorthorn Thursday, August 18, 2011

UTA Bookstore

400 South Pecan Street

www.uta.bkstr.com

812FBTS11

ANNOUNCEMENTS

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS BUSINESS ETIQUETTE DINNER presented by Delta Sigma Pi 10/28/11. 6pm. UC Rio Grande. See ďŹ&#x201A;yers all around campus. Contact Freddie 214-537-5287

DRIVER/DELIVERY $0 DOWN PAID CDL TRAINING 40K-50K Guaranteed Job Placement Fort Worth Based Full BeneďŹ ts! Experienced Drivers 85k+ 800-234-1534 COMPANY DRIVERS AND OWNER Operators wanted home daily, paid weekly, incentive programs end dump & pneumatic tanker. 817589-7063

GENERAL MISS PERSIS STUDIO OF DANCE now hiring male demonstrators for fall semester ballroom dance classes. Training sessions in August. Call 817-2617921 or email bigpersis@ aol.com for interview/ appointment

HOSPITALITY/SERVICE !BARTENDING! $250/ DAY potential! No experience nec, Training available, 18+ok 1-800-965-6520x137

EGG DONATION

$5,000$7,000

PAID EGG DONORS for up to 6 donations + Expenses. N/ smokers, ages 18-27, SAT>1100/ ACT>24GPA>3.0 info@eggdonorcenter.com EVENTS

LADIES

Ladies Night, Tuesday & Wednesday nights at Someplace Else Pub & Grill. $2 Wells. 1900 W. Arbrook Blvd Ste 116, Arlington. (817) 468-5500 â&#x20AC;&#x153;SURVIVING THIS ECONOMYâ&#x20AC;? Zeta Mu Business Weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Speaker Event. 9/9/11, 6pm. UC Bluebonnet by Delta Sigma Pi. S. M. A. R. T. & S. H. R. M. Contact Freddie 214-537-5287

EMPLOYMENT CHILDCARE RESPONSIBLE PERSON WITH reliable transportation and good driving record needed to transport child from school to aftercare three afternoons per week. Please call Debbie (817) 919-5282

GENERAL THE EEOC PROHIBITS hiring practices that discriminate based on a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s race, color, religion, gender, national origin or age. The Shorthorn does not accept discriminatory employment ads. THE SHORTHORN is currently accepting applications for the following positions for the FALL Semester; - Reporters (news, sports and feature) - Ad Sales Rep - Photographer (includes video) - Editorial Cartoonist - Graphic Artist (hand-drawn and computer-generated) - Copy Editor - Page Designer - Ad Artist Apply through our website at www.theshorthorn.com/ application Or call (817) 272-3188 for more information. Must be a UTA student.

PIANIST WANTED Covenant United Methodist Church is looking for a pianist for Wednesday nights, Sunday mornings, and special occasions. Call (817) 465-1291 TARRANT COUNTY KIDS has part-time position available to work in after-school care with children ages 5-12. Work hours 3-6:30pm every school day. $8/ hr. To apply, go to 2820 Matlock Road in Arlington T R A N S P O RTAT I O N MANAGER-MBM Lewisville, TX. Excellent wages & BeneďŹ ts Package. Degree in Business Admin/ Logistics. 3-5yrs transportation management exp. in the food distribution industry. ProďŹ cient in Microsoft software. Apply online : www.mbmcareers.com HOSPITALITY/SERVICE FRONT DESK CSR Evenings/Weekends Must apply in person Harrison Aviation 5070 S. Collins Street Arlington, TX 76018 (817) 557-0350

OFFICE/CLERICAL PART TIME CLERK/ RUNNER for Arlington Law Firm. Must type 30wpm, exp with word, multi-task, professional appearance, good driving record, must be able to lift 40 pounds, and car insurance. 1:30-5:30pm Monday-Friday. Please email resume to kathyg@rockywalton.com APPOINTMENT SETTER for ďŹ nancial professional. M-Th 12hrs per week, 6-9PM. Call after 12PM 817-226-4032 SALES/CUSTOMER SERVICE NOW HIRING! Texas Sumo Game Rental now Hiring Game Attendants! Flexible Hours Great Pay Please Call 214-357-7077 SALES REPS NEEDED Immediate Start for Dynamic People with Great People Skills and a Positive Attitude! Paid Training, Pay is Commission, 20 to 40 Hours Per Week Flexible Schedule NO PHONE OR DOOR TO DOOR SALES CALL 972-265-4425 or email GrassRoots@greenmountain.com (972) 265-4425

EMPLOYMENT

HOUSING

HOUSING

HOUSING

SEASONAL

APARTMENTS ALL NEW 1/1 GARAGE APT. $425/ mo. includes water, (817) 447-7027 $625 1BDRM ALL BILLS PAID Newly renovated; walk to campus; $399 move in special (817) 691-4858

HOMES

ROOMMATES RENT BEDROOM IN 26 SQ FT full bath, shared kitchen, all utilities paid, $750/month in South Arlington, Sublet Rd & Cooper. Call 267-608-3283 or email ssnehroberts@gmail. com ROOMS 4 RENT Starts @ $350. W/ D, internet. Close to UTA (817)8296876

FOOTBALL OFFICIALS NEEDED Earn $$, stay active JrHi&HS, Eves&Wknds dues&uniform req, summer thru mid Nov. www. fwfo.org (888) 393-6660 SEEKING EMPLOYMENT CONCRETE WORK (ALL KIND) A. B. CONTRACTOR 817-226-0701 or supercool5664@yahoo.com FREE ESTIMATE TEACHING/TUTORING ATTENTION DANCERS!! Miss Persis Studio of Dance now hiring, female, energetic dancer with 8 years minimum training in tap/ ballet/ jazz to assist in preschool & school age classes. Upbeat personality a must! Call 817-2617921 or email bigpersis@ aol.com for interview/ appointment PAID TUTORING JOBS!!! Tutors needed to work 3-7pm Mon-Fri at Boys and Girls Club of Arlington and Ft Worth, Aug 22nd Start! *Must be able to work Monday-Friday* Call (972) 361-8384 or send resume to ieshaguess@gmail.com

HOUSING APARTMENTS THE FAIR HOUSING ACT PROHIBITS discrimination in the sale or rental of housing based on race, color, national origin, religion, gender or disability. The Shorthorn does not accept discriminatory housing ads.

CONDO 2/1 CONDO FOR sale or rent. $64,900 or $795 rent. North Cooper and Green Oaks, Columbine condos. Very sharp, updated. Owner ďŹ nancing 817-991-7000 1,031 SFT 2bed/2bath, Washer/ Dryer incl. Comm offers pools/ jacuzzi/ tennis/ volleyball/ gym $800/ month $400/dep 817-271-9892 $600 1/1 CONDO Oak Creek gated community, all appliances including covered patio, carport North of Hurricane Harbor. Call/ txt 469-759-0356 bairdfarm12@gmail.com HOMES WALKING DISTANCE TO UTA at 409 S. Collins $525 per month. (817) 265-3789 CALL DAD TODAY. WHY RENT? Buy and make $$! Super cute 3 bedroom houses available less than Ί mile from campus for $100,000. Realtor, Amy 817-543-0000 HOUSE FOR RENT 3 Bed 1.5 bath just mins from UTA, large fenced backyard, hardwood ďŹ&#x201A;oors, $800 call 214-478-6559 FALL HOUSING Master bedroom w/ private bath 15 mins from UTA by car, $300 a month all bills paid, laundry & kitchen privileges, phone 1pm-8pm 817446-0464

ARTSY HOME ON YOUTUBE search â&#x20AC;&#x153;National Register UTAâ&#x20AC;? 4 minutes away, $1,000 for two students (817) 2747257 FOR LEASE $1250/ MONTH fully furnished 3 bedroom, 1 & 1/2 bath house, close to UTA. Two car garage, W/D, walk-in closets, privacy locks on doors, security system and water included in rent. NO pets & NO smoking inside. Call Mrs. Brown 972-2912871 ROOMMATES ROOMMATE NEEDED Close to UTA. $375 per month plus utilities. 802 Truman St. (919) 939-0520 ROOMMATE WANTED Two bedroom townhouse at Arkansas/ Cooper $100 deposit, $325 a month rent, split utilities. Call/ text Tony at 214-697-2519 ROOM FOR RENT Midtown apt complex. If you are interested please contact me at 214-529-2350 COMPLETE FURNISHED BEDROOM close to UTA, utilities included, whole house privileges. $400/ mo. 817-7093967 after 6pm ONE OR TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES looking for two bedroom apt. rent $525 which will be divided by two/ three 682-234-7954

  

    

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Page 30

The Shorthorn

Thursday, August 18, 2011

HUNGRY

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Smart Living. Smart Price. Fully Furnished Private Bathrooms Full Size Washer & Dryer in Every Unit Free Tanning Complimentary Internet & Cable with HBO 24 Hour Fitness Center Resort Style Swimming Pool

Maverick Place www.MaverickPlace.com 930 Benge Drive Arlington, TX 76013

817.277.0529 Have a SmartPhone? Scan this code for more info!

Maverick Place_20.63x5.33.indd 1

8/10/11 8:16 PM

1315 Wet N Wild Way Arlington, TX 76011

UTA

Ballpark Way

Collins

Visit your new IHOP for a delicious $4.99 breakfast you can have anytime of the day! Make it a Great Day! Make It An IHOP Day!

I-30 Randol Mill

Cooper

OPEN 24 HOURS!

Wet-N-Wild

Abram

(817) 795-7700

Only valid at participating IHOP restaurants. Valid everyday. Please mention coupon when ordering. Cannot be used with any other offer. Does not include tax & gratuity. Only Valid at this location Cannot be combined with any other offer. Tax and gratuity not included. Does not include beverages.


Student Media Department Main Campus PO Box 871502 Tempe, AZ 85287-1502

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

1

N A M H S E E R D F I GU 2011


2

2

A S PECIAL A DVERTISI N G S E C T I O N

OF

THE STATE PRESS

Freshman Guide

E D I INS

ve o m t n a rt o p m i y n t i a r o s i i r p m r a o d e b t h o g t i r s ed the e n g n s i u s p o e f m i l a c e g n 3 Cho e o l y ol h c t l o a t e g h n g sti u j d a n 5 Stayin he s w u y p l m k c a i C u q pe m s e T u p e 6 Move m m a o cC elc i n W h c 1 e 1 t 0 oly P e us 7 Fall 2 m p o m c l a e C W 1 wn 1 o t 0 n 2 w l l o a eD 11 F m o c l e W 1 1 0 2 l l g n i k r 15 Fa a P s e u p m o m c a l C e W st e W e 18 Fall m o c l e W n a 1 1 m 0 h s 2 e l fr a s s Q 21 Fal a A y F l ar me e o s c t l e e k W tic n o s a 25 Fall e ll s a e? b m t o o c o l f e b lW l a F 26 Gra g n i ur d p l e h â&#x20AC;&#x2122;ts 27 Need n o D & os D m r o 28 D

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S U M M E R 2011


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Freshman Guide

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Choosing the right dorm is an important move COLIN LECHER | T HE S TATE P RESS |

After you’ve registered for classes, picked a major and bought a bomb-shelter-worthy amount of ramen noodles, you’ll need a place to live. Arizona State University offers several options for freshmen dorms, each with different positive aspects. Choosing the right one is an important part of the residential life experience. Tempe starts off with the most choices. In the north neighborhood are Manzanita Hall, the Palo Verde dorms and San Pablo. The dorms feature a variety of dining options and recreation areas, such as outdoor volleyball courts and space for concerts and sporting events. In the center neighborhood, the living facilities include Best, Hayden, Irish and McClintock. Near them are Hayden Library, ASU Gammage, and the Memorial Union. The Memorial Union has several dining options, such as Pitchforks, chain restaurants and a convenience store. The south neighborhood includes Hassayampa, Sonora Center and the Adelphi Commons. Nearby is the Student Recreation Center, a full gymnasium with an Olympicsized swimming pool and several sports facilities for basketball, tennis, volleyball and squash. You can find areas with

computer labs and tutoring centers nearby, along with study lounges, for any nights spent studying. The Hassayampa Corner Market convenience store, with an attached coffee shop, and Hassayampa Dining Center for when hunger strikes. For honors students, Barrett, the Honors College Residential Community, right next to Hassayampa Academic Village, provides 24-hour campus security and front desk services. The seven-building

complex also features a tutoring center, academic advising, vending machines, study lounges and Ethernet ports for each student. For students on the Downtown campus of ASU, the University offers Taylor Place, nestled right in the heart of Phoenix and near classes, potential internships and restaurants. Two 12-story towers house about 1,300 students, and feature a laundry facility, meeting room, lounge and

screened porch areas. A 4,000-square-foot shade garden is also available to students. On the West campus, students can live in the relatively-new Las Casas. The apartment-style housing is close to academic buildings and amenities. However, Dorm room prices can be intimidating. Most dorms on the Tempe campus range from $2,800 to $3,200 a semester, except for the Barrett Honors Complex,

which runs from $3,300 to $4,300 depending on the style of the room. The West campus pricing depends on the number of bedrooms in Las Casas, and a new residence hall will be open in the Fall of 2012. Rates for Taylor Place in downtown Phoenix are the most expensive, costing $4,000 a semester to live in Tower I and $4,300 to live in Tower II. Whatever decision you make, the benefits of living

on campus, especially during your freshman year, are numerous. You’ll be able to save money on gas and food with a meal plan, for instance. You’ll also have the chance to be right next to your classes, and other services provided by the University, all under a safe and convenient environment conducive to making friends.

Reach the reporter at clecher@asu.edu

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Freshman Guide

PANHELLENIC SORORITY FALL FORMAL RECRUITMENT Date: September 2 - 6, 2011 Location: ASU Memorial Union

Mandatory Orientation: Tuesday August 30th. Students wishing to go through recruitment must attend

session one: 5:30-7 or session two: 7:30-9.

Register for recruitment online at asu.mycampusdirector.com

For questions, please contact Kimmy Babos at asuvpmembership@asu.edu


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Freshman Guide

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Staying healthy on campus needs to be a priority KATHERINE TORRES | T HE S TATE P RESS |

When students begin attending ASU, one concern they might have is whether or not they will have access to health care. Their concerns range from wondering where students can get prescriptions filled to if they have access to counseling. ASU offers health services as well as health programming through the Student Recreation Complex (SRC) and the Student Health Services Building. The Student Health Services building for the Tempe campus is located on the corner of Palm Walk and University Drive. The center offers

many services to students, including a pharmacy, immunizations, nutritional counseling, and massage therapy. Student Health Services accepts many different insurance carriers, and even if students do not have health insurance, they can sign up for Aetna student health insurance through ASU. Student Health Services does more than treat illnesses, and offers information and resources on student wellness, including counseling and stress management. Students who are interested in maintaining their wellness can also head to the SRC, which functions as a fitness complex and is where Sun Devil Mind Body (SDMB)

and Sun Devil Fit classes are offered. The SRC also offers massage therapy and has a sports medicine clinic. The SRC is located on the south side of the Tempe campus, at the southern end of Palm Walk. Currently, the SRC is undergoing a renovation and expansion that will be completed by the 2012 school year. The Student Health Services building is going through a renovation project that will be completed by the fall 2011 semester. Both projects will update the buildings and allow each department to expand their services.

Reach the reporter at katherine.torres@asu.edu

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Freshman Guide

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Move quickly when adjusting to college life RYAN MCCULLOUGH | T HE S TATE P RESS |

Transferring from a community college, even one boosting over 20,000 students like Mesa Community College, to a major university can be a daunting task. It can make one feel like a little fish in a big pond. Being proactive is an important quality in making such a change. When transferring, scheduling appointments with advisors, filling out the FAFSA, deciding whether to live on campus or off, and attempting to integrate into the community are just a few important tasks that are better done sooner than later. ASU offers orientation for new students, freshmen or those transferring. These events can be hectic and sometimes jarring. Students can meet with advisors, find

information on clubs, and receive their Sun Card among other things at orientation. Though, all of these things can be done before, without all the hassles of the lines. Carmel Richards, a recent Choral Education graduate, transferred from MCC to ASU. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The hardest part for me was how big the campus was,â&#x20AC;? Richards said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Before, you could just go to school (at MCC) five minutes before class started, walk to your class and not have to worry about it. But getting to class at ASU is an event.â&#x20AC;? Richards would park at 5th Street and Ash Avenue, then take the Orbit, a free shuttle offered by the city of Tempe, closer to campus. Even then, it was still a 10-minute walk for her to reach her classes. For Richards, getting involved in the community

was an important part of her experience. Besides advisors, talking to students who share your same major can provide valuable insight. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The other thing you can do is talk to the heads of your department and meet with them. Make sure that they know you right away, who you are,â&#x20AC;? Richards said. The university experience is shaped by how involved each student gets. Putting yourself out there is a way to make that experience memorable. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let everybody know that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here â&#x20AC;Ś that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to get this degree,â&#x20AC;? Richards said. More information about transferring to ASU, including admission requirements, can be found at www.transfer.asu.edu.

Reach the reporter at rjmccul1@asu.edu

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Freshman Guide Veteran’s Fall Welcome Orientation

Thursday, August 11, 8:30 a.m. - 11 a.m. Student Services Building Ampitheater Welcome new ASU veteran students. Come learn how to apply your educational benefits (e.g., the Post 9/11 GI-Bill) and receive information about ASU’s veteran resources. Please RSVP to militaryadvocate@asu.edu for more information.

E P M TE US P M A C

Move-In

Saturday, August 13, 7 a.m. - Monday, August 15, 6 p.m. Various Locations and Campuses Move-in times and dates will vary. Please check your e-mail for your e-packet from university housing for specific move-in information.

Residential Hall Floor Meet and Greet

Saturday, August 13, 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. Various Locations If your community moves in today, then you don’t want to miss this short meet and greet and dinner as you join your residential community neighbors. See your hall staff for specific details on where and when to meet.

Parents Association Hospitality Room

Sunday, August 14, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Memorial Union, Gila (224) Relax, refresh and reenergize! Enjoy a cool drink and refreshments; meet new and current parents and ASU staff. Visit our Parent Resources table, computers available to check e-mail and/or register for Family Weekend.

Residential Hall Floor Meet and Greet

Sunday, August 14, 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. Various Locations If your community moves in today, then you don’t want to miss this short meet and greet and dinner as you join your residential community neighbors. See your hall staff for specific details on where and when to meet.

EVENT SCHEDULE

(Dis)Orientation

Sunday, August 14, 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. Memorial Union, Arizona Ballroom (221) The School of Theater and Film and Stu-

7

dent and Cultural Engagement are thrilled to offer this show of SNL-like sketches, songs, comedic drama and slam poetry that show real-deal issues of campus life and living. Talented ASU students explain about dealing with new found freedom and independence, living with roommates, and preparing for college-level courses.

Target Back-to-College Shopping Event

Sunday, August 14, 9:30 p.m. - 11:30 p.m. Target at Tempe Marketplace EXCLUSIVE TARGET AFTER-HOURS SHOPPING EVENT JUST FOR ASU STUDENTS! Get everything you need to start school! Free transportation to Target, refreshments, music, prizes and the whole place to yourself! Pick up locations include: Downtown Phoenix campus University Center Building Tempe campus Gammage, Hassayampa, Palo Verde Main/Manzanita, and Sonora Final departure from Target back to campus is at 11:30 pm.

Parents Association Hospitality Room

Monday, August 15, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Memorial Union, Gila (224) Relax, refresh and reenergize! Enjoy a cool drink and refreshments; meet new and current parents and ASU staff. Visit our Parent Resources table, computers available to check e-mail and/or register for Family Weekend.

Grab a Cup of Joe and Go!

Monday, August 15, 9:15 a.m. - 10 a.m. Grassy area east of Student Services Building Students and families, grab a cup of coffee and light breakfast on the lawn before heading off on your campus tour.

Campus Tour

Monday, August 15, 10 a.m. - 11 a.m. Grassy area east of Student Services Building

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Freshman Guide

Monday, August 15, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m.

fraternity & sorority

recruitment

fall 2011

Interfraternity Council

Fall 2011 Interfraternity Council Recruitment Walk Around - August 31 Bid Day - September 14 Visit www.asu.edu/greeklife for more information and to register.

Panhellenic Council

Orientation - August 30 Formal Recruitment: September 2 - 6 Visit www.asu.edu/greeklife for more information and to register.

Multicultural Greek Council Open House

Tuesday, August 30 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. in MU Ventana Visit www.asu.edu/greeklife for more information and to register.

National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations Open House

Tuesday, August 30 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. in MU Ventana Visit www.asu.edu/greeklife for more information and to register.

National Pan-Hellenic Council

Open House

Tuesday, August 30 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. in MU Ventana Visit www.asu.edu/greeklife for more information and to register.

participate in a special Q and A.

Parent Success Seminar

Monday, August 15, 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Memorial Union, Gold (207) This seminar discusses transition topics and common feelings students and their families’ experience. Learn strategies for success and resources for you as a parent of today’s college student. Hear from current students and help us welcome your student to ASU by selecting a free care package presented to your student during their first week. Limited quantities available.

Parent Success Seminar

Monday, August 15, 1 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. Memorial Union, Gold (207) This seminar discusses transition topics and common feelings students and their families’ experience. Learn strategies for success and resources for you as a parent of today’s college student. Hear from current students and help us welcome your student to ASU by selecting a free care package presented to your student during their first week. Limited quantities available.

Barrett Dean’s Reception

Monday, August 15, 2 p.m. - 4 p.m. Barrett College Refectory located in Honors Hall, Tempe campus The informal Dean’s Reception, hosted by the Honors Parents Organization, will allow parents to meet the leadership of the college and find out ways to be involved and active. Barrett merchandise will be available for purchase at this event. Light refreshments will be served.

Legacy Family Member Event

Monday, August 15, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m. Old Main Basha Library,Tempe campus Are you a parent or relative of a new ASU student? Are you also an alumnus of ASU? After you help your student move into their new home for the semester, stop by Old Main to enjoy complimentary refreshments and snacks. Celebrate your Sun Devil Pride and revisit your former college years - an event not to be missed! You and your family members are encouraged to attend this special reception. Please RSVP here.

Broadway Buzz at ASU Gammage

Monday, August 15, 4 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. ASU Gammage ASU students and parents! Come see what Broadway shows are at ASU Gam-

Lutheran Campus Ministry at University Lutheran Church

Welcome!! Wednesday Worship 6:30pm Sunday Worship 10:30am 340 E. 15th Street Tempe, AZ 85281 Campusministry@ULCtempe.org www.ulctempe.org located just west of Vista del Sol

Apache Blvd.

N

15th St.

Rural Rd.

Barrett Fall Assembly

ASU Gammage, Tempe campus New honors college students are expected to attend this signature Barrett event. Academic requirements, internships, undergraduate research, parent involvement, alumni engagement, student organizations, and more will be addressed. Students will also enjoy small break-out sessions while their parents and families

College

Discover everything ASU’s Tempe campus has to offer! Enjoy a walking tour guided by a member of the student organization, Devils’ Advocates. Devils’ Advocates are campus experts, eager to show you the Tempe campus.

Mill Avenue

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Broadway Rd.

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rural & apache

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WELCOMES ASU FRESHMEN

MILL - JAGER MEISTER - GOLS - STOLI - LONG ISLANDS - CAPTAIN MORGAN - JACK DANIELS - JIM BEAM - BACARDI, 151, LIMON, O, PEACH - JOSE CUERVO - MALIBU - SOUTHERN COMFORT - SMIRVOFF CRANBERRY, APPLE, WATERMELON, STRAWBERRY, ORANGE, RASBERRY, VANILLA, CITRUS - DRAFT PINTS - BUD LIGHT - COORS LIGHT - KILLIANS - AMBER BOCH - PBR - ULTRA - HONEY BROWN - BUSHMILL - JAGER MEISTER - GOLS - STOLI - LONG ISLANDS - CAPTAIN

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- BACARDI, 151, LIMON, O, PEACH - JOSE CUERVO - MALIBU - SOUTHERN COMFORT - SMIRVOFF CRANBERRY, APPLE, WATERMELON, STRAWBERRY, ORANGE, RASBERRY, VANILLA, CITRUS - DRAFT PINTS - BUD LIGHT - COORS LIGHT - KILLIANS AMBER BOCH - PBR - ULTRA - HONEY BROWN - BUSHMILL - JAGER MEISTER - GOLS - STOLI - LONG ISLANDS - CAPTAIN MORGAN - JACK

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GOLS - STOLI - LONG ISLANDS - CAPTAIN MORGAN - JACK DANIELS - JIM BEAM - BACARDI, 151, LIMON, O, PEACH - JOSE CUERVO - MALIBU - SOUTHERN COMFORT - SMIRVOFF CRANBERRY, APPLE, WATERMELON, STRAWBERRY, ORANGE, RASBERRY, VANILLA, CITRUS - DRAFT PINTS - BUD LIGHT - COORS LIGHT - KILLIANS - AMBER BOCH - PBR - ULTRA - HONEY BROWN - BUSHMILL - JAGER MEISTER - GOLS - STOLI - LONG ISLANDS - CAPTAIN MORGAN - JACK DANIELS - JIM BEAM - BACARDI, 151, LIMON, O, PEACH - JOSE CUERVO - MALIBU - SOUTHERN COMFORT - SMIRVOFF CRANBERRY, APPLE, WATERMELON, STRAWBERRY, ORANGE, RASBERRY, VANILLA, CITRUS - DRAFT PINTS - BUD LIGHT - COORS LIGHT - KILLIANS - AMBER BOCH - PBR - ULTRA - HONEY BROWN - BUSHMILL - JAGER MEISTER - GOLS STOLI - LONG ISLANDS - CAPTAIN MORGAN - JACK DANIELS - JIM BEAM - BACARDI, 151, LIMON, O, PEACH - JOSE CUERVO - MALIBU - SOUTHERN COMFORT - SMIRVOFF CRANBERRY, APPLE, WATERMELON, STRAWBERRY, ORANGE, RASBERRY, VANILLA, CITRUS - DRAFT PINTS - BUD LIGHT - COORS LIGHT - KILLIANS - AMBER BOCH - PBR - ULTRA - HONEY BROWN- BUSHMILL - JAGER MEISTER - GOLS - STOLI - LONG ISLANDS - CAPTAIN MORGAN - JACK DANIELS - JIM BEAM - BACARDI, 151, LIMON, O, PEACH - JOSE CUERVO - MALIBU - SOUTHERN COMFORT - SMIRVOFF CRANBERRY, APPLE, WATERMELON, STRAWBERRY, ORANGE, RASBERRY, VANILLA, CITRUS - DRAFT PINTS - BUD LIGHT - COORS LIGHT - KILLIANS - AMBER BOCH - PBR - ULTRA - HONEY BROWN - BUSHMILL - JAGER MEISTER - GOLS - STOLI - LONG ISLANDS - CAPTAIN MORGAN - JACK DANIELS - JIM BEAM - BACARDI, 151, LIMON, O, PEACH - JOSE CUERVO MALIBU - SOUTHERN COMFORT - SMIRVOFF CRANBERRY, APPLE, WATERMELON, STRAWBERRY, ORANGE, RASBERRY, VANILLA, CITRUS - DRAFT PINTS - BUD LIGHT - COORS LIGHT - KILLIANS - AMBER BOCH - PBR - ULTRA - HONEY BROWN- BUSHMILL - JAGER MEISTER - GOLS - STOLI - LONG ISLANDS - CAPTAIN MORGAN - JACK DANIELS - JIM BEAM - BACARDI, 151, LIMON, O, PEACH - JOSE CUERVO - MALIBU - SOUTHERN COMFORT - SMIRVOFF CRANBERRY, APPLE, WATERMELON, STRAWBERRY, ORANGE, RASBERRY, VANILLA, CITRUS - DRAFT PINTS - BUD LIGHT - COORS LIGHT - KILLIANS - AMBER BOCH - PBR - ULTRA - HONEY BROWN - BUSHMILL - JAGER MEISTER - GOLS - STOLI - LONG ISLANDS - CAPTAIN MORGAN - JACK DANIELS - JIM BEAM - BACARDI, 151, LIMON, O, PEACH - JOSE CUERVO - MALIBU - SOUTHERN COMFORT - SMIRVOFF CRANBERRY, APPLE, WATERMELON, STRAWBERRY, ORANGE, RASBERRY, VANILLA, CITRUS - DRAFT PINTS - BUD LIGHT - COORS LIGHT - KILLIANS - AMBER BOCH - PBR - ULTRA - HONEY BROWN- BUSHMILL - JAGER MEISTER - GOLS - STOLI - LONG ISLANDS - CAPTAIN MORGAN - JACK DANIELS - JIM BEAM - BACARDI, 151, LIMON, O, PEACH - JOSE CUERVO - MALIBU - SOUTHERN COMFORT - SMIRVOFF CRANBERRY, APPLE, WATERMELON, STRAWBERRY, ORANGE, RASBERRY, VANILLA, CITRUS - DRAFT PINTS - BUD LIGHT - COORS LIGHT - KILLIANS - AMBER BOCH - PBR - ULTRA - HONEY BROWN - BUSHMILL - JAGER MEISTER - GOLS STOLI - LONG ISLANDS - CAPTAIN MORGAN - JACK DANIELS - JIM BEAM - BACARDI, 151, LIMON, O, PEACH - JOSE CUERVO - MALIBU - SOUTHERN COMFORT - SMIRVOFF CRANBERRY, APPLE, WATERMELON, STRAWBERRY, ORANGE, RASBERRY, VANILLA, CITRUS - DRAFT PINTS - BUD LIGHT - COORS LIGHT - KILLIANS - AMBER BOCH - PBR - ULTRA - HONEY BROWN- BUSHMILL - JAGER MEISTER - GOLS - STOLI - LONG ISLANDS - CAPTAIN MORGAN - JACK DANIELS - JIM BEAM - BACARDI, 151, LIMON, O, PEACH - JOSE CUERVO - MALIBU - SOUTHERN COMFORT - SMIRVOFF CRANBERRY, APPLE, WATERMELON, STRAWBERRY, ORANGE, RASBERRY, VANILLA, CITRUS - DRAFT PINTS - BUD LIGHT - COORS LIGHT - KILLIANS - AMBER BOCH - PBR - ULTRA - HONEY BROWN - BUSHMILL - JAGER MEISTER - GOLS - STOLI - LONG ISLANDS - CAPTAIN MORGAN - JACK DANIELS - JIM BEAM - BACARDI, 151, LIMON, O, PEACH - JOSE CUERVO MALIBU - SOUTHERN COMFORT - SMIRVOFF CRANBERRY, APPLE, WATERMELON, STRAWBERRY, ORANGE, RASBERRY, VANILLA, CITRUS - DRAFT PINTS - BUD LIGHT - COORS LIGHT - KILLIANS - AMBER BOCH - PBR - ULTRA - HONEY BROWN- BUSHMILL - JAGER MEISTER - GOLS - STOLI - LONG ISLANDS - CAPTAIN MORGAN - JACK DANIELS - JIM BEAM - BACARDI, 151, LIMON, O, PEACH - JOSE CUERVO - MALIBU - SOUTHERN COMFORT - SMIRVOFF CRANBERRY, APPLE, WATERMELON, STRAWBERRY, ORANGE, RASBERRY, VANILLA, CITRUS - DRAFT PINTS - BUD LIGHT - COORS LIGHT - KILLIANS - AMBER BOCH - PBR - ULTRA - HONEY BROWN - BUSHMILL - JAGER MEISTER - GOLS - STOLI - LONG ISLANDS - CAPTAIN MORGAN - JACK DANIELS - JIM BEAM - BACARDI, 151, LIMON, O, PEACH - JOSE CUERVO - MALIBU - SOUTHERN COMFORT - SMIRVOFF CRANBERRY, APPLE, WATERMELON, STRAWBERRY, ORANGE, RASBERRY, VANILLA, CITRUS - DRAFT PINTS - BUD LIGHT - COORS LIGHT - KILLIANS - AMBER BOCH - PBR - ULTRA - HONEY BROWN- BUSHMILL - JAGER MEISTER - GOLS - STOLI - LONG ISLANDS - CAPTAIN MORGAN - JACK DANIELS - JIM BEAM - BACARDI, 151, LIMON, O, PEACH - JOSE CUERVO - MALIBU - SOUTHERN COMFORT - SMIRVOFF CRANBERRY, APPLE, WATERMELON, STRAWBERRY, ORANGE, RASBERRY, VANILLA, CITRUS - DRAFT PINTS - BUD LIGHT - COORS LIGHT - KILLIANS - AMBER BOCH - PBR - ULTRA - HONEY BROWN - BUSHMILL - JAGER MEISTER - GOLS -

• KARAOKE THURSDAYS • FREE WIFI • POOL TABLES AND DARTS • FREE POKER FRIDAYS • OPEN MIC SUNDAYS • NFL PACKAGE

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Freshman Guide mage this year! From Green Day’s smash hit AMERICAN IDIOT to BLUE MAN GROUP and WICKED, check out a video preview of our hottest Broadway Season, enjoy free food and meet new friends. Discounted student ticket packages available, and the first 100 students to arrive receive a free gift.

