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S P OR T S

PAGE 6 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19,2010

BRIEF GYMNASTICS

Quakers recover from early injuries With a complete lineup, the Penn gymnastics team is heading into tomorrow’s meet at full strength. The Red and Blue will travel to Towson, Md., for the Shelli Calloway Invitational, where they will take on Towson, Cornell, Temple, and Ursinus. The team will be bolstered by

the return of freshman Dana Bonincontri, who has been out of competition after an injury spoiled the beginning of her season. “That’s a great addition coming back,” coach John Ceralde said. “She is our top freshman.” The return of the rookie will provide a boost to a team that proved its skill on bars last weekend against Brown and the University of Bridgeport in Providence, R.I. Penn performed well, going 6-for-6 in the event. They were

supported by a strong performance by freshman Kirsten Strausbaugh, who had careerbests in all of her events. While the Quakers will have to improve on the floor and on the beams, Ceralde believes his team is ready for the meet — in which it placed third out of four teams last year. “We’ve hit on all the events before,” Ceralde said. “We just need to hit them all at the same time and make a complete meet.” — Sima Golnabi

Penn faces two of Ivy’s worst D’s W. HOOPS from page 8 start to its conference schedule. According to senior cocaptain Sarah Bucar, there is no reason why it can’t. “We were a ver y young team, but that’s not an excuse anymore,” she said. “We’ve gone down to the wire a couple games, and I think we need to finally learn and carry over the experience we have gained this year.” Experience will certainly be a factor, since Penn saw both teams just three weeks ago. In order for the Quakers to reverse their fortunes against the Bears (6-16, 3-5), they’ll need to keep up with a Brown offense that put 61 points on the board last time around. It seems like a tough task for a Penn team that sits last in the League in scoring offense, but coach Mike McLaughlin knows his team will have its chances. “We’re looking to change a couple of our sets for Brown, to get better looks at the basket,” he said. “[Last time] I thought we defended them well and we just missed some opportunities.” It’s those missed opportunities that seem to have haunted

Joe Ovelman/DP File Photo

Sarah Bucar (2) chalked up 14 points against the Bulldogs in their first meeting on Jan. 29. She is averaging a team-high 8.8 points per game, the Quakers all season long. Despite an impressive rebounding display and shooting a season-best 45.5 percent from the floor last Saturday, Penn still fell to Columbia after failing to convert through its half-court offense down the stretch. If the Quakers can put the pieces together from last weekend’s road trip to Cornell and Columbia, they can pick up a second win on their waning season. By limiting turnovers, rebounding misses, and shooting a high percentage, they can exploit a defensively poor Bulldogs team (10-12,

5-3). McLaughlin understands that it’ll take much more than scattered flashes of brilliance to get a victory over Yale, which currently sits at fourth in the conference. “If we can utilize all the experience we have to this point, and put it all in one big package … I’m confident we have the right mind-set to be successful,” he said. With just seven games left in the season, now is as good a time as ever to show that Penn has learned from this season’s experiences.

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

Trinity after 12th straight squash title M. SQUASH from page 8 then square off against more familiar foes en route to Sunday’s final. Earlier this season, Penn came out on top over Franklin & Marshall, Navy and Williams. While this means the Penn team will mostly face opponents they know they can beat, senior captain Mark Froot urged caution. “If we do let our guard down a little bit, they could sneak out a 5-4 victory pretty easily,” he warned. “Not every match is going to be a walkover.” The structure of the tournament spares the Quakers an encounter with any of the teams that beat them in their last four matches, since the other five Ivy squads are competing in the A Division. Although the No. 2 Bulldogs will look to use their homecourt advantage to expand on their conference success, Thorpe-Clark doubted Yale could stop powerhouse Trinity from winning the Potter Cup for the 12th-consecutive year.

Pete Lodato/DP File Photo

Trevor McGuinness (left) won’t face Ivy foes like Princeton’s Kelly Shannon in the CSA championships this weekend, as Penn is the sole Ivy team in its Division. The Bantams demolished all of their prospective opponents for the weekend in the regular season, conceding only five games in 19 matches. First in line for stealing the defending champions’ thunder is University of Western Ontario, who beat Penn 5-4 back in November. The Mustangs have momentum behind them after winning their 27thstraight Ontario Universities

Athletics Championship last Saturday. While junior Porter Drake felt the Quakers deserved to be with the big guns in the A Division, his teammate McGuinness saw an opportunity to make up for their season finish. “ We’re all prett y eager to show that our Dartmouth loss was a fluke,” he said. “We want to take this weekend by storm.”