ASU Parents Reception

Monday, August 15, 5 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Memorial Union - Arizona Ballroom (221), Tempe campus Be sure to attend the ASU Parents Reception and meet ASU administrators, staff, the Parents Association Board and other ASU parents at this informal gathering. Make connections with parents from your area of the country when we break into regional groups. Light refreshments provided. Casual attire. We look forward to welcoming you to the ASU community!

(Dis)Orientation

Monday, August 15, 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. Neeb Hall 105 The School of Theater and Film and Student and Cultural Engagement are thrilled to offer this show of SNL-like sketches, songs, comedic drama and slam poetry that show real-deal issues of campus life and living. Talented ASU students explain about dealing with new found freedom and independence, living with roommates, and preparing for college-level courses.

Annual Tiki Luau

Monday, August 15, 7 p.m. - 10 p.m. Student Recreation Complex Fields Thousands of Sun Devils will meet you at the 12th Annual Residential Hall Association Tiki Luau on the SRC Fields with free food, entertainment, water rides, and giveaways. Kick off your year the Sun Devil Way and don’t miss out on this night to remember!

Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts Welcome Assembly

Tuesday, August 16, 8:30 a.m. - 9:45 a.m. ASU Gammage New students and parents will have the opportunity to meet deans, faculty, aca-

demic staff, and unit leadership. Visit here for more information.

W. P. Carey School of Business New Student and Family Welcome

Tuesday, August 16, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Dean’s Patio at the Business Administration Buildings, Tempe campus Welcome W. P. Carey students and families! Meet business deans, faculty, staff, and current students. Enjoy the WPC Annual First Lecture. Explore business majors, organizations and WPC resources at your new academic home. This is a Must Attend event for all our W. P. Carey family. See you there! For more information visit: wpcarey.asu.edu/fallwelcome for more information.

Parents Association Hospitality Room

Tuesday, August 16, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Memorial Union, Gila (224) Relax, refresh and reenergize! Enjoy a cool drink and refreshments; meet new and current parents and ASU staff. Visit our Parent Resources table, computers available to check e-mail and/or register for Family Weekend.

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Assembly

Tuesday, August 16, 9:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Various Locations All first-year students are expected to attend the welcome for their major from 9:30 - 10:30 a.m. followed by the College Welcome Assembly at Gammage Auditorium. For more information and to find out where to go at 9:30 a.m., visit our website: clas.asu.edu/fallwelcome.

Mary Lou Fulton Teachers CollegeCollege Assembly

Tuesday, August 16, 9:45 a.m. - 2 p.m. Education Lecture Hall, EDC 117 Students will gain insight from current students’ experiences, explore leadership opportunities in organizations, and meet with advisors and faculty. Guests learn about programs, financial aid, & resources. Informal lunch provided.

School of Sustainable Engineering and

WELCOME FRESHMEN

Bison Witches Bar and Deli is a small neighborhood hangout that features gourmet deli sandwiches, bread bowl soups, salads, appetizers, and a full service bar with tableside service. It’s an ideal, casual and unfussy space to settle in and savor a great sandwich and great times with a group of friends. Great for anyone who likes to eat with a budget in mind, or just looking for something good, Bison Witches will cast a spell on you.

the Built Environment Fall Welcome

Tuesday, August 16, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Schwada Classroom Office Building 210 Welcome Civil Engineering, Construction Engineering, and Construction students! Join us and connect with current students, faculty and staff. Share the excitement of your program and the School for Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, while meeting your future classmates.

School of Sustainability College Assembly

Tuesday, August 16, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Wrigley Hall 101 The School of Sustainability welcomes incoming students and their guests to an interactive day exploring their new degree program. Events include a welcome from the dean and interactions with faculty and students to learn more about exciting opportunities and resources.

2011 ASU University College Fall Welcome

Tuesday, August 16, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Memorial Union, Ventana (241) University College is proud to welcome the class of 2015! This event celebrates the exploring students’ beginning to a new academic year.

School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering Welcome Tuesday, August 16, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Physical Science F 166 Welcome Biomedical Engineering students! Join us and connect with current students, faculty and staff. Learn about the academic rigor in your classes and labs. Share the excitement of the School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering.

School of Computing, Informatics, and Descision Systems Enginnering Welcome Tuesday, August 16, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Artisan Court at the Brickyard 110 Welcome Computer Science, Computer Systems, Engineering Management, Informatics and Industrial Engineering stu-

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dents! Join us and connect with current students, faculty and staff. Learn about the academic rigor in your classes and labs. Share the excitement of the School of Computing, Informatics, and Decision Systems Engineering.

School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering Welcome

Tuesday, August 16, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Physical Science F 173 Welcome Electrical Engineering students! Join us and connect with current students, faculty and staff. Learn about the academic rigor in your classes and labs. Share the excitement of the School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering.

School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy Welcome

Tuesday, August 16, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Murdock 201 Welcome Aerospace, Chemical, Materials and Mechanical Engineering students! Join us and connect with current students, faculty and staff. Learn about the academic rigor in your classes and labs. Share the excitement of the School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy.

Sun Devil Welcome

Tuesday, August 16, 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Wells Fargo Arena, Tempe campus Don’t miss this “must-attend” event - the Sun Devil Welcome. Experience Sun Devil pride at its best - at the official welcome. You will be inspired by ASU President Michael Crow, learn about the opportunities that await you at ASU, sing the Fight Song and kick-off your Sun Devil story. (Mandatory for all first-time freshmen and new students.)

Whitewashing the “A”

Tuesday, August 16, 3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. Tempe Butte (“A” Mountain), Tempe campus Show your Sun Devil pride by participating in one of the university’s longest standing traditions - Whitewashing the “A” on Tempe Butte. Come help celebrate

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the new school year by painting the “A” white to signify the start of the 2011 fall semester. Enjoy refreshments, spirit and fun with other new students. Event begins immediately following the Sun Devil Welcome.

Off-Campus and Commuter Student Services Welcome Back Barbecue

Tuesday, August 16, 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. OCCSS Building, 915 S. Rural Rd, Tempe AZ 85281 Join OCCSS for a Welcome BBQ. Come meet the OCCSS staff, fellow off-campus and commuter students and their families. This is a great way to find out about other Fall Welcome events taking place on campus. Enjoy FREE Food and Good Company. Don’t miss this event. RSVP required by emailing OCCSS@asu.edu.

Fall Welcome Concert

Tuesday, August 16, 9 p.m. - 11 p.m. Wells Fargo Arena, Tempe campus A nationally touring artist and opener will take the stage at Wells Fargo Arena for a free concert for you and your fellow Sun Devils. Your ASU Sun Card gets you and one guest into the event. Doors open at 8pm. For more information, please email: fwconcert@asu.edu or visit www.asu.edu/ pab.

Books and Bagels

Wednesday, August 17, 8 a.m. - 10 a.m. ASU Bookstore Avoid the crowds and come and get your books before classes start. Enjoy a light breakfast while we help you find the right books for all of your ASU classes . . . . You can even rent your books and save up to 50% off of the retail price. Come and shop at the official bookstore of ASU on the Tempe campus next to the Computing Commons.

Disability Resource Center (DRC) New Student Orientation

Wednesday, August 17, 9 a.m. - 11 a.m. Memorial Union, Ventana B (241B) All new students and parents are invited to attend this informative session. Valuable information will be provided about services and accommodations offered by the DRC to qualified students. This is an opportunity to ask questions and gather information about university student support services.

Fall Welcome Community Service Project

Wednesday, August 17, 9:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Changemaker Central- First floor of Memorial Union across from the info desk Create some good karma in your life before starting the semester! Join the Community Service Program in our annual Fall Welcome project. We will be heading off campus to volunteer at a local nonprofit. Please wear clothes you don’t mind getting dirty and closed toe shoes. We have 50 open spots available at a first come, first serve basis. Don’t miss this chance to meet other service-minded Sun Devils and learn about the service opportunities at ASU! We will be leaving campus at 9:30am, so arrive a few minutes early to check in.

Student Employment Fair

Wednesday, August 17, 12 p.m. - 2 p.m. Student Recreation Complex, Blue and Green Gym Are you looking for a part-time job while attending ASU? If so, attend this job fair for the opportunity to meet with both on campus and off campus employers wanting to fill a variety of part-time and work study positions. Bring copies of your resume if you have one!

Change the World 101

Wednesday, August 17, 2 p.m. - 4 p.m. Changemaker Central- First floor of Memorial Union across from the info desk Want to create positive social change in

the world around you? Come to Changemaker Central and learn about the many ways YOU can make an impact. You will also have a chance to take part in an onsite service activity that will help a local nonprofit agency. Questions? Email: Changemaker@asu.edu

Saturday, August 20, 1 a.m. Memorial Union and Hayden Lawn Come play with the Greeks at MU After Dark!! The Greek Programming Board will be entertaining everyone on Hayden Lawn starting at 8pm! Free screening of the summer blockbuster “Thor” at 8 and 10:30! Enjoy all that MU After Dark has to offer with inflatable games, free bowling and billards, comedy shows, slam poetry, karaoke, trivia and dancing all night!

Passport to ASU

Wednesday, August 17, 6:30 p.m. - 9 p.m. Memorial Union, Business Dean’s Patio, Student Recreation Complex Attend Passport to ASU to learn ways to get involved on campus. Join clubs, fitness classes and intramural sports. See student performances, enjoy free food samples and head to Sparky’s Den for free bowling.

Devils After Dark: Dunkin’ Dodge

Saturday, August 20, 7 p.m. - 10 p.m. Student Recreation Complex Kick off the fall semester with a dive-in movie (Thor), and dodge ball, basketball, and volleyball tournaments. Get excited for music and plenty of other fun activities. Don’t forget your swimming suit, towel, and ASU Sun Card.

Neighborhood Activities and Events

Thursday, August 18, 7 p.m. - 10 p.m. Various Locations Did you know that there is an activity or event EVERY Thursday evening? With this being the first Thursday of the semester, this week is no exception. Come meet new friends from neighboring communities for a fun evening after your first day of classes. See your hall staff for specific details on what is being offered in your neighborhood.

Devils after Dark: Sparky’s A-MAZEing Race

Saturday, August 20, 10 p.m. Sunday, August 21, 1 a.m. Outside Stage north of the Memorial Union Come join us as the Student Alumni Association (SAA) hosts a unique scavenger/ challenge style race around Tempe campus. Discover numerous campus locations and participate in fun games and challenges. Prizes will be awarded to the top three finishing teams!

(Dis)Orientation

Friday, August 19, 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. Memorial Union, Arizona Ballroom (221) The School of Theater and Film and Student and Cultural Engagement are thrilled to offer this show of SNL-like sketches, songs, comedic drama and slam poetry that show real-deal issues of campus life and living. Talented ASU students explain about dealing with new found freedom and independence, living with roommates, and preparing for college-level courses.

ASU First Laugh

Sunday, August 21, 8 p.m. - 10 p.m. ASU Gammage Outlaw Comedy brings the 3rd annual “ASU 1st Laugh”. Start off the year laughing with 3,000 fellow Sun Devils! This signature event features an all-star team of comedians and BBQ’s near your residence halls from 5-7pm the day of the show. Talk with your Community Assistant for more information and visit outlawcomedy.com for updates on the event.

MU After Dark featuring Sparky’s Summer Shakedown Friday, August 19, 8 p.m. -

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EVENT SCHEDULE

Barrett Fall Assembly

Monday, August 15, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. ASU Gammage, Tempe campus New honors college students are expected to attend this signature Barrett event. Academic requirements, internships, undergraduate research, parent involvement, alumni engagement, student organizations, and more will be addressed. Students will also enjoy small break-out sessions while their parents and families participate in a special Q and A.

Poly Parent Welcome

into their new home for the semester, stop by Old Main to enjoy complimentary refreshments and snacks. Celebrate your Sun Devil Pride and revisit your former college years - an event not to be missed! You and your family members are encouraged to attend this special reception. Please RSVP here.

ASU Parents Reception

Monday, August 15, 5 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Memorial Union - Arizona Ballroom (221), Tempe campus Be sure to attend the ASU Parents Reception and meet ASU administrators, staff, the Parents Association Board and other ASU parents at this informal gathering. Make connections with parents from your area of the country when we break into regional groups. Light refreshments provided. Casual attire. We look forward to welcoming you to the ASU community!

Move-In Movies

Monday, August 15, 2 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Various Locations All Campus Residents: Join us for a mandatory floor meeting. Meet your neighbors and learn more about your hall and community.

Barrett Dean’s Reception

Monday, August 15, 2 p.m. - 4 p.m. Barrett College Refectory located in Honors Hall, Tempe campus The informal Dean’s Reception, hosted by the Honors Parents Organization, will allow parents to meet the leadership of the college and find out ways to be involved and active. Barrett merchandise will be available for purchase at this event. Light refreshments will be served.

Legacy Family Member Event

Monday, August 15, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m. Old Main Basha Library,Tempe campus Are you a parent or relative of a new ASU student? Are you also an alumnus of ASU? After you help your student move

Monday, August 15, 9 p.m. Tuesday, August 16, 12 a.m. TBA When the sun goes down, it’s time to head outside and watch one of the summer’s biggest hits. Grab your roommate and new friends for a movie night welcome kick-off!

College of Technology and Innovation

Tuesday, August 16, 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Aravaipa The College of Technology and Innovation welcomes the class of 2015! Hear from faculty and staff about resources and opportunities within the college. Join us as we kickoff the academic year and the first step in an exciting journey.

University College/School of Letters and Sciences Tuesday, August 16, 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Santa Catalina Hall (130)

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Residential Hall Floor Meetings

Monday, August 15, 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. TBA Faculty and staff welcome new students to participate in a summer tradition at Polytechnic. Come cool down and enjoy some ice cream after move-in!

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Monday, August 15, 2 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Cooley Ballroom Come meet other parents of the Class of 2015! Parents will have the opportunity to hear from campus resources and meet the campus partners that will help your student succeed.

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Freshman Guide Join us for a fun and informative College Day. Activities will be held to acquaint you with the Poly campus, the college and academic resources available to you.

Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College

Tuesday, August 16, 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Santan Hall (135) Join the Teachers College faculty, staff and students to learn more about your education majors and the services offered to help you become a successful student.

W.P. Carey School of Business/ Morrison School of Management & Agribusiness

Tuesday, August 16, 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Picacho Hall (150) The Morrison School of Agribusiness and Resource Management is excited to have you as a part of the class of 2015. Join us and hear from the school’s director, one of our noted faculty, and some of our student leaders. Our session will connect you to the school’s resources and your peers. After lunch on campus, we’ll take the shuttles to the Tempe campus to participate in the Sun Devil Welcome. This is the start of an enriching journey and we are here to assist you with each step.

Sun Devil Welcome

Tuesday, August 16, 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Wells Fargo Arena, Tempe campus Don’t miss this “must-attend” event - the Sun Devil Welcome. Experience Sun Devil pride at its best - at the official welcome. You will be inspired by ASU President Michael Crow, learn about the opportunities that await you at ASU, sing the Fight Song and kick-off your Sun Devil story. (Mandatory for all first-time freshmen and new students.)

Whitewashing the “A”

Tuesday, August 16, 3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. Tempe Butte (“A” Mountain), Tempe campus Show your Sun Devil pride by participating in one of the university’s longest standing traditions - Whitewashing the “A” on Tempe Butte. Come help celebrate the new school year by painting the “A”

white to signify the start of the 2011 fall semester. Enjoy refreshments, spirit and fun with other new students. Event begins immediately following the Sun Devil Welcome.

Off-Campus and Commuter Student Services Welcome Back Barbecue

Tuesday, August 16, 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. OCCSS Building, 915 S. Rural Rd, Tempe AZ 85281 Join OCCSS for a Welcome BBQ. Come meet the OCCSS staff, fellow off-campus and commuter students and their families. This is a great way to find out about other Fall Welcome events taking place on campus. Enjoy FREE Food and Good Company. Don’t miss this event. RSVP required by emailing OCCSS@asu.edu.

Fall Welcome Concert

Tuesday, August 16, 9 p.m. - 11 p.m. Wells Fargo Arena, Tempe campus A nationally touring artist and opener will take the stage at Wells Fargo Arena for a free concert for you and your fellow Sun Devils. Your ASU Sun Card gets you and one guest into the event. Doors open at 8pm. For more information, please email: fwconcert@asu.edu or visit www.asu.edu/ pab.

Obama Scholars Welcome

Wednesday, August 17, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m. Peralta Hall (130) Please join your campus peers to learn more about the program and the exciting opportunities it will provide you. This is a must-attend event for all Obama Scholars.

(Dis)Orientation

Wednesday, August 17, 3 p.m. - 5 p.m. Aravaipa Auditorium The School of Theater and Film and Student and Cultural Engagement are thrilled to offer this show of SNL-like sketches, songs, comedic drama and slam poetry that show real-deal issues of campus life and living. Talented ASU students explain about dealing with new found freedom and independence, living with roommates,

and preparing for college-level courses.

Poly Passport

Wednesday, August 17, 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. Student Union Poly Passport to Student Life provides students an opportunity to learn about different involvement opportunities on and around the Polytechnic Campus. In addition to finding out how to be involved on campus, you can learn about local businesses and the surrounding community.

Sand Volleyball Tournament

Wednesday, August 17, 8 p.m. - 10 p.m. North Residence Hall Sand Courts Ace your way into your semester by spiking some volleyballs. Campus Ambassadors will host their annual kick-off Sand Volleyball Tournament. Random teams are made from those who come. All students are welcome to attend. Come and make some new friends!

Devils After Dark: Artist Mic Night

Thursday, August 18, 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Cooley Ballrooms, Student Union Come share your talent (whatever it may be) and check out artists and performers of all different styles, from music to dance, poetry and more. Get in the action!

Veteran’s Fall Welcome Orientation

Friday, August 19, 9 a.m. - 11 a.m. Cooley Ballroom Welcome new ASU veteran students. Come learn how to apply your educational benefits (e.g., the Post 9/11 GI-Bill) and receive information about ASU’s veteran resources. Please RSVP to militaryadvocate@asu.edu for more information.

Student Employment Fair

Friday, August 19, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Student Union Are you looking for a part-time job while attending ASU? If so, attend this job fair for the opportunity to meet with both on campus and off campus employers wanting to fill a variety of part-time and work study positions. Bring copies of your resume if you have one!

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Housing Kick Off

Friday, August 19, 4 p.m. - 6 p.m. TBA Students will have the opportunity to see the exciting projects happening at Polytechnic campus while mingling with the architects that put these together. Fall 2012 is quickly approaching and students will be enjoying a new Recreation Center and Residence Halls and Dining facility. Come see what all the noise is about!

Devils After Dark: Comedy Night

Friday, August 19, 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Aravaipa Auditorium Enjoy a night of laughs from a nationally touring comedian. Brought to you by the Programming and Activities Board.

Just Cycle Around

Saturday, August 20, 9 a.m. - 11 a.m. Various Location The Polytechnic Bike Co-op invites you to enjoy a beautiful morning bicycle ride around the Polytechnic campus. Start your Saturday cycling!

Grillin’ and Chillin’

Saturday, August 20, 3 p.m. - 5 p.m. Poly Pool Enjoy some barbeque, take a dip in the pool & mingle with your peers at this Polytechnic tradition. The Programming and Activities Board will also have outdoor games, great prizes, music, and more!

Devil’s After Dark

Saturday, August 20, 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. TBA

Sun Devil Float

Sunday, August 21, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Student Union Join fellow ASU Poly students for a fun day at the 5th annual Sun Devil Float down the Salt River. Enjoy the Arizona sun with a lazy float down the river in an inner tube. Bring a towel, water shoes and a swim suit. Transportation, tube rental, lunch and drinks are provided. Nominal fee required.

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* ALL ORDERS ARE SUBJECT TO APPROVAL AND ACCEPTANCE BY DELL. Offers subject to change, not combinable with all other offers. Taxes, shipping, handling and other fees apply. Valid for U.S. Dell University new purchases only. Availability of electronics and accessories varies and quantities may be limited. Dell reserves right to cancel orders arising from pricing or other errors. XBOX & $699 system bundle offer only valid for actively enrolled high school, college, or university students or parents purchasing on behalf of such students. Demonstration of eligibility is required upon request and unverified orders may be canceled or rejected. No more than two bundles per household. Dell will only accept returns of the entire bundle. Abuse of student credentials will be investigated and may result in termination of the offer. * BEST PRICE: If you find a better price on your day of purchase, contact a Dell University sales specialist and we will beat that price. Best Price Guarantee does not apply to retail or reseller offers, Dell Outlet, affiliate websites, coupons, auctions or quotes from Dell sales representatives. You must present a valid E-value code or saved cart image with lower price to Dell U sales specialist on day of purchase prior to your transaction. *A 64-bit operating system is required to support 4GB or more of system memory. GB means 1 billion bytes and TB equals 1 trillion bytes; actual capacity varies with preloaded material and operating environment and will be less. TRADEMARKS: Windows is a registered trademark and Life without Walls is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation. Intel and Intel Core are registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries. Other trademarks and trade names may be used to refer to either the entities claiming the marks and names or their products. Dell disclaims proprietary interest in the marks and names of others.


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Freshman Guide Move-In

Saturday, August 13, 7 a.m. Monday, August 15, 6 p.m. Various Locations and Campuses Move-in times and dates will vary. Please check your e-mail for your e-packet from university housing for specific move-in information.

Taylor Place Resident and Family Orientation

N W O T N W DO HOENIX P S U P CAM

Sunday, August 14, 1 p.m. - 2 p.m. Cronkite 122 Join the Taylor Place Coordinators in a discussion on how to help your student adjust to their new home in order to be successful academically and socially.

Barrett Downtown Orientation (all Barrett students and families)

Sunday, August 14, 2:30 p.m. - 4 p.m. TBD An opportunity for students and guests to learn more about the benefits and requirements of the College.

Tempe campus Gammage, Hassayampa, Palo Verde Main/Manzanita, and Sonora Final departure from Target back to campus is at 11:30 pm.

Veterans Fall Welcome Orientation

Monday, August 15, 8:30 a.m. - 11 a.m. Post Office, Room 120 Welcome new ASU veteran students. Come learn how to apply your educational benefits (e.g., the Post 9/11 GI-Bill) and receive information about ASU’s veteran resources. Please RSVP to militaryadvocate@asu.edu for more information.

Barrett Fall Assembly

Sunday, August 14, 3 p.m. - 4 p.m. Cronkite 122 Join the Taylor Place Coordinators in a discussion on how to help your student adjust to their new home in order to be successful academically and socially.

Monday, August 15, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. ASU Gammage, Tempe campus New honors college students are expected to attend this signature Barrett event. Academic requirements, internships, undergraduate research, parent involvement, alumni engagement, student organizations, and more will be addressed. Students will also enjoy small break-out sessions while their parents and families participate in a special Q and A.

Barrett Welcome Dinner (all Barrett students and families)

Taylor Place Resident and Family Orientation

Taylor Place Resident and Family Orientation

Sunday, August 14, 5 p.m. - 6 p.m. TBD Meet the Associate Dean, Dr. Laura Peck, and join us in celebrating our new Barrett Downtown facility!

Target Back-to-College Shopping Event

EVENT SCHEDULE

Pick up locations include: Downtown Phoenix campus University Center Building

Sunday, August 14, 9:30 p.m. - 11:30 p.m. Target at Tempe Marketplace EXCLUSIVE TARGET AFTER-HOURS SHOPPING EVENT JUST FOR ASU STUDENTS! Get everything you need to start school! Free transportation to Target, refreshments, music, prizes and the whole place to yourself!

Monday, August 15, 1 p.m. - 2 p.m. Cronkite 122 Join the Taylor Place Coordinators in a discussion on how to help your student adjust to their new home in order to be successful academically and socially.

Barrett Dean’s Reception

Monday, August 15, 2 p.m. - 4 p.m. Barrett College Refectory located in Honors Hall, Tempe campus The informal Dean’s Reception, hosted by the Honors Parents Organization, will allow parents to meet the leadership of the

Continued on page 16

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college and find out ways to be involved and active. Barrett merchandise will be available for purchase at this event. Light refreshments will be served.

Taylor Place Resident and Family Orientation

Monday, August 15, 2 p.m. - 3 p.m. Cronkite 122 Join the Taylor Place coordinators in a discussion on how to help your student adjust to their new home in order to be successful academically and socially.

DPC Parent Mixer

Monday, August 15, 2:30 p.m. - 4 p.m. Sam’s Café, 455 N 3rd Street (Arizona Center) Mingle with ASU Downtown Phoenix campus parents, faculty and staff at our annual Parent Mixer. Learn about the exciting happenings for your student at ASU, find involvement opportunities and get connected with the Parents Association. We look forward to welcoming you to the Sun Devil family! Light refreshments provided. Casual attire.

Legacy Family Member Event

Monday, August 15, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m. Old Main Basha Library,Tempe campus Are you a parent or relative of a new ASU student? Are you also an alumnus of ASU? After you help your student move into their new home for the semester, stop by Old Main to enjoy complimentary refreshments and snacks. Celebrate your Sun Devil Pride and revisit your former college years - an event not to be missed! You and your family members are encouraged to attend this special reception. Please RSVP here.

ASU Parents Reception

Monday, August 15, 5 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Memorial Union - Arizona Ballroom (221), Tempe campus Be sure to attend the ASU Parents Reception and meet ASU administrators, staff, the Parents Association Board and other ASU parents at this informal gathering. Make connections with parents from your area of the country when we break into regional groups. Light refreshments provid-

ed. Casual attire. We look forward to welcoming you to the ASU community!

TaylorFest

Monday, August 15, 8 p.m. - 10 p.m. Taylor Place Meet residents from other residential college communities also living in Taylor Place while having fun at this evening late-night social program. Free food, giveaways, and more!

College of Nursing and Health Innovation Assembly and Welcome

Tuesday, August 16, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Nursing and Health Innovation 2, Room 110 All new students in the College of Nursing and Health Innovation as well as their guests are invited to Fall Welcome 2011! Meet the deans of the college and your academic advising team, and connect with your fellow Sun Devils. The event will conclude with a presentation of life at ASU through the eyes of current students, and an official induction into the College.

College of Public Programs Assembly and Welcome

Tuesday, August 16, 10 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. University Center Lobby This invitation only event is for new College of Public Programs undergraduate students and guests. Attend a welcome from College of Public Programs’ Associate Dean, a Q and A session with current students and a campus tour. Light refreshments provided.

University College/School of Letters and Sciences Assembly and Welcome

Tuesday, August 16, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. University Center 253 Join the dean, faculty, staff and your peers for this fun and interactive welcome. You will have the opportunity to get to know your college and academic success resources and to connect with other Sun Devils.

Walter Cronkite School of Journalism & Mass Communication Assembly and Welcome

Tuesday, August 16, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Cronkite, The First Amendment Forum Join Dean Christopher Callahan, faculty and staff for the school’s Fall Welcome. Meet fellow students, your academic advisers, Cronkite staff and faculty members. Light lunch will be served.

Sun Devil Welcome

Tuesday, August 16, 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Wells Fargo Arena, Tempe campus Don’t miss this “must-attend” event - the Sun Devil Welcome. Experience Sun Devil pride at its best - at the official welcome. You will be inspired by ASU President Michael Crow, learn about the opportunities that await you at ASU, sing the Fight Song and kick-off your Sun Devil story. (Mandatory for all first-time freshmen and new students.)

Whitewashing the “A”

Tuesday, August 16, 3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. Tempe Butte (“A” Mountain), Tempe campus Show your Sun Devil pride by participating in one of the university’s longest standing traditions - Whitewashing the “A” on Tempe Butte. Come help celebrate the new school year by painting the “A” white to signify the start of the 2011 fall semester. Enjoy refreshments, spirit and fun with other new students. Event begins immediately following the Sun Devil Welcome.

Off-Campus and Commuter Student Services Welcome Back Barbecue

Tuesday, August 16, 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. OCCSS Building, 915 S. Rural Rd, Tempe AZ 85281 Join OCCSS for a Welcome BBQ. Come meet the OCCSS staff, fellow off-campus and commuter students and their families. This is a great way to find out about other Fall Welcome events taking place on campus. Enjoy FREE Food and Good Company. Don’t miss this event. RSVP required by emailing OCCSS@asu.edu.

Fall Welcome Concert

Tuesday, August 16, 9 p.m. - 11 p.m. Wells Fargo Arena, Tempe campus A nationally touring artist and opener will

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take the stage at Wells Fargo Arena for a free concert for you and your fellow Sun Devils. Your ASU Sun Card gets you and one guest into the event. Doors open at 8pm. For more information, please email: fwconcert@asu.edu or visit www.asu.edu/ pab.

Obama Scholars Welcome and Information Session

Wednesday, August 17, 9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m. University Center 271 Please join your campus peers to learn more about the program and the exciting opportunities it will provide you. This is a must-attend event for all Obama Scholars. Afterwards, we will walk over to (Dis)Orientation together.

(Dis)Orientation

Wednesday, August 17, 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Sheraton Hotel, 340 N. 3rd Street The School of Theater and Film and Student and Cultural Engagement are thrilled to offer this show of SNL-like sketches, songs, comedic drama and slam poetry that show real-deal issues of campus life and living. Talented ASU students explain about dealing with new found freedom and independence, living with roommates, and preparing for college-level courses.

Downtown Campus Recreation Tours: Freshman and New Users

Wednesday, August 17, 12:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Lincoln Family Downtown YMCA: 350 N. 1st Avenue Tour the Downtown Recreation Center and learn about fitness and recreation programming available throughout the year to ASU students.

“Where Are My Classes?”

Wednesday, August 17, 4 p.m. - 6 p.m. University Center Building, Cronkite Building, Nursing and Health Innovation Building 2, Mercado Spend some time mapping out a route to your classes. Current ASU students will be located in the lobbies of the academic buildings noted above to help you search

Continued on page 18

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Undergraduate Student Government

A R I Z O N A

Are You Registered to Vote?

S T A T E

U N I V E R S I T Y

Free Bike Rentals and Affordable Bike Repairs!

Have your voice be heard! Stop by the Undergraduate Student Government Table to Register! You need: Valid Arizona Driver’s License or ID, copy of your US Passport or copy of your US Birth Certificate.

Stop by the Bike Co-Op proved by the Undergraduate Student Government from 10am to 4pm behind the SRC! Call 480965-8017 for any additional information

Safety First!

Free Music

Need a ride? Call the Safety Escort Service provided by your Undergraduate Student Government for a safe ride anywhere on campus from 7pm to 3am! Call 480-9651515

Come to the Fall Welcome Concert held in Wells Fargo Arena on August 16th @ 9pm! FREE for ALL Students with valid Sun Card +1 guest! Doors open @ 8pm

http://usg.asu.edu

Questions? Concerns? Contact your Undergraduate Student Government-Tempe Executives any time! Our offices are located on the 3rd floor of the Memorial Union. For more information call or email: Jacob Goulding, President at 480-965-4765 or email at Jacob.Goulding@asu.edu James Baumer, Vice President of Policy at 480-965-4216 or james.baumer@asu.edu Tina Mounlavongsy, Vice President of Services at 480-965-1246 or tina.mounlavongsy@asu.edu


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for your classrooms. Let us help you to ensure you’re ready to start your first day of classes!

Devils After Dark: Downtown Freeze

Thursday, August 18, 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Taylor Place Shade Garden After your first day of classes, come out and enjoy ice cream, music, and future friends. This event will take place in the Shade Garden of Taylor Place and will be

open to all ASU students. Come chill out with cool refreshments and music.

Devils After Dark: Big Bang

Friday, August 19, 8 p.m. - 11 p.m. TBD Come out for the 2nd annual Big Bang event on the Downtown Phoenix campus. Join the campus community, make new friends, reconnect with old friends and enjoy a free night of live music and fun

in your city. Hosted jointly by your Programming and Activities Board (PAB) and Residence Hall Association (RHA).

Phoenix Public Market

Saturday, August 20, 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Public Market, 14 E. Pierce Street Head out to the market to get some locally grown and produced veggies, fruit, honey, bread and so much more for your first week of classes.

Devils After Dark: Sparky’s Carnival

Saturday, August 20, 6 p.m. - 8 p.m. Civic Space Park Join us for the 6th annual Sparky’s Carnival and celebrate the start of the year the Downtown Phoenix campus way; by enjoying free live entertainment, activities, prizes, music, and of course the traditional carnival treats.

Fall welcome parking Downtown Phoenix campus Guests attending Fall Welcome events on the Downtown Phoenix campus can park in the UC II visitor park-

ing lot or in the NHI 2 visitors lot. Parking rates are $3 per hour or $12 per day. Lower parking rates may apply on weekends.

Note: Metered Parking is also available around the Downtown Phoenix campus. Please observe and obey all posted parking restrictions.

Downtown Parking Transit: 602-496-1023

and

Polytechnic campus Many evening events will take place at the Student Union, while daytime and college events will be hosted across campus. Free parking is available on campus for your to move and park your car in any lot as needed throughout Fall Welcome. ArizonaStateUniversityatthe Polytechniccampusisundergoing excitingconstructionprojects.You can keep up with the latest constructionalertsbyvisitingtheASUPolytechnic Facebook page. PolytechnicParkingandTransit: 480-727-2775 Tempe campus Free parking is provided for students, parents and guests attending Fall Welcome at the specified lots on the following dates: Saturday,Aug.13-Sunday,Aug. 14,2011:Parkingisfreeinallsurfacelotsandparkingstructureson campus.Ifyouarenotinvolvedin

Phoenix College now offers the AGEC online.

residencehallmove-inactivities,it isrecommendedyouparkinLot3, Lot16ortheTylerStreetStructure toavoidthevehicularandpedestriantrafficthatresidencehallmovein brings. Monday,Aug.15-Wednesday, Aug.31,2011:ParkingisfreeinLot 59andLot59N.Takeadvantageof thefreeFLASHshuttlesthatoperate every10-15minutestotakepeople whoparkinLots59and59Ndown to the central areas of campus. Note:Metersandvisitorslots arealsoavailableforanominalfee. Pleaseobserveandobeyallposted parkingrestrictions.Formoreinformationaboutvisitorparkingoptions,pleasevisittheParkingand TransitServiceswebsiteorPTSat 480-965-0641. TempeParkingandTransit:480965-0641 West campus Free parking is provided for students, parents and guests attending Fall Welcome on the following dates: Saturday,August13-Sunday, August21,2011:Parkingwillbe

freeinallpermitlotsoncampus. Note: Meter lots will be operatingattheregularfeeexceptat theLasCasasresidencehallwhere parkingwillbefree.Pleaseobserve andobeyallpostedparkingrestrictions. WestParkingandTransit:602543-3258 Motorist Assistance Program Parking and Transit Services has a Motorist Assistance Program (MAP) that helps ASU community members who have a dead battery or who lock their keys in their car while on campus. Downtown602-496-1023Monday - Friday, hours vary Polytechnic480-727-2775Monday - Friday, hours vary Tempe480-965-06417a.m.-10 p.m.,MondaythroughThursday;7 a.m.- 8:30 p.m., Friday. West 602-543-3258 Monday Friday, 7 a.m. - 5 p.m. Theserviceisfreeandnomatter whereyouareoncampus,amemberofourteamishappytoassist you.

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Freshman Guide Move-In

Saturday, August 13, 7 a.m. Monday, August 15, 6 p.m. Various Locations and Campuses Move-in times and dates will vary. Please check your e-mail for your e-packet from university housing for specific move-in information.

Camp Solera - Register now!

T S E W S U P M CA

Saturday, August 13, 8 a.m. Monday, August 15, 6 p.m. ASU’s West campus Camp Solera welcomes the freshman class to a residential bonding experience. Participate in university traditions and learn how to make the most of your first year at Arizona State! Don’t forget to bring your Participation Agreement and Conduct Form to Camp check-in on Saturday, August 13.

Devils After Dark

Saturday, August 13, 9 p.m. - 12 a.m. Kiva Lecture Hall Join your fellow Sun Devils for a show by Hypnotist Paul Ramsey.

Parent to Parent Brunch

Sunday, August 14, 9 a.m. - 11 a.m. University Center Building 240 Participate in a panel discussion with parents of past and current ASU students. Representatives from ASU Parents Association, Wellness and Health Promotion, Campus Safety, and more will be on hand to connect with you and answer your questions.

(Dis)Orientation

EVENT SCHEDULE

Sunday, August 14, 3 p.m. - 4 p.m. Kiva Lecture Hall The School of Theater and Film and Student and Cultural Engagement are thrilled to offer this show of SNL-like sketches, songs, comedic drama and slam poetry that show real-deal issues of campus life and living. Talented ASU students explain about dealing with new found freedom and independence, living with roommates, and preparing for college-level courses.

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Devils After Dark

Sunday, August 14, 9 p.m. - 12 a.m. La Sala Ballroom C Join your fellow Sun Devils for a Graffiti/ Black Light Party. Sun Devil spirit heats up as the sun goes down.

Barrett Fall Assembly

Monday, August 15, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. ASU Gammage, Tempe campus New honors college students are expected to attend this signature Barrett event. Academic requirements, internships, undergraduate research, parent involvement, alumni engagement, student organizations, and more will be addressed. Students will also enjoy small break-out sessions while their parents and families participate in a special Q and A.

Excite Fitness

Monday, August 15, 11 a.m. - 12 p.m. University Center Building B-119

Barrett Dean’s Reception

Monday, August 15, 2 p.m. - 4 p.m. Barrett College Refectory located in Honors Hall, Tempe campus The informal Dean’s Reception, hosted by the Honors Parents Organization, will allow parents to meet the leadership of the college and find out ways to be involved and active. Barrett merchandise will be available for purchase at this event. Light refreshments will be served.

Legacy Family Member Event

Monday, August 15, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m. Old Main Basha Library,Tempe campus Are you a parent or relative of a new ASU student? Are you also an alumnus of ASU? After you help your student move into their new home for the semester, stop by Old Main to enjoy complimentary refreshments and snacks. Celebrate your Sun Devil Pride and revisit your former college years - an event not to be missed! You and your family members are encouraged to attend this special reception. Please RSVP here.

Continued on page 23


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WELCOME ASU STUDENTS! ASU Health Services

ASU’s money-saving coupon book is produced four times a year and distributed on campus and other high-traffic locations.

Located at University and Palm Walk

Your Convenient On-Campus Health Care Resource Medical Appointments Women’s Health Urgent Care Clinic Travel Clinic Immunizations Acupuncture

The ASU community looks for Devil Deals as a great way to save valuable money on the products and services they need.

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Sports Medicine Pharmacy (no insurance billing yet) Lab and X-ray Massage Therapy Chiropractic Care Nutrition

High Quality, Cost Conscious Medical Care Board Certified Physicians & Highly Qualified Nurse Practitioners Students are eligible to utilize HS Services if registered for 1 or more credit hours HS will file your claims with your insurance provider Optional health coverage is available

Don’t have time to wait in line? Schedule your medical appointments on-line! On-line appointment scheduling is available for medical appointments at ASU Health Services – Tempe, ASU Health Services – South, ASU Health Services – SRC and ASU Health Services — Polytechnic. It is easy and you can schedule from the comfort of your own home 24/7 by going to the Health Services website @ www.students.asu. edu/health and click on the Sparky Button.

ASU Health Services Locations:

“We cover ASU like no one else!”

602-496-2166

HS Main – Palm Walk and University Drive – Open Monday - Friday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Last patient accepted at 5:30 p.m.) HS – SCR (Student Recreation Complex) – See website for hours HS – South (Located in Sonora Res Hall) – Open Monday - Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Last patient accepted at 5:30 p.m.) – Open Saturday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Health Services Appointment Line: 480-965-3349 www.asu.edu/health

INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL

PANHELLENIC COUNCIL

Dates for Fall Recruitment:

Fall Formal Recruitment

August 31 Information Session and Meet the Fraternities (Walk Around) September 14 Bid Day Pre-register by emailing your full name, email address, and phone number to ASUFraternityRecruitment@gmail.com For more information, visit ifc.asugreek.com

September 2-6 ASU Memorial Union Register online at asu.mycampusdirector.com Potential New Members are required to attend an Orientation Session Tuesday August 30th Session 1: 5:30-7 PM Session 2: 7:30-9 PM Arizona Ballroom ASU Memorial Union For questions please contact Kimmy Babos at asuvpmembership@gmail.com


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Freshman Guide ASU Parents Reception

Monday, August 15, 5 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Memorial Union - Arizona Ballroom (221), Tempe campus Be sure to attend the ASU Parents Reception and meet ASU administrators, staff, the Parents Association Board and other ASU parents at this informal gathering. Make connections with parents from your area of the country when we break into regional groups. Light refreshments provided. Casual attire. We look forward to welcoming you to the ASU community!

A Golden Tradition

Monday, August 15, 7 p.m. - 9:15 p.m. La Sala Ballrooms Participate in the candle lighting ceremony with your college deans as they welcome you to the ASU community at West campus. After the ceremony, enjoy a dinner with fellow Sun Devils from the class of 2015.

Devils After Dark

Monday, August 15, 9 p.m. - 12 a.m. University Center Building, La Sala C Ballroom Laugh the night away with comedian Michael Dean Ester and end the night with a movie and water wars.

Sparky’s Cool Down

Monday, August 15, 10:30 p.m. - 12 a.m. Sands Multipurpose Field and University Center Building, La Sala C Ballroom Join your fellow Sun Devils for flicks and kicks. Cool off watching a newly released film or team up with your new friends for late-night intramural sports.

Honors Breakfast

Tuesday, August 16, 8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. University Center Building 201 New Barrett Honors College students are invited to meet their honors mentors while sharing breakfast and conversation with current honors students, honors staff, and Barrett Associate Dean Ramsey. Please do not miss this opportunity to begin your honors experience at the West campus.

Parents & Guests Hospitality Room

pus Assembly

Tuesday, August 16, 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. Office of Student Engagement, UCB 320 Take a break from Fall Welcome festivities in the Office of Student Engagement. The hospitality room offers Parents & Guests a relaxing place to check email and enjoy refreshments.

Tuesday, August 16, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. University Center Building 265 Learn about resources to help decide on a major. Events include a welcome from the dean, success strategies, study abroad opportunities, a student panel, and opportunities to meet staff, faculty and students.

W. P. Carey School of Business New Student and Family Welcome

Sun Devil Welcome

Tuesday, August 16, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Dean’s Patio at the Business Administration Buildings, Tempe campus Welcome W. P. Carey students and families! Meet business deans, faculty, staff, and current students. Enjoy the WPC Annual First Lecture. Explore business majors, organizations and WPC resources at your new academic home. This is a Must Attend event for all our W. P. Carey family. See you there! For more information visit: wpcarey.asu.edu/fallwelcome for more information.

New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences Assembly Tuesday, August 16, 9:30 a.m. - 12 p.m. University Center Building, La Sala BC Ballrooms In the New College Assembly- engage in activities and college discussions with other freshmen, your peer mentors, faculty, staff and administrators from your college. Learn about the many resources and “tips” to thrive and excel during your first week of classes and beyond!

Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College Welcome and Assembly

Tuesday, August 16, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Classroom Laboratory Computer Classroom 146 At the Welcome and Assembly, you will meet with your peers and learn about exciting opportunities, helpful tools, and the resourses that are available to you to ensure your success. You will also have the privilege to meet the college dean and administrators who will support you during your academic career.

University College at the West Cam-

Tuesday, August 16, 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Wells Fargo Arena, Tempe campus Don’t miss this “must-attend” event - the Sun Devil Welcome. Experience Sun Devil pride at its best - at the official welcome. You will be inspired by ASU President Michael Crow, learn about the opportunities that await you at ASU, sing the Fight Song and kick-off your Sun Devil story. (Mandatory for all first-time freshmen and new students.)

Whitewashing the “A”

Tuesday, August 16, 3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. Tempe Butte (“A” Mountain), Tempe campus Show your Sun Devil pride by participating in one of the university’s longest standing traditions - Whitewashing the “A” on Tempe Butte. Come help celebrate the new school year by painting the “A” white to signify the start of the 2011 fall semester. Enjoy refreshments, spirit and fun with other new students. Event begins immediately following the Sun Devil Welcome.

Off-Campus and Commuter Student Services Welcome Back Barbecue

Tuesday, August 16, 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. OCCSS Building, 915 S. Rural Rd, Tempe AZ 85281 Join OCCSS for a Welcome BBQ. Come meet the OCCSS staff, fellow off-campus and commuter students and their families. This is a great way to find out about other Fall Welcome events taking place on campus. Enjoy FREE Food and Good Company. Don’t miss this event. RSVP required by emailing OCCSS@asu.edu.

Fall Welcome Concert

Tuesday, August 16, 9 p.m. - 11 p.m. Wells Fargo Arena, Tempe campus

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A nationally touring artist and opener will take the stage at Wells Fargo Arena for a free concert for you and your fellow Sun Devils. Your ASU Sun Card gets you and one guest into the event. Doors open at 8pm. For more information, please email: fwconcert@asu.edu or visit www.asu.edu/ pab.

Disability Resource Center (DRC) Fall Welcome Orientation

Wednesday, August 17, 9:30 a.m. - 11 a.m. University Center Lobby, 265/266 Location: UCB 265-266. The DRC is the central location for establishing eligibility and obtaining services/accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. At the orientation, learn how the DRC can become an integral part of your education.

“Where Are My Classes?”

Wednesday, August 17, 10 a.m. - 11 a.m. University Center Lobby, La Sala Foyer Spend some time mapping out a route to your classes. Current ASU students will be located at the building locations noted above to help you search for your classrooms. Let us help you to ensure you’re ready to start your first day of classes. Bring a copy of your class schedule (My Schedule in MyASU).

“Where Are My Classes?”

Wednesday, August 17, 11 a.m. - 12 p.m. University Center Building, La Sala Foyer Work together with fellow students and Devils’ Advocates to find the buildings and classrooms where you will be attending classes. Don’t forget to bring a copy of your fall schedule that includes your class locations.

TRiO Academic Achievement Center Orientation

Wednesday, August 17, 11 a.m. - 12 p.m. University Center Lobby, 302 Location: UCB 302. The TRiO Academic Achievement Center provides resources for academic and personal success to eligible students. Come learn about these services, including free tutoring, mentor-

Continued on page 24


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ing, workshops and one-on-one appointments.

Explore the West campus

Wednesday, August 17, 12 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. West campus Explore campus - visit the Bookstore meet with your academic advisor and grab a bite to eat.

Camp Solera Reunion and Lunch

Wednesday, August 17, 12 p.m. - 1 p.m. UCB La Sala Ballrooms Reunite with your classmates and Camp Counselors for lunch. Cheer on fellow Sun Devils during the Camp awards presenta-

tion and enjoy a photo slideshow of this year’s memorable moments.

Residential Hall Welcome and Floor Meetings

Wednesday, August 17, 3:30 p.m. - 4 p.m. Las Casas Residence Hall Learn more about your residential community and get to know the Las Casas staff. This is a mandatory event for all residents.

All Hall Meeting

Wednesday, August 17, 4 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. University Center Building, La Sala Ballrooms

Location: UCB, La Sala Ballrooms. Residents will gather for a mandatory all-hall meeting. Learn about living in Las Casas and the various resources to help you be successful.

Residential College Meetings

Wednesday, August 17, 4:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. University Center Building, Various Locations Meet the peer leaders, faculty and staff who will be working with the Residential Colleges. All residents participating in Residential Colleges must attend this event.

Dinner With Devils Progressive Dinner

Wednesday, August 17, 5:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. University Center Building, Student Lounge, 2nd Floor Eat up your college experience, literally! Learn about campus resources, meet staff and enjoy appetizers, entrees and des-

ASU

serts as you make your way through our progressive dinner in UCB.

Fall Kick-off BBQ with USGW and Involvement Fair

Thursday, August 18, 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Fletcher Lawn Sun Devils - join the Undergraduate Student Government at West campus for a festive BBQ! Meet your student representatives and learn more about student advocacy efforts.

Veteran’s Fall Welcome Orientation

Thursday, August 18, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. University Center Building Welcome new ASU veteran students. Come learn how to apply your educational benefits (e.g., the Post 9/11 GI-Bill) and receive information about ASU’s veteran resources. Please RSVP to militaryadvocate@asu.edu for more information.

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Freshman Guide Devils After Dark: Welcome Back Carnival

Thursday, August 18, 5 p.m. - 10 p.m. Las Casas Lawn Celebrate Sun Devil pride at ASU’s West campus! Enjoy live entertainment, fun activities and free food as we kick off the school year the Sun Devil way.

Student Employment Fair

Friday, August 19, 2 p.m. - 4 p.m. University Center Building, La Sala Ballrooms A & B Are you looking for a part-time job while

attending ASU? If so, attend this job fair for the opportunity to meet with both on campus and off campus employers wanting to fill a variety of part-time and work study positions. Bring copies of your resume if you have one!

Commuter and Transfer Student Reception

Friday, August 19, 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. University Center Building, Devils’ Den Mingle with other commuter students at this spirited reception. Hear from returning commuter students and discover stu-

Fall Welcome FAQs Why participate in Fall Welcome? Fall Welcome is a great time to get acquainted with ASU faculty and staff as well as a variety of resources available to the ASU community . You will have many opportunities to meet other new students and families before classes begin. Fall Welcome is your best opportunity to prepare for your first semester at ASU! Who should attend Fall Welcome? Fall Welcome is open to any member of the ASU Community. New students and their friends and families are especially encouraged to attend. I am a transfer student, can I still attend Fall Welcome? Yes, there are programs that are targeted to transfer students. Please view the Fall Welcome schedule to determine which events are appro-

priate for transfer students.

What kind of activities will I participate in at Fall Welcome? You will have the opportunity to meet your peers and learn about the resources available on campus. In addition to social events, you will also attend events that connect you to your academic college, participate in university traditions and move into your residential hall room. The Sun Devil is the official welcome ceremony full of spirit and tradition. Be sure to wear your gold t-shirt when you meet the rest of the Class of 2015. For details please view the Fall Welcome schedule. What is available for parents at Fall Welcome? There are activities and events such as the Parents Reception created especially for our new Sun Devil par-

ents. Please visit the Fall Welcome schedule of events to view all events that are available for parents and families. How long should parents plan to stay? Fall Welcome is designed primarily as a way for new students to get acquainted with the university and establish valuable connections. Parents and families are welcome to assist their student with move-in and participate in parent and family events. Please visit the Fall Welcome schedule of events to view all events that are available for parents and families when finalizing your travel arrangements. Don’t forget to attend the Parents Reception, scheduled on Monday, August 15, 2011 from 5-6:30p.m. How can I make a reservation for Fall Welcome? Reservations are only necessary for specific events

dent resources that will enhance your college experience.

Devils After Dark: Sun Devil Sundown Luau Friday, August 19, 8 p.m. - 12 a.m. Las Casas Pool Relax and cool down at the Las Casas pool for good food and great company at this student tradition. This is a perfect opportunity to make the most of your residential experience!

Shuttle Service to Desert Ridge Mar-

as specified on the event description. View all the available events on the events page, those that require a reservation will indicate so in the event description. Mustattend events for students include their College Assembly and the Sun Devil Welcome on Tuesday, August 16.

ketplace

Saturday, August 20, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Las Casas Residence Hall, East Gate Enjoy a free shuttle ride to a local hot spot with your Sun Devil family. Seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Service Project

Sunday, August 21, 9:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. Las Casas Residence Hall, East Gate Sun Devils are committed to giving back to their community. Join others and “be the change you want to see in the world.”

can’t find us online?

Is Fall Welcome free? YES! When can I begin moving into my residential hall? University housing will provide move-in details in July. For any additional movein questions, please visit University Housing. Who should I contact if I have special needs? Please contact Transition and Parent Programs at 480965-4564 or e-mail fallwelcome@asu.edu at least 10 business days before your arrival to the university.

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Grab football season tickets early as a freshman NATHAN MEACHAM | T HE S TATE P RESS |

Many national experts are predicting that the ASU football team will succeed in 2011. While that may be hard to believe after three straight seasons without a bowl game, being left out of the stadium in November isn’t any fun. Tickets were sold out before school started in 2008 after the team won 10 games in 2007. Now, they only won six in 2010 but some early rankings have the team as high as No. 11. It’s a ‘Don’t miss out’ situation. Unlike other services on campus, such as public transit costs and tuition increases, student ticket prices for football have generally remained the same. It will cost $129 for the full 2011 football season. There was no increase from 2010. Don’t forget that it also includes the men’s basketball season, which has the chance to be better with the addition of freshman point guard Jahii Carson out of Mesa High School. His electric style of play is worth the money (he scored 58 points in one game during the state playoffs). Then take into account that the ASU football team lost four games to nationally recognized opponents by a total of nine points. A field goal, a blocked extra point or one dropped pass could have turned 2010 into a success, but the team hasn’t been so

lucky in the past few seasons. The team that returns is dynamic and is coming off one of the most dramatic wins in Territorial Cup history with a two overtime victory over

UA. The momentum is there, junior Brock Osweiler is receiving national attention, and junior Vontaze Burfict might actually reduce his penalties

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Need Help During Fall Welcome? We are here to help you. If you have any questions or need assistance during Fall Welcome, please stop by any of the locations listed below.