teammates came to the first meeting, about half the team was attending the sessions by season’s end. The brothers also remain actively involved with AIA around campus. “It’s a real blessing for me,” Gabe said. “We meet a couple times a week, and we get to be around other people who love athletics and love Jesus Christ.” The Burak brothers have been a blessing for the Penn wrestling program as well. Gabe, who is in his third year on the squad, took a starting position for the Quakers at the beginning of this year. And he hasn’t looked back since. “The thing you have to remember is that he’s playing up a weight class,” Eiter said. “He’s wrestling at 165, but last year he was Matt Dragon’s backup at 157.” “The success that he’s had is a direct result of how hard he’s trained,” EIter added. W h i le Gabe has slowly worked his way into the top 20 this year, success came far

more quickly for his younger brother Micah. “As soon as I saw him wrestling he impressed me,” Eiter said. “For a big guy he’s got great skills, he’s quick.” And as good as Micah has been this season, his potential might be even mightier. “He’s not even close to what he can do. To be honest with you, he could be a four time All-American — potentially our next national champ. He could be that good.” As the two head off to face Princeton and No. 8 Lehigh this weekend, you can bet there will be fans around campus saying their prayers for the Red and Blue to take down the rival Tigers. Besides, with the way the two have been performing in their bouts this year, they might not be the only people with faith in that blocker room. “I don’t know if we’ve ever had brothers that are All-Americans at the same time,” Eiter said. “But I think we could do that, not only this year but next year as well.”

heavy burden on his shoulders. Any decisions he and his fellow doctors make can greatly impact the remainder of the season. An injury to a high-profile athlete can have ramifications beyond a franchise losing games, and can also affect the OLYMPICS from page 1 League’s profits. Luckily for the NHL, this is And since the Olympics fall not the first time that Dorshimmidway through the American er has assumed this post. hockey season, Dorshimer has a This year marks the doctor’s

third Winter Olympics. He previously attended both the 1998 Games in Nagano and the 2002 Games in Salt Lake City. After serving the NHL Team Physicians Society as its secretary and treasurer since 1987, Dorshimer was nominated to represent the group for his significant service to both the Society and the League. Although the NHL did not send any doctors to the 2006 Games in Torino, Dorshimer believes there were several instances where their presence could have been helpful. When the doctor is not at the Olympics, the professor and director of the Internal Medicine and Sports Fellowship at Pennsylvania Hospital still works with professional athletes. Dorshimer has been working with the Philadelphia Flyers since 1984 as a chief medical resident. He is also in his 11th year as the team internist for the Philadelphia Eagles. After an eight year hiatus from the Olympics, Dorshimer is extremely thankful to be back. “Doing this is a dream come true,” he said. “And now fortunately a three-times-in-alifetime experience.”

Both bros. could be AllAmericans BROTHERS from page 8 are rooted in their upbringing. G a b e a nd M ic a h w e r e brought up in a wrestling household in Colorado Springs, Colo. As kids, they attended summer wrestling camps, which their father directed for the sports ministry group Athletes in Action. “That was really a blessing,” Gabe said. “We got to be with our family, had tons of fun at camp and got to walk with our lord Jesus Christ too.” And university life has not changed the brothers commitment to their beliefs. They continue to maintain the ideals that were instilled in them as children. Last season, the older Burak began leading a Bible study after practice. While only a few

Penn doctor at Games for third time

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S P OR T S

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2010 PAGE 7

Penn should get chance in FCS tourney

Schreiber scores 10 in 15 minutes

KOTLOFF from page 8

M. HOOPS from page 8

team since the 2003 Quakers — essentially screamed to Amy Gutmann and the other Ivy presidents that Penn is ready for a challenge. Yet Bagnoli said that all he and his comrades can do is petition their “so-called commissioner” Robin Harris to examine the issue “based on fairness, based on logical thought process.” Speaking for the higherups, Ivy League spokesman Scottie Rodgers insisted that Harris and the League Office can only follow presidential orders. “Unfortunately, our opinion doesn’t matter,” he said. “In this case, it’s the opinion of the presidents that carries the day.” Well, in that case, what could the Ivy presidents possibly be thinking? That adding a few games would overextend the student-athletes’ commitment to an athletic team? The athletes in every other sport on campus — like volleyball, which will head to the NCAA