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West Ask Me! Information Booth Monday, Aug. 15 – Wednesday, Aug. 17 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. UCB, Information Desk

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Thinking about getting your first-time college student packed for dorm life can overwhelm even the most organized parent. Plenty of retailers are ready to chip in with advice — Bed Bath & Beyond, Target and Wal-Mart issue lists of “essentials” for your student. Most of these lists take a great approach to organization, breaking down potential items into categories (personal care; bath; linens; entertainment) that make the planning more manageable. And the lists often suggest items that parents and students might not think of otherwise. Retailers’ lists also might tend to suggest more purchases than necessary. Continued on page 31

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phil reads the state press ASU’s independent daily newspaper, The State Press, is written and produced by ASU students just like you. Read it daily to find out what’s happening on campus, in the community and around the world.

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Freshman Guide Fueled by parental love and anxiety, you may tend to load up on stuff. But will all that gear actually fit into your kid’s tiny new living space? We’ve rounded up expert advice on how to figure out what you really need to buy and from where.

1. GATHER INFO ABOUT THE SCHOOL AND DORM Take a deep breath. This isn’t as difficult as you think, says Harlan Cohen, author of “The Naked Roommate: And 107 Other Issues You Might Run Into in College,” a humorous advice book for first-time college students. Visit the school’s Web site or call the housing office to find out what’s provided and, equally important, what’s on the “don’t bring” list. “A lot of times, the university will provide a list of supplies that is really, really helpful,” says Deborah Hohler, retail expert for Upromise.com, which partners with retailers to help parents and students earn purchase rewards toward college savings and student

2. REMEMBER: LESS IS MORE Now it’s time to start packing. Universally, the experts we spoke with had one piece of advice: Pack light. Craig Allen, director of residential services for Texas Christian University says, students don’t need as much as they think they do. Allen likes the idea of breaking the room down into categories and listing a few must-haves, such as:

 Clothing  Bedding: 2 sets of extra-long twin linens, at least 2 towels, a blanket

 Personal items: hair dryers,

curling irons and other electronics; plastic dishes and cutlery

loans. The school list is smaller than commercial lists and more thoughtfully constructed, with the student and institution in mind, she says. Craig Allen, director of residential services for Texas Christian University, echoes Hohler, saying he invariably sees students who have followed commercial lists bring in (and then cart out) forbidden items. “They’re going to tell you to get your toaster oven, your coffeepot, your George Foreman grill, a halogen desk lamp,” he says. “We’re not going to allow those things.” Try to learn as much as you can about the dorm room your child has been as-

 Personal-care: toiletries,

cosmetics, a caddy, flip-flops and bathrobe if the bathroom situation is communal

 Cleaning supplies: Clorox

wipes or paper towels and spray cleaner, laundry detergent

 School/desk supplies: alarm clock, pens, pencils, calculator, personal computer, non-halogen desk lamp, flash drive, notebooks

 Decor: personal mementos, like pictures, 3M Command Strips for hanging them  Extras: sewing kit, first-aid kit It’s a sparse list, Allen says, but realistically, your student won’t need much more than that. “There’s this panic that, ‘Oh

signed. This will help you determine a) how much you can realistically fit and b) what type of extra storage you want, if any, says Barry Izak, an Austin-based professional organizer and past president of the National Association of Professional Organizers. Another option is to have your student get on Facebook or MySpace to track down a residential adviser or peer counselor. Or you can call the school’s residential life office to be put in touch with someone. Students are an excellent source of information. Some Web sites, such as www.askaboutcollege.com, can virtually connect your child with a student at his or her chosen school if one is available.

my God, I’m going to be without my lava lamp!’ and it’s kind of absurd,” says author Harlan Cohen. “People really need to chill out.” Both Allen and Cohen recommended taking only the absolute essentials and then allowing at least a week of settling-in time so the student gets a better idea of what he or she will really use. Cohen even recommends going as far as separating belongings into three piles: the essentials, things you’d like to have and things you’ll take if there’s space. Pack all the essentials, he says. Then box up the “like to have” so Mom and Dad can send it later, if needed. Don’t even think about taking the maybes. And resist the urge to buy the entire range of storage containers formulated for college dorms.

4. DON’T FORGET...

 Sewing kit  First-aid kit  Plastic dishes  Febreeze  Tide markers or Shout wipes  A window shade dark enough to block sunlight  Rolls of quarters for laundry A noise-blocking set of earphones for studying and

sleeping

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HAVE TAKEN THE SUSTAINABILITY PLEDGE? Curious about what you can do to contribute to a ‘greener’ culture? Take the WUSTL Sustainability Pledge, and join the conversation on facebook and twitter! See inside (Page 4-5) for more details.

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STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 1


2 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

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STUDENT LIFE THE STARTING LINE

CONTENTS SECTIONS 06 NEWS

What happened this summer? Find out all you need to know from Student Life’s news team.

14 FEATURES

A guide to your campus life and breaking outside the Wash. U. bubble

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32 FORUM

Words of wisdom from Student Life columnists, campus leaders, administration and the senior staff of Student Life.

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STORIES

314-644-3973 Call for an appointment

10 WASH. U. TEAM PREPARES FOR NEXT MARS MISSION

Washington University students and faculty work on a Mars rover.

18 THE 10 TYPES OF PEOPLE YOU’LL MEET ON YOUR FRESHMAN FLOOR Molly Sevcik gives you a sneak peek into the types of people you’ll meet.

20 PEARLS OF WISDOM Student Life editors share what they learned their freshman year.

32 NERDS, AND PROUD OF IT

Forum editor Chase Feree tells you why you should embrace your inner geek.

COVER PAGE PHOTOS BY MATT MITGANG

Editor in Chief: Michelle Merlin Associate Editor: Alex Dropkin Managing Editors: Alan Liu & Hannah Lustman Director of Multimedia: Matt Mitgang Senior News Editor: Chloe Rosenberg Senior Forum Editor: Daniel Deibler Senior Sports Editors: Sahil Patel & Kurt Rohrbeck Senior Scene Editor: Davis Sargeant Senior Cadenza Editor: Andie Hutner Senior Photo Editor: Genevieve Hay Senior Online Editor: David Seigle Design Chief: Mary Yang Graphics Editor: Godiva Reisenbichler Special Issues Editor: Paula Lauris Copy Chiefs: Lauren Cohn & Caro Peguero Copy Editor: Courtney Safir General Manager: Andrew O’Dell Advertising Manager: Sara Judd

Copyright © 2011 Washington University Student Media, Inc. (WUSMI). Student Life is a financially and editorially independent, student-run newspaper serving the Washington University community. Our newspaper is a publication of -WUSMI and does not necessarily represent the views of the Washington University administration.

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We Can Do It!

What You Can Do!

Help us Cultivate a ‘Greener’ Culture at WUSTL!

Recycle Here at Washington University, we recycle single stream so virtually any everyday waste item besides food, ice, liquids, and Styrofoam can be recycled in the same container! All paper products (including greasy to-go boxes and pastry bags), plastic, aluminum, steel, and glass are delivered collectively to our recycling vendor for sorting at their facilities here in St. Louis. Single stream has not only made the everyday recycling process easier for the campus community, but it also has increased our waste diversion rate by over 10% since 2010, as proven during the 2011 Recyclemania competition (in which we placed 15th of 362 teams for the Gorilla Prize)! Single stream is simple! Just remember:

When in doubt, keep F.I.L.S out! Recycle everything BUT Food, Ice, Liquids, and Styrofoam in the Single Stream! To-go cup/container? Dump it, wipe it, recycle it! Unsure? Toss it in and we'll sort it out! Questions or concerns about larger items such as furniture, appliances, or construction waste? Visit sustain.wustl.edu or email us at sustainability@wustl.edu.

Dine Sustainably Through local partnerships and responsible purchasing, the University strives to provide food that is produced and distributed humanely, fairly, and in an ecologically sound manner, building an increasingly sustainable menu for our campus community and supporting the regional economy. Just this last spring, Bon Appétit, the University’s dining services partner, switched to selling locally-raised grass-fed beef exclusively in campus dining facilities and, in order to protect world fish stocks, all seafood sold on campus is sustainably sourced according to the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch criteria. Bon Appétit has also partnered with farm worker organizations to support fair wages and humane working conditions as a part of their dedication to workers rights! To learn more about Bon Appetit’s commitment to sustainability visit circleofresponsibility.com. Dining Services is also committed to reducing our food waste and collects pre-consumer food waste and kitchen scraps for composting off-site in the three major campus dining facilities. We are also exploring post-consumer composting options: when eating at Bear’s Den, leave leftover food on your plate when returning your dishes and our staff will add it to the compost containers. The resulting compost is then returned to campus for use in lawn care and landscaping!


STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 5

Use

AlternativeTransportation

With the plethora of sustainable transportation options WUSTL provides, there’s no need to bring a car to campus. Take advantage of the following opportunities! •A Bicycle and Pedestrian-Friendly Culture: The University is committed to making campus safe and accessible to both bicyclists and pedestrians. We are undertaking campus bicycle infrastructure upgrades, including new parking nodes, as well as policy changes to improve programming and spread knowledge of bicycle maintenance and safety. St. Louis’s size makes it ideal for exploration on bike – a great form of exercise and a carbon-free mode of transportation too! Bring your bicycle to campus or rent from student-run business Bears’ Bikes and join the car-free campus community. •Metro U-Pass: The University fully-subsidizes a Metro pass, allowing students free access to the Metrolink light rail and all MetroBus routes in St. Louis! With five train stations and three dedicated MetroBus routes to service the needs of our University community, you can travel nearly anywhere in the St. Louis region for free! Visit parking.wustl.edu/metro to request your free U-Pass! •We-Car: For those times when public transport just can’t get you and your friends to your destination, the University maintains a fleet of hybrid vehicles for community use. Available for rent at just $5 per hour, this car-sharing program is a less-expensive alternative to maintaining a personal vehicle and reduces the number of cars on the road! Visit wecar.com/wustl to sign up!

Get INVOLVED! Tote those

Reusable Containers

Did you know that WUSTL was the first university to ban the sale of bottled water? This 2009 initiative was driven by our students and met with enormous support from the campus community who understand that bottled water represents a clear waste of energy and resources.In support of the ban and the use of reusable bottles, Washington University Facilities is working to retrofit existing drinking fountains with bottle filler units. You’ll find many locations on the campus offer this option, allowing convenient access to delicious St. Louis tap water, rated best in the country at the 2007 Mayor’s Conference! So remember: Tote that reusable bottle!

While you’re at it, join the campus community in using your reusable mug! Bring your mug to any Bon Appétit dining location and save money on your next coffee refill. The Danforth Campus used over one million mugs last year – together we can reduce this number. Mugs are available for purchase at the campus bookstore and at Bear Necessities.

Follow us on:

Dining Services also offers a reusable to-go box for sale at Bear’s Den, the DUC and the Village. After a one-time purchase of $3, diners who use the box receive a 25-cent discount on each meal purchased with the box. For a person who has lunch on campus each day, that’s a savings of about $240 per year. Help reduce the waste created by standard recyclable to-go containers and use a reusable to-go box!

Questions? Comments?

Visit us at sustain.wust.edu or email us at sustainability@wustl.edu!

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news

Bike plan construction continues

COURTESY OF WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY Students walk past the bike node outside of Olin Library in this architect’s rendering. The nodes are being constructed across campus as part of the University’s new plan to keep bikes out of the center of the Danforth Campus in order to improve safety for pedestrians.

MICHAEL TABB | NEWS EDITOR

T

he first major steps have been completed this summer, but the final touches to the bike plan being implemented on the Danforth Campus probably will not be finished until after 2015. For the past two years, students have been struggling with Facilities Planning & Management over the details of the plan that is just starting to appear on campus. When completed, the plan will provide a widened bike path around the perimeter of campus with inlets to allow students to park their bikes at “nodes” throughout campus. This summer, a bike path was added along Forsyth Road between Wallace Drive and Hoyt Drive, connecting to the previously finished

“trial” segment past Hoyt Drive. Houston Way was also constructed, creating a fire lane and bike path connecting Forsyth to the center of campus, where a “node” was created for parking bikes outside of Olin library. Ultimately, the plan aims to separate pedestrian and bicycle traffic on campus to improve both efficiency and safety, said Art Ackermann, associate vice chancellor of Facilities Planning & Management. While many students have voiced skepticism about the actual need for the plan, Ackermann said that it has been a priority for a long time. “The Danforth Campus was never planned well for as much bicycle traffic as there is now,” he said. In addition to physical construction, the plan will also involve implementing a series of new poli-

cies. The task of establishing those policies was delegated to the Office of Sustainability in the beginning of July. A major component of the policies will involve ensuring that people use the correct pathways and observe dismount rules, according to Sustainability Coordinator William Fischer. He noted that while the office had not decided on enforcement measures, students will be made aware of the changes. “Whatever enforcement measures there are, they’ll be clearly articulated to students, they’ll be in line with other universities in the country and they’ll be appropriate to campus culture here,” Fischer said. Beyond benefiting individual students, the plan should make the

campus more sustainable. “One of the University’s goals as part of the sustainability plan that was released last April was to reduce trips made by single occupancy vehicles. One of the ways of doing that is by making campus bicycle-friendly,” Fischer said. Policy currently planned for this year includes the introduction of a dismount zone by the entrance of Olin library, requiring students to get off their bikes between “peak hours”—10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Ackermann said that gates are being placed by the entrance to the overpass over Forest Park Parkway to enforce that dismount zone as well. He noted that the entire plan is being executed over an extended period of time to allow continued feedback as the project goes along.


STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 7

U. City Council kills controversial loitering bill CHLOE ROSENBERG | SENIOR NEWS EDITOR

MARY YANG | STUDENT LIFE Construction on the bike nodes and paths has been ongoing throughout the summer.

wider sidewalk for people to use,” Challa said. “Honestly at this point, we’re just waiting to see what happens.” Fischer said he believes that when students encounter the plan firsthand, they will view it more favorably. “Despite a lot of its early

COURTESY OF WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY As part of the University’s new bike plan, bikers will now be encouraged to travel along a path that cuts through campus and then dismount to walk to more peripheral classes.

feedback and negative sentiment around it, I think it’s a positive step forward for our campus, and students are excited to see more bicycle support on campus,” he said.

A

fter an ongoing debate reached its boiling point this spring, University City City Council members voted against an anti-loitering bill. University City authorities were considering taking a range of actions to halt the rampant disorderly conduct on the Loop. In April, a police officer was injured on the Loop when trying to break up a group of 50 to 100 disorderly youth. There had also been complaints from local vendors of disruptive activity, such as grabbing silverware from outside dining ares and general rowdiness. University City officials had been considering a bill, Bill 9112, that would make it illegal to, “stand, loiter or walk upon any public sidewalk or street so as to obstruct or unreasonably interfere with the use thereof.” Such behavior could earn the perpetrator a fine of $1,000. Bill 9112 was unanimously “killed” (the word choice of Councilman Arthur Sharpe, Jr.) in a special session of the City Council on June 6. Community members packed into the room for the session, eager to show that they opposed the bill. The City Councilmen voted against the bill before any attendees could voice their concerns. The bill had been criticized for being too vague in its wording and therefore making enforcement too easily up to the police’s discretion. According to Lehman Walker, the University City City Manager, the neighborhood is still taking steps to ensure that the Loop is safe. There has been an increased police presence on the Loop to deter people

news

But while Facilities and the Office of Sustainability have worked to make the bike plan as effective as possible, many students remain skeptical. At a Student Union meeting last spring, a large number students voiced concern that the plan would hinder undergraduates rushing between classes, or fail to restrain them from taking the most direct routes possible. Mamatha Challa, a junior and vice president of administration for Student Union, has been involved in the student side of the plan for more than two years. She said that some students were concerned that their opinions on the plan weren’t taken into account, but added that she is curious to see how the plan works out. “I don’t know if it will work immediately, but that doesn’t mean it won’t ever work. It could be effective; it could just be a


news

8 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

from committing crimes. He declined to comment on the percentage of this increase. “We’ve increased the number of officers in the Loop during the weekends in part and we’ve been working with the city of St. Louis as well and with the Washington University Police Department in order to make sure that there aren’t any problems in the Loop and that everyone can enjoy it,” said Walker. A curfew already exists for youth under 16 that prohibits them from being on the Loop after 9 p.m. Washington University students think that this increased presence will be effective enough at keeping order on the Loop. “I think the greater police presence makes sense. Maybe if people are afraid of getting into trouble, they will be more willing to act safely,” said senior Sarah Michaels. With additional reporting by Michelle Merlin.

New engineering building to open in fall

DAVID MORIN | STUDENT LIFE Construction of Green Hall is nearing completion in time for the building to open on schedule in the Fall. The new building will be the home of the Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering in the new Engineering Complex.

SADIE SMECK | NEWS EDITOR

T

he newest building in the engineering complex will be open to students and faculty at the start of the

semester. Green Hall is the third building in the installment of the Engineering Complex. The new facility, which connects to Brauer Hall’s eastern façade,

covers approximately 83,800 square feet and will be the new home of the Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering. The new, state-of-the-art building was named for Preston M. Green,

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STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 9

regional, national and international collaboration. The groundbreaking ceremony for Green Hall was held April 30, 2010 in Whitaker Hall. Construction of the new facility continued through the summer of 2011 in order to be completed by the beginning of the fall semester. The building was designed in accordance with the specifications of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) with the goal of receiving a Gold designation. LEED provides a national rating system for the sustainability of a building’s design, construction and operations. Other LEED certified buildings on the Danforth Campus include Brauer and Whitaker Halls, also part of the new engineering complex. The building’s design and direct physical connection to Brauer Hall aim to foster more interaction and collaboration among students within the School of Engineering

and Applied Science, and especially within the Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, unifying diverse research interests. “It really promotes collaboration by having the building all open and connected that way,” said Nick Benassi, associate dean in the School of Engineering and Applied Science. Both graduate and undergraduate students are looking forward to the opportunities the new facility will provide, both in their individual research pursuits and collaborative efforts. “Green Hall will be the physical embodiment of the department,” Ph.D. candidate in Electrical and Systems Engineering, Justin Ruths, said in a speech at the groundbreaking ceremony. “Students are much more likely to interact and share ideas when they are just down the hall, especially when the hall is lined with plasma screens.” Green Hall’s proximity to the Skinker Metrolink station, measured

to be only 87 steps apart, will also afford students more opportunities to interface with the community, as well as with students and faculty on other campuses, such as the Medical School. An archway structure in Green Hall will open up the Engineering Complex to the rest of the University, also serving as a symbol to promote this interaction. “Green Hall’s archway will form a gateway to the University, as I know the fusion of ideas and the exciting research within will inspire those that pass underneath,” Ruths said. The area above this archway is home to a large, open common area and study space for students, also with the goal of fostering collaboration among students. The Engineering Complex has plans to continue its expansion with two additional buildings, but no timeline has been set in place as these projects have yet to be funded.

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who received a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from Washington University in 1936. Green, who passed away in 2003, left $8 million to the project, which was announced publicly in 2006. In 2010, the Preston M. Green Charitable Foundation donated an additional $5 million to complete it. Additional funding for the project was garnered from other alumni donors. Green Hall contains three classrooms and 17 state-of-theart research laboratories, in which both graduate and undergraduate engineering students will have opportunities to conduct and assist with research. The building will also house the International Center for Advanced Renewable Energy and Sustainability (I-CARES), established at Washington University in late spring 2007. The center was designed to encourage research in alternative energy, environment and sustainability, with an emphasis on


news

10 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

Wash. U. team prepares for next Mars mission BECKY PRAGER | STAFF REPORTER

F

ollowing the success of NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover program, Washington University’s Mars Rover Project is now working on a new vehicle to send to the red planet. Now the planning for a new mission, known as the Mars Science Laboratory, is underway. Curiosity, the rover for the mission, is set to launch this November and land by August 2012. Ray Arvidson, the James S. Mcdonnell Distinguished Professor, is the deputy investigator in the Mars Rover Project and the leading investigator at the University. Arvidson says that this rover is different from the previous two, Spirit and Opportunity, in that it contains a special drill that allows it to search for organic material and send rock powder into instruments that determine the rock type. “So far, I’ve been involved in selecting the landing site and providing insight on the drilling system” said Arvidson. “We’ve also got a proposal being reviewed by our peers that will allow us to participate in archiving the data.” Arvidson says that Opportunity is making its way toward an area of old rocks in which researchers have taken a particular interest. It should arrive there by August. “These are rocks like we’ve never seen before,” said Arvidson. According to Arvidson, the rocks are important because they contain hydrated minerals, meaning they were formed in the presence of water, a sign that Mars may have once been capable of sustaining life. “That’s what this project is really all about” he said. “Reconstructing

NASA/JPL-CALTECH NASA’s Mar Science Laboratory Curiosity rover is being readied for launch in the fall of 2011. A team of Washington University students and professors are participating in the project. TOP: The Curiosity rover, a mobile robot for investigating Mars’ past or present ability to sustain microbial life. sits inside the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. BOTTOM: Curiosity examines a rock on Mars with its robotic arm in an artist concept.

past environments and the finding out the likelihood of places being inhabitable for life.” Arvidson, along with staff and

students at the University, perform research on the data that has been sent back from Spirit and Opportunity, the two Rovers currently being

used. “We’ve had students working on the archives, because we archive a lot of data for the Spirit and Op-


STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 11


12 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

news

portunity,” said Arvidson. After being launched in 1994, Spirit was operating until March of 2010, when it got stuck in some sand pointing in the wrong direction, and researchers lost contact with it. NASA also has a new mission underway in collaboration with the European Space Agency called Mars Sample Return, scheduled for 2018. “The mission will go to a place that, based on the evidence we have acquired, is the most likely to be able to inhabit life,” said Arvidson. “Wash. U. is part of a team that is designing that mission.” Arvidson is glad to give his students the opportunity to do handson research. “We’ve got freshmen through grad students involved in this” he said. “It’s fun because it gives students research experience that they wouldn’t get otherwise.”

Delmar adds Brookings to Walk of Fame

O

JACK MARSHALL | STAFF REPORTER

ne of Washington University’s own stars has been brought down to earth... and laid down on Delmar Boulevard. Robert S. Brookings received a star on the St. Louis Walk of Fame on the Delmar Loop this summer. The influential founder of the Brookings Institution think tank was the president of the Board of Trustees at Washington University from 1895 until 1928. According to Joe Edwards, the proprietor of Blueberry Hill who first envisioned the Walk of Fame, honorees for the Walk of Fame must have both been born in St. Louis – or spent creative or formative years in the city – and have had a significant national impact. “St. Louis has such a rich heritage of people who have influenced the nation, especially for a city of its

size,” Edwards said. “Not only was St. Louis the gateway to the west, but also the center of the migration between the North and South. There was a collision of cultures and the result was an explosion of creativity over several decades, which is still going on today.” In addition to Brookings’ contributions to Wash. U., he also founded the Brookings Institution, a major non-partisan political think tank centered in Washington, DC, and constructed the Cupples Station warehouse complex in downtown St. Louis in 1895. According to Cheryl Adelstein, director of community relations and local government affairs, Brookings lived during this time in the Alumni House on the South 40 and donated the land for the South 40, which until that time had been forested land under his possession. B:4.75” A committee of approximately T:4.75”

120 historians, academics and honorees vote for the Walk of Fame honorees. Anyone can make nominations for the Walk of Fame, which the committee takes into account. The top three vote-recipients receive stars on the Delmar Loop. Edwards believes that the public process helped Brookings receive his star. “A lot of people that were really great 100 or 150 years ago are often overlooked by current citizens,” Edwards said. “Someone mentioned his name, he was put on the ballot, and he got in right away.” Family members usually represent the honoree at the dedication, but because none of his relatives are alive, University officials represented Brookings instead. Chancellor Emeritus William Danforth spoke at the event, detailing Brookings’ life and contribu-

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STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 13

The First Year Center Welcomes all new students!

&

WHITNEY CURTIS | WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY PHOTO SERVICES Chancellor Emeritus William H. Danforth participated in a dedication ceremony for Robert Brooking’s star on the St. Louis Walk of Fame at the corner of Delmar and Skinker Boulevards. Brookings, the former president of the University board of trustees, oversaw the University’s relocation to Hilltop, now Danforth, Campus.

tions in his speech. Danforth cited Brookings’ creation of the Washington University School of Medicine and improvements he made to the school – such as joining it with Barnes Jewish Hospital, which Danforth referred to as “one of greatest happenings in Wash. U. history” – and moving the campus from Washington Avenue to the current Hilltop campus, for which Brookings hired Frederick Olmstead, one of the most prominent architects of the time. In addition to the dedication ceremony, the University and the Clayton Century Foundation co-sponsored a talk from St. Louis architect Eugene Mackey, who spoke for 45 minutes about Robert Brookings in College Hall. Adelstein cited Brookings’ impact on the University in the organization of the event.

“We wanted to have a campus event in addition to the dedication ceremony to celebrate his contributions to Wash. U.,” Adelstein said. Edwards believes that although Brookings has been dead since 1932, his influence on the University has survived through the decades. “Brookings set the tone for the University so that it would rise into the top tier,” Edwards said. “I wish I could go back in time and meet him. He was a very dignified man and had that great look in his eye [in his portrait] that many great leaders do.” Danforth says that even today’s students benefit from his work. “Robert Brookings was an amazing man with an enormous impact on Wash. U.,” Danforth said. “Everyone associated with Wash. U. is in his debt.”

recent graduates

Check out our website at firstyear.wustl.edu or stop by our offices, located in the Women’s Building


14 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

features

The ABCs of WUSTL The 40 | ArtSci | CS40 | DUC | EST | FroYo | GLO | Holmes | KWUR | LabSci | Mallinckrodt | Olin | Pre-O | Quad | ResLife | SHS | SU | StudLife | Thurtene | U-Pass | Village | WUPD | WUTV GEORGIE MORVIS | TV/MOVIE EDITOR

4

The 40: The South 40. This is a collection of dorms and recreational spaces where most freshmen and sophomores live.

A

ArtSci: The College of Arts and Sciences. With majors as far ranging as Biology to Women and Gender Studies, ArtSci considers itself the most diverse and hip college.

C

D

CS40: The Congress of the South 40 is the governing body of the South 40. An easy and fun way to get involved with your university, they put on fun programs like ResCollege Olympics and CS40 Formal. DUC: The Danforth University Center. A giant complex where you can eat lunch, attend meetings, watch live classical music concerts, record music, play video games, and best of all, write for StudLife.

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EST: The Emergency Support Team. These are your guardian angels, a group of students that are available for your medical emergencies whenever you need them. FroYo: Frozen yogurt. A delicious college phenomenon, frozen yogurt is available at Bear’s Den, the Village, or the Loop. It is a favorite post-workout snack of Wash. U. students. GLO: Greek Life Office. An office on the first floor of the DUC that houses the InterFraternity and PanHellenic councils. Holmes: Holmes Lounge. This a wonderful place to study and eat out-of-this-world delicious wraps and sandwiches for lunch. And no, Holmes is not what you’ll be calling your friends.

LEARN, LEAD, SERVE Washington University Campus Y

Stop by and learn about our many student-led community service programs.

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M

KWUR: The student-run radio station on campus. They are notoriously averse to anything played on other radio stations, proud of their limited broadcast ability that doesn’t even reach the 40 and are the most musically brilliant students on campus. LabSci: Laboratory Sciences Building. A huge building with a huge lecture hall, LabSci 300, where most of the staple classes at Wash. U. are held. Mallinckrodt: Mallinckrodt Center. In the running (along with Eliot Hall) for ugliest building on campus, this building houses essentials like Edison Theatre, the campus bookstore, Subway and Bank of America.

Welcome to campus! We have more than 32 years of experience helping college students make space in their new homes. Let us help you get organized. (We can even help you make room for your roommate!)

Interested in volunteering? Visit us in our temporary location Eliot Hall Room 110 Learn more at www.ymcastlouis.org/washington-university-campus.ymca or call 314.935.5010

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STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 15

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Olin: Olin Library. The main library on campus, where many students spend their days and nights studying. Pre-O: Pre-Orientation Programs. For four days before orientation, try out one of the many pre-o programs that Wash. U. offers. A little birdie told me that the StudLife one was especially awesome.

SHS: Student Health Services. In this writer’s opinion, a largely useless establishment where you will spend hours in the waiting room and minutes getting medical advice of about WebMD quality, but hey, free condoms!

U

U-Pass: A free-of-charge pass that gives you access to all St. Louis public transportation. Order it online and don’t forget to renew it each semester!

V

Village: An area on the northern part of campus where some upperclassmen live. It also has good stir-fry and some of thefraternities.

W

SU: Student Union. The main student government organization on campus. You’ve probably heard of them from the time they almost paid Bristol Palin $20,000 to speak on campus.