the half but failed to capitalize, heading into the locker room after an Eggleston air ball, trailing 36-29. But the Red and Blue came back in the second stanza and retook the lead seven minutes into the half. Aggressive play on both sides of the ball was the key to the Quakers turnaround. “Whether it was a pass to the post or a dribble-drive, the first couple games we’ve been a little passive, a little three-happy, and that’s not the game we want to play,” Rosen said. “It felt like we were in the paint more today.” And as the half wore on, the Quakers looked less and less like the team that dropped its last two games in the waning minutes and more like the contender many expected them to be before the season began. “At halftime, we talked about defending, getting one stop at a time,” coach Jerome Allen said. “We won the basketball game because we put together consecutive stops.” Allen’s emphasis on defense led to 16 second-half rebounds, and the Quakers scored 21 points off turnovers overall. With the momentum building, the shots began to fall — both in the paint and out — and the Quakers pulled away, at one point leading by 13. Penn outscored the Leopards by 16 in the second half. According to Lafayette coach Fran O’Hanlon, who was an as-

Alex Remnick/DP Senior Photographer

First team all-Ivy pick Billy Ragone led the Quakers to a second straight Ivy title. But despite its conference dominance, Penn won’t play in the FCS postseason. tournament next week — handle it pretty well. That participating in the FCS playoffs would diminish the importance of the Ivy season? As currently constructed, not giving the champion a chance to face other top programs relegates the Ancient Eight to an FCS footnote. Apparently, part of the reason the presidents won’t budge is to uphold “tradition” (in Rodgers’ words). But the presidents are simply perpetuating a pattern of inequity and irrationality. They’re not upholding tradition. They’re being stubborn. According to Rodgers,

participation in the playoffs isn’t on the League’s radar and will continue not to be “for the foreseeable future.” But if Penn’s emphatic display of League superiority over the past two months doesn’t get the ball rolling, what will? Ivy presidents, I know you have plenty on your plate this Thanksgiving. But you know what goes great with turkey and stuffing? Football. BRIAN KOTLOFF is a junior communications major from Elkins Park, Pa. He can be contacted at dpsports@theDP.com.

BRIEF FOOTBALL

Penn commands All-Ivy selections Much of Penn football’s success this season can be attributed to the offensive line. And while the O-line is often overshadowed, the Quakers’ front five have made their way into the limelight. Each of Penn’s starting linemen received all-Ivy honors yesterday. Seniors Joe D’Orazio, Luis Ruffolo and junior Greg Van Roten nabbed spots on the first team, while seniors Drew Luongo and Jared Mollenbeck were named second team and honorable mention, respectively.

Penn last had all five linemen named to All-Ivy teams in 2003. This year’s crew helped the Red and Blue lead the conference in total offense and fewest sacks — the third fewest in the Football Championship Subdivision. The additional 16 players that joined the honors list — nine of which were first team selections — marked the highest total in Penn history. Sophomore Billy Ragone a nd sen ior Lu ke DeLuc a were honored as first team offense, while seniors Zach Heller, Josh Powers, junior Erik Rask and sophomore Brandon Copeland joined on first team defense. Ragone finished fifth in the Ivies in rushing yards, just be-

hind fellow sophomore Brandon Colavita. The running back — whose 5.8 yards per carry is the second highest in Penn history — pulled in second team honors alongside senior Drew Goldsmith and junior Matt Hamscher. Eight Quakers were honorably mentioned, including senior Bradford Blackmon — who received honors for both defense and special teams — kicker Andrew Samson and punter Scott Lopano. As the Red and Blue boast the Ivy title and the conference’s highest number of AllIv y honorees, one of these Quakers may be named 2010 Player of the Year on December 6 in New York. — Megan Soisson

Mordechai Trieger/DP Senior Photographer

Though he only saw 15 minutes of play, senior center Andreas Schreiber (left) posted 10 points for the Quakers, including a big dunk in the first half. sistant at Penn when Allen was a player, the difference between this year’s Penn squad and the one he beat handily last year is clear: “Bernardini, Miles Cartwright, Andreas Schreiber,” he said. “They had a component there that they didn’t have last year.” While Cartwright didn’t put up big numbers offensively, his defensive effort — a block and five rebounds — stymied the Leopards on attack. Schreiber, for his part, scored 10 points in just 15 minutes of

play, shooting 4-for-5 from the floor, but only tallying one rebound in the post for Penn. “Dre is a big body,” Allen said. “When he takes his time and relaxes, he’s tough to guard. … But most importantly from him, we need a consistent effort on the defensive end. If he can give us that and rebound the ball, I think he’ll make us a much better team.” Penn will now spend the Thanksgiving holiday preparing for its matchup with No. 5 Pitt on Saturday.

Cartwright. “Its been a plus,” Allen said. “As a freshman, you try not to put too much pressure on those guys, but he’s blended in great with the group.” The team will have extra time to bond this week, rePITTSBURGH from page 8 maining in Philadelphia over the break — with practice One bright spot for the scheduled on Thursday — to Quakers this season has been prepare for Saturday’s 7 p.m. the play of freshman Miles matchup.

Strong play and all around team unity may still not be enough to topple the mighty Panthers, but it won’t be because the Quakers are unprepared. “You don’t play the games on paper,” Allen said. “Come [Saturday], we expect to win. We’ll play the game and we’ll try to impose our will, impose our style and after that, let the chips fall where they may.”

M. Hoops will practice over break

Frosh lead scoring in road win W. HOOPS from page 8 entered tonight’s contest averaging eight points per game prior to the match — to just one point in the Quakers 60-45 win over the Broncs. “[Nicholson] was the one defensively that helped greatly,” Penn coach Mike McLaughlin said “She guarded [Bopp] well when she received the ball. Her goal tonight was to hold her.” The Quakers (2-1) got off to an early lead — thanks in large part to Nicholson, who drained four consecutive shots to bring Penn to 11 points — and were ahead by as many as 18 points in the first half. In addition, Penn out-rebounded its opponent, 47-31, compared to last year’s margin, when the Broncs grabbed 15 more rebounds than the Quakers. “We really took them out of the game in the first half. We boxed them out” Nicholson said. “Last year, they ran all over us on the boards, so that was a huge emphasis, and … we obviously achieved our goal there.” Despite the Quakers’ ability to hold Bopp and her teammates to few opportunities, sophomore Sheeren Lightbourne came off the bench for 12 points — a team high for the Broncs. In the second half, Penn continued to hold onto its large margin until Rider put on a full-court press and cut the Quakers’ lead to only nine points with three minutes remaining. In the end, however, Penn pulled out a w in, mark ing their second of the season and matching their win total from last year. It was a collaborative ef for t f rom all, as f reshman Meghan McCullough was perfect from downtown, netting 12 points on four attempts and leading

Lingkai Tang/DP Staff Photographer

Freshman Alyssa Baron (1) had another strong night for Penn, totaling 15 points on 5-for-15 shooting from the field and 5-for-7 at the line. the team with 17 total points. Junior Jess K napp scored eight points and led the team in rebounds with 12. Penn is look ing to carr y this momentum into Saturday’s contest at New Jersey Institute of Technolog y (0 3). Although NJIT has yet to win a game, Nicholson claims the Highlanders are more athletic than Rider. “We really have to keep all of our guards in front of us,” Nicholson said. “They’re a lot quicker, so we’re going to try to take a lot of charges when they

go down the lane.” O ne of t hose g ua r d s is junior Melanie Griffin who leads her squad w ith 10.7 points per game. In addition, the Highlanders have three strong rebounders including R ay ven Joh nson who has tallied 15 total rebounds this season. “Every opponent is more about us. We are working hard as coaches to put together the best scouting report to help our team out,” McLaughlin said. “Our focus is making sure what we’re doing is as precise and organized as we can.”

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VA hospital accepts violations, fine BY VICTOR GAMEZ Staff Writer A letter dated April 8 from an official at the Department of Veterans Affairs confirmed the Philadelphia VA Medical Center accepts the specific violations that became public in 2008. The letter was addressed to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and confirmed that the VA will pay a fine to the NRC. “I understand the need for all of our facilities using radioactive materials to focus on a safety culture,” wrote Veterans Affairs Under Secretary for Health Rob-

Most profs. hold classes despite Fling FLING from page 1 the fact that many students are planning on skipping. College sophomore Jason Grant said he skipped class the Friday of Fling last year and is planning on doing so again today. “Classes should be canceled before Fling since it’s for a University-wide and -sponsored event that everyone participates in,” he said. College freshman Ushma Shah does not have class on Fridays or Mondays — but if she did,

ert Petzel. On March 17, the NRC proposed a fine of $227,500 for the VA after a reported 97 botched brachytherapy procedures, wherein radioactive seeds are implanted near cancerous tissue. Gary Kao, then an associate professor of radiology at the School of Medicine, was on contract with the VA at the time and performed the procedures between 2002 and 2007. According to NRC spokeswoman Viktoria Mitlyng, the VA has already paid the proposed fine. However, Petzel also wrote