MATT MITGANG | STUDENT LIFE

O

ResLife: Residential Life. The organization that takes care of housing – watch out for their end-of-year fines, though, as they are always pushing the boundaries of silliness.

ity skits, delicious delights – all in front of Brookings Hall.

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R

Quad: The Quadrangle, a word which here means the idyllic grassy area between Brookings, Busch, Ridgley and Cupples I Halls. Study, hang out with friends, enjoy the outdoors, as the quad is one of the nicest areas on campus.

WUPD: Wash. U. Police Department aka the on-campus cops. Don’t get on their bad side. They’re nicer than U. City cops, but they are still cops. WUTV: Wash. U. TV – the student run television station. They can be found on campus on channel 22.

StudLife: Free, student-run, independent on-campus newspaper. We’re awesome, and you should join us!

T

Thurtene: A carnival thrown each April by the fraternities and sororities of Wash. U. There are real rides, scintillating soror-

WELCOME NEW STUDENTS!

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MATT MITGANG | STUDENT LIFE

1 1 ‘ L L FA • Students may request a U-Pass for Fall ‘11 beginning July 20 • Full-time registration for classes must be completed before U-Pass is requested • Request U-Pass before August 8 for inclusion in your Freshman Packet OR pick up at the Danforth Distribution Center in the Danforth University Center • Danforth Distribution Center dates are: August 29, 30 and 31 • Fall U-Passes are valid August 1 - December 31

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16 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

10 songs to play on

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ANDIE HUTNER & MOLLY SEVCIK CADENZA EDITORS

1

“Party in the USA” by Miley Cyrus Sure, this song is a little old by now it was around when some of us were *gasp* freshmen - but is there a better way to pump up before going out than a little Miley?

2

“Don’t Stop Believing” by Journey This one is pretty obvious, but there’s nothing better than a power ballad about believing in yourself when you’re insecure during the first few weeks of college.

Treasure aisl es

“What a Beautiful Mess” by Jason Mraz A simple song about a messed up love. Most likely to be heard during your second week at Wash. U., when the afterglow of both orientation and your doomed floorcest relationship have faded away.

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”Macarena,” “ChaCha Slide,” or another cheesy nineties group dance song. With all the floor bonding activities that your over-zealous RAs are sure to mention, one will undoubtedly involve forcing the floor to participate in one of these ridiculous dances. At basic training, they say shared hardship builds team cohesion. As it turns out, these army rules apply to 18 year old biology majors.

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“F*ck You” by Cee-lo This song has quite a bit of staying power. Freshmen will delight in being able to scream obscenities at the top of their lungs, free from the fear of a reprimanding glance from their mother or father.

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STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 17

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8

;

“Your Love is My Drug” by Ke$ha Again, a tad bit old. But its recent radio revival speaks volumes about its playability and recognition power in the near future. Whose beard are we liking, anyway?

“DJ Got Us Fallin’ In Love” by Usher A big favorite at the frat parties, this song tells the tale of a big night out. College freedom certainly makes “falling in love” much easier and open parties certainly don’t hurt.

“Living on a Prayer” by Bon Jovi There will without fail be that one guy on your floor who believes that showing appreciation for this or any other ridiculous 80s anthem is sure to impress his fellow floormates. Even if it doesn’t, be prepared to hear this song quite a bit.

“Come On Get Higher” by Matt Nathanson Some of you are going to come to college still deeply attached to your high school boy/girlfriends. While this may seem an uphill battle, listen to romantic far-away songs like this one to be able to last the distance.

7

9

Washington University Libraries Welcome the Class of 2015

10

“Friday” by Rebecca Black Nothing like this classic ditty to alert us of the weekend’s hastening approach. Expect frequent renditions of the musically dynamic bridge.

At the Libraries you can: • Get books, articles, and other materials for class • Get one-on-one research help from librarians and staff • Study (and snack) 24/7 in Olin Library’s Whispers Café • Check out movies, CDs, audio books, novels, and more • Find a comfortable place to study alone or in group study rooms • Use our computers, or use your mobile device to connect to the Internet via WiFi • Explore specialized collections in our departmental libraries • See the Parent & Family Orientation Schedule for library tours or demonstrations

WU Libraries’ Mobile Website:

library.wustl.edu/m

Washington University has 12 libraries:

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter: WUSTLlibraries

Art & Architecture Library • Business Library • Chemistry Library • Earth & Planetary Sciences Library • East Asian Library Law Library • Medical Library • Music Library • Olin Library • Physics Library • Social Work Library • West Campus Library

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your freshman floor


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18 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

The 10 Types of People You’ll Meet on Your Freshman Floor MOLLY SEVCIK | MUSIC EDITOR College is the perfect time to reinvent yourself. Most incoming freshmen are excited to break the proverbial mold they formed in high school. Still, stereotypes will be stereotypes. There is a predefined set of personalities living on each freshmen floor, and you’ll probably meet them all during the first 72 hours of college.

1 THE FLOOR MOM Never seen without her Vera Bradley Day Planner, this girl always has a plan, a piece of advice or a helping hand to offer. However, just like the average mother, Floor Mom exists in a constant state of involvement in everyone’s business but her own. She’ll know when you’re lying, she’ll know when you’ve cheated and she’ll know when you’ve been drinking. You won’t be able to hide anything from this busybody, so don’t even try. It’s nice to have someone looking out for you during those first hectic weeks, but most would agree that having a quasi-parent gets old.

2 THAT KID YOU DIDN’T INVITE He’s at all the wildest dorm parties. He eats dinner with your crew every night. He comes to every movie break and late night study session you plan. There’s only one problem: you don’t remember inviting him. There’s one on every floor. You know him. He’s that weird kid with the awkward speech patterns. Though he can name every person currently residing in your dorm, you and your friends generally try to steer clear. Like an awkward ninja, you only know he’s there when he wants you to know he’s there; which, unfortunately, is most of the time.

3 YOUR FLOORCEST MISTAKE Don’t kid yourself. You will hook up with that slightly attractive creature sulking across the room at your first floor meeting. And true, not all floor-bred relationships end in vicious Whoever-Can-Have-Sex-Firstis-the-One-Who-Really-Ended-this-Relationship break up battles. But this one will. In fact, it may even be worse. Every time you catch his/ her eyes after whatever drunken shenanigans you found yourselves in, you’ll quickly look away, trying to locate the nearest doorway to fling yourself through.

4 THE KNOW IT ALL There’s a hand waving in the front of the crowd gathered around your RA. Then, a voice. “I can lead the tour, Robbie. You know, I’ve been on at least a hundred of these silly things.” Yes, it’s the floor’s resident encyclopedia--if that encyclopedia had been written by Psyduck. She thinks she knows everything about the school, from it’s founding date to its original name. However, almost every fact she’s carefully stored away in her mind is incorrect. Wash. U. was originally known as Eliot Seminary, not Washington College, you dimwit. And that’s the chemistry building, for Christ’s sake. Stop telling my roommate it’s where literature classes are held.

5

WHATSHISNAME

You will see this guy twice in person during your freshman year. The first time will be at the first floor meeting when he introduces himself to you. His name will remain in your memory just long enough for you to type it into Facebook and add him as a friend. Then, he will slip back into the furthest confines of your mind. You’ll most likely not worry about him, as he’s that kid who got a girl friend with a single in one of the traditional dorms and spends every night with her. Then, on the last day of move out, you’ll see him again. He’ll say hi, and you’ll say hi, while you’re trying desperately to see if he wrote his name anywhere on that box he’s carrying, because you just can’t remember what the hell it is.

6

DRUNK DEBBIE

This girl didn’t get out much in high school, and she assumes that she has to make up for her lack of party-hardy expertise with weekly alcohol binges. She’ll circulate the floor, sleeping in random bathrooms, relying on the compassion of strangers willing to hold her hair back while she loses the contents of her stomach and her dignity in one fell swoop. Eventually, her parents will catch wind of what she’s doing, and she’ll have to have a “powwow” with her RA. Immediately, her partying will subside. Once she’s convinced those around her that she’s changed her ways, she’ll be right back to her old habits. Let’s just hope she ends up in her own bathroom next time.

7

FACEBOOK FANATIC

Of all the people on your floor’s Facebook page, this is the one you’re least excited to meet. She’s friends with every single person on the floor less than 48 hours after housing assignments are announced. She’s got a comment for every thread (and has actually started most of them), and she’ll try to “pump up” the group with rally cries of “This year is gonna be so fun!!! <3 Can’t wait to meet you all!!!” We know you’re excited to go to college and start forming new friendships. But if you’ve already spilled your biggest secrets on your “Two Truths and a Lie” thread, then what will you talk about once arriving at school?

8

THE PLEASER

Probably on the low end of the totem pole during high school, this person is determined to have as many friends as possible. In an effort to not piss anyone off, he never offers up his own opinion--rather, he goes along with whatever someone else proposes. This kind of attitude seems easy going at first. But soon, people will tire of his total lack of a backbone. People will most likely walk all over this poor wallflower, but his refusal to stand up for herself will make you less inclined to help. There’s only so many times you can hear, “I don’t care. Whatever you want is fine,” before the apathy starts to get to you.

9

THE FLOOR HISTORIAN

If you glance in the direction of the never-ending stream of camera flashes, you’ll spot number nine on our list. The Floor Historian will have added over 2,000 photos to Facebook during her freshman year. Every event earns an album with a clever title and every moment is a Kodak one. Want to know where your inebriated hookup last night was on a scale of 1 to 10? Just check their page the next day.

10

THE GUY WITH THE GUITAR

When he pulled out his guitar, this guy earned about five cool points in your mind. And yes, his rendition of Axis of Awesome’s “Four Chord Song” during the first floor bonding activity was hilarious. But then the veneer cracks, reality hits, and you realize---those are the only chords he knows how to play. Every song he strums (only strums, constantly strums) is in the same key. Every melody he plays runs together, a repeating track you can’t stop. Playing and singing till all hours of the night. No, not everybody wants to listen to you, dude. Especially not at 3 A.M.


STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 19

The Sam Fox School is a diverse community of artists, architects, and designers, bringing together interdisciplinary learning, creative activity, research, and exhibition. samfoxschool.wustl.edu Get Involved Visit the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum – View the permanent collection or the special exhibitions – Attend free public lectures, talks, films, and concerts – Join the docent program or the Student Advisory Committee – Take advantage of FREE STUDENT MEMBERSHIPS

check It out Fall exhibitions open September 9 Mon, Wed, Thu, Sat, Sun: 11-6 | Fri: 11-8 | Closed Tue | Admission is always free kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu


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20 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

MICHELLE MERLIN | EDITOR IN CHIEF

If you’re not from St. Louis, you’re not alone. Well over 90% of the incoming class is from out of state, and there are some aspects to St. Louis life that might take getting used to. Here’s a list of oddities you might not expect in your new home.

6

LAX ALCOHOL LAWS You’re not ready to drink yet, but as people occupying the same space as legal drinkers, you should know what you’re in for. Missouri has some of the most lax alcohol laws in the country. This will first become apparent to you when you go to a movie theater, and see that people are allowed to consume beer there. Some other unique St. Louis alcohol laws include permitting open containers in cars so long as there is one fewer open containers than passengers (presumably the unopened container is the driver’s drink), legalized public intoxication and 3 a.m. bar closings.

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STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 21

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FOOD St. Louisians take pride in being known for certain foods that you’re bound to try at some point. Toasted ravioli are, contrary to their name, breaded and fried. Ooey gooey butter cake is what it sounds like and eating it will make your whole body feel eewy (also comes with the side effect of feeling like a child when pronouncing the name). Ted Drewes (frozen custard) is such a St. Louis hotspot that you may even spot a wedding party there.

2

THE WEATHER At home, odds are you can dress for the day based on what the weather was like the day before. This is not so in St. Louis. One day could be a balmy 80 degrees and sunny and the next could be 20 degrees and snowy. I’m not even exaggerating. Be sure to check a couple of weather sites (weather.com, weatherbug and wunderground would be my suggestions) every morning to make sure you’re prepared for the precipitation of the day. Oh, and you’ll want to bring some umbrellas (the first few will be ruined by the incredibly strong winds that whip around campus) and rain boots.

1

IMO’S PIZZA Your friends from St. Louis might love it, but don’t be fooled by its name: Imo’s pizzas have little relation to real pizza. They are made with something called provel cheese, which is a mixture of Cheddar, Swiss and provolone and is unique to St. Louis (you might also find this cheese on salads and in pasta dishes at other restaurants). Provel is classified as a “cheese product,” not a cheese, by the FDA. It melts into something smooth like plastic and has a buttery texture. Imo’s pizza also has a thin, crackery crust. Some people describe Imo’s pizza as tasting like “cardboard, ketchup and cheese whiz,” and that’s pretty much what you’ll get.

IDLE CHATTER Especially if you’re from the East coast, you’re probably used to going about your business in a timely manner without anyone getting in your way. Well, the Midwestern nice is real, and it is indifferent to the fact that you might be in a rush. People will babble at you when you’re already late for class and walk alongside you in a laid-back manner. It’s even worse off campus. Be sure to leave plenty of time when you go to the supermarket, because the cashiers will talk to you for minutes before checking you out.

L A SU

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4

SQUIRRELS The Danforth Campus might look picturesque, well maintained and safer than your AP U.S. history class, but a very real and sinister danger is staring you in the face from every tree, ledge and garbage can: squirrels. The squirrels here are no mere furry rodents, chattering away with their woodland friends, cracking open acorns and fleeing the moment you cross their path. These diabolical fiends are unique to St. Louis, travel in packs and are watching your every move and ready to pounce. You certainly don’t scare them, and they should definitely scare you.

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22 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

• Favorite food on campus Stir-fry on the South 40 is a delicious option for anybody. The station offers a dozen toppings, at least six options for protein and plenty of sauces. With all those permutations, it’s nearly impossible to say “I’ve tried everything this place offers!” Davis Sargeant, Senior Scene Editor I’d be remiss if I didn’t say Holmes Lounge. Great bread, lots of cheeses and sauces to choose from and the meat is delicious. Come prepared to wait on flank steak days, but it’s totally worth it. Andie Hutner, Senior Cadenza Editor A chicken club sandwich from Bear’s Den (hold the lettuce and tomato, add Swiss cheese) slathered in hot sauce with a side of sweet potato chips—because when they give me too much bacon, I can dip it in the extra hot sauce. Michael Tabb, News Editor • Best place to eat off campus Uncle Bill’s Pancake House may not have the best food in St. Louis, but it guarantees a memorable experience. The restaurant is open 24 hours, and some of the strangest people in the area stop by after midnight. One time, I overheard a man demanding that his scrambled eggs be “undercooked, and I mean soggy. No way I’m getting a disease.” Davis Sargeant, Senior Scene Editor Bobo’s Noodle House serves Asian fusion and is right at the northeast corner of cam-

pus. It’s super close AND they deliver! I highly recommend the Asian barbecued spare ribs and grilled curried chicken with roasted chili peanut sauce and seared egg noodles. Alan Liu, Managing Editor Al Tarboush, a Middle Eastern “deli” with delicious and cheap falafel, not to mention house-made hummus. They stock hookahs, as well as tobacco in a myriad of flavors, all of which sound (and smell) like types of candy. Natalie Villalon, Forum Editor • One item you’re glad you brought to school A deck of cards. When you first get on campus, you are always looking for ways to meet new people, and games beat awkward ice breakers every time. Sahil Patel, Senior Sports Editor There isn’t one thing I rely on a lot. If there was I’d probably just lose it. Kurt Rohrbeck, Senior Sports Editor Earplugs. My roommate’s alarm clock always went off a few hours before mine, but I slept through it thanks to my lovely pink plugs. Andie Hutner, Senior Cadenza Editor • Favorite freshman memory My floormates and I formed an intramural soccer team. More than half of the team had never played before. I’m pretty sure we lost every game, but it was fun watching the inventive ways we came up with playing soccer. By the third game, everyone finally under-

stood that hands were off limits. Davis Sargeant, Senior Scene Editor Getting lost on the way to Mardi Gras or tricking Michelle into a birthday scavenger hunt with a not-so-elaborate scheme involving the old editor in chief and Justin Beiber…it’s a toss-up. Michael Tabb, News Editor My friends from Freshmen Press plastered my door with photos of a politician I didn’t support while I was out. When I saw the vandalism I screeched and woke everyone up. Needless to say, my Freshmen Press friends and I have been tight ever since. Michelle Merlin, Editor in Chief • What you learned freshman year Frats are NOT the best place to party. Expiration dates ARE important. The Cinnamon Challenge is NEVER a good idea. Natalie Villalon, Forum Editor Non-Studlifers tire of hearing about Student Life. Also joining all the clubs you can will keep you from truly dedicating yourself to any of them. Pick one or two things that you are passionate about, and stick with them. Michelle Merlin, Editor in Chief Go to class and try paying attention so you don’t have to teach the material to yourself. Also pretend to be an extrovert at least until October. Michael Tabb, News Editor


STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 23

Art Hill in Forest Park is just a short walk from campus and in the winter it’s great for sledding. Alex Dropkin, Associate Editor The City Museum. It makes you feel like a kid again. Mary Yang, Design Chief • How would you have picked your classes I was incredibly overwhelmed by the course catalog, but it helped to go through it together with a friend and break it down into categories. Sahil Patel, Senior Sports Editor I’m an engineer. I didn’t have much of a choice. Matt Mitgang, Director of Multimedia Take ones that you know pertain to the majors you are considering, but also make sure to take a few that just make you feel all tingly inside. Godiva Reisenbichler, Graphics Editor • Favorite place to study? The East Asian Library in January Hall features impressive architecture, a strict adherence to silence, and, as strange as it may sound, the best smelling study space on campus. Davis Sargeant, Senior Scene Editor On the second floor balcony in the Gaylord Music Library and by the windows in the Kopolow Business Library. Those two libraries are also closest to the South 40! Alan Liu, Managing Editor The laundry room, where the only real noise is the monotonous drone of machines, not distracting conversation. If you’re OK with the strange looks you get from passersby, it is a productive place. Sahil Patel, Senior Sports Editor

• Secret spots on campus The tunnels beneath the quad, Crow Observatory, and the supposedly haunted attic in the social work library are all worth checking out. Also, there may or may not be some easily accessible rooftops on the 40 for some beautiful views of campus. Genevieve Hay, Senior Photo Editor

• One take-away lesson from freshman year Reserve judgments about people. At the beginning of the year, I think I tried too hard to fit people into molds I knew from high school, and didn’t think I really needed to get to know them to understand them. Michael Tabb, News Editor

The observatory. No better place to be on a clear night. Lauren Cohn, Copy Chief

Use upperclassmen as a resource. They’ve been here longer than you and have taken all of the classes that you will be taking. Mary Yang, Design Chief

The law school has food. And it’s good. Nobody knows the hours, and it only takes Campus Card, not meal points, but it can be great once you’re sick of the DUC. Matt Mitgang, Director of Multimedia • First thing to do when you meet your room mate Say hello and smile! Above all, remember that successful relationships depend on compromise. A “my way or the highway” attitude will make you the “problem room” on the floor. Davis Sargeant, Senior Scene Editor Get to know each other’s schedule - both class and life - not just so you can avoid conflicts like showering, but also so you can plan some much-needed alone time. Andie Hutner, Senior Cadenza Editor Go out to dinner with your family and his or hers. Even though it might be painful at the time, you can bond over how embarrassing your respective parents were later. Michelle Merlin, Editor in Chief • How to handle leaving your parents Keep you parents involved in your life. They may no longer inquire, “what did you learn today,” but periodically send them funny anecdotes or ask for their advice. Davis Sargeant, Senior Scene Editor Make it like ripping off a band-aid. The less drama involved, the easier saying saying goodbye will be. Chloe Rosenberg, Senior News Editor It’s not so bad. They’ll call you every hour anyway, it’s like they never left. Except now they can’t tell you to make your bed. Charlie Low, Forum Editor

As a JProg, I learned that freshman year really flies. Freshman year is a great introduction, but it may take another semester to hone your interests and get involved in the activities for which you are most passionate Genevieve Hay, Senior Photo Editor • College is different than high school because... That three hour block between your first and second class of the day? Yeah, that doesn’t all count for passing time. Godiva Reisenbichler, Senior Graphics Editor There’s so much more to do, so efficiency is a lot more important; there’s a lot more studying, and since you’re constantly surrounded by friends and fun things to do, it’s important to make sure you take advantage of your time working. Michael Tabb, News Editor • Why you should join Student Life! Everyone needs a place or activity where they can blow off some steam, and that’s what StudLife was for me. There is always good conversation and a friendly atmosphere in the office, and every member on staff really feels like part of the family. It is a great way to get involved on campus from the first day. Sahil Patel, Senior Sports Editor You get to do cool things. I’ve photographed the President of the United States... twice. Matt Mitgang, Director of Multimedia It’s a group full of fun, sarcastic, nocturnal, snobs who are pretty much the best people on campus. You will never be so happy you blew off your homework or your bedtime. Lauren Cohn, Copy Chief

features

• Best place to go with your freshman floor Chill Frozen Yogurt is on Wydown and walkable from the South 40. They have a great selection of flavors and there are often special deals online to get $10 worth of fro-yo for $5. Alan Liu, Managing Editor


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24 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

MARY YANG | STUDENT LIFE

Cheap places to eat around Wash. U.

WEI-YIN KO | NEWS EDITOR You’re about to embark on the best years of your life. But they certainly won’t be your wealthiest. And even though campus food is good, sometimes you’ll need a break and want to eat out—without emptying your wallet. Here are a few places you can eat at guilt free—from a monetary standpoint, at least. PLACES AROUND THE LOOP The closest place outside of Wash. U. to get food. While there are other relatively inexpensive places to eat on this street, the following are my personal favorites. CAFÉ AL-TARBOUSH In addition to their delicious falafel wraps at around $6, this joint also have an assortment of hookahs, flavored tobaccos, and Mediterranean yogurt drinks! WONG’S WOK All kinds of authentic Asian food at reasonable prices. The beef noodle bowl is highly recommended if you like spicy food. Remember to bring cash though since this restaurant does not take credit cards. U. CITY GRILL This restaurant, hidden behind Cicero’s, has the best Korean food you can buy in University

City. The Korean barbeque is their signature item. However, like Wong’s Wok, this establishment does not take credit cards. GYROS IN THE LOOP Out of the two gyro restaurants on the Loop, GitL has the cheaper gyros—less than $6. There is not a discernable difference between their gyros, so this eatery makes the list. MARKET PUB HOUSE This place just opened last year, and Wash. U. students have flocked to it. This burger joint has some other food (sandwiches and salads), but the best part of this menu is that every item is priced at $5, $6 or $7. CHIPOTLE For less than $7 you can get a custom-made giant burrito with all kinds of fillings you want inside. The staff there prides itself on making as big

of a burrito as the tortilla will allow. Highly recommended for a quick bite. NOODLES & CO Located right next to Chipotle (in case you and your friends can’t decide), Noodles & Co. offers a variety of noodle dishes, ranging from Asian to American to Italian. A picky eater is sure to find something here, and all for around $7. JIMMY JOHN’S Tired of Subway? Try out Jimmy John’s subs with their fresh Italian bread. The Big John sandwich is highly suggested if you like roast beef. PLACES AROUND FORSYTH Take the metro westbound for one stop and you will arrive at Forsyth Station, which is still fairly close to Wash. U. Below are the two cheap restaurants to dine at if you are ever around this area.

CRAZY BOWLS & WRAPS This restaurant has a wide variety of noodle and rice bowls along with their wraps. Besides the choices of what kind of protein and rice you want in your bowl/wrap, you can also pick the different types of vegetables that go along with it. My favorite combination is teriyaki chicken bowl with white meat, white rice and spicy salad, which costs under $6. BELLACINO’S The signature item at this diner is the grinder, which is a sub that is baked in a pizza oven. The steak grinder is absolutely delicious and you can watch the Cardinals game on the flat screen TVs while you wait. Be sure to bring your student ID for a 10% discount.


STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 25

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28 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

features

THE CELLIST OF SARAJEVO A review of your freshman reading book ANDIE HUTNER | SENIOR CADENZA EDITOR The Cellist of Sarajevo, by Steven Galloway, is your Freshmen Summer Reading Program book this year. ‘Summer Reading Program?’ you think to yourself. ‘Won’t I be doing enough reading once I become a full-fledged college student?’ The truth is, you probably will, especially if you’re going to be majoring in the humanities. That being said, you should find some time to read this book. It’s 256 pages, but it’s really a collection of three intertwined stories. While historical fiction may sound boring to you, be glad it’s not a non-fiction book about global warming, like the class of 2012 had to read. The book takes place during the siege of Sarajevo, Bosnia, which started in 1992 and lasted for years. While the siege of Sarajevo is

a real event, the novel was only somewhat inspired by true events. When 22 innocent people were killed just standing in a bread line, a local cellist took to the streets to play for 22 days, one day per victim. This is where the book loses its connection to reality. Galloway’s three protagonists, Dragan, Kenan and Arrow, are all inspired by the cellist to keep fighting. Their lives are affected differently by the siege, but it has certainly changed everything for all of them. One man, Dragan, sent his family away to safety, but risks dying every day on his way to work in his bakery. Kenan has to cross town to get water for his family, but the “men in the hills” could keep him from ever getting home again. The last protagonist, Arrow, is a sniper trained to protect the cellist to allow him to play his music. The book focuses on both the internal and external struggles of its three main characters, but Galloway’s use of the cellist as the frame for the story is what makes it impressive. It shows how music can inspire even in such hard times. And it may even teach you a good lesson – how to survive your first all-nighter. Just find some cello music to listen to.

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STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 29

MUST-HAVES FOR YOUR FIRST YEAR AT WASH. U. ALEX DROPKIN | ASSOCIATE EDITOR

WATCH A sturdy, accurate watch is an invaluable tool in college. Use it to keep time when you’re getting ready in the morning to make sure you’re not late for your first class. Use it between classes to make sure you’re not late for your next class. Use it while stuck in class to pass the time - nothing makes a 90-minute class go by more quickly than checking your watch every other minute. CANDY At Wash. U., something strange starts happening at the beginning of your freshman spring semester. Gigantic posters decorated with chocolates and candy will start popping up all over your floor (as a part of sorority recruitment). You and all of your friends will devour them because college students love both free food and snacks. Why wait until January? Get a big bag of candy at the beginning of the year to share with your floor. NICE PAIR OF HEADPHONES Toss aside those white earbuds in lieu of a nice pair of headphones. It

UMBRELLA If you’ve never been to St. Louis before, there are two things you should know: the weather is often unpredictable, and it rains often. My sophomore year, for a number of weeks in the fall, it stormed every single Thursday. I didn’t bring an umbrella, and after about the third time getting drenched while walking to class, I realized I needed one. Be prepared: bring an umbrella. A rain jacket will work just as well. SOME SORT OF BALL I cannot count how many hours we spent messing around with a blue rubber ball someone on my freshman floor brought. We played catch with it in the halls, bounced it off of the ceiling and continually found new ways to entertain ourselves with it all year. Bring a ball, even if it’s just a tennis ball. You and your floormates won’t regret it. BOTTLE OPENER Having a bottle opener on hand is essential for those times when you and your friends will want to “kick back” and enjoy delicious bottles of Root Beer. Sure, this is college, and most of the time you will be drinking inexpensive, low-quality Root Beer out of a can, but I guarantee you will want to drink something classier every once and a while. Make sure to bring a bottle opener.

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The School of Engineering & Applied Science welcomes the class of 2015 The Freshmen Registration Guide for Engineering students is online. Check out Stanley’s café in Lopata Hall for wraps, sandwiches, salads and more. Find the full menu and café hours at diningservices.wustl.edu. Sitting area is open 24 hours and includes Wi-Fi access and computer stations.

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features

I’m sure that lots of people have told you what you need to bring to school to get through freshman year. You’ve seen quite a few “Headed to College” checklists and probably even got one in the mail from Wash. U. Those lists are great and can really help, but they lack the foresight of someone who was once a freshman at Wash. U. Based upon my experiences, I came up with a few things that you will both want and need for your first year:

doesn’t matter what style, shape or size, just make sure to have them, as headphones will come in handy this year. Having to live with someone you’ve never met (in some cases, two other people) can be a challenge, but headphones will help. Put on some headphones if you want to listen to music, instead of possibly annoying your roommate. Also, if your roommate happens to snore at night, the headphones will block out the snoring.


30 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

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314.935.6543 edison.wustl.edu MATT MITGANG | STUDENT LIFE


STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 31

A guide to St. Louis sports teams

A St. Louis Tradition Since 1947

HANNAH LUSTMAN | MANAGING EDITOR For many students, coming to Washington University means a painful break from their favorite teams back home. However, fans of pro sports in St. Louis have the opportunity to see games throughout the year with the St. Louis Rams (football), Blues (Hockey) and Cardinals (baseball). RAMS For NFL fans, regular season action for the Rams can be seen shortly after classes begin. After a slump to the very bottom of the football heap, the Rams are looking to rebuild around second-year quarterback Sam Bradford. Bradford produced impressive stats; he started every game and surpassed Peyton Manning’s record for pass attempts as a rookie. The team recently hired Josh McDaniels for its offensive coordinator vacancy to open up the playbook for number 8. The Blue and Gold play home games at the Edward Jones Dome, which is accessible on MetroLink. Single-game tickets are available through on Stlouisrams.com and by phone at (314) RAMS-TIX. BLUES The Blues, or “the Note” as some St. Louisans refer to the team, are an NHL squad named for the famous musical genre. The franchise offers the best deal to students of all pro squads in the area – with a valid student ID presented at the box office, the Blues charge $20 for a mezzanine-level ticket with a voucher for a hot dog and soda. Seats in the plaza level can be purchased under the same promotion for $35. The deal extends to 14 regular season games including match-ups with the Sharks and Red Wings. The team recently signed forward Jonathan Cheechoo, and fellow forward T.J. Oshie is a fan favorite. Blues Home games are held at Scottrade Center, a 21,000-seat arena accessible through MetroLink. CARDINALS In St. Louis, the Cardinals are kings. The city is quick to identify as a baseball one: fans are loyal and sports pages and talk radio waves are dominated by Cards talk. Shortly before the All-Star break the team welcomed back Albert Pujols after a short stint on the disabled list. Pujols, undoubtedly one of the best players in the game, will become a free agent at the conclusion of this year’s season. Currently tangled in a fight for the NL Central, the Cardinals will hope for more production the bats of Pujols, Lance Berkman and Matt Holiday as their pitching has slumped. Games are played at the recently built “new Bush stadium”, accessible by MetroLink.

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32 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

forum

Embrace that Midwestern attitude

H

aving been a New Yorker all my life, the Midwestern attitude came as something of a culture shock to me. Only hours after stepping off the plane, still in an Empire state of mind, I was standing at the checkout counter of Bed, Bath, & Beyond. Suddenly, something happened that left me utterly shocked: the man checking out my two shopping carts full of dorm room items started talking to me. This man, a complete stranger, actually began a conversation with me—asking where I went to school, how I liked St. Louis, even telling me about himself and, after finding out where I was from, sharing funny stories from his experiences visiting New York City. All the while he was jovial and friendly, as if we were old

BECKY PRAGER | STAFF COLUMNIST

pals rather than just two strangers having an insignificant encounter. And it was then I knew: I wasn’t in New York anymore. The thing that struck me most about the Midwest when I first got to WashU: people are so nice here. When I passed people on the sidewalk, regardless of whether I knew them or not, I was surprised to hear them say “Good morning” or “Hi, how are you?” to me—and even more surprised to find myself responding. Rather than everyone rushing and stomping on whoever got in their way, people took the time to stop and be courteous. When I was standing in line at Bear’s Den and the girl making my sandwich asked me how my day was going, I was so taken aback that it actually took a few seconds for me

to respond. I couldn’t believe that a stranger, someone who had no relationship to or personal stake in me, actually cared how my day was going. When I would call and email professors or locals for a StudLife article, they weren’t rude to me nor did they express any disgust at being bothered by a pushy freshman begging for an interview the night before her article was due. They were always patient, kind and more than willing to help me. My advice to all the new freshman unaccustomed to this kind of attitude: when in the Midwest, do as the Midwesterners do. This means you are expected to say hi to your floor’s housekeeper every morning, even if she walks in on you in your pajamas at 9 am. This means smiling and being friendly with the woman who

makes your coffee at Whispers, even if she takes a long time and you’re desperate for caffeine. This means learning the names of all the guys at the Grill and Ursa’s (and asking them about their wife and kids), and making conversation with the lovely ladies at the checkout counter at BD (trust me, they’re worth talking to). It may seem strange at first, but eventually (like me) you’ll learn to appreciate the relaxed, friendly attitude that seems to be ingrained in the psyches of all Midwesterners from birth. You never know—maybe when you go back home, you’ll be the one shocking the guy at the checkout counter by asking him how his day is going. Becky Prager is a sophomore in Arts & Sciences. Write to Becky at becky.prager@ studlife.com

Nerds, and proud of it

T

here’s a girl I work with who has the words “Wear sunscreen” tattooed on her shoulder. It’s a line from a spoken-word-song called “Everybody’s Free (To Wear Sunscreen)” that has become the standard bearer for this kind of article. “Here is a list of insightful, whimsically expressed observations on life that will help graduates as they grow up.” Granted, the song is an enjoyable and moving little number, but column after column of the very same sentiments becomes easy enough to ignore. If I filled this space with sage advice for your full college experience, you would not only ignore it because it’s all stuff you’ve heard before, but also because it very well might be the wrong advice. A lot can change in four years. That’s probably the most candid advice I can give you, anyway.

CHASE FEREE | FORUM EDITOR

I suppose there’s one more thing that I could share with you as you quickly approach move-in day. It’s not advice for how to get an A+ in General Chemistry (dream on!), nor a recommendation of the ideal stir-fry combination in the Village, or anything else even half as useful. Instead, it’s just something to keep in mind as you come into school: Accept the fact that we’re all nerds here. Don’t hide the truth that you worked your asses off in high school to get into a place like Wash. U. Embrace it. It wasn’t just academics that got you here, but many of your other endeavors are nerdy enough. I played the viola, took I.B. classes and ran cross country, for crying out loud (to say nothing of my long-standing passion for Star Wars). Who knows what you were into. I’m not saying that you aren’t cool because you got into Wash. U., or

that you should only focus on your studies while you’re here. Rather, take your nerdiness and give it a spin. Maybe you’ve got a talent for music composition—start a band or join an a cappella group. Or you know everything there is to know about Detroit techno—train to be a KWUR DJ. Some of you who are Biomedical Engineering or Philosophy-Neuroscience-Psychology majors are also planning to be varsity athletes. All it takes is a simple reevaluation of what “cool” means, and you’ll realize that being a nerd has its perks. If you want to read Ulysses for fun or examine gender representation in 1960s Marvel comics, do it—it might seem nerdy now, but you’ll realize quickly how your academic interests will pay off if you dedicate yourself to them. As I said before, embrace your nerdiness—people here already have or you wouldn’t have been

accepted. Whether it’s your classmates, your RAs, your teachers or members of the administration, folks at Wash. U. will always take you for who you are…or for who you want to be. Some of you will decide that you want to be called by your middle name instead of your first name; some of you will present an entirely different person than the one who lives at home; some of you will just downplay your status as a high school Quiz Bowl champion. There’s nothing wrong with any of that, but don’t lose total sight of that person, of that nerd, who’s hidden in there. And hey, you’re still going to a school that was recently named one of the “Trendiest Colleges” in the US by the Huffington Post. Pretty solid standing for a school full of nerds. Chase Feree is a senior in Arts & Sciences. Write to Chase at chase.feree@ studlife.com.


STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 33

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34 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

How to deal with your roommate

A

h, the first day of freshman orientation. Naturally, you are excited to meet your roommate. Thoughts of the fun roomie-bonding activities fill your head. Perhaps you two will get to the stage where matching tracksuits are appropriate. You step through the door. He or she turns, smiles, and you begin your fairytale life together. Or…not. Maybe she likes to “have a few friends over” on the night before every bio test ever and they never seem to run out of Bacardi Breezers. Or you walk in on him and his GF doing unspeakable things with YOUR toothbrush. Perhaps you two just don’t get along. Never fear. Building a solid roommate relationship can be challenging, but anyone with a modicum of human decency can manage it. Even roommates who are good friends run into problems. My friends-cum-roommies, magnanimous though they are, still complain about my behavior. Mea culpa, guys. I brushed off my roomie’s gentle hints that I should “clean up this frickin’ pig’s sty” and “find somewhere else to slobber all over that guy.” Like most offenders, I wasn’t purposely

NATALIE VILLALON | FORUM EDITOR

being a creep; I was just dense. Avoid my mistakes. Follow a few basic principles, and you and your roommate can both avoid the damning epithet of “bad roommate”.

1. Communicate. This is the most important principle, encompassing setting boundaries and rules as well as the airing of grievances. Those roommate contracts are sort of corny and not legally binding, but important nevertheless because they give you the chance to set expectations about behavior before problems arise. Why wait to tell your roommate that weeknight parties are problematic until you have ten drunks passed out in your room on a Tuesday? Set guidelines about cleanliness, lights-out, sharing items, parties, etc. and stick to them. Renegotiate if necessary. Later, if your roommate is doing something that bothers you, tell them. Be respectful, but firm. Failing to do so, either out of fear or a misplaced sense of Gandhi-esque martyrdom, is completely inimical to your interests. The problem(s) will only worsen. Assume that your roommate is not purposely being a tool; in

all probability, it hasn’t occurred to him or her that there is a problem to begin with. Hint: alcohol can cause decent people to commit indecent acts. Be understanding, but “I was drunk” is not an acceptable excuse the 5th time he or she vomits in your bed. 2. Listen. You are not perfect and you will make mistakes. Often, you will not realize that your habits irk your roommate. Listen and make a sincere effort to address the concerns your roommate raises. Hint: Typically annoying habits encompass things like never cleaning your room, having unannounced parties, and constant sexiling. Take responsibility for your behavior. Work on your bad habits before they become a problem. 3. Compromise. Once you’ve both communicated your positions on a potentially problematic issue, such as partying in the room or cleaning responsibilities, negotiate. Let’s say you have Bieber Fever or you like to study in your room. Take turns picking music. Ask your roommate to kick out her


STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 35

forum

GODIVA REISENBICHLET | STUDENT LIFE

friends at a certain time. Be flexible, but not a pushover. 4. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be a tool. Of course, there will always be people who just do not understand how to live with another person.

Other times, decent people just make mistakes. Fortunately, 97% of the Wash. U. population will not engage in poor behavior, at least not a regular basis. Inter-roommate relations are typically plagued by more mundane and

more easily fixable problems. With a little work, a solid roommate relationship can be yours. Natalie Villalon is a junior in Arts & Sciences. Write to Natalie at natalie.villalon@studlife.com.


36 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

Sharing With a stranger? Keep an open mind forum

MATTHEW CURTIS | STAFF COLUMNIST

C

ompared to other colleges, Wash. U. does not go to great lengths to make roommates of individuals who are compatible on paper. I completed my survey in a few minutes; my sister, who is going to Rice, spent days agonizing over her answers to a questionnaire. Consequently, many freshmen find themselves completely mismatched and will spend their first year of college cohabitating with someone with whom they have little in common. Horror stories abound about freshman roommates. One turned her TV to keep her roommate from being able to see and take pictures of her side of the room

when she went away; another rarely went to class and allowed his roommate almost no personal time; yet another brought all manner of disreputable characters by at odd hours to the extreme annoyance of his suite. These are of course extreme examples, but the pairing of opposites – or at least, of those with few shared interests – almost seems to be the norm. It can be difficult for two people with very different lifestyles to get along, and it is very easy for the constant party-goer to ignore his dormbound roommate, and vice versa. The ease with which one can find more like-minded students to befriend can make developing

a meaningful relationship with a very different roommate seem like a pointless exercise, and it is not unheard of for freshmen to treat their roommates as nothing more than an animated piece of furniture. This need not be the case. At the end of my freshman year, someone from my floor, waxing sentimental, said of his suitemate “I’m really glad we had [him] in our suite this year. He’s a good guy.” The two weren’t roommates, but the concept is similar: they were forced to live in close quarters, ran in different social circles, and had different interests, but eventually developed an appreciation of each other, and valued the

time they spent together. There’s a lot to be gained from this situation. Because we’re forced to live in such close proximity to our roommate, it is a good opportunity to get to know someone with whom we wouldn’t otherwise associate. The Sigma Chi pledge can grow close to the chess club member, the die-hard Catholic to the Conservative Jew. Under normal circumstances, neither would seek out the other, but as roommates, they are all but begged by Wash. U. to become friends, and can subsequently gain a greater appreciation for the other’s social circle and lifestyle. There are alternatives. Some freshmen simply disappear from

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forum

their rooms for days on end, returning only for class items or clothes. Others maintain a vaguely hostile yet ostensibly cordial relationship. Neither of these options is particularly desirable; they lead to awkward situations in the room that continue into subsequent years – you will still see that acquaintance around campus until you graduate. Hopefully, you will be perfectly matched and will meet the best friend you’ll ever know. On the off-chance that this doesn’t happen, however, I cannot recommend enough that you make that extra effort to get to know your roommate. It can be an incredibly rewarding experience, and come the end of the year, you may find yourself lamenting that you will no longer live together.

Matthew Curtis is a junior in Arts & Sciences. Write to Matthew at matthew.curtis@ studlife.com GODIVA REISENBICHLET | STUDENT LIFE


38 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

Think you’re smart? Prepare to be wrong Undergraduate Business

Do you want to study business or do an internship in another country? Olin’s study abroad programs and international internships offer many ways to incorporate an international experience into your education. Our international programs allow students to integrate what they learn in the classroom while they work and study abroad! We currently offer programs in: • London, England • Paris, France • Herzliya, Israel • Koblenz, Germany • Madrid, Spain • Hong Kong, China • Milan, Italy • Melbourne, Australia • Maastricht, Netherlands • Singapore • Chile (coming soon!!) Olin also offers a European Study Tour for students participating in an European Program. The tour ends with a mock parliament where students debate current issues just like the EU does.

For students who would like to spend just a few weeks abroad, Olin offers short-term programs. Past programs included: • The Luxury Goods Study Tour (Milan, Rome, Paris, and London) • Business in Israel • Venture Capital in Budapest Come learn more during the First Year Series study abroad information session on November 15, 2011!! Questions? Contact Tammy Orahood, Director of International Programs and Global Initiatives at Orahood@wustl.edu or at (314) 935 - 3569. Or check out our website: http://www.olin.wustl.edu/academicprograms/BSBA/International Study/Pages/default.aspx.

T

DANIEL DEIBLER | SENIOR FORUM EDITOR

his is a really good school you have all gotten yourselves into. Most of you were probably at the top of your high school classes or remarkably close to it. Most of you ranked in the top 2.5 percent of all SAT and ACT takers. I could go on and on about how impressive you all are, but where orientation is going to be the carrot telling you how perfect our student body is, I’m going to try and give you a little bit of the stick. My goal is to remind you that you aren’t the smartest kid in the class anymore, and that can be a very difficult idea to accept. I was once in those shoes. I went through high school thinking that I was smarter than everyone else. I certainly didn’t get the best grades, but I just assumed once I got to college, I would buckle down and just blow the competition out of the water. Then I met my freshman floor. One of them was a Biomedical Engineer who has patented a method of easily detecting cancer. One of them was the most brilliant Mechanical Engineer I have ever met. He can take apart and put together any machine built by human hands (and I bet if he was given alien technology, we would have a reverse engineered copy in 6 months). One of them was a Linguistics major who can speak four languages. One of them is going to be the next Steven Spielberg. And one of them is brilliant at just about everything he tries. All of them are math whizzes. These people outclassed me; they still do in fact. In their fields, they are some of the most impossibly intelligent students I have ever met, and by comparison, I’m downright average. Coming to terms with that is stressful for anyone. For a lot of you it is going to be difficult coming from a place where everything came naturally, where you were the best at most of what you

did, and good at everything else. That isn’t the case anymore, and you have to realize it before you start. I’m not going to claim I don’t falter sometimes. I still fall back into that place where I’m the greatest, and you will too. Of course it’ll happen; it’s nice to feel smarter than people. It’s why you’ll run into folks quoting Sartre and Locke, running around reading a book solely because they’ll be able to say, “have you read _____?” But if you can get past that pride you’ve developed, you might come to realize that just because you aren’t the best doesn’t mean you aren’t going to be good, and it won’t mean that you can’t find your own special niche. What it takes is dedication to your craft and an understanding of your own limitations. It takes a willingness to let others help you that might be younger, or less practiced, because the sum of the knowledge you are going to encounter at Wash. U. will dwarf what you have experienced by this point in your life. So my ultimate suggestion is to get over yourselves. You are smart, yes, but you aren’t smarter than the person sitting next to you in class, you aren’t smarter than your floor mates, and you won’t be smarter than the first person you date. Try and take that knowledge in stride, and work with it. Be competitive as hell, do your best to do better than your gifted friends, and when you need help, ask them for it. The knowledge of your own imperfections is the first step to overcoming them, and there is absolutely no reason you cant do so. It’ll take a lot of work, but in the end, while you only might be more successful, you will definitely be more mature.

Daniel Deibler is a sophomore in Arts & Sciences. Write to Daniel at daniel. deibler@studlife.com


STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 39

Innovate for the sake of the middle class

I

JUSTIN GOAD | STAFF COLUMNIST

’d like to welcome the Class of 2015. I hope you enjoyed your summer break, because it’s time to get to work. As the school year approaches and orientation winds down, both you and the returning students will have an increasing amount on their plates. The new freshman class and the large body of returning students will face an unknown future and job market. This is a great time to remind the entire student body of the underlining goal that seems to lay dormant while you are at school. Whether it’s medical students preparing for life-saving surgery or engineers researching the next stage in vehicle fuels, let it be known that the middle class is watching. What am I talking about? It’s simple: we’re all attending school to learn a trade, profession or job skill. These abilities will propel many of us through life, helping to achieve various goals and dreams. But how will our choices now affect the economy once we leave college? There are people on campus and in the media who will tell you that our economy’s in bad shape. But telling us is the easy part. It’s our job to put an end to it. Right now the rich are still rich and the poor are still poor, but what about the middle class? That group of Americans that have defined our nation for the past 70 years, and has been squeezed hard since the financial crisis by a toxic combination of high unemployment and stagnant wages. Two of the largest employers of the middle class were always good-paying union and non-union manufacturing jobs. Another large sector was technology and customer service. But over the past several decades, thousands of jobs have

moved overseas. We don’t make televisions, cell phones, radios or even silverware anymore. Purchase a new computer and find out it’s made in China. Call customer service when it breaks and talk to someone in India. That television you are watching? It’s made in Mexico. I’m not saying that these jobs are going to come back. No matter how hard we try, they won’t. But you are in a special place to correct that problem. If this country has anything left, it is the greatest universities in the world, and guess where you are? Wash. U. is a research university, a place where we push the envelope of what can be accomplished, and what people can do. That is what the middle class needs more than anything else: the innovation you can provide. While you are here you will have access to the best opportunities to help this country that you might ever get throughout your entire life. New technologies and industries bring jobs. Starting from railroads and textiles to oil to cars to computers and the internet, wherever innovation has come, jobs have followed. You have the potential to create that innovation. So as you go through your time here, try and think about the middle class, and what you can do for them. Both your and this country’s future are inextricably tied to theirs. While you are here, you will have the opportunity to create something, to make something new. It’s a chance most people will never get, but you will at Wash. U.

Justin Goad is a student at University College. Write to Justin at justin.goad@ studlife.com.

Welcome Class of 2015

creating value inspiring change transforming business creating value inspiring change transforming business creating value inspiring change transforming business creating value inspiring change transforming business creating value inspiring change transforming business creating value inspiring change transforming business creating value inspiring change tran transforming business creating value inspiring change transforming business creating value inspiring change transforming business creating value inspiring change transforming business creating value inspiring change transforming business creating value inspiring change trans transforming business creating value inspiring change transforming business creating value inspiring change transforming business creating value inspiring change transforming business creating value inspiring change transforming business creating value inspiring change trans transforming business creating value inspiring change transforming business creating value inspiring change transform creating value inspir change transforming business creating value inspiring change transforming business creating Follow us on: value inspiring change transforming business creating value inspiring change transforming www.olin.wustl.edu

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40 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

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Monday, April 18, 2011

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JOHN HERGENROEDER | STUDENT LIFE

Washington University students throw water balloons at each other as part of Holi, a traditional Hindu festival. About 150 students participated.

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SEE BASEBALL, PAGE 5

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SEE DESIGN, PAGE 2

How to make your new college friends, the right way

A

JOE SUTHERLAND | OP-ED SUBMISSION

s I look over two Facebook friend requests from Fifteens I’ve never met, two things run through my mind. The first thought is a sobering reality: “Who are these skinny kids? Damn…I’ve gained some weight!” I pause to pine away for a few seconds, justify my lack of a “training schedule,” and convince myself that muscle weighs more than fat. After I’m comfortable with my shoddy explanation, I return to a second musing: “Are these people my friends? What value do I now place in others that I didn’t before?” Using my experiences from Wash. U., I’ve distilled my knowledge about forming relationships into two golden nuggets of advice. First, place your focus on others. During my freshman year, living on my own caused me to focus more on myself solely because I experienced me more directly than anyone else could. The decisions I made started to seem like the most earth-shakingly consequential choices anyone anywhere will ever make. Remember to take a step back and remember that if that were true, you would be living in a frightening world with a population of one; that certainly isn’t the case. A focus on you precludes the self-growth interpersonal engage-

ment can bring. Second, don’t take yourself too seriously. The best time to practice this is when you’re meeting someone new. Often, one of the first conversation topics for a fledgling relationship will be, “So, what do you do?” Talk about what you like to do, whether it’s for fun or giggles or jolly ha-has; talk about your passions. Focusing on others is about candidly absorbing who they are as people, and it’s awfully hard to fully engage with someone when you are too busy thinking about how important you are. True value is expressed through the manner in which you interact with others. So there you have it. When you leave this university, you will have what you learned, a diploma and perhaps a scar on your face from cheerleading (if you get a chance, see my chin). More importantly, though, you will have the relationships you formed while you were here. Make the most of them.

Joe Sutherland is a junior in Arts & Sciences. Last year, he served as Speaker of the Congress of the South 40 and this summer served the Obama Administration as a White House Intern. Write to Joe at jlsutherland@wustl.edu.


STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 41

Opportunity may come knocking, so leave the door open

I

had never heard of Wash. U. until I was a sophomore in high school. One night my high school in Jackson, Mississippi, hosted a college fair for confused kids like myself. As I was walking amongst all of the tables, my eye caught three very important words, “in St. Louis.” I noticed the rep at that particular table had no one currently speaking with him. As a major Cardinals’ baseball fan and someone who feels sorry for people who get ignored as much as he was, I decided to go chat him up. The conversation that followed had a profound impact upon me, and Wash. U. imme-

diately became my number one choice. I tell people now that the Cardinals are the reason that I am at Wash. U., which in some ways is very true. Had it not been for that simple impulse to go and talk sports with the rep, I may never have discovered our wonderful school. And it is on this point I want to offer some advice: be open to any opportunities, great or small, that present themselves. You never know how a chance conversation could impact the rest of your life. I would imagine that many from the class of 2015 are coming in with set plans. Whether

you are pre-med, pre-law, or set to be the next great architect, I hope that at some point during your time at Wash. U. you are forced to seriously reconsider the path you are ready to follow. Your college experience is whatever you choose to make it, and I hope that it will be a time for exploration and discovery, not simply a means to an end. There are so many opportunities at Wash. U. to expose yourself to new ideas and different people. With over 300 student groups that range in activities from slam poetry to padded sword fighting, you will be able to find someone else who shares

your interest or discover an interest you never knew you had. With over 1500 incoming classmates, you will have the chance to meet a large and diverse group of talented people. I encourage you to talk to someone new every day over the course of your first semester. You will not be disappointed by the conversations that ensue, and you never know the impact you could have on that person or they could have on you. John Harrison York is a senior in Arts & Sciences and the Student Union President. Write to John Harrison at jhyork@wustl.edu.

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JOHN HARRISON YORK | OP-ED SUBMISSION

W Clas elcome s of 2 015!

Best WU Jansport Best WU geargear fromfrom Nike, Nike, Jansport & more! & more! School Supplies * Dorm Supplies * We School Supplies * Dorm Supplies * W e have it! have it! Located near YOUR Dorm in Umrath House

Located near Y O U R Dorm in Umrath House

Orientation Bonus * Thursday & Friday

Orientation Bonus * Thursday & Friday

Get a free gift with your in store purchase: WU KEYCHAINS * TOTES * MORE Get a free gift with your in store purchase: W U K Equantities Y C H A I NS * D E C A LS * M O R E (While last)

(While quantities last)

Store Hours*: Mon-Fri: 10:30am - 8pm !"#$%&'#($)*+&,#-./$0+&12+3245&.&675& Sat: Noon - 8pm, Sun: Noon - 5pm !4"+&8##-&.&6759&!(-+&8##-&.&:75& *Hours extended for Orientation *Not affiliated with Campus Store "#$%&'!()*(+,(,!-$&!.&/(+*0*/$+!!!"1$*!0--/2/0*(,!3/*4!5067%'!8*$&(!

Bear Necessities is a not for profit store operated by the Women’s Society of Washington University !"#$%&"'"(()*)"(%)(%#%+,*%-,$%.$,-)*%(*,$"%,."$#*"/%01%*2"%3,4"+5(%6,')"*1%,-%3#(2)+7*,+%!"#$%&'#()* All of our proceeds fund scholarships & student projects +,,*-.*-/&*0&-1%%2'*./"2*'13-,4&'3#0'*5*'(/2%"(*0&-6%1('*


42 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

Some advice you might not have heard yet forum

MICHAEL OFFERMAN | OP-ED SUBMISSION

G

et excited to begin the most exciting four years of your life!” “You are going to change the world with your research and your passions!” “You can completely redefine who you are! Go explore what you love!” All of these things are completely true. These will be the best years of your life, and you can change the world, but I bet you are getting sick of hearing that over and over. Instead of writing another motivational pep talk about how to throw your inhibitions to the wind, and find your true friends, here are a few things I wish I had learned earlier that hopefully will help you out: • Wash. U. is a training ground. This

is your opportunity to try whatever it is you wish to do upon graduation, on a smaller scale. • Chill > FroYo. (Frozen yogurt places near campus). • If you love your arteries and/or you have a slow metabolism, avoid Half&-Halves from Bears Den. • You can’t talk to people on the way to class if you are on a bike, and that’s lonely. Walk with friends! • Leggings are not pants. Don’t be fooled. • Explore the different neighborhoods of St. Louis. Some will write STL off as a boring Midwest city, but it has some amazing hidden gems and you will come to love it. • We have the best administrators and staff on this campus, and they all

want to help you. Ask for help and it will make all the difference. • There is an ice cream machine on the third floor of the DUC! (Surprise! There is a third floor in the DUC). • Don’t ever complain about the quality of food on campus. It’s amazing college food. (Take the metro to SLU if you need proof) • A wise alum once said to me: “Too many people on this campus do four or five things inadequately. Do one or two really well and make it yours.” • You don’t say the definite article “The” in “The Bear’s Den.” You just say “Bear’s Den.” Also acceptable is “BD.” • You can sleep when you are dead. There is a ton to do in four short

years. Find a caffeinated drink of choice. • Try to do at least five new things in Forest Park each semester (Balloon Glow, Ice Skate, Zoo, Planetarium, Muny, Art Museum, etc) • You will never actually see a butterfly in the Elizabeth Danforth Butterfly Garden. It’s all a façade. • My final thought (and I apologize if it’s a little cliché): Don’t be hubristic, you have equal potential as everyone else on this campus. Make yourself who you want to be and someone you are proud to be. Don’t be afraid to push the envelope a little bit. Michael Offerman is a senior in Architecture and the Olin School of Business. Write to Michael at offerman@wustl.edu.

A welcome to the class of 2015 from the Chancellor

W

elcome to the Class of 2015! I am delighted that you will be making Washington University your new home. You are talented and accomplished, and you have the potential to make a positive difference in the world. We are fortunate to have you join us, and we are pleased that you have selected one of the world’s premier research universities as your residence for the next four years. I look forward to our Academic Convocation on August 25. Students are at the heart of Washington University. They contribute not only to our culture and identity, but they also influence our academic enterprise by sharing new ideas and engaging in critical thought and dialogue. I hope that you will take advantage

CHANCELLOR MARK WRIGHTON | OP-ED SUBMISSION

of the many opportunities that will be presented to you to create and disseminate new knowledge. We are here to nurture your intellectual growth. The University is also a place where you will grow socially and emotionally. Nearly all of you will spend your first year in one of Washington University’s residential colleges located on the South 40. Your new friends come from many different backgrounds and experiences. This diversity is one of our great institutional strengths. I encourage all of you be open to new ideas and let others challenge how you view the world in which you live. You will learn a great deal from your classmates, both inside and outside the classroom. This is one of the rewards of a residential college experience. Washington University is a great

university located at the geographic center of the vibrant and historic St. Louis metropolitan area. Your free Metro Pass will allow you to visit St. Louis’ attractions via one of two MetroLink stations, conveniently located adjacent to the Danforth Campus. I hope you will also consider using your Metro Pass to find ways to engage in service to the greater community. The Richard A. Gephardt Institute for Public Service is one of many Washington University programs that offer students the opportunity to contribute their time and talents to the community. You join Washington University at a wonderful time. We are executing our Plan for Excellence with our goal being to “enhance our global leadership today to benefit the world tomorrow.” A key objective is to continue to strengthen the

undergraduate experience. More than any other time in our history, undergraduate students are pursuing international academic opportunities as a part of our University study abroad programs. For those who are interested in government or national politics, the Washington University program in Washington, D.C. offers an outstanding opportunity for students to learn in the nation’s capital. There are countless organizations, ranging from fraternities and sororities, to a cappella singing groups that are counting on you for your time and leadership. You might also enjoy intercollegiate athletic events as a participant or spectator! Again, welcome to Washington University! You have my very best wishes for continued success in our community of learning and discovery.


STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 43

The Campus Card is a cashless payment method that allows students to make purchases on campus through the use of their University ID card. Students are able to add dollars to their Campus Card Account via Guest Deposits with a credit or debit card or through WebSTAC - an online student management system. Students are then able to swipe their Campus Card at numerous locations throughout campus, and the corresponding dollar value will be subtracted from their balance. Where is the Campus Card accepted?

Campus Store - Mallinckrodt Center Student Union - over 200 student groups participate Edison Theatre Bear Necessities - Umrath Hall Congress of the South 40 Wash-U-Wash & Wydown Water - Gregg Hall All campus dining locations Various vending locations All campus laundry facilities Printing at campus libraries and print labs

Visit card.wustl.edu Call 314-935-8800 Or toll free 1-855-935-8800 Email

campuscard@wustl.edu


studlife

44 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

Student Life Student Life was founded in 1878 and is Washington University’s independent student newspaper. It is one of the oldest collegiate newspapers in the country. Student Life is devoted to making sure students are informed about campus, student and university news. Student Life is divided into five sections—news, forum, sports, scene and cadenza—and comes out Monday and Thursday each week. Student Life has won multiple Pacemaker Awards, the collegiate equivalent of a Pulitzer, most recently for the 2008-2009 year. Its offices are located on the third floor of the DUC—you’re always welcome to stop by!

Student Life photographer Matt Mitgang and reporter Michelle Merlin covered a rally under the arch in support of Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign.

MATT MITGANT | STUDENT LIFE

NEWS News is the driving force behind any newspaper, and Student Life is no exception. Newsworthy events happen around campus every minute of every day. In one news cycle alone, one club may be organizing its largest event of the year and another may be bringing a national political figure to campus —all while the University announces a policy change that will affect the student body. Finding the appropriate balance of news stories and creating a twice-weekly paper is the product of countless hours of writing, researching and designing on the part of the news staff.

MATT MITGANT | STUDENT LIFE Student Life was on scene with reporters and photographers when a small fire broke out in Bear’s Den in December 2010, arriving five minutes before the Fire Department.


STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 45

Staff Columns: Columns reflect the opinions of their writers, not of Student Life as a whole. Members of the Forum section are free to write about any subject in their columns, so long as they maintain a certain level of professionalism and quality. Ad hominem attacks and libelous statements are not permitted. SNOW POWERS | STUDENT LIFE

FORUM Forum is Student Life’s opinions and editorial section. It is composed of staff editorials, staff columns, letters to the editor, op-ed submissions and editorial cartoons. As an independent newspaper, Student Life’s editorial pages are solely under the control of the Student Life staff. In forum, students can read opinions about a variety of issues, ranging from a new campus policy, politics (local and national), an event that’s about to take place or even an article or column already published in Student Life. The editorial staff is kept separate from the news staff. Members from the news section are not welcome to contribute to staff editorials, and if students are interested in writing for both then they must cover entirely different issues in each section.

Letters to the Editor: Letters are short reader responses to content in Student Life or a news event. Letters will not be edited except for grammar and spelling. Like Op-Eds, letters cannot contain libelous statements or ad hominem attacks.Student Life reserves the right to publish or not publish any letter. Letters should be no more than 300 words. To submit a Letter to the Editor, e-mail it, along with your name, to letters@studlife.com. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Op-Ed Submission: An Op-Ed is an opinion article written by any member of the University community and submitted to Forum for publication. Student Life will only edit it for grammar and spelling; no content changes will be made by the newspaper to any submission unless directed by the author. Op-Eds typically discuss recent news events, both on campus and in the outside world. Some Op-Eds are also written as responses to staff editorials or columns. While Student Life welcomes all submissions, we reserve the right to publish or not publish Op-Eds as we deem fit. If we receive several submissions on the same topic, we can only publish a select few. Please send your Op-Ed submission, along with your name, year/position and e-mail address to forum@studlife. com. An editor will respond to let you know whether or not the Op-Ed will run.

Pathem puzzles will run in the puzzle section of every Student Life issue starting August 25th along with Crossword and Sudoku. Solution is on page 52.

www.UrbanSafetySolUtionS.com

studlife

Forum, in focus Staff Editorial: Staff editorials reflect the opinion of the newspaper and its staff. Once a week, the Editorial Board meets to discuss various issues facing campus and to decide on what the staff editorials should say. The board democratically chooses its topics; each member has an equal vote. After choosing topics, the E-Board then debates all sides of the issues at hand and formulates a position. Members who have a conflict of interest in a matter are asked to remove themselves from that particular staff editorial. One member of the board, typically either a Forum editor or managing editor, then writes up the editorial and e-mails it to the rest of the board for editing or further comments.


46 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

studlife

CADENZA

MATT MITGANG | STUDENT LIFE Student Life sports and photo staff members flew to Cleveland, Ohio to cover the volleyball team’s victory in the 2009 NCAA championship match.

SCENE

Cadenza is Student Life’s Arts & Entertainment section. Cadenza reporters write reviews of movies, tv shows and music. Whether you fancy yourself more cultured than everyone else or you just have a quirky take on entertainment, then Cadenza is for you. Reporters can even get free tickets to shows to review concerts, go to movie screenings, and even fly out to LA to interview movie stars! Cadenza also includes longer feature articles, including the “Oscar Picks,” fall preview of theater lineups and in-depth coverage of the biannual W.I.L.D. (Walk In, Lay Down) concerts on campus. Aside from the traditional movie and album reviews, writers have contributed critiques of art exhibits and video games.

Scene is the features section of Student Life. Its reporters write more personal stories or stories about campus trends, student activities, fashion alerts, clubs and the goings on of Greater St. Louis. Scene writers are encouraged to explore St. Louis, participate in a wacky activity or experience a day in the life of someone else and then write about the experience. Scene has also tackled more weighty subjects such as student mothers, campus diversity and the issues surrounding rape and consent.

CARTOONS & GRAPHICS Here’s a fun fact: Mike Peters, the man behind Mother Goose and Grimm, once worked for Student Life. And if you like to draw, you can too! Student Life features an assortment of graphical elements to enhance and accompany stories. These include graphics, infographics, cartoons, comics and illustrations. Over the past few years, Student Life’s cartoonists and illustrators have won numerous awards for their work. Forum also includes editorial cartoons, which show the opinion of the illustrator, and also graphics that go along with columns.

PHOTO

SPORTS Are you a sports nut? Knowledgeable in a sport you used to play? Come be part of a winning team in Student Life’s sports section. Become a true Washington University sports fan and see just how fantastic Division III sports are. Sports writers can even have the opportunity to travel with various teams to away games. Typically, a sports reporter covers one varsity sports team for the entire season. These articles are complemented by features about club and intramural teams as well as individual athletes.

Student Life features award-winning photography captured by both advanced amateurs and novices alike. The photo section, comprised of a senior editor, section photo editors and staff photographers, visually illustrates every section of the paper, except Forum. Whether it’s breaking news, the latest basketball game or a colorful dance performance, Student Life’s photographers are on the scene. Student Life also publishes photo essays, spreads and slideshows.

 Student Health Services (SHS) We’re here for you!

Location: Habif Health & Wellness Center (in Dardick House on the South 40)

Services: Medical, Mental Health, and Health Promotion Services (all healthcare needs should be addressed with a student healthcare provider prior to going to any provider in St. Louis unless it is an emergency.) Come to SHS if you have an illness, injury, or mental health concern, or for information about healthy decision making. Web site: http://shs.wustl.edu (services, hours, etc.) Phone: (314) 935-6666 (after hours, a nurse will answer.) Deadline for submitting your Health History, Immunization, and Meningitis information online via the SHS Student Portal: 9/30/11. Go to http://shs.wustl.edu and follow the link to the Incoming Students page for instructions and required immunizations. Insurance: As a part of the Student Health Fee, you are enrolled in the Student Health Insurance Plan (see web site). This plan requires you to have referrals for all healthcare providers while you are in St. Louis. SHS will provide you with any necessary referral.

                         

   


MORE FIRE COVERAGE ONLINE

ABSINTHE SCENE, PAGE 6

BASKETBALL SPORTS, PAGE 8

STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 47

the independent newspaper of Washington University in St. Louis since 1878

Wednesday, December 8, 2010

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Vol. 132, No. 39

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www.studlife.com

JOSH GOLDMAN & JOHANN QUA HIANSEN STUDENT LIFE STAFF

CAROLINE AWH CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Olin Library will soon take steps to prevent burglary by making laptop locks available for checkout. After last year’s spike in laptop thefts from the library, former Student Union Senator senior Eric Schwartz has been working with the library administration to find a solution to this problem. The thefts occur when students leave their computers unattended and take a break to head to the bathroom or to Whispers, the first-floor café. Schwartz was the student liaison to the library last semester. “One thing that was brought up by several people was that it would be nice if when you’re there working you could have some way to leave your laptops secure,” MATT MITGANG | STUDENT LIFE

ABOVE: Richmond Heights firefighters enter South 40 House Tuesday evening after an electrical fire in an industrial ice machine triggered a building-wide evacuation. Three firetrucks from the Richmond Heights and Clayton fire departments responded to the call. BELOW: Washington University police officer Kimberly Chaitman blocks off the main entrance to Bear’s Den with caution tape. No injuries were reported in the incident. running out of the area,” sophomore Armando Matias said. “I couldn’t hear what they were saying, but they were panicking. I

didn’t understand what was going on. They were tapping the fire

SEE FIRE, PAGE 7

Matt and Kim to play WUStock MOLLY SEVICK CADENZA REPORTER Matt and Kim, the popular Brooklyn-based indie duo, are coming to Washington University this April to headline this year’s WUStock. The group has been active since 2004, when its adorable members Matt Johnson and Kim Schifino (now husband and wife) met at Brooklyn’s Pratt Institute. If there is one thing Matt and Kim know how to do, it’s draw in an audience. Whether it’s Matt’s enthralling and peculiar lyrics or Kim jumping on top of her stool that grabs your attention, it’s certain that not one audience member will be left standing still. Matt and Kim shows are a lively affair—hollering, dancing, and full-on merriment are expected and encouraged. They will be the perfect soundtrack to the hilarious and slightly childish activities encouraged by WUStock, which in the past have included bullriding, jousting and rolling around in a giant hamster ball. Although their first album, the self-titled “Matt and Kim” (2006), went relatively unnoticed, its release earned the band some local recognition and gave listeners a hint of what they were capable of becoming: the dancepunk-duo that struck gold with their sophomore effort, “Grand.” Though the album was released in January of 2009, its tracks (most notably the synthesizer fueled “Lessons Learned” and “Good Ol’ Fashion Nightmare”) powered many students’ go-to summer playlists for the past two years. The band’s latest album, “Sidewalks,” was released just last month and contains such gems as the hip-hop laced “Cameras” and “Silver Tiles.” “Tiles” grants

Washington University in St. Louis

COURTESY OF RIGHT ON! PR

THE ALBUMS

Matt & Kim

2006

Grand

TRACKS TO DOWNLOAD a nostalgic look back to Matt and Kim’s humble beginnings, as it was the first song the two wrote together. It’s been a regular feature at their shows, but “Sidewalks” marks its first professionally recorded appearance. For those who listen to Matt and Kim on a regular basis, congratulations. You’ll be well prepared in the spring. The rest of the student body has homework to do. When you return home for Christmas festivities, take an hour to get to know this amazing band. Unplug your earbuds and let Kim’s

2009

Sidewalks

2010

f ‘Daylight’ f ‘Lessons Learned’ f ‘Cameras’ f ‘Silver Tiles’ unapologetic, messy drum lines and Matt’s unadulterated voice fill your room, and don’t fight the smile that will undoubtedly work its way onto your face. And to anyone convinced that Matt and Kim “isn’t their thing?” I’ve got a special assignment just for you: go home, listen to “Daylight,” and just try to keep from tapping your foot to the beat. Go on. I dare you. WUStock takes place April 9 in the Swamp.

Write to Molly Sevick at MOLLY.SEVICK@STUDLIFE.COM

Schwartz said. The library has already ordered a dozen laptop locks, according to Shirley Baker, vice chancellor for scholarly resources and dean of University libraries. These locks will be advertised the locks as part of a pilot program as soon as the shipment arrives, and if students use them, the library will order more. The locks cost about $50 each and are funded through the library’s technology budget. They will be free for checkout from Olin Library’s circulation desk. Some students are looking forward to the locks. “It’s really inconvenient to have to take my laptop down to Whispers when I want to get some

SEE LAPTOPS, PAGE 7

Students present resolution to UN Call for reduction in carbon emissions signed by American, Chinese negotiators MICHELLE MERLIN SENIOR NEWS EDITOR A climate resolution that students at Washington University and China’s Fudan University wrote last month received a stamp of approval in Cancun from two key negotiators at an ongoing U.N. conference about climate change. Eleven members of Washington University Students for International Collaboration on the Environment (WUSICE) and 11 students from Fudan University had drawn up the resolution at a mock climate conference on the Danforth campus in November. WUSICE flew the Chinese students in with the express purpose of creating an international dialogue. Last weekend, WUSICE members Summer Jiakun Zhao and John Delurey, both juniors, traveled to Cancun to garner as much support for the resolution as possible. The conference they attended, which runs through Friday, is part of the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change, and it aims in part to address the upcoming expiration of the Kyoto Protocol, a landmark 1997 climatechange agreement. Zhao and Delurey spent their time trying to get top negotiators and media to look at their memorandum. The highlight for the two students was when they ran into the top Chinese negotiator, Su Wei, and then the top U.S. negotiator, Jonathan Pershing, walked by. Both negotiators signed the students’ document at the same time, and though Delurey says that the delegates hadn’t read it, they encouraged the international collaboration that it represented. “They signed just to encourage this kind of dialogue,” Delurey said. Su Wei wrote, “You are really doing great things. Keep doing.” Pershing wrote, “Only through continued dialogue can we find solutions.”

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The students’ resolution calls for a set target maximum level of atmospheric carbon dioxide at 450 parts per million. ZHAO Currently, carbondioxide levels are nearing 400 parts per million. It also calls for international collaboration to develop cleaner DELUREY energy forms, and PHOTOS for the formation COURTESY OF of a committee SUMMER ZHAO charged with measuring and enforcing energy standards. “It’s essentially just the compromise, or at least the understanding, between the U.S. students and Chinese students that we had flown in,” Delurey said of the resolution. Zhao, who will be in Cancun for until the conference concludes on Friday, was accredited by the Sierra Club, a U.S. environmentaladvocacy group. “The whole conference is overwhelming, just in sheer number of people there and the diversity of people,” Delurey said. “There are literally people from 190 nations, so a lot of different languages are being spoken and there are constantly different meetings and discussion sections going on. It was chaotic, but it was an incredible learning experience.” People who saw the two negotiators signing the students’ resolution appreciated the students’ work. “People were joking that that’s the most progress that will come out of the conference and that both of them were signing the same sheet of paper,” Delurey said. Even though the two major negotiators didn’t read the students’ resolution, Delurey still said he thinks WUSICE’s work is important. “China and the U.S. are pretty much the biggest players and negotiators in this negotiation, and we were able to help undergrads see eye to eye,” he said. With additional reporting by Josh Berry and Puneet Kollipara

Write to Michelle Merlin at MICHELLE.MERLIN@STUDLIFE.COM

Presentation counts. Headlines can attract a reader’s attention, but so too can the way the articles are laid out on the page. Graphics, colors and the placement of articles on a page differentiate each page from the next and make the newspaper more appealing. Think of it as an advertisement for the articles: you make the newspaper look good and people will want to read it. Designers ensure that readers don’t become confused by awkward jumps to different pages or pictures seemingly placed with the wrong article.

COPY The copy editors are some of the last people in the newspaper production line. While they may not have bylines or get very much credit, copy editors play an important role for the paper. In fact, the better the job they do, the less they are noticed. Readers can sometimes focus on one spelling or grammatical mistake and forget about the point of the article—copy editors try to make sure that doesn’t happen. The work put into writing and designing the paper can fall apart if it is poorly presented, so copy editors are sort of a last line of defense against errors.

studlife

Fire closes Bear’s Den An electrical fire in the Bear’s Den kitchen forced evacuation of the dining hall and all of South 40 House at around 9:35 p.m. Tuesday evening. No injuries were reported. The motor in one of the ice machines in the kitchen shorted and caused the fire. Reports of damage were mixed. “The damage to the facility is zero, except for the ice machine,” said Nadeem Siddiqui, resident district manager for Bon Appétit. According to Washington University police Sgt. Ron Newbold, the sprinkler system was activated, extinguishing the fire, and there was water and smoke damage. Eyewitnesses said that a Bon Appétit employee burst out of the kitchen asking for assistance, after which chefs shouted for everyone to “get out of the building.” Smoke accumulated in the kitchen beyond the Mexican and world food stations. “Some woman started yelling, ‘Fire, fire,’” freshman Campbell Rinard said. “It was fairly intense.” A Bon Appétit chef rushed to the fire with an extinguisher, according to Rinard and other eyewitnesses. “I was waiting for a sandwich, but then these workers came

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Library to offer locks for laptops

DESIGN

ONLINE The online editor and his or her staff is responsible for the design and upkeep of Student Life’s website, studlife.com. The online staff works with the section editors to find innovative ways to display content online. The online editor also develops in-house plugins to support publishing the website using our WordPress backend.

MULTIMEDIA Members of the various sections work with the Director of Multimedia to find and create innovative ways to tell stories in non-written formats both online and in print. Through audio slideshows, video and interactive content, stories can be presented to readers in more interactive forms.

Washington University Campus Store Mallinckrodt Center | 314-935-5500 | wubookstore.com


studlife

48 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

Student Life Staff Michelle Merlin EDITOR IN CHIEF

Michelle Merlin hails from Avon, Conn., and, being from the northeast, does not buy into the sandwich method of criticism. She enjoys Russian literature (along with AE Alex Dropkin), and will probably make you watch a YouTube video of her dog barking at deer. Michelle hates when prepositions are used incorrectly, metaphors are extended and commas are overused. She has been with Student Life since Freshman Press, Student Life’s pre-orientation program. In her past life she wrote for news. When Michelle isn’t working on Student Life, she can be found in the office not working, eating ice cream from the ice cream machine located on the third floor of the DUC (right next to the office) and sleeping.

Alex Dropkin ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Alex Dropkin, your one and only (also favorite) Associate Editor, comes from Farmington Hills, Mich. This senior, a former sports editor, is a general enthusiast and Student Life fanatic; among other things, he enjoys Russian Literature (along with EIC Michelle Merlin) and going on adventures. He has a strong penchant for spicy food. Alex often spends his time watching ESPN, cheering on Detroit sports teams or listening to obscure bands that you’ve probably never heard of. He likes both cats and dogs, Internet videos of both cats and dogs, but not the 2001 film Cats & Dogs; he also dislikes wordiness and not using the inverted pyramid. He can almost always be seen wearing Birkenstock sandals, even in the winter.

Alan Liu

MANAGING EDITOR

Alan Liu is a senior from Joplin, Mo., which is a good four and a half hour drive from St. Louis. He is a triple major in Finance, Economics & Strategy, and International Business and spent last semester abroad in London. Alan has been writing for Student Life since Freshman Press and previously wrote for News. Alan can be found in his natural habitat in the business school undergraduate lounge, and has the unfortunate habit of taking naps in public.

Hannah Lustman MANAGING EDITOR

Hannah Lustman is a junior from St. Louis, Mo. (maybe you’ve heard of it). She loves Rams football (especially Sam Bradford), Art Hill and will fight anyone who insists her hometown isn’t awesome. Hannah started her StudLife Life (hah, get it?) as a Freshman Presser and has enjoyed getting to know the stories of many Wash. U. students and faculty. She spent two years covering the men’s soccer team and a year and a half as sports editor and section mom. Aside from that she writes some news articles and editorials. If Hannah isn’t prolonging her day in the StudLife office by doing more socializing than working, she might be on Ruby 3 where she is an RA, helping with a psychology research project or getting a milkshake at Coffee Cartel with friends. Likes: crime TV shows, telling stories (even if she’s not the best at that), college basketball, and NPR podcasts. Dislikes: doing the dishes and regular soda. That means you too, Coke Zero.


STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 49

Mary Yang DESIGN CHIEF

Matt Mitgang

DIRECTOR OF MULTIMEDIA

Chloe Rosenberg SENIOR NEWS EDITOR

Daniel Deibler

SENIOR FORUM EDITOR

studlife

Mary Yang is from Katy, Texas (yeehaw). She delights in froyo, bubble tea, classical music and clean design. Her dream is to one day buy an island in the Thousand Islands and live in a castle. When Mary isn’t in the Student Life office, you can find her chasing after the bunnies on campus, playing her ukelele or training for a marathon.

Kurt Rohrbeck

SENIOR SPORTS EDITOR

Matt Mitgang is a senior Computer Science major from San Diego, Calif. He can frequently be found simultaneously in multiple locations on campus with unnecessarily large amounts of camera gear. Matt has been a member of the Student Life staff since his freshman year. Before becoming Director of Multimedia, he served as Senior Photo Editor on three separate occasions. His favorite animals are polar bears and he strongly dislikes avocados.

Chloe Rosenberg is the Senior News Editor. She is a senior from New York City, and is double-majoring in Math and Political Science. She has written for the News Section since the first semester of her Freshman year. At home, Chloe recently came to possess a hairless dog.

Andie Hutner

SENIOR CADENZA EDITOR

Sahil Patel

SENIOR SPORTS EDITOR

Daniel Deibler is from the beacon of civilization, more commonly known as New York City. He came to St. Louis because the overall better demeanor of the Midwest called out to him. Also, he heard they had tornadoes, which he really should be afraid of by now. He enjoys running and making up excuses as to why he shouldn’t run, as well as ranting about the insanity found in certain classic children’s films. He has worked at Student Life since Freshman Press. When Daniel isn’t working at Student Life he can be found screaming while running away from insects.

Davis Sargeant SENIOR SCENE EDITOR

Kurt Rohrbeck is from Devon, Pa. He is a huge Philadelphia Eagles, Phillies, Flyers, and 76ers fan, and is an Eagles season ticket holder since childhood. He obviously is a terrible person who enjoys throwing snowballs at Santa Claus. He is fascinated by Google Maps, and his only trip outside of the United States was a trip to Israel back in freshman year - a fact that he finds fairly ironic, given that he isn’t actually Jewish. He has been involved with the sports section of Student Life since his arrival on campus when he participated in the Freshman Press Pre-O program. When not working with Student Life, Kurt is either with Dance Marathon Exec, Alpha Phi Omega, working on his next assignment due or watching sports on the computer. You can probably guess which one is more likely.

Sahil Patel is a sophomore from Houston, Texas, who, above all else, loves sports. Being a Texans fan, he is often found sulking around the South 40 on Sundays in the Fall following yet another heartbreaking loss. As a result, he enjoys holding vendettas against teams and athletes for little or no reason at all. Sahil has been a StudLifer since he was a freshman and has designed News and Forum, photographed one event, and was a Sports Reporter and Sports Editor. For the 10% of his life that does not revolve around sports, Sahil likes performing magic tricks, visiting museums, reading in strange places late at night and hunting and messily devouring the wild olive.

Andie Hutner comes from Glen Rock, N.J., a very small town whose selling point may be that it does not have a selling point, but it is close to NYC. She loves being the Cadenza editor because it gives her an excuse to watch TV and movies instead of studying, but also because it makes her win at entertainment-related trivia. Andie would rather take a long walk in Disneyland than a long walk on the beach, and would do anything in her power to avoid wearing socks, almost to the point of risking toe-hypothermia. She studies 20th century history and American culture studies, and unfortunately spends much of her non-Student Life time reading about those subjects. Andie has worked on Student Life since the beginning of her sophomore year, but wishes she started earlier.

Davis Sargeant is a junior from Williamsburg, Va. If he’s not writing for Student Life, he might be watching a movie at the Tivoli, playing tennis, biking around St. Louis, or just chilling with his friends. More likely, though, he’s catching up on either sleep or homework. His absolute favorite things in the world are apple pie, Las Meninas, chimpanzees, and Doctor Who marathons. Davis edits Scene, and previously wrote for Cadenza. He joined Student Life the spring of his freshman year.


50 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

Genevieve Hay

Lauren Cohn COPY CHIEF

Caro Peguero COPY CHIEF

Godiva Reisenbichler GRAPHICS EDITOR

studlife

SENIOR PHOTO EDITOR

Genevieve Hay is an English and American Culture Studies major from Charleston, S.C. After completing her first year as a JProg, she began shooting for StudLife the fall of her sophomore year. This semester will be her first as senior photo editor. When not working for StudLife, Genevieve enjoys listening to music that hipsters probably already discarded, Redditing, and exploring St. Louis. At home, she spends her time kayaking and jet skiing with her water-loving dog and wakeboarding.

Paula Lauris

SPECIAL ISSUES EDITOR

Special Issues editor Paula Lauris hails from the sunny state of California. As such, her favorite hobbies include reading in the grass, running through parks and going to farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; markets. She is also an avid traveler and enjoys exploring new places. Paula has a passion for finding the most fun and bizarre things to do in different cities and kindly coercing others to do them with her. When not in the Student Life office, Paula can usually be found wandering in the middle of nowhere, as she sadly has no sense of direction.

Lauren Cohn is from Glenview, Ill., a suburb a on the North Shore of Chicago. She is a fan of copy cows, writers who follow A.P. Style rules, cupcakes and eating the cheese she has stockpiled in her room. She can often be heard making sarcastic comments from across the room and talking about food, all while online shopping. If you need a restaurant recommendation, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your girl. At some point she will probably ask for your opinion on the clothing she is designing for her sorority and fraternity. Lauren has been copy editing, online producing, and successfully distracting those in the office since her sophomore fall, when she transferred to Wash. U. from the University of Missouri. She is also on a one-woman crusade to let the world know the difference between a macaron and a macaroon.

Caro is a senior Accounting and Spanish major from Miami, Fla., which is more humid than St. Louis. She has been a copy editor since her first freshman semester. She totally respects AP Style; however, she loves Oxford commas and cringes slightly every time she removes one from an article. Her favorite movie is "Legally Blonde," and she can quote it entirely. Caro is usually listening to music or obsessively reading food blogs, but, when not, she spends her time dreaming about Disney World, eating split pea soup, buying stuffed animals, watching TV Land, and generally confusing people who can't decide whether she is actually five or 80 years old.

More often than not, you can find Godiva Reisenbichler in studio, playing with some variation of dirt. And fire.

David Seigel

SENIOR ONLINE EDITOR

David Seigle is the mastermind behind studlife.com and is a senior. He is pale as he spends much of his time inside on computers. David Seigle, also known as Deigle, is nocturnal, in part because stays up until the paper is finished so he can put the PDF online because Michelle and Alex are not capable of doing it on their own without breaking something. The senior staff once made him a cake with his face on it to celebrate his greatness. He does not like English (he prefers Java). Deigle has been working on Student Life since his freshman year, but is only known by the late-night crew, who are the coolest people anyway. He also fancies himself something of a hipster.


STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE 51

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52 STUDENT LIFE | THE STARTING LINE

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HAVE TAKEN THE SUSTAINABILITY PLEDGE? Curious about what you can do to contribute to a ‘greener’ culture? Take the WUSTL Sustainability Pledge, and join the conversation on facebook and twitter! See inside (Page 4-5) for more details.

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SKIFF

TUESDAY, AUGUST 23, 2011 V o l u m e 110 â&#x20AC;˘ I s s u e 1

TCU DAILY

FROGS FIRST

3

New program targets freshmen and transfers.

Est. 1902

www.tcu360. com

NEW YEAR Milton community grows stronger after first year of renovation

Students walk up to the front of the Milton Daniel Hall which houses freshmen and honors students. The hall is celebrating its first anniversary of being open since the renovations on it were finished last fall.

TYLER SAMUELS / STAFF

MEET THE EDITORS 4

STUDY ABROAD 2

The Skiff staffers come from North, South, East and West.

Students should be safe from London unrest.