that the NRC’s inspection report did reject a “proposal to retract medical events based on an activity metric,” and that he plans to “pursue approval for use of such a metric.” Mitlyng said the metric refers to a definition of a “medical event” reportable to the NRC. “If the amount of radioactive material in a patient is 20 percent more or less than the prescribed dose, it’s a medical event,” she said, adding that most of the medical community uses this definition. Mitlyng explained that a “blue ribbon panel” held by the VA determined that a more sensible

way to define a medical event would be to measure the amount of radioactive activity in a patient. However, Mitlyng maintained that a 20-percent discrepancy between the dosage prescribed and the dosage given signifies a “deficiency.” “If you’re going to use nuclear material, you have to use it correctly,” she said. She also said there are avenues to change the contested definition, but “even if the metric changes, it won’t be applied retroactively,” adding that “hopefully [Veterans Affairs] will take the lessons they learned and apply them elsewhere.”

she would skip class for Fling. “Missed class work can be made up, but if you missed a good time, there’s nothing you can do,” she said. But not everyone can afford to skip class today. While some students planned ahead and “saved up” their quota of absences for the semester, others won’t have that option. Many classes that take place on Fridays are recitations and seminars where attendance is mandatory. Philippon-Daniel stressed that she would not excuse students for skipping class. “Attendance on this day each year can be a problem,” she said. “Motivated students will feel obligated to go to class, but are also torn between doing so and being with friends.” This is true for many students, including a Wharton senior who

wished to remain anonymous because he is not planning on attending any of his classes today and does not want to risk getting in trouble. “It’s my last Fling,” he said. “I won’t get another again, so I’m going all out.” While some faculty members do not want to appear to be overly strict, it is not University policy to cancel classes for events such as Fling. “We’ve already missed some days of class because of the snow days, and next week is Hey Day,” Philippon-Daniel said. “If we cancel class for one event, where do we stop?” And even though many students are going to class today, that did not necessarily prevent them from beginning their partying early. “I have a mandatory recitation

Friday morning so I have to go,” said another College sophomore who wished to remain anonymous because her “TA reads the Daily Pennsylvanian.” “Whether or not I attend sober however is a whole other issue,” she added.

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Stepping up for Heps TRACK AND FIELD | Fresh off Relays success, Penn enters Heptagonal Championships BY MEGAN SOISSON Staff Writer

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While the Penn track team will go from racing in front of over 54,000 fans at the Penn Relays to a far smaller crowd at Princeton, N.J., the stakes will be much higher at next weekend’s Ivy League Heptagonal Championships. After an exciting Penn Relays — where sophomore Leah Brown shaved an impressive two seconds off her split in the seventh-place 4x400 -meter relay — women’s head coach Gwen Harris is still settling down as her team works out its soreness. Under Harris’s four-week workout cycle, the remainder of this week and next will focus on speed work. The team will complete short but fast intervals in order to keep runners sharp.

“It’ll be short,” Harris said. “They love this time of year.” And with one of the biggest meets of the season just over a week away, Penn will only complete three full workouts. The remainder of the time will be spent focusing on academics and studying for next week’s final exams. “The little things are so important right now,” Harris said. “Getting enough sleep, making sure they take their ice baths. You just have to do it.” Even so, Harris doesn’t see the timing of Heps as a disadvantage — she knows that the Quakers’ competition will be dealing with the same issues. And though Harris and her assistant coaches have not yet finalized a lineup for next weekend, she is not afraid to

move runners around to score points. According to Harris, several athletes have offered to run whatever is needed to help the team. The 4x100m relay team of Renee McDougall, Kali Strother, Paige Madison and Brown — currently ranked second in the conference to Cornell — will likely challenge for the top spot. On the distance side, freshman Leslie Kovach will look to continue her Penn Relays success in the 3,000m. She currently sits at the number three spot in the Ivy League — just four seconds behind the fastest time in that event. Senior A nna Aagenes is less than one second behind Ivy leader Jacqueline Drouin from Columbia in the 1,500m and could challenge for a Heps title. On the men’s side, junior Darryll Oliver should compete for the top spot in the 800m. Oliver has one of the top times in the nation and is currently ranked second in the conference. And though freshman Tim Carey won’t be competing alongside hurdlers from toptier schools like he did at Penn Relays, he still remains a favorite in both the 100m and 400m hurdles, where he tops the Ivy standings. The Quakers will face tough competition from Cornell, who has won all but one of the last eight outdoor track titles, in addition to defending champion Princeton. But if Penn can carry the momentum from buzzing Franklin Field to Princeton’s Weaver Stadium, the team may bring back a few Heps Champions.

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