2

Tuesday, August 23, 2011 www.tcu360.com

STUDY ABROAD

London riots should not pose threat to study abroad students By Brett Musslewhite Staff Reporter

Participants in the TCU study abroad program in London this fall are well-prepared and should be safe despite the recent unrest in England’s capital city, Associate Director for the Center for International Studies Tracy Williams said. The study abroad program in London begins Sept. 15 , a month after a peaceful protest in North London turned into a violent riot, eventually spreading throughout the country. Residents organized the protest on Aug. 6 two days after a man was shot and killed by police. Williams said she had no “major concerns” about the impact of the riots on the London program. “My main concern when students go abroad for a semester is that they use their common sense and are really aware of their surroundings,” she said. Ben Hoskins, who plans to go to London this fall, said he felt comfortable with the situation. “I personally feel fine about it, and it sounds like it’s pretty much over,” Hoskins, a senior international economics major, said. “I think London is going to be safer post-riot than it might have been beforehand because people are in a heightened state of alert.” The University of Westminster, which hosts the students studying in London, has not been affected by the riots, Williams said. “Our concern is always the safety of our students,” she said. Every student who participated in the study

abroad program was required to take an online health and safety orientation course to prepare for their experience and to ensure their safety, Williams said. Kaitlin Cherry, a senior marketing major, said TCU prepared the students well for the semester. “TCU is definitely ahead of the pack with studying abroad,” Cherry said. “I feel I’ll most definitely be safe.” Karen Steele, professor of English and Women’s Studies, taught a class thissummer with the study abroad program in London and returned to the United States before the rioting occurred. Steele said she initially reacted to the riots with “horror, distress and confusion” but felt comfortable with TCU’s decision to move forward with the program. “I think TCU does a wonderful job of ensuring our students’ safety,” Steele said. “They would never send students on a program [if] they weren’t sure the students could be taken care of in a safe way.” She said crises such as the riots will not affect the overall participation in study abroad programs, especially in London. “I think students will continue to enroll because it is a world-class city, and it’s an extraordinarily safe city to be in,” Steele said. Cherry thought participation in the program would continue, and that events of this scale shouldn’t make a difference. “I don’t think people should be afraid to go out and try something new just because of a little bit of turmoil,” she said.

LEWIS WHYLD / ASSOCIATED PRESS

A masked protester hurls an object toward riot police officers in Tottenham, north London, on August 7.

LEWIS WHYLD / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Firefighters and riot police survey the area as fire rages through a building in Tottenham, August 7, as a demonstration against the death of a local man turned violent and cars and shops were set ablaze.

SIMON DAWSON / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Police arrest a man for looting in Clapham Junction in south London on August, as violence and looting spread across some of London’s most impoverished neighborhoods, with youth setting fire to shops and vehicles during a third day of rioting in the city that will host next summer’s Olympic Games.


www.tcu360.com Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Milton community expands

HOUSING AND RESIDENCE LIFE

Tyler Samuels Staff Reporter

Milton Daniel Hall, renovated in 2009, has outgrown its original nickname of “The Dungeon.” Now, after the first year of the new and improved Milton “Hilton,” Milton Daniel Hall Director David Stout said he and his staff were planning ways to make the community stronger. “In the first year of Milton Daniel, we really laid the foundation for our community,” Stout said. The Community Renewal program taught residents to care for their neighbor, he said. In his first year, Stout and his staff established several activities to bring this motto to life. To celebrate the holiday season, the Milton community held a Yule Ball similar to the one seen in the Harry Potter series, Stout said. Al-

most 200 residents dressed in prom-like attire and enjoyed a dance party with food, decorations and fun. This year, Stout said he hoped to have an even better turnout. Another residential activity included the Frog Film Competition, Stout said. Students from the John V. Roach Honors College created their own original films and watched them in the outdoor amphitheater with spectators, including Chancellor Boschini. Stout said the Milton community was also planning to have a new mentorship program this year between the upperclassmen on the third floor and the freshmen in the rest of the building. The program will help Milton Daniel continue to strengthen its relationship with the Honors College, he said. “Incoming freshman can look to the sophomores on the third floor to really help them

get acclimated to campus,” he said. The RA community at Milton Daniel was “incredible to work with,” Stout said. Despite outside activities, Honors College demands and class loads, Stout said his RAs were still able to produce high results. “They know their residents on really, really intimate levels,” Stout said. Bianca Castro,a strategic communication and Spanish double major, was one of the RAs who worked last year to assess the needs of her hallway. “Last year, a lot of my residents struggled with homesickness,” she said. Castro held a Girls’ Day In, birthday parties, and celebrations during the holidays, all designed to make the women in her hall feel comfortable and at home. Castro said she believed the residents of Milton Danielhad great relation-

ships with each other through her and other resident assistants’ help. Amberle Durano, a junior nursing major, said residents “really got the royal treatment from the Honors College.” , Durano lived in Milton Daniel last year and spoke highly of the staff and the activities held at Milton “Hilton.” Through the ice cream socials and other residential activities, Durano said the community of Milton Daniel grew closer and established lasting friendships. Though Milton Daniel has cast off its original nickname, Stout said both he and his staff constantly worked so that the aesthetics were not the only beautiful.part of Milton He wanted the closeness of the community to supercede the beauty of the building, he said. “Why would we settle for good when we can be great?” he said.

CAMPUS

New program targets freshmen and transfers By Patrice Greene Staff Reporter

Frogs First, a mandatory new program that serves as an incentive to push first-year students into the threshold of collegiate life, kicked off Thursday. The program will help freshman and transfer students become adjusted to the college environment and strengthen the TCU community, Assistant Director of Student Activities Kim Turner said. She said Frogs First is the largest small group based program at TCU. She said the class of 2015 was the first group of 2,200 students and student leaders to attend this four-day program taking place from Aug 18-21. The groups were organized by the residence halls, and included transfer students as well as incoming freshmen, according to the Frogs First website. Frogs First will focus on small group activities and a mentoring relationship between the group leaders, Turner said. She said the program will also give students an opportunity to meet one another before classes begin. Some of the activities for the first-year students were a Trinity River canoe trip, a visit to the Fort Worth Zoo and a private

shopping experience at Target. There is no cost for any of the events. “The idea for Frogs First has been in the works for years and has been a dream of mine, [student activities coordinator] Brad Thompson and the collaboration of an additional staff member Brett Phillips ,“ Turner said. In past years, TCU has hosted various Frog Camps and the Connections program geared toward fostering relationships between incoming freshmen. Both Frog Camp and Connections will continue on TCU’s campus. Frogs First differs from those two programs because the new program is geared toward freshmen, first year and transfer students, and there will be interaction between students in different sessions, Turner said. Junior accounting major, Lennesha Morgan, says she is looking forward to Frogs First and the arriving academic year. Morgan is an international transfer student from the British Virgin Islands . Orientation, Frogs First and other activities and events geared toward freshman and other first year students will help her open up and understand

KATIE TERHUNE / EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Michael Ridings, a freshman political science major from Tucson, Ariz., sits on a longhorn during the Frogs First picnic on Sadler lawn. Frogs First is a new program created to help incoming freshmen and transfer students adjust to life at TCU. The four day program ended Sunday with the Class of 2015 reception in the TCU Commons.

people from other cultures more, Morgan said. She said she was excited about the opportunity to become involved. “This opportunity comes once in a lifetime,” Morgan said. Freshman economics major Nikasha Chandhok, who is from India, said that International Orientation prepared for her things she would not have known otherwise and will help her to succeed at Frogs First and

her first academic year at TCU. Chandhok said TCU provides a “welcoming, warm, friendly and small” atmosphere. She is excited about her first year and sharing her culture and experiences with fellow Horned Frogs. “Before we’re members of student organizations, before we’re students from Texas or outside Texas, international students, American students, that we’re all Frogs first”, Turner said.

CAMPUS

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New online permit process proves efficient

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY ALYSON MORALES / STAFF

The new parking stickers for this year feature a new curved rectangle replacing the circular stickers from last year.

By Sneha Antony Staff Reporter

TCU Police’s parking and transportation services division has shifted from a paperbased application process to an online procedure, according to Janet Martin, administrative assistant for the TCU Police. Students can now sign up for their parking permits using their my.tcu.edu accounts, where a parking permit tab appears in the drop-down menu under the student center link. TCU Police notified students about the shift in application process, which began in May, via email late July. Sophomore criminal justice major Amy Preaux commented on the ease and straightforwardness of the new electronic permit process. Preaux said that when she filled out her parking permit application at the TCU Police Station last year, she did not know most of the vehicle registration information the application required. “I had to call my father because I didn’t know anything about my car,” she said. Martin said stories like Preaux’s were the main motivation that prompted the change to an online, computerized system for application registration and processing. “The main reason for the change was the convenience to the students. They could access it at home, 24 hours a day,” Martin said. “The new system helped the application process for both students and the TCU Police, with fewer students lining up at the police station to register for their permits this year,” she said. Under the new application system, students can pick up their parking permit stick-

ers at the TCU Police Station once their applications are submitted online. Senior business major Jason Moore said TCU should consider going a step further to make the process even more efficient and convenient by having the permit stickers mailed to a student’s TCU mailbox. “We still need to take the extra step. We need to use gas and drive to the TCU Police office to pick up our permits,” Moore said. Martin said since TCU is a campus with a small population, the current method of students picking up their permits at the TCU Police Station seemed more beneficial to students. Students got their permits right away and were also briefed on parking regulations on campus when they came to pick up their permits, she said. Both Preaux and Moore agreed the new online system was far better than the paperbased application process of the past and a good initiative toward the green movement on campus. While it was not the primary motivation for the change, the shift to a computerized system for parking permit application was yet another example of TCU’s environmentally friendly practices around campus, Martin said. The Princeton Review recognized TCU’s nearly two-decade long eco-friendly efforts by including TCU in its 2011 Edition of “Guide to 311 Green Colleges” on April 20. Martin said most students have responded positively to the change. “They love it. Both students and parents have repeatedly said that this is the easiest thing that they have done at TCU,” she said.


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Katie Terhune, Editor in Chief Helena, Montana

I’m a senior news editorial major. I love the Horned Frogs, hot weather, and getting tons of emails. In the rare moments that I am not in the newsroom, I’m usually down the street at the Fort Worth Judo Club. I have an apartment, but I plan to move into the newsroom so that nothing can happen that I don’t know about. After I graduate, I hope to become a crime reporter so I can chase ambulances around all day.

Matt Coffelt,

Multimedia Editor San Diego, California

Matt is a junior from San Diego, California who is going into his third year with the Skiff and the second year as multimedia editor. Upon stepping out of his car into 105 degree Texas weather, he realized that although ready for school to start back up, he would miss not needing to carry a gallon of water with him wherever he went.

Ryan Osbourne, Sports Editor

Lawton, Oklahoma

SKIFF TCU DAILY

Est. 1902

The TCU Daily Skiff is an official student publication of Texas Christian University, produced by students of TCU and sponsored by the Schieffer School of Journalism. It operates under the policies of the Student Publications Committee, composed of representatives from the student body, staff, faculty and administration. The Skiff is published Tuesday through Friday during fall and spring semesters except finals week and holidays.

news@dailyskiff.com

Circulation: 3500 Subscriptions: Call 817-257-6274 Rates are $30 per semester. Location: Moudy Building South Convergence Center, Room 212 2805 S. University Drive Fort Worth, TX 76109

Phone (817) 257-7428 Fax (817) 257-7133

COPYRIGHT All rights for the entire contents of this newspaper shall be the property of the TCU Daily Skiff. No part thereof may be reproduced or aired without prior consent of the Student Publications Director. The Skiff does not assume liability for any product and services advertised herin. The Skiff’s liability for misprints due to our error is limited to the cost of the advertising.

TCU Box 298050 Fort Worth, TX 76129

Distribution: Newspapers are available free on campus and surrounding locations, limit one per person. Additional copies are $.50 and are available at the Skiff office.

I’m a Sophomore journalism major from Lawton, Oklahoma. I grew up an avid fan of the Texas Rangers and jumped on the Thunder bandwagon when the team came to town in 2008. I played baseball for 13 years but now my athletic endeavors consist of the occasional (and mostly unsuccessful) attempt at golf. I wrote sports for the Skiff last year and I’m looking forward being even more involved as the sports editor this fall.

www.dailyskiff.com

STAFF Design Editor: Julie Susman Advertising Manager: Joanie Swearingen Student Publications Director: Robert Bohler Business Manager: Bitsy Faulk Production Manager: Vicki Whistler Director, Schieffer School: John Lumpkin


www.tcu360.com Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Brooke Crum,

Associate/Opinion Editor Mesquite, Texas

Brooke Crum is a Dallas girl trying to make it in this Fort Worth world. She transferred from SMU as a sophomore, trading in her pony for a blood-spitting Horned Frog. Now, she is a senior, studying news editorial journalism and philosophy. After graduation, she plans to rough it as a reporter or roam the world with the Peace Corps.

Chelsea Katz,

Managing Editor Richmond, Texas

I am a Junior this year and love playing and watching sports – especially baseball and football. I am a member of Diamond Darlings and had the opportunity to work in the Texas Rangers’ press box during the World Series games. I love Texas, but the United Kingdom has a special place in my heart after studying abroad. If I’m listening to music, it is probably country music.

Kim Burdi, News Editor

Ridgewood, New Jersey

Ashley Monismith, News Editor

Haughton, Louisiana

I’m a junior actuarial mathematics and news editorial double major. I was born overseas in Germany and lived there for five years. For the other 15, I’ve travelled around the U.S. Even though I’ve called many places home, my real home is where my family is—Louisiana. Once I graduate I hope to become an actuary and maybe even work somewhere I’ve never lived before. I also hope to write business articles on the side and let out my creative streak through writing.

Kim is a fist-pumping Jersey girl who fled from the land of tan, gelled-up Guidos. She’s got Jersey blood but a southern heart. The TCU Diamond Darling lives for the baseball season. Saying she loves the Texas Rangers is an understatement. Nolan Ryan was her childhood hero, but she openly has a crush on CJ Wilson (guess it’s a pitcher thing). Before she dies, she plans to visit all 30 major league baseball stadiums.

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CRIME

Second sexual assault incident reported on campus

By Travis Puckett Staff Reporter

and Staff reports TCU Police, already investigating a sexual assault reported last week, notified students Monday night of another attempt on a student. Sgt. Kelly Ham said in a campus-wide alert that a known aquaintance had attempted to sexually assault a student who resisted the assault. Ham said the suspect had been identified. TCU Police Chief Steven McGee said the suspect has been banned from campus and

would be arrested if the suspect returns. Earlier Monday TCU Police said the investigation of a sexual assault on a female student reported on Aug. 18 is ongoing but that no arrests have been made.A female student told police she had been sexually assaulted at a campus residence hall Sgt.Ham declined to comment on whether there was a suspect in the case. He declined tocomment if the student has decided to press charges, The Fort Worth StarTelegram reported that Fort Worth police said the woman

did not intend to press charges. Sgt. Ham would not disclose the location of the assault or include the students’ class rank. “I hope by putting out the Crime Alert people are made aware of what the law and a sexual assault is,” Ham said. Ham also stressed that “no” means “no” and an intoxicated person cannot give consent. However, he would not say whether that was the situation in this case. TCU had safety resources for students who did not feel comfortable walking back to their dorm at night, Sgt. Ham said. If a student felt

endangered they could call the TCU Police Department and ask for Froggie Five-O to come pick them up. Froggie Five-O was an escort service provided to students in order to help them feel safe on campus, he said. Ham said if it’s after Froggie Five-O hours the TCU Police department will escort students. There are also classes that students can take to learn how to defend themselves from a potential assualt. Rape Aggression Defense was a class taught by Pam Christian, a Crime Prevention Officer at TCU,

that helps show students how to properly defend themselves from a potential aggressor. Christian said she gave tips students could use to help avoid a situation that could lead to a sexual assualt. Christian said she wanted to make students aware that alcohol is the No. 1 date rape drug in America. “Drug facilitated assualts are on the rise, so you don’t want to leave your drinks unattended while you’re talking or dancing,” Christian said. She advised that if a drink tastes different or if it is suspected

something has been placed in their drink, then studentsget a new one regardless of whether or not the drink contained alcohol. For those students that wanted to get involved with the RAD. classes, Christian said she will send out an e-mail with the next scheduled class. RAD. and Froggie Five-O were resources that students could use to help them feel safe while on campus. There are also Emergency Response Stations all around campus where students can directly call the police station in case of an emergency.


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Riff ram!

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go frogs!

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Purple Reign!

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FOOTBALL

SKIFF ARCHIVES

Hundreds of fans and band members celebrating Frogs for the Cure form a ribbon at half time at the BYU game in 2010. This year’s video will be at the TCU - BYU game on Oct. 28 at Cowboys Stadium.

Frogs for the Cure will make a mark in a “flash” By Caressa Bateman Staff Reporter

If you want to be a part of the Frogs for the Cure flash mob dance, Thursday will be your last chance.The final video taping will take place in the Campus Commons from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. on Thursday. The video of the dance will be shown during the TCU football game at Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas, on Oct. 28. It will be the 7th annual Frogs for the Cure game benefitting Susan G. Komen for the Cure and spreading awareness about breast cancer. Frogs for the Cure began in

2005 as a football game fundraiser to collect donations, to spread awareness and to honor those who have battled breast cancer. Ann Louden, the Chancellor’s Associate for External Relations and chair of the TCU Frogs for the Cure committee, stated in a recent press release there will be a halftime flash mob video with 2,000 participants. “No school has ever done this before, not for a cause and not with 2,000 people in it,” Louden said. The participants included breast cancer survivors, celebrities, athletes, Fort Worth Mayor Betsy Price and mem-

bers ofthe TCU community, Louden said. “Every group we’ve rehearsed has just been so energized about this,” she said. “They’re thrilled to do something important for the community.” Tim Halperin, TCU alumnus and American Idol finalist, will be providing the music for the video with the song “We Fight Back,” which he composed and recorded himself, Louden said. In an email, she said “TCU’s Frogs for the Cure is a model program for Komen for the Cure,” and their national headquarters will also be participating.

“We are going to attract attention for TCU in corners near and far. And best of all, do this for a great cause,” Louden said. One group in particular that was taking part in helping out with Frogs for the Cure was the Residence Hall Association. Junior neuroscience major Haydee Izurieta said the role of the resident assistants was to “bring out [the] initiative to others students if they want to learn the dance to the flash mob.” Although she was not involved with this event last year, Izurieta said the flash mob helped people realize

why Frogs for the Cure was important. “It’s a good option for people to get more involved in the game and really become aware of what the Frogs for the Cure actually is, what it’s for and its main purpose,” she said. Senior modern dance major Jason Fowler isanother TCU student who will be participating in the flash mob and Frogs for the Cure event. Last year, Fowler helped choreograph the dance and worked closely with the Residence Hall Association. Fowler said this year the resident assistants taught the dance to residents who wanted to be part of the flash mob.


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CONSTRUCTION

Master plan makes campus more pedestrian friendly by Andrea Drusch TCU 360

Three parking garages, additional residence halls, and improved crosswalks are all part of a 2020 campus master plan for TCU. Renderings of the plan were posted on KillerFrogs. com last month. Drawn up by the Atlanta-based design firm of Perkins + Will, the plan would transform the campus over the next decade.

University spokeswoman Lisa Albert wrote in an email that the plan on Perkins + Will’s website was an older version of the plan that is currently under review by the university. Albert wrote that she did not know when a final plan would be released, and that it was too early to release details on any changes to the plans. “As with any dynamic university, TCU is constantly

“As with any dynamic university, TCU is constantly assessing its plans for the future, including its facilities master plan. TCU is reviewing the current plan to determine potential changes.” Lisa Albert

University Spokeswoman

assessing its plans for the future, including its facilities master plan. TCU is reviewing the current plan to determine potential changes,” Albert wrote. The renderings on Perkins + Will’s website include plans for three parking garages, additional residence halls where the health center currently stands and improved pedestrian cross walks. There’s also a bike path

around the university. To accomplish this, it calls for street closures on West Bowie (behind the GrandMarc) Princeton Street (between Moudy and Robert Carr Chapel) and Bellaire Drive (between Worth Hills and the football practice fields). University Drive would have four traffic-calming raised crosswalks, similar to the one on Cantey Street near Ed Landreth Hall. The campus rendering

shows a version of Worth Hills where Greek housing is condensed into two rows of town-houses. Pond Drive/ W. Devitt Street would be reopened to traffic. Stadium Drive would become a Boulevard with two lanes, a median, and raised crosswalks.

Visit www.tcu360.com to view the map of the master plan.

TODAY’S CROSSWORD

PATHEM

SUDOKU PUZZLE

Sponsored by:

Sponsored by:

Sponsored by:

How to play:

Check tomorrow’s paper for today’s crossword solution.

Spell the phrase in the grid above it, writing each unique letter only once. The correct solution will spell the complete phrase along a single continuous spelling path that moves horizontally, vertically and diagonally. Fill the grid from square to square - revisiting letters as needed to complete the spelling path in order. Each letter wil lappear only once in the grid.

Check tomorrow’s paper for today’s pathem solution.

Sample

Directions Fill in the grid so that every 3x3 box, row and column contains the digits 1 through 9 without repeating numbers. See Wednesday’s paper for sudoku and crossword solutions.

Check tomorrow’s paper for today’s sudoku solution.

GET TIPS AND MORE SOLUTIONS AT WWW.SUDOKU.COM


www.tcu360.com Tuesday, August 23, 2011

SPORTS

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Younger Hester embraces leadership role Ryan Rhoomes SPORTS

By Lauren Galippo Staff Reporter

The successful athletic journey of Fort Worth native Kristen Hester began in 6th grade. Despite growing up in a basketball family, Kristen and her sister, Irene, convinced their father that volleyball was the sport for them. Kristen joined a club volleyball team her sophomore year of high school and continued the sport into college. This season marks the first year during in her college career that Kristen,a senior communication studies major, will not be playing on the court with her sister. Former TCU volleyball outside hitter Irene graduated last fall and is now playing volleyball in Switzerland for the next 9 months. Kristen explains what this season will be like without both Hester sisters on the TCU volleyball team. How big of an impact did Irene have on easing the transition from high school to college? She made it easy because I would always come out and hang out with [the TCU volleyball players] so I knew the girls already. It couldn’t have been an easier transition. How did your bond as sisters help you on the court? We just know each other so well. Any time either one of us was frustrated, we knew how to make each other laugh or shake it off. She knows how to approach me and I know how to approach her better than anyone else. When you have

may not get opportunity to play with Frogs

“It’s fun and it’s really about showing by example. With everyone back I am more than excited, I can’t even explain it. I just can’t wait to get playing.”

By Ryan Osborne Sports Editor

Kristen Hester

A top TCU basketball recruit is under review from the NCAA about issues concerning academic eligibility, according to TCU Athletics Media Relations. According to a Newark’s Star-Ledger report, incoming freshman Ryan Rhoomes has been ruled ineligible for the upcoming season. The 6-foot-8-inch, 205-pound forward from Queens, NY signed with TCU in the summer and was set to begin classes Monday. However, according to his preparatory school president, his high school diploma may be invalid, the Star-Ledger reported. Alif Muhammad, the president and founder of NIA Prep High School, where Rhoomes played last year, told the Star-Ledger that NCAA officials informed him that the classes Rhoomes took last year were “not college preparatory.” Rhoomes tweeted Thursday night: “I’m not stressing it. I did what I had to do. It’s on Alif not me.” Three of Rhoomes’ NIA teammates were also ruled ineligible. Rhoomes attended the Newark, NJ school after graduating from Cardozo High School in 2010.

Senior communications major

something like that it really helps, because when you’re frustrated it can make it go away. Irene was one of the main leaders on the team, do you feel pressure to fill that leadership void? I don’t feel the pressure, it is more exciting for me to step into the senior leader role. It’s fun and it’s really about showing by example. With everyone back I am more than excited, I can’t even explain it. I just can’t wait to get playing.

SKIFF ARCHIVES

Kristen Hester, number 5, marks up opposing SMU at home during lastyear’s season.

tent and I work hard. I am working hard every day because it’s my senior year. I’m giving it my all.

How have you embraced being a leader on this team? Just leading by example is the main thing. Showing the newcomers what you need to do and making sure they’re not goofing off. They watch everything you do so you just have to make sure you lead by example.

How are you adjusting to not playing on the same team as Irene? Of course it is different, but I always joke with her, ‘it’s like you’re here, you’re up on the [gym wall] and I always look at you.’ We Skype still, and we have an application that lets us text for free.

What can your team expect of you as a leader this season? Excitement! I am really consis-

The team had two injuries at the end of last season, what did you learn from that?

This year we are definitely extra cautious. That’s our big thing this year, everyone needs to stay healthy. Stuff like that happens all the time. It’s crazy how it happens but it made us come together as a team. What are your goals for this season? We want to make the [NCAA Championship] and either win conference or the conference tournament. You’ll be able to tell our first tournament that we are doing so well. Everyone is stepping up and I definitely have high expectations for us.

SPORTS

The Frogs are making the NCAA Tournament a team goal By Kristina Rogers Staff Reporter

The TCU women’s soccer team has high expectations for the 2011 season with seven of their 11 starters returning Senior forward Jordan Calhoun, who holds the TCU all-time record for goals (29), said the ultimate goal for this season is to make it to the NCAA Tournament. “We want to go to the NCAAs this year,” Calhoun said. “We are the only team at TCU that’s never been.” Calhoun said last year’s team had the talent but were at times too inconsistent and lacked execution. “We just lacked the final ball, the final tackle you know this or that,” Calhoun said. “So I think this year we need to focus on finishing strong.”

Senior midfielder Alex Mechalske agreed with Calhoun. “Making sure everyone is focused on the same goal and making sure we all are focused on the same game plan,” Mechalske said. Last year, the team had different mindsets at the same time so it was difficult to get everyone together, she said. Mechalske played in all 19 games last season and scored TCU’s only two goals in a preseason match against Houston on Aug. 13. Mechalske, like Calhoun, will be relied upon as a top scorer for the Frogs. Mechalske said her mindset is to take advantage of every scoring opportunity she can. “I’m not much of one to be selfish,” Mechalske said. “But if you’re close, you got

PHOTOS COURTESY OF BRETT MUSSLEWHITE

Freshman midfielder Natalie Werner scores first career goal at TCU, putting the Frogs up 1-0 against Lamar Sunday.

to do what you got to do and shoot it.” Although Calhoun and Mechalske are top scorers, both know the importance of passing and finding the best available scoring op-

tion for each play. “I am always looking to go forward,” Mechalske said. “I love being crafty and all, but it’s about the best option for the team, the best pass for the team to be successful”.

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W E D NESDAY

Stadium construction update

SPORTS

T H U R S DAY

Season ticket sales approaching 21,000

PHOTO COURTESY OF ERIC RAMOS

Freshman forward Tori Hale watches the ball after being fouled by Lamar defender Nicole Frank. TCU defeated Lamar 2-0 on Sunday after losing to Oklahoma State 1-0 Friday night.

Soccer team splits pair of weekend games By Brett Musslewhite

“Sundays are never pretty games. They are the mental tests. We found a way to get a result and that’s what The TCU women’s soccer season got underway this weekend with a road loss to No. 7 Sundays are about: finding ways to Oklahoma State and a home win against Lascratch and claw results.”

Staff Reporter

mar. The Horned Frogs lost to the nationally ranked Cowboys 1-0 Friday, but they bounced back to beat the Cardinals 2-0 Sunday at the Garvey-Rosenthal Soccer Stadium. Head coach Dan Abdalla said the team fought hard and improved over the weekend. “Obviously you always want to try to come out with two wins, but I thought we got bet-

Dan Abdalla

TCU Head Soccer Coach

ter as the weekend went on,” Abdalla said. “We walked out of that game against a very good Oklahoma State team knowing that we had the ability to play at that level, and today

(Sunday) was a bit of a unique challenge.” “Sundays are never pretty games. They are the mental tests. We found a way to get a result and that’s what Sundays are about: finding ways to scratch and claw results,” Abdalla said. “Overall I was pleased with the effort.” The Frogs featured four true freshmen throughout the weekend, and Abdalla said they are a good addition to the team. “They’re going to be great for us,” he said. “It’s nice because I think we have a lot of great leadership with some of our older players. Having that balance of the maturity but also having some fresh new faces that bring a lot of pace and a lot of vigor to the game

can change things up so things are great.” Freshman midfielder Natalie Werner and redshirt freshman defender Brooke Kviz both scored their first goals as Horned Frogs Sunday against Lamar. The Frogs are 1-1-0 on the season and play against the Rice Owls this Friday at 7 p.m. at the Garvey-Rosenthal Soccer Stadium. Notes: Senior forward Jordan Calhoun, TCU’s all-time leading goal scorer, suffered an ankle injury in Friday night’s 1-0 loss to Oklahoma State and missed Sunday’s game against Lamar. Freshman forward Dixie Kurrus left the Lamar game early with an injury. Abdalla said he doesn’t know whether or not the injury is serious.


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